University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: Kapiolani Community College
Program: Radiologic Technologist

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The last comprehensive review for this program was on 2013, and can be viewed at:
http://ofie.kapiolani.hawaii.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/cpr2013rasiologictech.pdf
STEM Program

Program Description

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

Kapi’olani Community College offers the only two-year associate in science Radiologic Technology degree program in the State of Hawai'i.  The program curriculum combines classroom studies, hands-on exercises in well-equipped laboratories, and intensive supervised clinical practice in affiliated hospitals.  The program is a combination of subject matter and faculty-supervised clinical experiences designed to prepare a person for the safe operation of x-ray equipment in clinical settings under the supervision of a radiologist or other physician. Satisfactory completion of the requirements for the AS degree permits the student to take the qualifying examinations of the American Registry of Radiologic Technologist (ARRT), which is accepted by the Hawai‘i Board of Radiologic Technology for State licensure. This program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT).

Radiologic technologists are medical personnel who perform diagnostic imaging examinations or administer radiation therapy treatments. They are educated in anatomy, patient positioning, examination techniques, equipment protocols, radiation safety, and basic patient care. Radiologic technologists may practice general radiography, or specialize in a specific imaging technique, such as bone densitometry, cardiovascular-interventional radiography, computed tomography, mammography, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine, quality management, or sonography. The radiologic technologists who specialize in radiation therapy, which is the delivery of high doses of radiation to treat cancer and other diseases, are radiation therapists and medical dosimetrists. Radiologic technologists work closely with radiologists, the physicians who interpret medical images to either diagnose or treat disease or injury. Radiologic technologists work in hospitals, clinics, or sometimes even in private physicians’ offices. Their duties may also include record-keeping, ordering and/or stocking supplies, preparing processing solutions, and maintaining equipment.

MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of Kapi’olani Community College’s Health Education Unit is to develop and deliver student-centered health career programs that employ industry standards through partnerships with the healthcare community. The mission of the Radiologic Technology Program is to follow the Health Education Unit as well as to serve the needs of the Radiology healthcare community by:

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Healthy

Majors Included: RAD     Program CIP: 51.0907

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 New & Replacement Positions (State) 18 19 29 Healthy
2 *New & Replacement Positions (County Prorated) 13 7 20
3 *Number of Majors 46.5 47 41
3a     Number of Majors Native Hawaiian 9 10 9
3b     Fall Full-Time 98% 100% 98%
3c     Fall Part-Time 2% 0% 2%
3d     Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 0% 0% 2%
3e     Spring Full-Time 100% 100% 98%
3f     Spring Part-Time 0% 0% 2%
3g     Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 0% 0% 2%
4 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes 1,653 1,301 1,465
5 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes 0 14 8
6 SSH in All Program Classes 1,653 1,315 1,473
7 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes 55 44 49
8 Total Number of Classes Taught 37 31 32

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
9 Average Class Size 14.4 14.4 14.9 Healthy
10 *Fill Rate 100% 100% 100%
11 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 2 2 2
12 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 23.2 23.5 20.5
13 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty 12.8 15.9 12.4
13a Analytic FTE Faculty 3.6 3.0 3.3
14 Overall Program Budget Allocation $240,000 $207,302 $279,915
14a General Funded Budget Allocation $240,000 $185,196 $172,068
14b Special/Federal Budget Allocation $0 $0 $0
14c Tuition and Fees $0 $22,106 $107,847
15 Cost per SSH $145 $158 $190
16 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 18 16 13
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
17 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 97% 93% 97% Healthy
18 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 15 5 16
19 *Persistence Fall to Spring 100% 97.8% 97.5%
19a Persistence Fall to Fall     76.4%
20 *Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded 27 20 23
20a Degrees Awarded 27 20 23
20b Certificates of Achievement Awarded 0 0 0
20c Advanced Professional Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
20d Other Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
21 External Licensing Exams Passed   100% 100%
22 Transfers to UH 4-yr 0 0 0
22a Transfers with credential from program 0 0 0
22b Transfers without credential from program 0 0 0

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
23 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught 0 0 0  
24 Enrollments Distance Education Classes N/A N/A N/A
25 Fill Rate N/A N/A N/A
26 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) N/A N/A N/A
27 Withdrawals (Grade = W) N/A N/A N/A
28 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education) N/A N/A N/A

Perkins IV Core Indicators
2011-2012
Goal Actual Met  
29 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment 90.00 100.00 Met  
30 2P1 Completion 50.00 95.65 Met
31 3P1 Student Retention or Transfer 74.25 96.00 Met
32 4P1 Student Placement 60.00 82.61 Met
33 5P1 Nontraditional Participation 17.00 58.33 Met
34 5P2 Nontraditional Completion 15.25 63.64 Met

Performance Funding Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
35 Number of Degrees and Certificates     23  
36 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     4
37 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     23
38 Number of Pell Recipients     14
39 Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr     0
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

Program Demand

Demand indicators show the program to be “healthy”. The Radiologic Technology program continues to graduate qualified students who have the appropriate technical skills and are well-prepared for employment as an entry-level technologist in any imaging facility. Student demand continues to be high for the Radiologic Technology program; 16 students were accepted of the 63 qualified applicants for the Fall 2013 semester. In addition, there were 204 prospective students in attendance for the information sessions held in 2012. There were over 175 in attendance in 2013. Salaries have remained high despite the general economic status of the state, and this continues to be a major driving force for student interest and demand for the program.

Efficiency

Efficiency indicators show that the program is “healthy”.  The fill rate is 100%.  There are three FTE program faculty positions but one position is currently vacant.  Efficient delivery of the program requires a team teaching approach.

Effectiveness

Effectiveness indicators show the program to be “healthy”. The program has maintained a 100% first-time pass rate for the national certification examination given by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) since 2003. In 2012, there were 19 graduates actively seeking employment on Oahu following graduation, of which 15 found employment within six months of graduation, however, most were in part-time positions.

Employer satisfaction surveys continue to provide evidence that employers are generally satisfied with the program’s graduates, and graduate satisfaction surveys also continue to indicate that graduates are generally satisfied with their training. The admissions process apepars to be effective, as the program’s attrition rate is low. Students unable to complete the program do not attribute being unprepared for the academic rigor of the program as their reason for their inability to complete the program.

Related to the effectiveness of the program is the equipment used by students to become proficient in their skill attainment. To that end, the portable x-ray machine that was inoperable and disposed of has not been replaced due to lack of funding. In addition, students only have access to “hands-on” training for digital equipment in the clinical setting, as the program equipment at the college is still film-based.  The energized laboratory is equipped with two x-ray machines that were purchased in 2009, and two x-ray machines that were purchased in 2011 (installed in 2012). The non-energized laboratory is equipped with four x-ray machines, used for simulation purposes only, that were purchased in 2011 (installed in 2012).(See action plan and resources.)

Part III. Action Plan

Action Plan

Long term plans for the Radiologic Technology program are guided by the college’s strategic plan.  In the intermediate term, plans are guided by the program’s three-year comprehensive program review (CPR).  The actions indicated in this report provide short term measures which will contribute to the goals of the three year comprehensive program review, aligned with the college’s strategic plan.

1.  The Radiologic Technology program has advanced the goal of providing academic programs to underserved regions of the state.  The plan requires a needs assessment of distance education based on the Neighbor Island Special Admissions Policy and annual workforce needs.

2.  Looking at the long-term needs of the radiologic technologist workforce within the State, a workforce needs assessment will be completed to identify training needs beyond the current curriculum.

3.  Laboratory equipment is critical to train and prepare student to meet rigorous employment standards. The plan is to procure industry-level digital equipment so that students are able to attain those skills expected for job placement after graduation. The program will also need to purchase a new portable x-ray machine for student training.

4.  Invite new members to the Advisory Board to expan financial support for the program.  Additional sources of funding will continue to be sought for maintenance of the newly purchased units and replacement of old equipment.

Part IV. Resource Implications

Equipment Needs

To maintain the level of achievement found in Perkins Indicator 1P1, a Perkins Grant will be submitted to obtain needed equipment. Program fees help defray part of the high supply costs of the program. Continued financial support from the College is required.

Staffing Needs

To maintain efficiency of program effeciently the vacant faculty position will be filled and delivery of the clinical curriculum will be a integrated team approach

 

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

Yes
Take diagnostically acceptable radiographs of any or all parts of the body.

2

Yes
Practice appropriate radiation safety measures.

3

Yes
Communicate and interact appropriately and effectively with patients, patients’ family and friends, peers, staff, and supervisors.

4

Yes
Work effectively as a team member with students, staff, and radiologists.

5

Yes
Maintain professional and ethical behavior as a healthcare provider.

6

Yes
Adapt patient positioning, projections, and technical factors based on patient condition.

7

Yes
Discuss the value of life-long learning and being an active member of a professional society.

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

The Radiologic Technology Advisory Board consists of staff technologists, radiologists, and department managers of local hospitals and

imaging facilities on O’ahu, Hawai’i, Maui, and Kaua’i. The Board is surveyed with regard to many Program issues, including Program SLOs.

In addition, an employer survey is conducted annually which includes an assessment piece on the graduates’ skills.

The professional society for radiologic technologists, the ASRT, plays an important role in maintaining current scope of practice of the

profession and provides opportunities for continuing education. In addition, the ARRT requires that registered technologists remain “current”

in their field; technologists are required to obtain 24 hours of continuing education in order to maintain certification.

B) Expected Level Achievement

SLO #1:

1. Students are expected to achieve 40 points out of a maximum of 60 points on the energized section of the Standard Laboratory Form

of the Final Performance Test for RAD200L.

2. It is expected that employers will rate our graduates with a minimum score of 3.0 (on average) on a scale from 1 to 4 on the Employer's

Satisfaction Survey (Question 2).

SLO #2:

1. Students will complete Item 10 of the Objective Checklist for RAD140.

2. It is expected that employers will rate our graduates with a minimum score of 3.0 (on average) on a scale from 1 to 4 on the Employer's

Satisfaction Survey (Question 3).

SLO #3:

1. It is expected that students will achieve a minimum score of 3.0 (on average) on a scale from 1 to 4 for Section 1, Item 6 and Section 2,

Items 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 of the Student Evaluation Form for RAD241.

2. It is expected that employers will rate our graduates with a minimum score of 3.0 (on average) on a scale from 1 to 4 on the Employer's

Satisfaction Survey (Question 5, Item 3).

SLO #4:

1. It is expected that students will achieve a minimum score of 3.0 (on average) on a scale from 1 to 4 for Section 4, Item 4 of the Student Evaluation Form for RAD241.

2. It is expected that employers will rate our graduates with a minimum score of 3.0 (on average) on a scale from 1 to 4 on the Employer's

Satisfaction Survey (Question 4, Item 4).

SLO #5:

1. It is expected that students will achieve a minimum score of 3.0 (on average) on a scale from 1 to 4 for Section 4, Items 1-5 of the

Student Evaluation Form for RAD241.

SLO #6:

1. Students are expected to achieve 28 points out of a maximum of 40 points on the non-energized section of the Standard Laboratory

Form of the Final Performance Test for RAD200L.

2. It is expected that students will achieve a minimum score of 3.0 (on average) on a scale from 1 to 4 for Section 3 of the Student

Evaluation Form for RAD241.

SLO #7:

1. Students are expected to achieve 75 points out of a maximum of 100 points on the ASRT homework assignment for RAD100.

C) Courses Assessed

All RAD courses were assessed during the 2012-2013 year.

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

See "Expected Level of Achievement" section above.

E) Results of Program Assessment

SLO #1:

1. Students achieved an average of 51 points out of a maximum of 60 points on the energized section of the Standard Laboratory Form of

the Final Performance Test for RAD200L.

2. Employers rated our graduates with an average score of 3.8 on a scale from 1 to 4 on the Employer's Satisfaction Survey (Question 2).

SLO #2:

1. 100% of students completed Item 10 of the Objective Checklist for RAD140.

2. Employers rated our graduates with an average score of 3.5 on a scale from 1 to 4 on the Employer's Satisfaction Survey (Question 3).

SLO #3:

1. Students achieved a range of scores from 3.4 to 4.0 on a scale from 1 to 4 for Section 1, Item 6 and Section 2, Items 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 of the

Student Evaluation Form for RAD241.

2. Employers rated our graduates with an average score of 3.3 on a scale from 1 to 4 on the Employer's Satisfaction Survey (Question 5,

Item 3).

SLO #4:

1. Students achieved a range of scores from 3.3 to 4.0 on a scale from 1 to 4 for Section 1, Item 10 and Section 4, Item 4 of the Student Evaluation

Form for RAD241.

2. Employers rated our graduates with an average score of 3.8 on a scale from 1 to 4 on the Employer's Satisfaction Survey (Question 4,

Item 4).

SLO #5:

1. Students achieved a range of scores from 3.8 to 4.0 on a scale from 1 to 4 for Section 1, Items 1-5 of the Student Evaluation Form for RAD241.

SLO #6:

1. Students achieved an average of 30 points out of a maximum of 40 points on the non-energized section of the Standard Laboratory

Form of the Final Performance Test for RAD200L.

2. Sttudents achieved range of scores from 3.2 to 4.0 on a scale from 1 to 4 for Section 3 of the Student Evaluation Form for RAD241.

SLO #7:

1. Students achieved an average of 95% out of a maximum of 100 points on the ASRT homework assignment for RAD100.

F) Other Comments

No content.

G) Next Steps

Develop a plan for the 5 year course cycle.