University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: Hawaii Community College
Program: Electronics Technology

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The last comprehensive review for this program was on November 30, 2012, and can be viewed at:
http://hawaii.hawaii.edu/program-unit-review/docs/2007_et_comprehensive_instructional_program_review.pdf
STEM Program

Program Description

This program prepares students for employment in telecommunications, medical electronics, computers, and consumer electronics.  The electronic technician fabricates, installs, maintains, and repairs electronic equipment. 

The program courses cover basic DC and AC component theory and circuit analysis, digital systems, optics and computers and networking.  Students applying to the electronics program should have two years of high school math including geometry or algebra, and two years of high school science including chemistry or physics.

Upon completion of the program students will be able to apply to entry-level electronic technician positions as well as entry-level Information Technology positions. 

Program Mission

The Electronics Technology Program, in alignment with HawCC's mission, accepts students from all segments of our Hawai'i Island community.  We strive to develop quality electronic technicians and life long learners.   

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Cautionary

Majors Included: ET     Program CIP: 15.0303

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 New & Replacement Positions (State) 28 12 11 Unhealthy
2 *New & Replacement Positions (County Prorated) 4 1 1
3 *Number of Majors 24.5 12 13
3a     Number of Majors Native Hawaiian 9 5 7
3b     Fall Full-Time 58% 36% 64%
3c     Fall Part-Time 42% 64% 36%
3d     Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 0% 0% 0%
3e     Spring Full-Time 68% 50% 58%
3f     Spring Part-Time 32% 50% 42%
3g     Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 0% 0% 0%
4 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes 369 65 160
5 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes 12 0 1
6 SSH in All Program Classes 381 65 161
7 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes 13 2 5
8 Total Number of Classes Taught 15 5 10

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
9 Average Class Size 9.7 5.4 6.3 Cautionary
10 *Fill Rate 48.6% 27% 42%
11 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 0 0 1
12 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 0 0 13
13 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty 17.4 27 13.5
13a Analytic FTE Faculty 1.4 0.4 1.0
14 Overall Program Budget Allocation $64,575 $43,855 $80,024
14a General Funded Budget Allocation $64,575 $29,750 $50,490
14b Special/Federal Budget Allocation $0 $0 $3,758
14c Tuition and Fees $0 $14,105 $25,518
15 Cost per SSH $169 $675 $497
16 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 5 5 10
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
17 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 87% 100% 86% Cautionary
18 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 0 0 0
19 *Persistence Fall to Spring 83.3% 64.2% 72.7%
19a Persistence Fall to Fall     54.5%
20 *Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded 8 1 5
20a Degrees Awarded 8 1 5
20b Certificates of Achievement Awarded 0 0 0
20c Advanced Professional Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
20d Other Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
21 External Licensing Exams Passed   Not Reported Not Reported
22 Transfers to UH 4-yr 0 0 0
22a Transfers with credential from program 0 0 0
22b Transfers without credential from program 0 0 0

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
23 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught 0 0 0  
24 Enrollments Distance Education Classes N/A N/A N/A
25 Fill Rate N/A N/A N/A
26 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) N/A N/A N/A
27 Withdrawals (Grade = W) N/A N/A N/A
28 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education) N/A N/A N/A

Perkins IV Core Indicators
2011-2012
Goal Actual Met  
29 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment 90.00 100.00 Met  
30 2P1 Completion 50.00 37.50 Not Met
31 3P1 Student Retention or Transfer 74.25 37.50 Not Met
32 4P1 Student Placement 60.00 60.00 Met
33 5P1 Nontraditional Participation 17.00 15.38 Not Met
34 5P2 Nontraditional Completion 15.25 33.33 Met

Performance Funding Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
35 Number of Degrees and Certificates     5  
36 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     3
37 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     5
38 Number of Pell Recipients     10
39 Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr     0
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

Overall Health -- Cautionary

Demand -- Unhealthy

The Program rating of Unhealthy is due to the large number of students in the major and low number of New and Replacement Positions. 

This Unhealthy rating can be due to the CIP code designated for the program.  The CIP code does not encompass all the new and replacement positions in the county that the students from this program are eligible to fill.   Instead, the CIP code narrows the prospective jobs down to a single field which results in a low number for the new and replacement (county prorated) field.  The Electronic Technology student at HawCC is trained to fill many types of technician positions such as service technician, entry-level information technologist, communication technician… etc.  It is difficult to find one CIP code that is indicative of the programs job prospects especially in the Hilo County.  The field is very broad and could fall under many CIP codes.    

Efficiency -- Cautionary

The program is given a Fill Rate of 42% which is an unhealthy level and the Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty are 13 which is a cautionary level.  The average of the two numbers put the program at a cautionary level. 

The low fill rate is due to the student enrollment being less than the maximum enrollment.  Previous to the fall of 2012 the program had stopped taking new enrollment and started up again last fall 2012.  In that first semester, the program enrollment was at 5 full-time students.  In the fall of 2013 the enrollment increased by 4 for a total of 9 full-time students.  The enrollment grew 80% in 1 year.  If the upward trend continues, the fill rate level should become higher. 

The Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty is a cautionary level but should also increase in to the upper end of the cautionary level as the enrollment numbers increase.   

Effectiveness -- Cautionary

The effectiveness indicators are based upon the average category health score of two fields, the persistence from fall to spring and unduplicated degrees/certificates awarded.   The persistence from fall spring was given a healthy rating with a 72.7% persistence rate. 

The program was given an unhealthy rating for unduplicated degrees/certificates awarded with a score of 5.  The effectiveness indicator is the average of the two fields which resulted in a cautionary health indicator. 

The unhealthy rating is again dependent on the new and replacement positions for the county which is low due to the CIP code designated for the program.  As mentioned previously, the CIP code does not encompass all the new and replacement positions in the county that the students from this program are eligible to fill. 

 

Significant Program Actions for 2012 - 2013

1.  Added Math 100 and English 100 to curriculum

 

Previous Program Actions

1.  Acquire proper equipment and workbenches so students may run labs without having to deal with test equipment malfunctions.

2.  Align program to mirror UH  Maui's AS program to facilitate student transfer into UH Maui's BAS program.

3.  Build a strong advisory council team that can help guide the program in a direction that will fulfill community needs.

 

Perkins IV Core Indicators

The program did not meet 2P1 and and 3P1 Perkins Indicator.  Electronics Technology is one of the more math rigorous programs.   The first year is very math intensive and requires a high-level of critical thinking and problem-solving skills.  Students that are not at the proper math level when they enter the program will struggle.  Many of them end up dropping out after the first year.  The current action is to raise the math level.  This is the first year that students are required to test into math 100 or higher.  In previous years, students were only required to test into math 66.  With this new math requirement, incoming students will have the math background to successfully complete the degree program.  This should help increase the number of students who pursue their degree/credentials/certificate and student retention. 

Nontraditional participation (5P1) was below the performance goal.  Our actual 5P1 indicator was 1.6% off the goal.  We are currently looking into recruiting women into the field through a program called Women Tech Educators.     

Part III. Action Plan

Program Action Plan

1.  Modify program so that it is relevant to community needs.

Perkins Core Indicator

Electronics Technology is one of the more math rigorous programs.   The first year is very math intensive and requires a high-level of critical thinking and problem-solving skills.  Students that are not at the proper math level when they enter the program will struggle.  Many of them end up dropping out after the first year.  The current action is to raise the math level.  This is the first year that students are required to test into math 100 or higher.  In previous years, students were only required to test into math 66.  With this new math requirement, incoming students will have the math background to successfully complete the degree program.  (The activity is currently taking place.)

Electronics Technology is one of the more math rigorous programs.   The first year is very math intensive and requires a high-level of critical thinking and problem-solving skills.  Students that are not at the proper math level when they enter the program will struggle.  Many of them end up dropping out after the first year.  The current action is to raise the math level.  This is the first year that students are required to test into math 100 or higher.  In previous years, students were only required to test into math 66.  With this new math requirement, incoming students will have the math background to successfully complete the degree program.  (The activity is currently taking place.)

The nontraditional participation is 1.6% off the goal.  We are currently looking into recruiting women into the field through a program called Women Tech Educators.  (There is no exact date set at this time.)

 

Part IV. Resource Implications

Cost Item 1

Proper cooling/ventilation in  the lab.                            Equipment                          $50,000

The laboratory space for electronics should have proper ventilation and temperature control.  The electronic components need to be kept in a temperature controlled space so that they do not break down over time as quickly over time.  Also, the solder stations should have better ventilation so students are not breathing in the fumes.  We use lead free solder but there should still be proper ventilation. 

We also need proper ventilation for solder iron fumes. The facility's existing square footage does not provide for an efficient working space for students, especially in the non-air-conditioned lab.  During lab, the jalousies and the bay door are opened fully for maximum ventilation to dilute solder fumes from vehicles passing by the shop. 

Cost Item 2

Laboratory benches                              Equipment                               $20,000

The classroom does not have enough desk space to accommodate the maximum number of students.  Currently, we are able to seat 8 students comfortably and 10 when we use a folding table.  The maximum enrollment for the program is 10 students.   The best way to mitigate this classroom space issue is to reduce the computer lab area.  The lab area uses desktop computers which require more space then necessary. 

Cost Item 3

Classroom supplies:  Printer, projector, projector screen, white boards, smart boards                    Equipment                           $5,000

The classroom needs an equipment update.  The printer in the classroom works intermittently and the TV screens used for powerpoint lessons are slowing dying.  The program should replace these items before they do not work at all.  With the new students cycling in every fall, equipment has more and more wear and tear. 

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

Yes
Specify, design, build, install, program, operate, troubleshoot, analyze, and modify electronics systems, automated test, and manufacturing control systems

2

No
Specify, install, program, operate, troubleshoot, and modify computer systems

3

Yes
Have effective written, interpersonal, presentation, and team building skills

4

No
Have necessary leadership and management skills to effectively complete a project

5

No
Have a well-developed sense of work ethics and personal discipline to succeed in their chosen profession

6

No
Have attitudes, abilities, and skills required to adapt to rapidly changing technologies and a desire for life-long learning

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

N/A

B) Expected Level Achievement

N/A

C) Courses Assessed

ETRO 122L

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

Two SLO's were assessed for 2012-2013.  The SLO's assessed are as follows: 

  1.   Demonstrate the operation of optoelectronic devices i.e. LEDs, photodiodes, photocells..etc.
  2.   Work in teams to complete lab assignments

Assessment of SLO 1 was done through testing.  An example of the test question is provided below:

Circuit Design (10pts)

Note:  Specification sheet shown in problem could not be imported to this document.   

You are asked to design a simple series LED circuit.  The specification sheet for the LED is shown above.  In order for the LED to run at its most optimal conditions, we want it to run in forward voltage.  We will be using a 9V battery as the power source.  Draw the schematic design of the circuit with all components properly labeled with values.  Show all your work for partial credit.

Assessment of SLO 2 was administered through a team assignment.  Their assignment was to develop a bicycle light that automatically turns on at night.  The students turned in a final report as well as a final product.   The project is also an assessment of SLO 1 because the assignment involved a photoresistor and an LED which are both optoelectronic devices.  

E) Results of Program Assessment

Results of SLO 1 are shown below

________________________________________________________________________

                        Student 1    Student 2    Student 3      Student 4     Student 5      TOTALS

RAW SCORE        9.00           8.00                7.50             6.50                7.00            7.60

PERCENTAGE      90.00%    80.00%           75.00%       65.00%          70.00%        76.00%

________________________________________________________________________

Results of SLO 2 were assessed using a rubric.  The students all assessed their teammates and that score was averaged into the instructor assessment of the team.   The average grade was 85%. The Rubric can be provided upon request.

For SLO 1 were were slightly below our goal of 85% and for SLO 2 we just met our goal. 

F) Other Comments

N/A

G) Next Steps

The program will work on developing students ability to properly read specification sheets and interpret what their reading.  This is where most of the students had trouble.  They may have had the ability to answer the question but they did not possess the ability to interpret the specification sheet.  

The teamwork skills met our goals but this may not be the case for larger classes.  Our data is based on 5 students which is not a very large sample set.  New data drawn from larger classes may result in lower percentages.  We will re-assess this SLO within the next five years.