University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: Kapiolani Community College
Program: Nursing: Associate Degree

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The last comprehensive review for this program was on 2013, and can be viewed at:
http://ofie.kapiolani.hawaii.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/cpr2013nursing.pdf
STEM Program

Program Description

Kapiolani Community College
2012 Annual Report of Instructional Program Data

Nursing: Associate Degree

The Associate in Science (AS) degree in Nursing Program at Kapi’olani Community College (KCC) is approved by the Hawai‘i State Board of Nursing and accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN).  The AS in nursing program is taught by KCC faculty each fall and spring at the KCC Diamond Head (DH) campus site and at the Leeward Community College (LCC) satellite campus site.

To graduate with an AS degree in nursing, students are required to have successfully completed the program prerequisites and be admitted into the AS in nursing program. The degree is a total of 72 credits which can be completed within four semesters.

In fall 2012 the KCC AS in nursing program adopted the Hawai’i State Nursing Consortium (HSNC) curriculum. The purpose of this consortium is to provide a unified approach to nursing education across the State of Hawai’i.  This unified approach to nursing education helps to avoid unnecessary duplication of courses, experiences, and content; streamlines the delivery of nursing education; and offers a seamless transition to the baccalaureate nursing program at UH Manoa, for AS nursing graduates who wish to pursue their baccalaureate studies.  The last course of the “old” AS in nursing curriculum expired in the summer of 2013.  As of fall 2013, all students enrolled in the AS in nursing program at KCC are enrolled in the consortium curriculum.

Nursing Program Licensure

The AS in nursing students are eligible to take the licensure examination for practical nurses (NCLEX-PN) upon successful completion of their third semester nursing courses and are eligible to take the licensure examination for registered nurses (NCLEX-RN) upon successful completion of the fourth semester nursing courses.

The mission of the Nursing Department and the ADN Program

The Nursing Department follows the College Vision of “preparing students for lives of critical inquiry and effective engagement and leadership careers which strengthen the health, well-being and vitality” of the individuals, families, and communities that support all of us, the cultural traditions that shape and guide all of us, and the land and sea that sustain all of us.  The AS in nursing program mission is to develop practitioners who are safe, caring, competent, and who recognize the responsibility for life-long learning.  The Nursing Department strives to prepare students for lives of ethical, responsible community involvement and community engagement.  Our mission is to prepare students to meet rigorous employment standards while providing opportunities for those who wish to continue their formal education.

Graduates who have successfully completed the Associate in Science degree in Nursing as well as the NCLEX-RN licensure exam become licensed registered nurses who are able to support the vision of Kapi’olani Community College by being able to:

  1. Evaluate nursing care based on the legal and ethical framework of the state in which they practice and the American Nurses Association Standard of Practice and the Code of Ethics.
  2. Describe and analyze episodes of clinical practice and self-care; and identify areas of strength and those requiring development.
  3. Implement evidence-based practice by locating and evaluating the best available evidence in making clinical decisions; and engage in on-going professional growth and self-directed learning in the practice of professional nursing.
  4. Employ leadership skills in implementing and/or delegating the delivery of safe nursing care to clients and client systems.
  5. Collaborate with the multidisciplinary team to advocate for clients, client systems, and groups in meeting their health care needs.
  6. Contribute to the improvement of the health care system through involvement in interdisciplinary activities and choose from a variety of tools in accessing, interpreting, and providing cost-effective nursing care.
  7. Develop therapeutic relationships based on mutuality, respect, cultural sensitivity, caring and the beliefs and value systems with the client, client systems and community.
  8. Communicate professionally, clearly and therapeutically in all interactions.
  9. Demonstrate clinical judgment in the delivery of safe, cost-effective, quality care, using information and patient care technologies to diverse clients across a wide range of settings AND Utilize health promotion, disease prevention, and restorative nursing in assisting clients and client systems to maintain independence.

 

 

 

 

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Cautionary

Majors Included: NURS     Program CIP: 51.3801

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 New & Replacement Positions (State) 306 305 376 Unhealthy
2 *New & Replacement Positions (County Prorated) 232 228 293
3 *Number of Majors 155.5 155.5 131.5
3a     Number of Majors Native Hawaiian 27 27 25
3b     Fall Full-Time 2% 2% 21%
3c     Fall Part-Time 98% 98% 79%
3d     Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 1% 1% 4%
3e     Spring Full-Time 3% 3% 23%
3f     Spring Part-Time 97% 97% 77%
3g     Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 3% 4% 9%
4 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes 2,914 2,863 2,756
5 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes 456 324 336
6 SSH in All Program Classes 3,370 3,187 3,092
7 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes 112 106 103
8 Total Number of Classes Taught 45 37 33

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
9 Average Class Size 17.5 20.3 21.5 Healthy
10 *Fill Rate 87.9% 97.2% 91%
11 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 27.4 21.5 19.7
12 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 5.6 7.2 6.6
13 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty 19.9 26.1 24.5
13a Analytic FTE Faculty 7.8 6.0 5.4
14 Overall Program Budget Allocation $1,637,298 $1,436,877 $1,732,454
14a General Funded Budget Allocation $1,637,298 $980,035 $866,227
14b Special/Federal Budget Allocation $0 $0 $0
14c Tuition and Fees $0 $456,842 $866,227
15 Cost per SSH $486 $451 $560
16 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 11 1 0
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
17 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 89% 94% 94% Cautionary
18 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 40 12 23
19 *Persistence Fall to Spring 85.8% 94.4% 95.2%
19a Persistence Fall to Fall     72.7%
20 *Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded 61 77 72
20a Degrees Awarded 61 77 72
20b Certificates of Achievement Awarded 0 0 0
20c Advanced Professional Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
20d Other Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
21 External Licensing Exams Passed   95% 88%
22 Transfers to UH 4-yr 0 3 16
22a Transfers with credential from program 0 1 15
22b Transfers without credential from program 0 2 1

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
23 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught 0 0 0  
24 Enrollments Distance Education Classes N/A N/A N/A
25 Fill Rate N/A N/A N/A
26 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) N/A N/A N/A
27 Withdrawals (Grade = W) N/A N/A N/A
28 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education) N/A N/A N/A

Perkins IV Core Indicators
2011-2012
Goal Actual Met  
29 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment 90.00 98.92 Met  
30 2P1 Completion 50.00 82.80 Met
31 3P1 Student Retention or Transfer 74.25 87.93 Met
32 4P1 Student Placement 60.00 82.67 Met
33 5P1 Nontraditional Participation 17.00 27.46 Met
34 5P2 Nontraditional Completion 15.25 34.62 Met

Performance Funding Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
35 Number of Degrees and Certificates     72  
36 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     10
37 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     72
38 Number of Pell Recipients     48
39 Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr     16
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

Program Demand

The first KCC AS in nursing graduating class of the HSNC curriculum will graduate in spring 2014.  The “old" curriculum has been phased out in the summer 2013 with 39 AS in nursing graduates these numbers are not captured on the quantitative indicators which had a negative impact on the demand and effectiveness indicators of this report


• The number of majors in the nursing program (156) divided by the county new and replacement positions (228), show that the program demand indicator to be .68 or “cautionary”. To be defined as “healthy” the number of majors would need to increase by over 200 to meet the current demand. The data show that the number of new and replacement positions for registered nurses increased by 29 positions between the 2008-09 and 2011-12 ARPD.The last three ARPD reports show that the Kapi’olani CC nursing program like all other state nursing programs, have adjusted the number of students admitted into nursing in order to meet the State workforce needs.


• The county prorated registered nursing positions needs to be explained. Currently, new nursing graduates are more likely to obtain either part-time RN positions or work as an LPN and Nurse Aide. Assessment of the county and state nursing workforce indicates that nurses are remaining in workforce rather than retiring as expected due to the economic downturn. This means that full-time positions are not readily available and are not expected to be for 3 to 5 years. To increase the number of nursing majors would potentially increase the number of students in the ADN to BSN career pathway or the applications to related health careers. Kapi’olani CC nursing program is aligning the curriculum content with the system-wide consortium as of fall 2012. The alignment will help new graduates unable to find full time work and wishing to continue on in their nursing education.  In the fall of 2012 the ADN program offered the first 3 courses in the Consortium Curriculum.


• The demand for the Kapi’olani CC nursing program is also related to the accreditation status of the program. Department faculty are preparing the self study documentation and related curriculum changes as the 2013 accreditation team will be assessing the program at each campus location.


Program Efficiency


• One of the ARPD efficiency indicators is class fill rate. The ADN program fill rate is 97%, which is approximately a 10% increase in efficiency. The program continues to fall  within the 75 and 100 percent range the program can be considered “healthy” and efficient. The efficiency measure of majors to FTE BOR appointed faculty is 7.2 which means the program is unhealthy. Given the current number of majors of 156 there would need to be 10 faculty teaching within the ADN program to be considered a healthy efficient program.
• The data is explained in part by the structure of the nursing program found in the program description of this report. The nursing curriculum is an integrated career pathway program, meaning that faculty members are hired at the highest level of skill, which is the ADN program, but team teach across all nursing programs. The BOR appointed faculty numbers need to be investigated based on which faculty position numbers because there are currently over 20 faculty members teaching in the ADN Program.


Program Effectiveness


• The effectiveness of the ADN nursing is “healthy” at 49% based on the number of unduplicated degrees awarded (77) divided by number of majors (156). This is a 10% increase over last year's report.  To be considered healthy the program needed to achieve greater than 20%. The second measure of effectiveness is program persistence and is “healthy” at 97%, and increase of over 10% from the last report.  The nursing faculty counselors and teaching instructors continue to work  very hard to increase this indicator. Their work is supported by the data which show that the persistence rate has increased over the last 3  ARPD reports by approximately 30 percentage points.

Perkins Indicators


• To the credit of the ADN nursing program, all six Perkins Core Indicator goals were met; technical skills attainment, completion rate, student retention or transfers, student placement, non-traditional student participation and completion. The non traditional students are represented by males as well as Native Hawaiian students.


• The higher successful completion rate and lower withdrawal rate indicate that actions taken since the last ARPD Report to address the on-time pass rate through curriculum changes which have been successful. Actions included 1) changing the selection criteria to give extra consideration to applicants with health care or care-giving experience; 2) all students who earn a theory exam grade of less than 72,or  who performed poorly in clinical or were absent from class received mandatory remedial assistance from the program counselors and the Nursing Laboratory Resource Center.
• Use of computerized assessment testing continued to be incorporated in all nursing courses.


• Perkins core indicator of student retention/transfer rate increased from 92.76% to 94.2% from the last report which demonstrates the success in part the  system approach to the integrated nursing career pathway. The success is reflected by the number of students progressing through the ADN program at the various campus sites. For example, the spring 2011 cohort students continued on into the fall 2012 DH and LCC sites

• Perkins core indicator of student completion at 76.0% is supported by program faculty teaching at both the main Diamond Head campus and the Leeward CC satellite site. Faculty implemented the last ARDP action plan to meet regularly, prepare for classes and laboratory sessions at each site, and establish a parallel Laboratory Resource Center for students needing to practice their clinical skills and receive remediation help from program faculty.

Part III. Action Plan

Program Action Plan

Long term plans for the Nursing Associates Degree program are guided by the college’s strategic plan.  In the intermediate term, plans are guided by the program’s three-year comprehensive program review (CPR).  The actions indicated in this report provide short term measures which will contribute to the goals of the three year comprehensive program review, aligned with the college’s strategic plan.

Currently working on ADN program self study report and curriculum changes as recommended by the last accreditation report and preparing for the 2013 site visits to each campus.

  1. Continue to align and deliver the system-wide consortium curriculum effective fall 2012, including the ADN program student learning outcomes (SLOs) aligned with course competencies.
  2. Completed the simulation laboratory and poly-communication system at the Leeward CC satellite site. Implementation and alignment of the ADN curriculum began in fall 2012 with the program UH-Manoa Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program via the Hawai‘i State-wide Nursing Consortium Curriculum.  This action will enable ADN graduates to continue their nursing education in pursuit of a BSN degree at UH-Manoa.  The Nursing Department offered the first 3 courses in the consortium Curriculum fall 2012.
  3. The pediatric courses require a simulation baby manekin for skill attainment prior to clinical placement. (See resource implications).
  4. Obtained approval to administer and accept only the Assessment Technology Institute’s Test of Essential Academic Skills (ATI-TEAS) exam.  The exam was approved as a program pre-admissions requirement and effective as of March 20, 2012.  Students applying to the KCC ADN program and the KCC LPN-RN Transition Program are required to meet an individual total score of 78% or higher. This plan will alleviate the lack of resources to administer the previously used NLN pre-admissions exam as well as the current concern that ADN applicants are unable to access or secure their exam scores in a timely manner.
  5. Obtained approval to eliminate the five-year time limit for the science prerequisite and co-requisite courses for the ADN Program and LPN-RN Transition Program. Effective June 2012 student applications for the ADN Program and LPN-RN Transition Program in the spring 2013 semester. This action parallels the system-wide prerequisites to ADN programs.  In place of the current pre-requisites students will be required to complete the pathophysiology course.
  6. Request permission to hire our 9-month faculty counselor for the summer session. Beginning summer session of 2010, and continued for 2011 and 2012, the nursing counselor has worked in an overload position to provide teaching and student support for the ADN and PCRN Nursing Programs on three campuses.  This work is not manageable by one counselor.  In addition,  well over 200 applications come in for the PN Program at Diamond Head and Windward CC, the ADN program at Diamond Head and Leeward CC, as well as the Surgical Technology Program. To date, the Nursing Department has managed to support the summer student needs by hiring a casual instructor APT, and two nine month faculty – one counselor and one instructor to serve as Nursing Lab Resource Center instructor at the three sites. (See resource implications)
  7. A secretary for the Nursing Department was hired.

Part IV. Resource Implications

Program Resource Implications

Funding to carry out the action plan includes the following: 

For any additional fiscal resources, the Nursing Department had sufficient funds to purchase necessary office, medical equipment and supplies through College funds and Professional Fees.  The costs of creating a simulation laboratory with simulation mannequin and technology at the LCC satellite site have been funded with Professional Fees.

As we implement the new Statewide Consortium Curriculum, Mental Health Psychiatric Nursing in now integrated in all courses across the curriculum. The Mental Health Psychiatric Coordinator is also teaching across all programs and cannot accomplish this in 9 months.

The Nursing Department needs new laptop computers with adequate programs. We need a “smart cart” system for each classroom so computers and equipment can be secured in a locked cabinet, and faculty can have easy access to conduct class activities.

For testing we need 70 new laptop computers on Laulima for all nursing courses, as the testing center cannot accommodate all of our nursing students.

New tables are required as students bring their laptops to class and the current desks cannot safely accomodate a laptop computer.
The tables will also be used for group projects to address student engagement and open learning ecology similar to the STEM students and is part of the state wide consortum curriculum.

The Nursing Lab at Diamond Head campus needs a washer and dryer to maintain the bedding used for hospital beds.

The Department needs DVDs that can “stream” so that all three campuses can facilitate student engagement and group learning.

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

Yes
There are nine program SLOs in the nursing program. 1. Evaluate nursing care based on the legal and ethical framework of the state in which they practice and the American Nurses Association Standard of Practice and the Code of Ethics.

2

Yes
Describe and analyze episodes of clinical practice and self-care; and identify areas of strength and those requiring development.

3

Yes
Implement evidence-based practice by locating and evaluating the best available evidence in making clinical decisions; and engage in on-going professional growth and self-directed learning in the practice of professional nursing.

4

Yes
Employ leadership skills in implementing and/or delegating the delivery of safe nursing care to clients and client systems.

5

Yes
Collaborate with the multidisciplinary team to advocate for clients, client systems, and groups in meeting their health care needs.

6

Yes
Contribute to the improvement of the health care system through involvement in interdisciplinary activities and choose from a variety of tools in accessing, interpreting, and providing cost-effective nursing care.

7

Yes
Develop therapeutic relationships based on mutuality, respect, cultural sensitivity, caring and the beliefs and value systems with the client, client systems and community.

8

Yes
Communicate professionally, clearly and therapeutically in all interactions.

9

Yes
Demonstrate clinical judgement in the delivery of safe, cost-effective, quality care, using information and patient care technologies to diverse clients across a wide range of settings AND Utilize health promotion, disease prevention, and restorative nursing in assisting clients and client systems to maintain independence.

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

The Associate in Science degree in Nursing (ANURS/ADN) Program at Kapi’olani Community College is approved by the Hawai‘i State Board of Nursing and accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN).

Upon successful completion of all ADN courses and clinical practice, graduates of the Associate in Science Degree in Nursing Program are prepared to write the National Council for Licensure Examination for registered nurses (NCLEX-RN) examination and to perform as entry level registered nurses.

B) Expected Level Achievement

C) Courses Assessed

The following ADN courses were assessed in 2012-2013:

Fall 2012 (old curriculum)

Fall 2012 (new curriculum)

Spring 2013 (old curriculum)

Spring 2013 (new curriculum)

The “new” HSNC curriculum was instituted in fall 2012.  The first semester of the new curriculum includes the following courses: NURS 210, NURS 211 and NURS 212.  All course SLOs were assessed for each of these courses.  NURS 220 was taught for the first time in spring 2013, all SLOs for this course were assessed in spring 2013.  Expected levels of achievement were met for each of the course SLOs.

 

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

E) Results of Program Assessment

Program Assessment is based on the national benchmark for NCLEX-RN which is a pass rate of is 86%.  It is expected that the KCC AS in nursing graduates will exceed or meet the national mean pass rate.

A second program assessment benchmark is the National Council for State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) completion rates for AS in nursing programs ranging from 73.2% to 73.7%.  It is expected that the KCC AS in nursing student completion rates will meet or exceed the NCSBN completion rates.

Workforce data provide additional program assessment.  Based on the Hawai’i State Center for Nursing (HSCN); 34% of new graduates in the State of Hawai’i took over six months to secure their first nursing position.

F) Other Comments

Counseling SLOs for use across campus were developed in 2010.  Since that time, units have assessed these SLOs.  Completed templates and summaries of the assessment cycle for counseling support of this program are available at the OFIE website at http://ofie.kapiolani.hawaii.edu/program-review.

In an effort to better align terminology and respond to feedback gained in previous assessment cycles, on November 21 and 22, 2013, an assessment retreat was held to revise these SLOs.  The revised Counseling SLOs will be assessed in the upcoming year.

In fall 2012 the HSNC curriculum was implemented.  The first KCC AS in nursing graduating class of the HSNC curriculum will graduate in spring 2014.  The “old curriculum has been phased out; the last course of the “old” curriculum expired in summer 2013.  Therefore, the final graduating class of the old curriculum occurred during the summer, which consisted of 39 AS in nursing majors.  Historically, the nursing program only has graduating cohorts during the spring and fall semesters.  However, since the AS in nursing program was undergoing an accreditation visit during the spring of 2013; an executive decision was made to phase out the “old” curriculum prior to the accreditation visit.  Therefore, an exception was made and the final cohort graduated during the summer.  Unfortunately, since this cohort graduated during the summer months, these numbers are not captured on the quantitative indicators which had a negative impact on the demand and effectiveness indicators of this report. Students who graduated from the “old” curriculum who wish to pursue baccalaureate studies may do so at UH Hilo or UH MAi¿½noa.  If they wish to enroll in UH MAi¿½noa, they must take an additional nursing course (NURS 301) in addition to the required HSNC baccalaureate coursework. 

The HSNC curriculum differs from the “old” curriculum in several ways:

G) Next Steps

    Workforce and Employment:

         Accreditation Suggestion and Curriculum Changes: