University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: Hawaii Community College
Program: Remedial/Developmental Reading

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The last comprehensive review for this program was on Because the remedial/developmental series in the English Department is not a program, no comprehensive program review is required..

Program Description

The remedial/developmental reading effort at HawCC consists of three writing courses offered by the English Department: English 18, English 20R, and English 21. The courses are designed to prepare students to read effectively for college courses and programs, including certificates and degrees. A significant number of students in the CTE and Liberal Arts divisions depend on remedial/developmental reading courses to support their success. To assist student success, the English Department depends on the interdependence of its reading, writing, and ESL faculty, as well a close working relationship with other departments. Its primary goal is to meet student needs and the needs of the community.

 

Program Mission

The Associate in Arts Degree Program is designed for students and prepares students for roles as continuing students, family members, employers, employees, and citizens of local and global communities.

 

 

 

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Healthy
Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 Enrolled in any Remedial/Developmental 664 638 535 Healthy
2 Semester Hours Taught 114 114 99
3 * Student Semester Hours (SSH) Taught 2205 2109 1818
4 Full Time Students (Fall) Enrolled 263 254 198
5 Full Time Students (Spring) Enrolled 179 128 122
6 Number of Classes Taught 38 38 33
Achieving the Dream AtD Fall Cohort
2009 2010 2011
7 Percent AtD Cohort with Placement 90% 95% 93%
8 AtD Cohort Placing Remdial/Developmental 41% 43% 41%
9 Cohort Enrolling Remedial/Developmental 275 330 336
9a Percent Cohort Enrolling Remedial/Developmental 72% 70% 73%
10 * Increase Percent Enrolling -1% -2% 3%

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
11 Average Class Size 19.3 18.5 18.4 Healthy
12 * Fill Rate 97.2% 92.5% 91.8%
13 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 0 2 0
14 * BOR Appointed Faculty (FTE) 1.4 0.8 1.2
15 Non-BOR Appointed Faculty Teaching Classes 8 8 7
16 Percentage Classes Taught by Regular Discipline Faculty 37% 21% 36%
17 Percentage Classes Taught by non Regular Discipline Faculty 63% 79% 64%
18 Program Budget Allocation $198,850 $280,612 $239,335
18b Tution and Fees $0 $31,208 $54,893
19 Cost per SSH $90 $133 $132
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: November 13, 2013

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
Retention (Course Completion) Cautionary
20 1 Level Below College Level 96% 95% 96%
21 2 Levels Below College Level 95% 98% 99%
22 3 or More Levels Below College Level 94% 91% 100%
Successful completion (Equivalent C or Higher)
23 1 Level Below College Level 64% 56% 59%
23a 1 Level Below College Level 387 321 297
24 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 26 27 22
25 2 Levels Below College Level 53% 54% 63%
25a 2 Levels Below College Level 52 47 45
26 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 5 2 1
27 3 or More Levels Below College Level 69% 41% 58%
27a 3 or More Levels Below College Level 24 18 18
28 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 2 4 0

Achieving the Dream AtD Fall Cohort  
2009 2010 2011
29 Cohort Enrolled in Remedial Developmental Course 275 330 336  
30 Cohort Successful Completion at Least One Remedial/Developmental Course within First Academic Year 185 230 193
31 Percent Cohort Successful Completion 67% 10% 57%
Remedial/Developmental Pipeline
32 AtD Cohort Size 927 1,101 1,102
33 Percent AtD Students Placing Into Remedial/ Developmental Level 41% 43% 41%
34 Percent AtD Cohort Enrolled in Remedial/ Developmental Course 30% 30% 30%
35 Percent AtD Cohort Successfully Completing Any Remedial/ Developmental Course Within First Academic Year 49% 49% 42%
36 Percent AtD Cohort Successfully Completing College Level Course Within First Academic Year 39% 39% 41%

Successful Next Level Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
Persistence (Fall to Spring)  
37 * Percent From 1 Level Below College Level, To College Level   21.6% 15.3%
37a From 1 Level Below College Level, To College level 44 47 29
38 Percent From 2 Levels Below College Level, To 1 Level Below   74% 84%
38a From 2 Levels Below College Level, To 1 Level Below 25 23 31
39 Percent From 3 or More Levels Below College Level, To 2 Levels Below   46% 50%
39a From 3 or More Levels Below College Level, To 2 Levels Below 10 6 6
Success in Subsequent Level (Equivalent C or Higher)
40 College Level From 1 Level Below 30 37 21
40a * Percent College Level From 1 Level Below   78.7% 72.4%
41 1 Level Below From 2 Levels Below College Level 15 13 15
42 2 Levels Below From 3 or More Levels Below College Level 2 5 2
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: November 13, 2013
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

Overall Health:  Healthy

Demand Health:  Healthy

Strengths:

Demand for remedial and developmental reading  classes remains healthy as evidenced by the following data:

•           535 students enrolled in remedial/development reading courses;

•           1818 (SSH) semester hours taught

•           284 full-time students enrolled in the fall;

Efficiency:  Healthy

Strengths:

Efficiency is healthy as evidenced by the following data:

•           Average class size of 18.2 out of class capacity of 20 indicates efficiency of class size;

•           the fill rate for remedial/developmental reading  classes is 91.8 which falls well within the the healthy benchmark set by the UHCC data scoring rubric;

•           no low enrolled courses were offered;

•           percentage of classes taught by regular discipline faculty increased from 21% to 36%;

•           percentage taught by non regular discipline faculty decreased from 79% to 64%; and

•           cost per SSH dropped by $1 from the previous year.

Weaknesses:

•           Although fill rates remained healthy, 91.8%, they dropped slightly from 92.5%;

•           although the percentage of courses taught by regular discipline faculty rose from 21% to 36%,  64% of faculty were taught by non regular faculty;

•           program budget allocation dropped from $280,612 to $239,335.

•           198 full-time student enrolled in the fall and 122 in spring; and

•           enrollment for the ATD cohort increased by 3%.

Effectiveness: Cautionary

Strengths:

•           The retention rate increased for all three levels: from 95-98-91% to 96-99-100% for all three levels;

•           the successful completion rate increased for all three levels, from 56-54-41% to 59-63-58%; and

•           withdrawals dropped from 4 to 0.

Weakness:

•           Persistence levels dropped for one level below college, from 21.6% to 15.3%, but went up for two levels below college level, from 74% to 84%, and three levels below, from 46% to 50%; the drop in persistence levels for one step below college level could be attributed to ENG 21 being the terminal level for many students under the previous AAS degree requirements, which are being phased out;

•           success at the subsequent level for one step below college level to college level dropped from 78.7% to 72.4%.

Weaknesses:

Demand for remedial classes remained healthy,

•           but enrollment, following a campus-wide trend, in remedial/developmental reading dropped from 638 to 535, while semester hours taught (SSH) dropped from 2109 to 1818; and

•           number of classes taught dropped from 38 to 33.

 

Significant Program Actions for 2012 2013

1.  Preliminary agreement to align course numbers, titles, and learning outcomes with other CCs in the system for English 18, 20R, and 21.

2.  Piloted an ENG 21-History 151 linked-course project to shorten time to graduation. Allowed students who did not meet prerequiste for History 151 to enroll in both courses.  

 

Previous Program Actions

1.  Utilize the program review process to evaluate developmental education enrollment and completion to determine effectiveness; meet once a year as a program.

2.  Expand financial aid programs and improve remedial/developmental education by securing a portion of the $2 million UH system funds set aside for these purposes.

 

Part III. Action Plan

Program Action Plan

1.  Increase faculty for remedial developmental reading courses.

2.  Seek funding for security cart and 25 laptops/tablets for mobile classroom.

3.  Obtain funds to allow one faculty member teaching developmental reading to attend a national level conference.

Part IV. Resource Implications

Cost Item 1

New faculty position                                       Personnel                                   $55,00

Full-time faculty provide consistency of instruction, work on committees, provide academic advising,  participate in  professional development, and support department activities.

Cost Item 2                                               

Equip 1 classroom with tablets/laptops and security storage cabinet                            Equipment                                        $50,000

Continued demands of evolving technology require that writing students engage in learning via the technology that they will be using in academic and commercial work places.

Cost Item 3

Conference                                       Personnel                                           $5,000

In order to innovate, faculty must be aware of new ideas and new methods to improve retention and success rates. Although we have access to technology which allows for distance education, faculty need to be outside their comfortable environment to accept new ways of doing things.