University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: Honolulu Community College
Program: Aeronautics Maintenance Technology

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Program did not provide date of the last comprehensive review.

Program Description

Program Mission:  The Aeronautics Maintenance & Technology program’s mission is to:

    •    Provide students with the opportunity to gain the documented knowledge and experience to qualify for certification as aircraft mechanics as required by Part 65 and in the manner prescribed by Part 147 of the Federal Aviation Regulations, as approved by the Honolulu Flight Standards District Office.

    •    Enable students to attain their personal educational goals by becoming highly qualified aviation maintenance technicians, meeting the needs of the aviation industry and thereby promoting safety in aviation.

    •    Provide specialized training as necessary for prospective aircraft technicians and industry.

 

Program Description:

The Aeronautics Maintenance Department is an approved aviation maintenance technician training facility operating under Federal Aviation Administration Air Agency Certificate No. DI9T087R with Airframe, Powerplant, and combined Airframe and Powerplant ratings. It is the only such school in the Pacific Basin. Students enrolling in the Aeronautics program have three choices as outlined below.

    1.    Certificate of Achievement in Aviation Maintenance Technician Certification: This program consists of the General Maintenance curriculum of 500 hours, the Airframe Maintenance curriculum of 750 hours, and the Powerplant Maintenance curriculum of 750 hours which meets the FAR Part 147 minimum required total of 1900 hours of theory and laboratory instruction in four (4) semesters and an additional semester of General Education courses. A Certificate of Achievement will be awarded to students completing the Aviation Maintenance Technician Certification program, upon application.

    2.    Associate in Science Degree in Aeronautics Maintenance Technology is awarded to students who complete the additional General Education requirements as well as the General, Airframe, and Powerplant Maintenance curricula as outlined under the Certificate program.

3.         Transfer Option to prepare for the Completion of the Aviation Systems Management Degree in a 4-year program. Contact Brian Isaacson for details.

 

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Cautionary

Majors Included: AERO     Program CIP: 47.0608

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 New & Replacement Positions (State) 21 16 50 Healthy
2 *New & Replacement Positions (County Prorated) 19 14 38
3 *Number of Majors 49.5 61.5 77
3a     Number of Majors Native Hawaiian 5 7 17
3b     Fall Full-Time 83% 79% 66%
3c     Fall Part-Time 17% 21% 34%
3d     Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 0% 2% 2%
3e     Spring Full-Time 79% 71% 63%
3f     Spring Part-Time 21% 29% 37%
3g     Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 0% 3% 1%
4 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes 1,015 1,043 931
5 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes 14 0 42
6 SSH in All Program Classes 1,029 1,043 973
7 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes 34 35 32
8 Total Number of Classes Taught 8 10 14

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
9 Average Class Size 18.4 14.9 12.2 Cautionary
10 *Fill Rate 73.5% 59.6% 41.3%
11 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 3 3 3
12 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 16.5 20.5 25.6
13 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty 23.9 23.7 22.6
13a Analytic FTE Faculty 2.1 2.6 3.4
14 Overall Program Budget Allocation $389,126 $345,542 $448,650
14a General Funded Budget Allocation $386,062 $330,756 $396,604
14b Special/Federal Budget Allocation $0 $0 $0
14c Tuition and Fees $0 $14,786 $52,046
15 Cost per SSH $378 $331 $461
16 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 0 2 6
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
17 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 18% 49% 42% Unhealthy
18 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 0 2 7
19 *Persistence Fall to Spring 71.1% 82.4% 73.1%
19a Persistence Fall to Fall     33.3%
20 *Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded 1 3 6
20a Degrees Awarded 1 2 6
20b Certificates of Achievement Awarded 0 1 0
20c Advanced Professional Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
20d Other Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
21 External Licensing Exams Passed   100% 100%
22 Transfers to UH 4-yr 1 1 0
22a Transfers with credential from program 0 0 0
22b Transfers without credential from program 1 1 0

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
23 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught 0 0 0  
24 Enrollments Distance Education Classes N/A N/A N/A
25 Fill Rate N/A N/A N/A
26 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) N/A N/A N/A
27 Withdrawals (Grade = W) N/A N/A N/A
28 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education) N/A N/A N/A

Perkins IV Core Indicators
2011-2012
Goal Actual Met  
29 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment 90.00 69.23 Not Met  
30 2P1 Completion 50.00 7.69 Not Met
31 3P1 Student Retention or Transfer 74.25 60.00 Not Met
32 4P1 Student Placement 60.00 58.33 Not Met
33 5P1 Nontraditional Participation 17.00 6.78 Not Met
34 5P2 Nontraditional Completion 15.25 50.00 Met

Performance Funding Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
35 Number of Degrees and Certificates     6  
36 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     1
37 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     Not STEM
38 Number of Pell Recipients     37
39 Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr     0
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

Overall, the AERO program continues to improve although it is still maintaining a Cautionary status. The job outlook forecast still remains positive and the projected number of new jobs and replacement positions are expected to grow in the next decades. Aviation periodicals quote Boeing and others sources that as many as 650,000 new mechanics will be needed world-wide by the year 2030. Locally, Hawaiian Airlines tells us they need more mechanics, Aloha Air Cargo is planning an apprentice system to guarantee the number of mechanics they will have available, and every member of our Advisory Committee tells us that they are having trouble finding people to hire, and expect to do so in the coming months and years. From what we can tell, it would appear that the State supplied New and Replacement Positions (item 1) may be off by as much as a factor of three. The number of Aero Majors (item 3) has increased since the previous year from 61.5 to 77 although our Fill Rate (item 10) has dropped (59.6 to 41.3%) due to the decision to have a Spring starting class to better utilize our instructional staff. The Spring start class was small and has remained so. Our Persistence (item 19) has decreased from 82% to 73%. This change we contribute primarily to a factor associated with our first semester students. We traditionally have a much lower retention rate with our first semester students, but some classes are better than others. Apparently some enter our program under prepared or without totally realizing just how time-consuming or strenuous this program can be. Regardless of the reason our first semester attrition rate is often somewhere around 15-20%, with many leaving within the first few weeks. The change in the attrition rate associated with that first semester class apparently resulted in the change in Persistence displayed for the 12-13 year. Although our Cost per Student Semester Hour (item 15) has not been reported at this time, we suspect it may be an increased figure from that of the previous year, primary resulting from the increase in the number of classes without a proportionate increase in the number of students in our program’s courses, due to the smaller Spring start class.

Our Successful Completion (item 17), which had dropped from 49% to 42% requires some explanation. We know that we have had, in the past, a high number of incompletes. This number of incompletes we (the Aero faculty) felt were primarily the results of a policy established by our previous Director.  The policy allowed Aero students to maintain an incomplete grade for up to a year and a half. This seemed to create an atmosphere that there was no urgency in completing the classes on time and as a result, many didn't. This policy was formed as a result of our passport program, which resulted in additional projects, and at the time seemed warranted. When we discontinued the passport program a few years ago, this extension program remained in effect, and the incompletes continued without justification. We have discontinued this policy effective the Fall 2011 semester. Having made the policy change, the on-time passing rate has jumped to almost 50%, and the percentage may rise as we have fewer students who have classes to complete which are still under the old rule. By mid-November 2012, all students were subject to the normal college incomplete rules.

Another low value, Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded (item 20) which rose from a low value of 3 to low value of 6 during this evaluation period also needs addressing. The majority of the students entering the Aero program seem to be primarily concerned with receiving their FAA Airframe and Powerplant Certification. Those who opted to continue on and earn a Certificate of Achievement or an Associate Degree usually do so after completing the Aero program by the completion of the necessary liberal arts classes (additional semesters). As a result, the graduates from the Aero program who have completed the Aero courses and have received a Certificate of Completion (which is not currently recognized by this evaluation and which is all that is necessary for the FAA A&P certificate testing) have not yet earned or received an Associate Degree or Certificate of Achievement. This reflects in low numbers on this evaluation, which does not accurately depict the results of the students who attend and successfully complete the Aero program. As we understand it, we are currently in the process of having our Certificate of Completion recognized as a program completion, which will result in more favorable figures for the Aero program. Historically, the overall average of students who are still enrolled by the end of the first semester (i.e. those who are not no-shows, or who drop early in the program) who complete the program and are eligible for their certification exams is close to 60%. Those students who complete the curricula are awarded our Part 147 Certificate of Completion that they need to be able to be signed off by the local Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) to be able to take their knowledge, oral and practical exams for their certification as aircraft mechanics. Consequently (item 20d) Other Certificates Awarded should read 32, as we issued ten airframe and nine powerplant Certificates in the Fall of 2012 and six airframe and seven powerplant Certificates in the Spring of 2013, roughly two Certificates per student. As our enrollment continues to increase with industry demand and student interest, the numbers of the certificates that we award should increase.

 

Program Student Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the AERO program, students will be able to:

 

Satisfactorily pass the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) knowledge (written), oral, practical and written examinations in General, Airframe, and Powerplant subjects.

Obtain FAA general mechanic, airframe and powerplant certifications.

Demonstrate a working knowledge and mechanical ability to inspect, maintain, service and repair aircraft electrical, engine (piston and turbine), airframe structures, flight control, hydraulic, pneumatic, fuel, navigation and instrument systems and other aircraft components specified by Federal Aviation Regulation Part 147.

Identify, install, inspect, fabricate and repair aircraft sheet metal and synthetic material structures.

Maintain and repair any part of any aircraft system of any rotorcraft, light aircraft, air carrier aircraft, glider, or ballon within the regulatory limits imposed by the FAA certification, without error, to ensure the safety of the flaying public.

Display proper behavior reflecting satisfactory work habits and ethics to fulfill program requirements and confidence to prepare for employment.

 

Program Student Learning Outcomes that have been assessed in the year of the Annual Review of Program Data. 

 

All of the Program Student Learning Outcomes have been assessed in the year of the Annual Review of Program Data.

 

Assessment Results

 

Our Program Student Learning Outcomes are tied directly to our FAA Approved Part 147 Manual and although our Advisory Committee has been apprised of their content, they understand that our Part 147 manual is the overall guide to what our students should learn and how that is to be accomplished. Since the structure of the curriculum is governed by the organization of Part 147, the role of our Advisory Committee has been to suggest changes in emphasis rather than overall content. Interestingly, much of their advice has to do with emphasizing the qualities that a prospective mechanic should have as an employee, rather than specific technical knowledge, as progress is always being made in the industry and mechanics have to learn new technologies and systems as time goes by.

Each course assesses student achievement with numerous objective and subjective evaluations, including, on average, a dozen subject objective exams, a final exam, oral exams, written work, and practical tasks, which are tallied on a Project Check List for each student, signed off by the student and the instructor, as well as tables of student scores recorded using MicroGrade Pro course software. Records for each student are compiled and filed at the Aero facility and kept indefinitely.

Our Part 147 Manual states that all work will be completed to a 70% standard or better for an individual to pass the classes and complete the curricula requirements. By completing the curricula requirements, the student satisfactorily completes both course and program SLOs to the required standard.

Changes that have been made as a result of the assessments.

 

Our FAA approved curriculum and system of instruction has been operating with success by several measures over the years. It works well for the individuals who are prepared for the required course work. We continue to seek assistance for individuals who come into the program and prove deficient academically to be successful.

 

Part III. Action Plan

The following action plan items can be tied to the HCC-Specific Additional Outcomes and Measures accessible online at http://honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/strategicplan/pdf/2009-strategic-outcomes-statements.pdf

  1. Contract professional services to help recruit non-traditional students into the program.
  2. We want to work with our Dean to develop plans to help retain our students who may be underprepared for the courses. Such a plan may help other HCC programs with similar problems. The new Math 197 course may offer the necessary skills to our prospective students. A summer course with technical math content might be helpful to students coming into our program and other technical programs. We have had an on-site math instructor at Aero this last semester and will be very interested to see if we have an improvement in the success rate for math intensive subjects. We have discussed the possibility of a college math resource available over the web for technical students since they are often either off the main campus or in class much of the day and unable to go to the learning center. Many technical students work, so their time available outside of class is limited.
  3. Program faculty will continue to work with the Division Dean  and appropriate College personnel to properly inventory and create a basic maintenance schedule for major shop/facility equipment.

 

Part IV. Resource Implications

There are resource implications for the Action Planning Item above. We will work with the Division Chair and Division Dean to submit the necessary paperwork to request funding to complete these items in the Spring semester, depending on which of the alternatives seem to have most chance of being effective.

 

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

Yes
Satisfactorily pass the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) knowledge, oral, practical and written examinations in General, Airframe, and Powerplant subjects

2

Yes
Demonstrate a working knowledge and mechanical ability to inspect, maintain, service and repair aircraft electrical, engine (piston and turbine), airframe structure, flight control, hydraulic, pneumatic, fuel, navigation and instrument systems and other aircraft components specified by Federal Aviation Regulation Part 147

3

Yes
Obtain FAA general mechanic, airframe and powerplant certifications

4

Yes
Identify, install, inspect, fabricate and repair aircraft sheet metal and synthetic material structures

5

Yes
Maintain and repair any part in any aircraft system of any rotorcraft, light aircraft, air carrier aircraft, glider, or balloon within the regulatory limits imposed by the FAA certification, without error, to ensure the safety of the flying public

6

Yes
Display proper behavior reflecting satisfactory work habits and ethics to fulfill program requirements and confidence to prepare for employment

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

No content.

B) Expected Level Achievement

No content.

C) Courses Assessed

During the 2012-2013 Academic Year, the AERO program faculty continued routine course student learning outcome assessments for the following courses listed below.  Details and specific outcomes of the assessment can be located in the Dean's office Assessement inventory folder.

AERO 130

AERO 131

AERO 132

AERO 133

AERO 134

AERO 135

AERO 136

AERO 137

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

In response to recent accrediation recommendations relating to outcomes based assessment, the College has adopted processes and timelines to ensure that regular and systematic assessment of course student learning outcomes takes place.  Faculty were provided with an course slo assessment inventory template and asked to complete the form for courses taught in the 2012-2013 academic year.  Detailed result and other information can be identified on these forms which can be located in the Dean's office.  

Central to performing additional comprehensive program and course slo assessment is also gaining a stronger understanding of the entire process and expectations.  While the College and program has made considerable efforts and changes to strengthening the entire assessment process, we are hopeful that further training will be provided moving forward.

E) Results of Program Assessment

No content.

F) Other Comments

No content.

G) Next Steps

No content.