University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: Hawaii Community College
Program: Business Technology

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The last comprehensive review for this program was on 2011, and can be viewed at:
http://hawaii.hawaii.edu/program-unit-review/docs/2011_btec_comprehensive_instructional_program_review.pdf

Program Description

The Business Technology program enables students to communicate clearly through oral and written interactions complying with standard office etiquette. Students will use current and emerging technologies to create and produce quality, mailable office documents, and will learn how to organize and manage multiple organizational tasks and coworkers in an office, making efficient use of time and resources.

The Business Technology program enables students to communicate clearly through oral and written interactions complying with standard office etiquette. Students will use current and emerging technologies to create and produce quality, mailable office documents, and will learn how to organize and manage multiple organizational tasks and coworkers in an office, making efficient use of time and resources.

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Healthy

Majors Included: BTEC     Program CIP: 52.0401

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 New & Replacement Positions (State) 250 271 271 Healthy
2 *New & Replacement Positions (County Prorated) 36 33 31
3 *Number of Majors 118.5 120.5 97.5
3a     Number of Majors Native Hawaiian 61 57 47
3b     Fall Full-Time 56% 61% 50%
3c     Fall Part-Time 44% 39% 50%
3d     Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 2% 1% 0%
3e     Spring Full-Time 58% 54% 50%
3f     Spring Part-Time 42% 46% 50%
3g     Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 1% 1% 1%
4 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes 963 1,037 814
5 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes 1,138 902 840
6 SSH in All Program Classes 2,101 1,939 1,654
7 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes 70 65 55
8 Total Number of Classes Taught 49 48 44

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
9 Average Class Size 17.1 16.4 14.7 Healthy
10 *Fill Rate 78.1% 78.6% 68.6%
11 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 4 3 3
12 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 29.6 40.1 32.5
13 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty 28.3 29.3 24.8
13a Analytic FTE Faculty 4.2 4.1 3.9
14 Overall Program Budget Allocation $374,293 $311,678 $324,762
14a General Funded Budget Allocation $374,293 $306,464 $291,260
14b Special/Federal Budget Allocation $0 $0 $1,149
14c Tuition and Fees $0 $5,214 $32,353
15 Cost per SSH $178 $161 $196
16 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 8 7 11
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
17 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 76% 78% 80% Cautionary
18 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 35 27 31
19 *Persistence Fall to Spring 70.5% 70% 68.6%
19a Persistence Fall to Fall     44.4%
20 *Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded 24 22 18
20a Degrees Awarded 20 19 17
20b Certificates of Achievement Awarded 3 2 2
20c Advanced Professional Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
20d Other Certificates Awarded 4 1 2
21 External Licensing Exams Passed   Not Reported Not Reported
22 Transfers to UH 4-yr 0 2 6
22a Transfers with credential from program 0 0 2
22b Transfers without credential from program 0 2 4

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
23 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught 2 2 2  
24 Enrollments Distance Education Classes 56 49 52
25 Fill Rate 93% 82% 87%
26 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 54% 59% 69%
27 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 7 7 1
28 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education) 75% 78% 69%

Perkins IV Core Indicators
2011-2012
Goal Actual Met  
29 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment 90.00 77.50 Not Met  
30 2P1 Completion 50.00 27.50 Not Met
31 3P1 Student Retention or Transfer 74.25 69.77 Not Met
32 4P1 Student Placement 60.00 68.57 Met
33 5P1 Nontraditional Participation 17.00 14.93 Not Met
34 5P2 Nontraditional Completion 15.25 10.53 Not Met

Performance Funding Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
35 Number of Degrees and Certificates     19  
36 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     8
37 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     Not STEM
38 Number of Pell Recipients     83
39 Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr     6
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

Overall Health -- Healthy

Demand -- Healthy

Demand health is calculated by dividing the number of majors in the program by the number of new and replacement positions for the county.  The BTEC program continued to be healthy from AY 2012-2013 (as well as AY 2010-2011 and AY 2011-2012)in this category.  There continues to be a demand for employees with the skills and knowledge developed in the BTEC program.  There was a decrease in the number of program majors from 120.5 to 97.5, but there was also a decrease in the number of new and replacement positions for the county from 33 to 31.  Non-BTEC majors continue to take BTEC courses to learn skills and knowledge necessary for success in the workplace.

Efficiency -- Healthy

Program efficiency is calculated by using fill rate and majors to FTE BOR appointed faculty measures.  The fill rate for the BTEC program is 68.6 percent .  Many classes in the program are capped at 20 students due to equipment capacity and the hands-on nature of the subject matter.  The ratio of majors to FTE BOR appointed faculty is calculated to be 32.5 students per faculty.  The overall efficiency call for the program is healthy.

Effectiveness -- Cautionary

The effectiveness indicator remains at cautionary status.  There are three measures used to determine effectiveness health.  The first measure is calculated by dividing unduplicated degrees/certificates awarded (#20) by majors (#3).  (18/97.5=0.18)  This number is close to the top of the range for the cautionary status and missed being healthy by just 2 percent.  The second measure is found by dividing unduplicated degrees certificates (#20) by annual new and replacement positions (county prorated) (#2) (17/31=0.55)  A rating of 0.75 would have put the program in the healthy range.  The final measure used to determine health in this category is persistence.  The persistence rating for the BTEC program is 68.6 percent.  To improve the health of the program, a higher number of students persisting from fall to spring would have helped the program.  In addition, a higher number of students who were awarded unduplicated degrees/certificates would also support the health of the program in this category.  This indicates that action taken in the area of student support would help the program have a healthier rating in the effectiveness category.  In addition, the BTEC program is hoping to have better statistics in this category with the change in policy allowing students to automatically earn certificates as requirements are completed.  The faculty and division counselor encourage students to come in for advising to confirm that students are on the right path to completing program requirements.   It is also possible that students enroll in our program to develop employable skills and to upgrade skills.  Once those skills are obtained, the students transition into the workforce without completing a degree. 

 

Significant Program Actions for 2012 - 2013

1.  BTEC program reviewed equipment and technology to ensure that current and emerging technology needs are fulfilled.

2.  Program faculty participated in webinars and attended local workshops and conferences to keep current with trends in the program area.

3.  Program faculty collaborated with the BTEC PCC to articulate course curriculum and update the articulation agreement with LeeCC, WinCC, KauCC, and UHMC.

4.  Continued to work with Nursing and Allied Health to offer a MOA certificate. 

5.  Contacted BTEC graduates with job opportunities in the community.  Continued to maintain an electronic database of BTEC graduates.

6.  Contacted area high schools to present HawCC programs to potential students and provide for a smooth transition from high school to college.

7.  Met with the advisory council to review community needs in the area of business technology.  Contacted students declared as BTEC majors via classes and email to assist them with advising.

8.  Continued to explore experiential learning to establish a program to recruit industry personnel without degrees as new students.

 

 

Perkins IV Core Indicators

Only one Perkin's Core Indicator (4P1 Student Placement) was met for the BTEC program.    All other indicators were not met.  From the last academic year, the BTEC program improved in the areas of 4P1 and 5P1.  There was a decrease in the areas of 1P1, 2P1, 3P1, and 5P2.

1P1-Technical Skill Attainment-The BTEC program's actual participation was 77.50, down from 84.62.  Faculty need to work with students to assist them in being successful in program area classes.

2P1-Completion-The BTEC program's actual participation was 27.50, down from 38.46.  Faculty will work with students to assist them in making sure they complete requirements for certificates and degree.  As stated earlier, some students transition into the workforce without completing a degree.  As the economy has improved and more jobs have become available, that has meant more students are joining the workforce before completing a degree.

3P1-Student Retention or Transfer-The BTEC program's actual participation was 69.77, down from 77.32.  Faculty will support students to encourage them to complete degrees or assist them in transfer efforts.

5P1-Nontraditional Participation-Nontraditional participation is an area with a goal of 17 percent  participation.  To calculate this figure, the percentage of those from underrepresented groups is compared with the total number of participants who participated in a program that leads to employment in nontraditional fields.  The BTEC program did not meet this goal and had a performance rate of 14.93, up from 12.59 in the previous year and 11.86 and 7.55 in years prior.  The numbers seem to indicate that we are improving over the years, but not enough to meet the Perkins goal.  Male students are considered to be nontraditional students for the BTEC program.  Marketing to males and supporting their efforts in the program would help BTEC reach the goal of 16.25 percent participation.  Ways to promote BTEC as a nontraditional career continue to be discussed, and the program will seek help from those who may have advice on reaching nontraditional students.

5P2-Nontraditional Completion-Nontraditional completion is calculated by comparing the concentrators from underrepresented gender groups who earned a degree or certificate to all of the concentrators who completed a program that leads to employment.  The Perkins goal is 15.25 percent and the BTEC actual performance was 10.53, down from 14.29.  The BTEC program would like to increase nontraditional participation so as to improve numbers in nontraditional completion.

Part III. Action Plan

Program Action 1

Develop and implement VOA program to increase the pool of nontraditional BTEC students.

The VOA certificate supports ILOs 1, 2, and 3 through the curriculum required for completion of the certificate.  The VOA certificate is a new certificate in the BTEC program and supports program development for  a healthy BTEC program that operates efficiently and effectively to deliver academic services and ensure ongoing improvement to the program.  The BTEC program also hopes to target under served populations by offering stackable certificates as an academic incentive for low-income students, enabling them to earn certificates at various steps in their education, providing them with a greater chance of finding a job in the event their education is interrupted by outside factors.  This certificate also meets the need for graduates to fill the demand for "middle-skilled" workers in industries requiring more than a high school diploma and less than a bachelor's degree.  These industries represent the greatest number of future job openings and are projected to have the highest worker shortages in the years ahead.

Program Action 2

The PLA initiative supports program development by allowing potential students who have college-level knowledge to enter at the community college level and allowing them to earn credits for the knowledge they already have.  The BTEC program also hopes to target under served populations by offering this process of earning credits as an academic incentive for low-income students, enabling them to earn certificates and degrees faster than it would take if they had not earned the PLA credits.  This provides students with a fast-track method to earning their degree and rewarding them for life experience and knowledge that relates to the BTEC program.  This initiative allows graduates better chance for promotion and advancement in the workforce.

Program Action 3

Improve student support and support Kauhale concept in BTEC. 

Improving the BTEC programs student support will strengthen course completion, retention, persistence, and ultimately degree  completion.  This student focused initiative will allow students to develop strong relationships with each other, with the faculty, and also with staff and support members in our program.  It will connect students to the community in preparation for their entry into the workforce.

 

Part IV. Resource Implications

Cost Item 1

Membership Dues in professional organizations for non-teaching organizations (e.g. ARMA, IAAP, IVAA) to have access to materials to support curriculum including publications, webinars, and training materials.  In addition, purchasing curriculum to study for the IAAP CAP certification.

Equipment                    $2,000

Allowing membership in professional organizations will allow faculty to take advantage of publications and trainings available to those in the organization.  This will allow for cutting-edge information to be shared with students.  In addition, faculty will be able to network with business professionals while encouraging them to plan events where BTEC students can be involved.  Finally, the training materials available with membership in IAAP will allow the program to determine whether IAAP CAP certification is a reasonable effort for our students to undertake.  It will also allow the faculty to make changes to the curriculum based on the current industry needs. 

Cost Item 2

Professional development training via attendance at national and state conferences in areas relating to business technology.  Conferences offered by National Business Education Association, Western Business Education Association, Hawaii Business Education Association, IAAP, ARMA, and IVAA all have topics relating directly to the courses taught in the BTEC program.

Equipment                  $8,000

Allowing faculty to attend local and national conferences will strengthen the skills and knowledge that can be shared with the students.  The program is trying to stay up-to-date with trends in industry and networking and attending conferences will support that effort.  This ultimately will strengthen the program and keep it a viable and in-demand program.

Cost Item 3

Funding to offer student support initiatives.  Open house, business collaboration events, advising efforts.

Equipment                     $2,000

Improving the BTEC program's student support will strengthen course completion, retention, persistence, and ultimately degree  completion.  This student focused initiative will allow students to develop strong relationships with each other, with the faculty, and also with staff and support members in our program.  It will connect students to the community in preparation for their entry into the workforce.

 

 

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

Yes
Work as a responsible member of a team to meet an organization's objectives.

2

No
Demonstrate professionalism in work quality, appearance, attitude, and workplace behavior as required in a diverse business environment.

3

Yes
Use current and emerging technologies effectively to create and manage documents and handle multiple priorities.

4

Yes
Communicate clearly and effectively through oral and written interactions, complying with standard office etiquette.

5

Yes
Use research and decision-making skills to make informed choices consistent with personal and organizational goals.

6

No
Apply appropriate strategies to secure employment, retain a job, and advance in a career.

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

April 2013 Minutes of the BTEC Advisory Council, Artifact examples from advisory council members.

B) Expected Level Achievement

BUSN 170

•             All artifacts produced in the class were used for this assessment.

•             Performance rubric used.

•             At least 75 percent of students will meet or exceed expectations

 

BUSN 292

•             All artifacts produced in the class were used for this assessment.

•             Performance rubric used.

•             100 percent of students will meet or exceed expectations.

 

ENG 55

•             All artifacts produced in the class were used for this assignment.

•             Performance rubric used.

•             At least 75 percent of students will meet or exceed standards (score 15 or higher) as determined by the Memo Rubric for PLO #4.

C) Courses Assessed

BUSN 170 - Records and Information Management

BUSN 292 - Integrated Office Procedures

ENG 55 - Business Communication

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

BUSN 170 - Students are asked to research a local company and its records management system.  In a written report, students must describe and analyze the company’s recordkeeping system in relation to the ARMA International’s Generally Accepted Recordkeeping Principles.  Finally, students must make recommendations for improving the company’s recordkeeping system.  (See project assignment).

BUSN 292 - Students are asked to write a persuasive letter asking for donations (see project assignment).

ENG 55 - Students are asked to produce a written memo using word processing software in standard business memo format. The memo will include an appropriate heading, cohesive introductory, message and concluding paragraphs, and closing utilizing the 6 Cs of business writing: courteous, clear, complete, concise, correct and consistent communication.  Students will complete a 3-5 minute oral presentation before the class utilizing a PowerPoint or similar visual presentation software program, with graphics and photos as appropriate. Students will select one of five business ethics case studies, each with accompanying questions for their presentation. They will develop their presentation using the case study questions as a guide, the ‘What is Ethics?’ handout provided, notes from the ethics lecture, their text, their own online research on the topic, and  notes from the lecture on oral presentations. The oral presentation will consist of an introduction, background, issues, and recommendations and/or findings and conclusion. The case studies, questions, and the “What is Ethics” handout are attached. The attached Oral Presentation Rubric was used to assess eye contact, voice control, body language, appearance, visual aids, use of language, and assigned content, to include business/office protocol for this qualitative assessment.

E) Results of Program Assessment

BUSN 170 - Students worked in teams on this project and seven artifacts were submitted.  One student did not complete the assignment.  Six out of the seven artifacts submitted met or exceeded standards as determined by the assessment rubric.  One of the artifacts scored below standards.  The main area the students lacked is in addressing the industry ARMA Generally Accepted Recordkeeping Principles in their analysis.   Students did interview and research local businesses and documented their findings in a paper.  However, many of the students did not connect what they found to the industry standards which would indicate an understanding of why businesses do what they do.  More instruction in this area will be done beginning in the Fall 2013 semester.

BUSN 292 - Four out of the six students Met or Exceeded Standards (14 pts/70% or higher).  Here is the breakdown:

Student #1       11 pts  55%

Student #2       16 pts  80%

Student #3       14 pts  70%

Student #4       19 pts  95%

Student #5       15 pts  75%

Student #6         11 pts 55%

The results indicate that a third of the students (two) need to work on their writing skills. One of these students did not take ENG 22 or ENG 100, but passed ENG 55.  The other student successfully passed all three courses.

Discussion among the BTEC program faculty included:  the appropriateness of the writing sample (students have little or no practice to creating this type of letter), the appropriateness of students to Google and use sample letters or templates, and is the expected level of writing necessary for graduates.

ENG 55 - One hundred percent (16 of 16) of the artifacts submitted met or exceeded standards as determined by the assessment rubric.  Scoring ranged from 16 to 20 (out of a possible score of 20), with a mean of 17.75, and median of 18.  Three students (19%) scored at the low end of the range (16 of 20); errors were primarily mechanical, and could be resolved with more thorough proofreading. However, as stated, all three scored above the ‘meets standards’ cutoff. One student turned in an exemplary document that scored at 20. One student was not available for the assessment. All seventeen students attend class regularly and engage consistently in daily writing activities. The instructor rates the assessment results as consistent with work produced by the class on a daily basis the final quarter of the semester.

One hundred percent (17 of 17) of the oral presentations met or exceeded standards as determined by the oral presentation rubric. Scoring ranged from 15 to 21, with a ‘meets standards’ cut-off at 14, with a mean of 18.2 and a median of 17.5. One student scored at 15, at the low end of the range of scores; this particular student had requested to present on her own, and was clearly nervous, rushing through her presentation. Nonetheless, all categories rated at least satisfactory, though with only one category rating above the average level (dress/appearance).  The remaining students worked in groups of two, though were assessed individually.

F) Other Comments

N/A

G) Next Steps

“Next Steps” can include revision to syllabi, curriculum, teaching methods, student support, and other options.

BUSN 170 - Recommend continuing this project next semester and have more discussion with students about how to address the ARMA Generally Accepted Recordkeeping Principles.  Students indicated that this research and analysis was a good experience and that they liked seeing how records management systems were used in the local workplace.  One way that this project could address the communication aspect more is by asking students to make an oral presentation about their findings to the class.  This has been considered in the past, but lack of time is a factor in allowing oral presentations.

BUSN 292 - Do a similar writing assessment in fall 2013 and ask members of the BTEC Advisory Council to participate in the assessment.  The assessment letter or memo should be something similar to what they have done in previous classes and/or what is often drafted by our graduates (office workers).

ENG 55 - As stated above, this assessment (for PLO#4) was also administered to the Fall 2012 semester ENG 55 class; while oral communication assessment results were identical (at 100% meeting standards), improvement was noted on the writing assessment (84% meeting standards in the Fall, compared to 100% in the Spring). As these are small samples over a short period of time, any statistical significance should not be concluded. However, anecdotally, the difference may be attributed to improved instructional technique gleaned from lessons learned over the course of the two semesters (and of course a higher performing set of students in the Spring could also be considered a factor).

It is indicated that students who attend class regularly, complete the required daily writing assignments, as well as the major written assignments, and take the time necessary to proofread and effectively edit will successfully meet written communication standards for English 55.

It is also indicated that students who attend class regularly, and are provided thorough lecture analysis and practical discussion, along with the information provided in the text book, and have the opportunity for a practice presentation with feedback, will successfully meet standards for oral communication for English 55. It was observed in their first presentation that most students had discovered they could not only survive a presentation, but do well. It was also observed that utilizing high interest presentation topics encourages engagement and thorough preparation, which is 90% of a good presentation. With that, students tended to approach the podium with more confidence, as they were prepared, they had taken a position on their topic, and believed in what they were to present.

The need to regularly practice and apply writing and oral communication concepts discussed in the text and in class, to include active class discussion, in order to increase the probability of success in communicating in the business environment, and to master those concepts and skills, will continue to be emphasized. Hands-on activities and real-world applications in the classroom will also be utilized to the greatest extent possible to facilitate student interest, buy-in, and overall learning.