University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: Kauai Community College
Program: Facilities Engineering

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The last comprehensive review for this program was on 2007, and can be viewed at:
http://info.kauai.hawaii.edu/admin/gov/progreview/documents/07ProgRevFENG.doc
STEM Program

Program Description

The Facilities Engineering Technology program will prepare individuals for employment in jobs requiring multiple maintenance competencies. These competencies will allow graduates to obtain general maintenance positions in a variety of industries. Graduates will have gained knowledge in electrical applications and practices; refrigeration and air conditioning systems; basic plumbing installations and repair: and drywall, painting, and construction methods. The program has been revised in response to industry needs.

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Cautionary

Majors Included: FENG     Program CIP: 15.9999

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 New & Replacement Positions (State) 184 186 227 Healthy
2 *New & Replacement Positions (County Prorated) 15 15 20
3 *Number of Majors 44.5 41.5 33
3a     Number of Majors Native Hawaiian 9 7 5
3b     Fall Full-Time 21% 16% 13%
3c     Fall Part-Time 79% 84% 87%
3d     Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 0% 0% 0%
3e     Spring Full-Time 9% 3% 4%
3f     Spring Part-Time 91% 97% 96%
3g     Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 0% 0% 0%
4 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes 384 394 262
5 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes 213 194 244
6 SSH in All Program Classes 597 588 506
7 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes 20 20 17
8 Total Number of Classes Taught 24 27 18

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
9 Average Class Size 11.0 10 11.5 Cautionary
10 *Fill Rate 77.7% 69% 81.4%
11 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 1 1 0
12 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 44.5 41.5 0
13 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty 21.5 17.8 20.7
13a Analytic FTE Faculty 2.1 2.3 1.6
14 Overall Program Budget Allocation $24,953 $58,745 $81,730
14a General Funded Budget Allocation $22,173 $58,745 $79,832
14b Special/Federal Budget Allocation $0 $0 $0
14c Tuition and Fees $0 $0 $1,898
15 Cost per SSH $42 $100 $162
16 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 8 12 3
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
17 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 89% 88% 83% Cautionary
18 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 5 3 8
19 *Persistence Fall to Spring 82.5% 62.7% 53.8%
19a Persistence Fall to Fall     46.1%
20 *Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded 12 11 7
20a Degrees Awarded 0 0 0
20b Certificates of Achievement Awarded 0 0 0
20c Advanced Professional Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
20d Other Certificates Awarded 12 11 7
21 External Licensing Exams Passed   Not Reported Not Reported
22 Transfers to UH 4-yr 0 0 0
22a Transfers with credential from program 0 0 0
22b Transfers without credential from program 0 0 0

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
23 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught 0 0 0  
24 Enrollments Distance Education Classes N/A N/A N/A
25 Fill Rate N/A N/A N/A
26 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) N/A N/A N/A
27 Withdrawals (Grade = W) N/A N/A N/A
28 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education) N/A N/A N/A

Perkins IV Core Indicators
2011-2012
Goal Actual Met  
29 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment 90.00 94.44 Met  
30 2P1 Completion 50.00 38.89 Not Met
31 3P1 Student Retention or Transfer 74.25 70.27 Not Met
32 4P1 Student Placement 60.00 88.89 Met
33 5P1 Nontraditional Participation 17.00 12.50 Not Met
34 5P2 Nontraditional Completion 15.25 0.00 Not Met

Performance Funding Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
35 Number of Degrees and Certificates     0  
36 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     0
37 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     0
38 Number of Pell Recipients     8
39 Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr     0
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

DEMANDS:  In the report of Program Data for Facilities Engineering we have a Healthy rating in “Demand,” This reflects a need for filling positions in the areas that the FENG program offers.  This has always been our experience in our evaluation of the students attending our program, they and their employers are understanding the value our program offers. In surveying our students they are looking at both advancement within their employment or desiring to gain additional skills to hold their positions with an unfavorable economic status that exists today.  In addition, in evaluating the courses and our graduating students, that it is typical for FENG graduates to have several classes worth of credits beyond what is necessary to graduate.

EFFICIENCY:  The efficiency indicator is cautionary this year.  This indicator is based on fill rate and major to FTE faculty.  This is an indicator that the division will pay attention to in the future.  The program needs a permanent program faculty to address the concerns and provide a pathway for students to achieve their objectives in a timely manner.

EFFECTIVENESS:  The ratio of graduates to the number of available jobs in the county shows that it is barely below the Healthy range.  The program is not graduating quite as many students as it needs to in order to fulfill the work force needs of the community.  The fall to spring persistence rate is 63% down from the 83% the previous year and this is below the Healthy range.  This shows that too many of the program's majors are dropping out or changing majors and this may cause the graduation rate and the overall number of graduates to be lower in the future since students are not continuing in the program as much as we expected.

Overall, the program gets 2 points for #1, 1 point for #2, and 1 point for #3, for a total of 4 points on the Effectiveness health call. The healthy range is 5 or 6, so if either #2 or #3 would rise to a healthy level, the overall health call would become healthy.

Based on this data, a reasonable conclusion could be that the program should concentrate efforts on both attracting new students and on keeping current majors interested in FENG and on track in the program. This way the program could improve persistence, graduate more students, and fill the workforce needs of the community.

Taking a quick look at the majors from this academic year shows that FENG has a lot of part-time students (91%) compared to the general student population at the college (65%). So another possible action would be to make efforts to get students to enroll in more classes at a time so that they can complete the program more quickly. This might make sense because students who face a long road towards getting their degree or certificate have a greater tendency to drop out, either due to being discouraged with their progress or because of work, family, or other reasons outside of the college.

PERKINS:  We have met and exceeded the majority of workforce indicators (Perkins).  We recognize that more effort is needed in the areas of non-traditional students/non-traditional completion.  One of the responsibilities of the new program faculty will be to focus on these areas of attention.

 

Part III. Action Plan

 

UH System Goals, Kaua‘i Community College Goals, and Strategic Goals

Program Goals

UH Goal 1:  Educational Effectiveness and Student Success

KCC Goal 1: Access &

KCC Goal 2: Learning and Teaching

Strategic Goals: Student Recruitment, Retention and Success of All Students and Particularly

o   Increase success of Remedial/Develomental Students

o   Non-traditional Students in Career and Technical Programs

o   Increased Completion of Degrees, Certificates, and Licensure

o   Improve partnerships with K-12 to improve college preparation and to ensure that students are aware of specific opportunities that KCC provides

 

Relevant Curriculum Development

o   Sustainability/Green Jobs

o   Health

o   DOE-KCC English Alignment

o   Increase and improve design and delivery of distance education offerings

o   Increase transfer rates by strengthening four-year pathways, particularly in STEM fields

 

Completion of             

o   Course Student Learning Outcomes (CLOs)

o   Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs)

o   Institutional Learning Outcomes (ILOs)

o   Course Action Forms (CAFs)

 

Assessment Activities and Analysis

 

To Provide the necessary training and education in the areas of study that are important for positions in both the trades as well as the building maintenance facility engineering industry.

 

Our Construction Academy program is actively involved in bringing to the high schools as well as the middle schools the assistance to the DOE in preparing and exposing the students to the career paths of building trades and building design.

 

 

The FENG program has imbedded both sustainable and green building methods and techniques by supporting the professional development of our instructors along with the introduction of new technologies in renewable energy and energy efficiency.

 

In assessment of our curriculum, both in Construction Academy and our other courses, endorsement from industry is an extremely effective indicator.  We have been asked by the carpenters union to recommend some of our students to enter the union program, as they have been involved with our efforts and acknowledged our program as successful in preparing students for the industry.

UH Goal 2:  A Learning, Research and Service Network

KCC Goal 3: Workforce Development & KCC Goal 5: Community Development

Strategic Goals: Increased Job Placement and/or Performance through

o   Revised or New Curriculum

o   Better Coordination with Business and Industry

 

Our new offering of renewable energy and energy efficiency courses is preparing individuals for nationally recognized certificates in Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic installations and maintenance.

UH Goal 3:  A Model Local, Regional and Global University

KCC Goal 6 Diversity

Strategic Goals:

o   Fostering Global Understanding and Intercultural Competence

o   Increased Enrollment and Success of International Students

Providing instruction that meets both todays needs as well as those of tomorrow by keeping up and relevant to the trends of the industry.

UH Goal 4:  Investment in Faculty, Staff, Students and Their Environment

KCC Goal 4: Personal Development

Strategic Goals:

o   Professional Development Directed to Any of the Above Goals

o   Enriching Student Experience, Particularly Directed to Any of the Above Goals

o   Increasing the Efficiency, Effectiveness and Sustainability of the KCC Environment

Professional Development for instructors is needed in areas of building energy efficiency, and application of the new energy codes in both designing and building a home or other commercial building.

 

Having the instructors certified as professionals by the industry they are helping is extremely important.

 

 

UH Goal 5:  Resources and Stewardship

KCC Goal 5 Community Development

Strategic Goals:

o   Reduce Deferred Maintenance

o   Address Health and Safety Issues

o   Promote Sustainability

Our program is focused on sustainability, we have the only course in the system devoted to green waste and zero waste implementation.

 

ACTION PLAN

 

The FENG program’s educational effectiveness is maintained through the instructors experience and introduction of the new methods and technologies in their respective fields.   Along with providing the ability for students to be exposed to the new materials being developed and the ability to gain insight into the understanding and exposure of how to utilize the new technologies being offered, all the instructors in the program are working professionals in their respective field.  This combination provides the students with an industry-based experience that combines the classroom learning, hands-on practical application and problem solving techniques that are industry relevant.   This combination has provided student success and retention in the program along with attracting previous students with the desire to return to the program.  Statistics from the National Education association reveal that students favor an instructor with industry experience over only one with academic background by 69%.

The program’s goals with respect to employed students is to offer a path for advancement within their career path relating to facilities engineering, by offering courses that will increase their worth to an employer.  In addition the program offers individual paths for those that desire additional training in specific disciplines found in both facilities engineering and construction technology.  This is proven by the fact that our graduates for the most part are graduating with 29 credits as the program’s minimum is 23, the average for our graduates is 39 credits.

The FENG program offers articulation between the high school courses and the equivalent course offered at KCC.  This provides a path for individuals to enter the trades with the entry-level skills that the trades require.  Working with workforce development that they have exposed as needing education, these courses can be used to assist the 16 to 19 year old population; they are not in school and not working.

Most all of the industries associated with the six clusters of employment that the county refers to as emerging all have a need for either new or refurbished facilities.  In addition, they all have a need for maintaining their facilities in order to maintain productivity.  All of these have a need for skilled and knowledgeable personnel that would require the skills and knowledge we provide.

This will be accomplished through building of relationships with the industries that are involved with the program’s course content.  The economic development of the county is focused on six cluster areas of development.  All of these areas have a direct need for both construction projects and the maintaining of these facilities.  The program offers education and training that will assist these Kauai industries to involve Kauai companies to help with the growth of these industries.

Specific action plans for Perkin's Core indicators that did not meet the projected goals, first is Completion our actual is 40.0 and the goal is 44.5. Not far from the goal, but not sure what we need to do to improve the score, noting the number of courses our students on average are taking..  In regards to both nontraditional participation and nontraditional completion, the course offerings in the past have not had the attraction to these segments of the community.  The addition of AutoCAD has seen an increase in nontraditional participation, if in this field women are considered "nontraditional", however these courses only are attracting the non-traditional student to them.  This is possible justification to expand the AEC courses and offer an AEC program.

In the areas of new and emerging technologies, both Green and Sustainable Construction and Alternative Energy, the projected growth indicates a need for trained individuals.  The Solar Foundation’s first annual report indicates a 30% growth in alternative energy for Hawaii statewide.  In addition a report from the state “Hawaii Green Jobs” indicates an even larger number as this report takes into account existing occupations that with additional training can realize growth in these areas.  In meeting with the state representatives, their data is skewed by the fact that the qualifications of certain positions they uncovered were in demand had adequate people available, were not based on those people having any nationally recognized certificates to prove their ability.  Hawaii ranks 6th in the nation in the amount of photovoltaics installed, but we only have, at this time 15 individuals that have this certification.  Our building codes require all new home construction to have thermal hot water systems.  The state does not have any individuals with the North American Board of Certified Energy Practioners (NABCEP) Solar Thermal Certification.

 

 

Action Plan(s)

 

Program Goal & Campus

Strategic

Priority

Action Item

Resources Needed

Person(s) Responsible

Timeline

Indicator of Improvement

PLO impacted

Status

Campus goal #1 Student retention.

Provide a continuing learning environment for the students

More room, to maintain this model as we expand our offerings in additional courses

Bob Conti, all the part time instructors of the FENG program

Over the next year as we are going to share space with two additional programs starting up on campus, the CARP and EIMT programs

Attempting to maintain the ongoing statistic that we have graduates that are not just meeting the minimum requirements of the program but are on average exceeding the minimum requirements by several additional courses

The objective of the program is being attained through alignment with industry standards and input from our industry partners.

In the future our ability to continue may be limited due to space requirements and the needs of teh other programs needing to utilize the same space.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Part IV. Resource Implications

The need for additional space could be met by gaining access to the other buildings in the trade technology program, those used in part by welding, only an elective course, and sheet metal, a program that has not been active for some time.  This would allow for the program growth with greatly reduced costs, only those to outfit the interior space without having to construct additional buildings.

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2011-2012 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

Yes
The ability to read a blueprint and negotiate through the drawings to layout a project. (Over all students in assessment achieving a score of 83% or better in this category.)

2

Yes
The proper selection of materials for a given project. (Students are scoring at 86% or better in this category.)

3

Yes
The ability to maintain and care for the tools required in the construction & maintenance industry. (Students are scoring at 88% or better in this category.)

4

Yes
The safety procedures necessary to assess a task for hazards and the steps required minimize the risks, protecting themselves and others. (Students are scoring 95% or above, this is based on a no tollerance policy in regards to safety.)

5

Yes
The ability to communicate successfully in writing, orally and with computer technology. (Students are scoring at 81% or better in this catagory.)

6

Yes
The application of codes and regulations in the mechanical, electrical, and carpentry fields to construct or repair and maintain these systems within a facility. (Students are scoring at 80% or better in this category.)

7

Yes
The commitment to craftsmanship standards of dependability, punctuality, and quality that the industry expects. (Students are scoring at 80% or better in this category.)

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

The FENG program’s educational effectiveness is maintained through the instructors experience and introduction of the new methods and technologies in their respective fields.   Along with providing the ability for students to be exposed to the new materials being developed and the ability to gain insight into the understanding and exposure of how to utilize the new technologies being offered, all the instructors in the program are working professionals in their respective field.  This combination provides the students with an industry-based experience that combines the classroom learning, hands-on practical application and problem solving techniques that are industry relevant.   This combination has provided student success and retention in the program along with attracting previous students with the desire to return to the program.  Statistics from the National Education association reveal that students favor an instructor with industry experience over only one with academic background by 69%.

B) Expected Level Achievement

The expected benchmark is at 90%.

1.  The ability to read a blueprint and negotiate through the drawings to layout a project.  (Over all students in assessment achieving a score of 83% or better in this catagory.)

2.  The proper selection of materials for a given project.  (Students are scoring at 86% or better in this catagory.)

3.  The ability to maintain and care for the tools required in the construction & maintenance industry.  (Students are scoring at 88% or better in this catagory.)

4.  The safety procedures necessary to assess a task for hazards and the steps required minimize the risks, protecting themselves and others.  (Students are scoring 95% or above, this is based on a no tollerance policy in regards to safety.)

5.  The ability to communicate successfully in writing, orally and with computer technology.  (Students are scoring at 81% or better in this catagory.)

6.  The application of codes and regulations in the mechanical, electrical, and carpentry fields to construct or repair and maintain these systems within a facility.  (Students are scoring at 80% or better in this catagory.)

7.  The commitment to craftsmanship standards of dependability, punctuality, and quality that the industry expects.  (Students are scoring at 80% or better in this catagory.)

C) Courses Assessed

 

AEC 110 (1 section), CARP 19 (1 section), ELEC 20 (2 sections), ELEC 22 91 section), FENG 22 (1 section), FENG 23 (1 section), FENG 60 (1 section), WELD 17 (4 sections).

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

AEC, CARP, and WELD use project-based assessment.  FENG utilitizes a combination of in-shop practical demonstrations, projects, and quizzes.  ELEC utilitizes a combination of in-lab practical demonstrations, worksheets, exams, and quizzes.

E) Results of Program Assessment

In review of the limited data, the students are receiving grades that indicate a performance level of about 80% and above overall.  Few are below; however, those are under performing in the courses overall due to non-attendance.

F) Other Comments

Students missing classes due to scheduling conflict with work.

G) Next Steps

Have students work with instructors and counselors with their scheduling.  Have student work with tutoring and/or have a 99V class to make up classes.

Part IV. Resource Implications

No content.

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

No
The ability to read a blueprint and negotiate through the drawings to layout a project. (Over all students in assessment achieving a score of 83% or better in this category.)

2

No
The proper selection of materials for a given project. (Students are scoring at 86% or better in this category.)

3

No
The ability to maintain and care for the tools required in the construction & maintenance industry. (Students are scoring at 88% or better in this category.)

4

No
The safety procedures necessary to assess a task for hazards and the steps required minimize the risks, protecting themselves and others. (Students are scoring 95% or above, this is based on a no tollerance policy in regards to safety.)

5

No
The ability to communicate successfully in writing, orally and with computer technology. (Students are scoring at 81% or better in this catagory.)

6

No
The application of codes and regulations in the mechanical, electrical, and carpentry fields to construct or repair and maintain these systems within a facility. (Students are scoring at 80% or better in this category.)

7

No
The commitment to craftsmanship standards of dependability, punctuality, and quality that the industry expects. (Students are scoring at 80% or better in this category.)

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

No content.

B) Expected Level Achievement

No content.

C) Courses Assessed

No content.

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

No content.

E) Results of Program Assessment

No content.

F) Other Comments

No content.

G) Next Steps

No content.