University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: University of Hawaii Maui College
Program: Engineering Technology

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Program did not provide date of the last comprehensive review.

Program Description

Program Description

The Engineering Technology program which leads to a Bachelor of Applied Science degree provides curriculum and extensive hands-on training in electronics, computers, optics, remote sensing, and other technologies required for employment in local and regional high tech companies and industries.

Program Mission

The mission of the ENGT program is to prepare graduates to be productive technologists with a broad array of skills in a variety of areas such as telescope operations, high performance computing for scientific and engineering applications, energy production and distribution including photovoltaic and wind turbines, and system administration in a variety of industries.

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Cautionary

Majors Included: ENGT

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
1 New & Replacement Positions (State) 0 13 124 Healthy
2 *New & Replacement Positions (County Prorated) 0 0 8
3 *Number of Majors 0 8 17
4 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes 0 59 193
5 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes 0 0 16
6 SSH in All Program Classes 0 59 209
7 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes 0 2 7
8 Total Number of Classes Taught 0 6 12

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
9 Average Class Size 0 3 5.3 Unhealthy
10 *Fill Rate 0% 19% 33%
11 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 0 0 0
12 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 0 0 0
13 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty 0 10.8 11.8
13a Analytic FTE Faculty 0 0.7 1.4
14 Overall Program Budget Allocation Not Yet Reported $65,251 $63,429
14a General Funded Budget Allocation Not Yet Reported $65,251 $63,009
14b Special/Federal Budget Allocation Not Yet Reported $0 $0
14c Tuition and Fees Not Reported Not Reported $420
15 Cost per SSH Not Yet Reported $1,106 $303
16 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 0 6 11

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
17 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 0% 89% 84% Cautionary
18 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 0 1 0
19 *Persistence (Fall to Spring) 0% 100% 94%
20 *Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded 0 0 3
20a Degrees Awarded 0 0 3
20b Certificates of Achievement Awarded 0 0 0
20c Advanced Professional Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
20d Other Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
21 External Licensing Exams Passed Not Reported Not Reported Not Reported
22 Transfers to UH 4-yr 0 0 8
22a Transfers with credential from program 0 0 0
22b Transfers without credential from program 0 0 8

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
09-10 10-11 11-12
23 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught 0 0 0  
24 Enrollment Distance Education Classes 0 0 0
25 Fill Rate 0% 0% 0%
26 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 0% 0% 0%
27 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 0 0 0
28 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education) 0% 0% 0%

Perkins IV Core Indicators
2010-2011
Goal Actual Met  
29 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment 90.10 100.00 Met  
30 2P1 Completion 45.00 100.00 Met
31 3P1 Student Retention or Transfer 56.00 100.00 Met
32 4P1 Student Placement 51.00 0.00 Not Met
33 5P1 Nontraditional Participation N/A N/A N/A
34 5P2 Nontraditional Completion N/A N/A N/A
Last Updated: August 6, 2012
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

 1. PROGRAM'S STRENGTHS

a. Response to Demand Indicators

There are job opportunities in the local high tech industry for technologists (#2), and the BAS ENGT degree program fulfills this request by training an adequate number of majors (#3) leading to a healthy ratio #majors/ #county positions.

b. Response to Effectiveness Indicators

During the academic year 2011-2012, 5 seniors and 10 juniors were actively enrolled in BAS ENGT courses for a total of 17 majors. 3 seniors graduated in spring 2012. This corresponds to healthy ratios:  #degrees/ #majors and #degrees /#county positions.

2. PROGRAM'S WEAKNESSES

Response to Efficiency Indicators

#11, 12, 13, and 14 are incorrect.

#11 shows zero FTE faculty. There should be at least .5 FTE allocated to the program.

We are not aware of how the #12 was calculated and therefore cannot confirm this number.

We are not aware of how the #13 was calculated and therefore cannot confirm this number.

#14 shows a budget allocation, however the approved budget for this program was denied by administration. We do not understand how this budget number was calculated and cannot confirm the validity of this amount. The program has been operating solely on extramural funding.

 

3. RESULTS OF PRIOR YEAR'S ACTION PLAN

Number of AS ECET graduates 2005-2012

4. RESPONSE TO PERKINS INDICATOR 4P1 (student placement, does not meet the goal)

All three seniors who graduated in spring 2012 with their baccalaureate degree found a job in the local high tech industry on Maui (Boeing and Pacific Defense Solutions).

5. PROGRAM ACTIONS

Part III. Action Plan

No content.

Part IV. Resource Implications

The program is currently operating without any budget support from the college general fund. All required supplies, including software licenses have been purchased using extramural funding. Some funding has already expired and the remaining funding will expire in the summer of 2013.

The part-time counseling position in the approved program proposal has not been funded by the campus general fund. This has resulted in students being referred to the program coordinator by the counseling department. The referral was necessary because the counseling department does not have the resources to support this program. Without adequate funding for counseling student progress is expected to suffer. This may be the cause of under enrollment.      It has also placed additional workload in the program without additional compensation.

The student program coordinator position will become unfunded next year. This position is critical to the program. All industry, internship, job placement, high school recruiting, data collection and analysis rely on this position. The implication will impede program development and student success.

Student lab technicians are needed in order to provide up to date experiments and maintain current laboratory facilities. Student help is estimated to cost $20,000 per year

These positions will require $85,000 per year.

The program requires state of the art software programs and licenses in order to meet the goals of local industry employment. The cost of upgrades increases significantly if the software maintenance agreement lapse. Without campus resources on the order of $25,000 per year the software licenses will become out of date and therefore effect student desirability in the workplace.

The electro-optics laboratory will be installed in the new science building starting in January of 2013. This laboratory will require new hardware, computers, optics, and instrumentation.  the estimated cost is approximately $100,000.

Conferences, and other travel are required to keep faculty up to date on the latest technologies and teaching methodologies.

Marketing materials and travel are required to recruit Hawaii and Kauai community college students.

Travel budgets are estimated to be $10,000 per year.

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2011-2012 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

No
analyze, design, and implement electro-optic systems, control systems, instrumentation systems, communication systems, computer systems, or power systems

2

No
apply project management techniques to electrical/electronic(s) and computer systems

3

Yes
utilize integral and differential calculus, or other appropriate mathematics above the level of algebra and trigonometry to solve technical problems

4

Yes
demonstrate critical engineering technology skills and experiences such as: making existing technology operate, creating/selecting new technology, troubleshooting, calibrating, characterizing, and optimizing

5

No
demonstrate engineer's way of thinking, analyzing technology as systems

6

No
demonstrate engineer professional skills such as communication and managing projects

7

Yes
demonstrate proficiency in the general education college core requirements: creativity, critical thinking, oral and written communication, information retrieval, quantitative reasoning

8

No
demonstrate a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in lifelong learning

9

No
demonstrate an ability to understand professional, ethical and social responsibilities

10

No
demonstrate a respect for diversity and a knowledge of contemporary professional, societal and global issues

11

No
commit to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

Local industries on the ECET/ENGT advisory board were involved in ENGT program development starting with the authorization to plan, continuing with input and review of the program proposal. Most recently in September 2012 the advisory board again reviewed the program goals, classes, map, and curriculum. A statewide meeting is planned for November 2012  where again local industry will validate the ENGT program. Evidence of industry validation may be found in the appendix of the program proposal.

B) Expected Level Achievement

C) Courses Assessed

Courses assessed:

ETRO 305: Engineering Computing

ETRO 310: Applied Robotics

ETRO 497: Capstone Project I

PLOs assessed:

PLO 3: Utilize integral and differential calculus, or other appropriate mathematics above the level of algebra and trigonometry to solve technical problems

PLO 4: Demonstrate critical engineering technology skills and experiences such as: making existing technology operate, creating/selecting new technology, troubleshooting, calibrating, characterizing, and optimizing

PLO 7: Demonstrate proficiency in the general education college core requirements: creativity, critical thinking, oral and written communication, information retrieval, quantitative reasoning

Program map:

  

Assessment Plan:

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

Assessment tools used to assess PLO#3 in ETRO 305:

Assessment tools used to assess PLO#4 in ETRO 310:

Assessment tools used to assess PLO#7 in ETRO 497: Oral and written Presentation Skills

    

E) Results of Program Assessment

ETRO 305

Overall the assessment shows that students are meeting the program goals. Math at the calculus level is a challenge for some of  the Engineering Technology students.

ETRO 310

Students are meeting or exceeding the goals of the program.

ETRO 497

100% of the students are exceeding the expectations of the faculty in the final project demonstrations.

F) Other Comments

Engaged Community

High School visits, AY 2011-2012

Venues, AY 2011-2012

(1): This event gathered students enrolled or interested in a bachelor's degree at UHMC, local business leaders, and faculty.

(2): "Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day" organized by the Maui Economic Development Board's (MEDB)Women in Technology Project in collaboration with the Maui Chapter of the Hawaii Society of Professional Engineers, the County of Maui, and UHMC.

(3): The purpose of this event was to help students prepare for their successful transition from high school to college.

(4): Advanced Maui Optical and Space Surveillance Technologies Conference held in Wailea.

G) Next Steps

There are no plans to change ENGT curriculum at this time.

 

The program strengths are that the curriculum was designed in collaboration with local industry and is designed specifically to meet the needs for a local trained workforce. Instruction is advanced and both didactic and hands on laboratory work are addressed. The program trains students using state of the art hardware and software. 100% of the first graduation class found employment on Maui in high technology companies. These companies now are calling to request additional interns and graduates to fill positions on Maui.

 

The program weakness is mainly in lack of financial support from the campus administration. This will become a major factor as current extramural funding expires