University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: Kauai Community College
Program: Hawaiian Studies

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The last comprehensive review for this program can be viewed at:
http://info.kauai.hawaii.edu/admin/prapru.htm#pr

Program Description

Program Description:

The Hawaiian Studies department of Kaua’i Community College is committed to addressing the preamble of the Hawai’i State Constitution.  “ We, the people of Hawai’i, grateful for divine guidance, and mindful of our Hawaiian Heritage and uniqueness as an island State, dedicate our efforts to fulfill the philosophy decreed by the Hawai’i State motto, “Ua Mau Ke ‘Ea O Ka ‘Aina I Ka Pono”.  In addition, as an educational agency of the State of Hawai’i, we are empowered to “...promote the study of Hawaiian culture, history, and language.  The state shall provide for a Hawaiian education program consisting of language, culture, and history in the public schools.  The use of community expertise shall be encouraged as a suitable and essential means in furtherance of the Hawaiian education program.” (Article X, section 4, State of Hawai’i Constitution) In addition, the Hawaiian language has been officially recognized as an official State language.  (Article XV, section 4.) “ English and Hawaiian shall be the official languages of Hawai’i, except that Hawaiian shall be required for public acts and transactions only as provided by law.”

In view of these State of Hawai’i constitutional statements, the Hawaiian Studies department of Kaua’i Community College has developed the following mission. 

 

The Hawaiian Studies program shall promote, practice and perpetuate the values, language, culture, and native perspective of history of the indigenous peoples of Hawai’i.  In addition, the Hawaiian Studies program will strive to promote Hawaiian culture, language, and history to the general population of the community of Kaua’i.  The program strives to assist the community to gain an understanding and knowledge of Hawaiian culture, language, and history that may address personal, professional, and/or academic pursuits.  To attain this mission the following goals have been developed.

Goals:

1. Provide a center for the coordination/collaboration of Hawaiian activities between Kaua’i Community College, the community, other campuses, agencies, and schools.

2. Preserve and perpetuate the study, collection, and research of various aspects of the Hawaiian culture and language through networking with resources within the community.  Special emphasis in the dialectical study of Ni’ihau Hawaiian language will be promoted.

3. Disseminate knowledge gained from resources and research through instruction, lectures, and presentations.

4. Encourage and develop the study of Hawaiian language and culture not only as an academic field, but also as a valid medium of communication within the communities of Kaua’i and Ni’ihau.

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: To Be Determined

Majors Included: HWST     Program CIP: 05.0202

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 Number of Majors     20 To Be Determined
1a     Number of Majors Native Hawaiian     16
1b     Fall Full-Time     53%
1c     Fall Part-Time     47%
1d     Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System     7%
1e     Spring Full-Time     28%
1f     Spring Part-Time     72%
1g     Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System     8%
2 *Percent Change Majors from Prior Year      
3 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes      
4 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes      
5 SSH in All Program Classes      
6 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes      
7 Total Number of Classes Taught      

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
8 Average Class Size       To Be Determined
9 *Fill Rate      
10 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty      
11 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty      
12 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty      
12a Analytic FTE Faculty      
13 Overall Program Budget Allocation      
13a General Funded Budget Allocation      
13b Special/Federal Budget Allocation      
13c Tuition and Fees      
14 Cost per SSH      
15 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes      
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
16 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher)       Healthy
17 Withdrawals (Grade = W)      
18 *Persistence (Fall to Spring)     86.6%
18a Persistence Fall to Fall     60%
19 Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded Prior Fiscal Year     9
19a Associate Degrees Awarded     1
19b Academic Subject Certificates Awarded     9
19c Goal      
19d *Difference Between Unduplicated Awarded and Goal      
20 Transfers to UH 4-yr     0
20a Transfers with degree from program     0
20b Transfers without degree from program     0
20c Increase by 3% Annual Transfers to UH 4-yr Goal      
20d *Difference Between Transfers and Goal      

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
21 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught      

 

22 Enrollments Distance Education Classes      
23 Fill Rate      
24 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher)      
25 Withdrawals (Grade = W)      
26 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education)      

Performance Funding Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
27 Number of Degrees and Certificates     1

 

28 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     1
29 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     Not STEM
30 Number of Pell Recipients     14
31 Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr     0
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

The following is a summary of the courses that were taught by the Hawaiian Studies faculty for the 2011-2012 and 2012-2013 academic years as well as the fall semester of the 2013-2014 academic years.

 

Fall 2011 Spring 2012

2 sections HWST 107 (54 students) 2 sections HWST 107 (48 students)

1 section HWST 111  (14 students) 1 section HWST 281  (15 students)

1 section HWST 128  (11 students) 1 section HWST 251  (5 students) 1 section HWST 299V (4 students)

2 sections HAW 101  (25 students) 1 section HAW 102  (16 students)

1 section HAW 201 (13 students) 1 section HAW 202 (6 students)

1 section HAW 221 (12 students) 1 section HAW 222 (10 students)

1 section HAW 261 (19 students)

1 section BOT 105 (20 students) 2 sections BOT 105 (38 students)

1 section HIST 284 (13 students)

1 section REL 205 (21 students) 1 section REL 205 (18 students)

 

Total (12 sections) (202 students) Total (11 sections) (160 students)

 

Fall 2012 Spring 2013

2 sections HWST 107 (48 students) 2 sections HWST 107 (48 students)

1 section HWST 111  (14 students) 1 section HWST 177 (12 students)

2 sections HAW 101 (40 students) 1 section HWST 251 (5 students)

1 section HAW 201 (12 students) 1 section HWST 281 (23 students)

1 section HAW 221 (7 students) 2 sections HAW 102 (26 students)

1 section HAW 261 (16 students) 1 section HAW 202 (5 students)

2 sections BOT 105 (43 students) 1 section HAW 222 (7 students)

1 section HIST 284K (11 students) 1 section BOT 105 (23 students)

1 section REL 205 (12 students) 1 section HIST 284 (19 students)

1 section REL 205 (24 students)

Total (12 sections) (203 students) Total (12 sections) (192 students)

 

Fall 2013

3 sections HWST 107 (72 students)

1 section HWST 111 (14 students)

1 section HWST 251 (5 students)

2 sections HAW 101 (36 students)

2 sections HAW 201 (25 students)

1 section HAW 221 (6 students)

1 section HAW 261 (18 students)

2 sections BOT 105 (45 students)

1 section ANTH 220 (28 students)

1 section HWST 199V (3 students)

 

Total (15 sections) (252 students)

Part II. Analysis of the Program

In review of the data collected regarding courses taught by Hawaiian Studies faculty, it has shown a steady increase in the numbers of students enrolled overall from year to year.  For instance, in Fall 2011 a total of 202 students were enrolled.  In Fall of 2013, a total of 252 students were enrolled in courses.  This was an increase of 50 students or a 24% increase from Fall 2011 to Fall 2013.  Looking at the Spring semesters of 2012 to 2013, a noticeable increase was also noted.  There was a 20% increase representing 32 students from Spring 2012 to Spring 2013.  Reviewing the overall increase from the years 2011-2012 (362 students) to 2012-2013 (395 students) shows a difference of 33 students or an increase of 9%.

 

 

Fall 2011

Spring 2012

Fall 2012

Spring 2013

Fall 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

# of students

202

160

203

192

252

 

Regarding program degrees and certificates, we have just completed the first full year of offering the AAHWST degree and conferred the first degrees this past Spring 2013.  Two (2) Associate in Arts, Hawaiian Studies degrees were awarded during our May graduation ceremonies.  During the Fall 2012 semester, there were 14 declared majors for the AAHWST degree and 16 majors for the ASC Hawaiian Studies certificate.  During the ensuing Spring 2013 semester, 25 students declared the AAHWST as their academic goal while 11 students pursued the ASC Hawaiian Studies certificate.  This Fall 2013 semester the latest data reveals that 39 students have declared the AAHWST as their goal while 11 students are pursuing the ASC Hawaiian Studies certificate.  Thus, between the past three semesters there was first an increase of 78% (11 majors) and subsequently an increase of 56% (14 majors).  This represents an overall increase of 25 majors between Fall 2012 and Fall 2013

 

 

Fall 2012

Spring 2013

Fall 2013

 

 

 

 

AA- HWST

14

25

39

ASC-HWST

16

11

11

 

In reviewing the data that was presented in the Annual Report of Program Data produced by the UH system office, we believe that a number of changes need to be made to more accurately reflect the reality of our program.  The most immediate would be defining “program classes/courses”.  According to information provided, only one (1) course is attributed to the Hawaiian Studies program.  That particular course is HWST 177 – Hawaiian Music in Transition.  The remaining HWST and HAW courses are attributed to the Liberal Arts program.  Upon further questioning, we were told that a course could only be linked or “owned” by a single program.  The system, at this time, does not allow a course to be attributed to multiple programs.  This approach does not accurately reflect the program SSH, analytical FTE faculty or other demand and efficiency indicators.  A discussion needs to take place to identify those courses that should be attributed to the Hawaiian Studies program, or identify courses that could be attributed to multiple programs to more accurately reflect each program.  This in turn will assist in defining FTE faculty workload, efficiency, SSH, and other factors.

 

The increase in majors also reflects an increase in students that enroll in courses taught by HWST faculty.  The numbers of sections offered, along with the number of students, have also increased.  To address the needs of these additional sections, classes are being offered in rooms that may not be conducive to the learning of the subject matter.  Two of the courses are being taught in a Nursing classroom and an Auto Body Repair classroom respectively.  In addition, courses are also being taught in the Learning Center classrooms, a computer lab, and at times even in the One Stop Center building.  This situation will be further compounded by the addition of at least two more sections of courses in the coming years.  In one case, a required course for the program is currently not offered on this campus, but will be offered on campus within the next three semesters.  In the second case, there are at least two other courses not currently offered for the lack of an instructor, which may be rectified within the next four semesters.  Minimally, that would indicate three (3) additional courses that would potentially need classroom space each semester.

 

In terms of program actions, support for student workers, along with the offering of HWST 251 – Kalo Cultivation each semester, has brought a renewed vigor and active production of kalo in the lo’i area.  The area continues to be utilized by the HWST and HAW courses as well as a community resource to nearby schools such as Island School, Kawaikini Charter School, Punana Leo, and Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School.  In a broader sense, the lo’i area is also seen as the visual “Hawaiian” aspect of the campus. With the addition of an agriculture program and courses, the lo’i can be seen as the basis of Hawaiian agriculture and food production.   Continued funding to support the maintenance and production of the area is needed in order for the area to thrive.  Conversation is ongoing to further develop the area in terms of collaboration with the culinary program either in food production and/or an outdoor cooking facility. 

 

The “radio station” has been supported by Hawaiian Studies is currently on “hiatus” due to the renovation of the former student services site.  We are hoping to renew the relationship with KKCR community radio station once the renovation is complete and the equipment re-installed.    The program’s addition of the Associate of Arts degree, along with the Academic Subject Certificate, the shortage of adequate classroom and activity space, and the continuing work of installing and completing the Kikuchi Center and the covered outdoor cooking (imu) area are the driving forces in the proposed action plans for Hawaiian Studies.

 

As mentioned previously, the increased enrollment of students in courses taught by Hawaiian Studies faculty and the increased number of majors in both the AAHWST and the ASC Hawaiian Studies has definitely been a strength of the program.  This has been due to a number of department activities led by the faculty themselves that include a “pa’ina” activity at the beginning of each semester, an active Hula Club, an emerging Hawaiian Club, the Kikuchi Center, international programs, and various off-campus activities that are tied into various coursework.  The occurrence of a beginning of the semester Hawaiian Studies department “pa’ina” at the start of each semester has appeared to encourage students to become involved in the program.  All students that are enrolled in any HWST or HAW course and any other interested students are invited to this “pa’ina”.  The “pa’ina” has been a venue in which students are able to interact with each other outside of a classroom environment as well as to get to know the Hawaiian Studies faculty, program, and services available to them.  The department averages 38 students during every “pa’ina” activity.  This number is probably restricted because of the size of the venue (Hawaiian Studies classroom).  The Hawaiian Studies faculty provide the funds to purchase “pupu” type refreshments for those attending.  The student clubs (Hula and Hawaiian) along with the faculty advisors have been quite active around the campus and community.  These students have performed for campus activities, participated in community projects, and have become representatives of the program and institution. 

 

In terms of areas that could be strengthened, the most obvious would be the upkeep and repair of the existing facilities.  The existing two structures that make up the Hawaiian Studies building was built in 1994 (as a replacement for the first building destroyed in 1992 by Hurricane Iniki) and then an addition to the building was done in 1998.  Since that time there has been a gradual degradation of the building both to the exterior as well as the interior.  Portions of the lanai, railings surrounding the lanai, steps, gutters, roof eaves, and even the roof shingles have deteriorated to the point of being unusable or unsafe.  In addition, the carpet within the building that houses Hawaiian Studies faculty, an academic advisor part-time, and the Na Pua Noeau program coordinator has not been replaced since first installed in 1994.  Because of moisture that has gotten into the building due to design of the roof eaves and the natural movement of wind and rain, has become a breeding place for mold and mildew. 

 

In keeping with the facilities note, a weakness would be the availability of appropriate instructional spaces that are needed during the appropriate times.  The current fall 2013 schedule lists 15 sections of HAW or HWST courses or courses that are taught by Hawaiian Studies faculty.  If we take into account that these courses use three (3) different classrooms, then that would mean an average of 5 sections would utilize each classroom.  That would mean (assuming at least one hour of class time per section) each classroom would be used for 5 hours each day during the semester.   In comparison, the English department has 33 sections listed in the Fall 2013 schedule utilizing 10 different rooms.  This averages to 3.3 sections being housed in each classroom and a usage of 3.3 hours per day by the English department.  We know that the reality is all classrooms, as well as other spaces, are being utilized to the maximum.  But, this does show that the Hawaiian Studies classroom, consisting of one (1) classroom space, is being fully utilized.  In addition, other spaces (e.g. Computer lab, automotive rooms, OSC conference room, etc.) are being used as classrooms for those HWST and HAW courses that cannot be housed in the Hawaiian Studies building and thus detracts from the intended usage of those spaces.   There is the argument that within an average workday, the existing facilities should be able to handle the amount of classroom space needed.  However, we all know that classroom space at the appropriate or in-demand times are at a premium.  Our students (both traditional and non-traditional) drive the timing of class schedules as well as the courses themselves that then impact classroom demand during specific times of the day or evening.  The construction of a new building to house Hawaiian Studies courses and activities would also lessen the burden on classroom space in other areas. 

 

Another area that needs to be addressed concerns a shortage of personnel.  At present there are two faculty and one APT position officially assigned to the Hawaiian Studies department.  Another faculty is officially assigned to the LAH division but is housed within the department and is an active and key faculty member within the department.  At current levels, 15 sections of courses are taught by the 3 faculty which translates to a full workload.  In addition to instructional duties, the Hawaiian Studies staff have also been tasked with the establishment of the Pila Kikuchi Center, the maintenance and production of the lo’i, the anticipated return to the air of the radio program, 2 student organizations along with the various activities of these organizations, involvement in campus activities and initiatives, active involvement with international programs, promotion and refinement of 2 academic programs, tasked with the overall operation of the department including budgetary, personnel, program reviews, and strategic planning responsibilities, assisting students to successfully complete their programs, monitor and supervise a minimum of 3 student workers each semester, active involvement in system-wide integration of Hawaiian Studies and Hawaiian language courses and programs (Puko’a Council, Makaloa Council, Council of Hawaiian Studies Coordinators), and collaboration efforts with community groups, organizations, and institutions.  An additional APT position will greatly assist in solidifying the department and program, as well as, the establishment and then operation of the Pila Kikuchi Center, assist library staffing needs, nurture relations between the Hawaiian Studies program/department and the broader Kaua'i community, and assist in the support of department and division (LAH and SAM) activities.

 

With a growing program, it is anticipated that another teaching position will be needed in the near future.  As mentioned earlier, within the next 4 semesters we are anticipating the addition of at least 2 to 4 sections of courses.  This does not include “new” courses that would address student, community, or faculty expertise requests, but rather the expansion of existing courses.   Anticipated “new” courses would include courses in Mythology (a required course), Ethno-zoology, Advanced Polynesian voyaging course, a Wahi Pana (culturally important places) course, an intermediate hula course, and Hawaiian language courses focusing on oratory, protocol, and translation.  Of course, this would not include the expertise of any “new” instructor that would join the department. 

Part III. Action Plan

Part III. Action Plan

The action plans for Hawaiian Studies attempts to address a number of issues relating to facilities and personnel.  In both cases, the intended outcome will increase efficiency and services to students, other campus programs, the institution, and the general community of Kaua’i.   

Action Plan – 1

As we occupy a building that was rebuilt after Hurricane  Iniki (1992) and a classroom built in 1998, these wooden structures are in need of refurbishment and replacement in certain areas.  We are seeking an overall repair of the lanai and walkway portions of the Hawaiian Studies building.  These lanais and walkways do pose a safety issue if they should fail while in use by students, faculty, or the general community.  The interior of the original building (built in 1993) is in need of refurbishment of carpets, wall paint, and a general “sprucing up”.  Both buildings of the complex are also in need of re-roofing and painting of the exterior walls.  This plan aligns not only with safety issues, but also with the UH system-wide goal-5, reducing deferred maintenance projects, as well as KCC Goal-4, Increasing the efficiency, effectiveness, and sustainability of the KCC environment.  This action plan that has been carried over from the previous 2012 APRU plans.  There has been minimal movement on this item primarily due to funding and lack of sufficient maintenance personnel and resources. 

Action Plan – 2

The department is seeking to strengthen its ability to serve our students, campus, and community.  The addition of an Education Specialist will broaden and strengthen the department’s ability to service our population.  This Education Specialist position would service a number of areas within Hawaiian Studies.  This would include assistance in the operation and maintenance of the Pila Kikuchi Center located within the library; support the overall Liberal Arts program (which includes the Language, Arts, and Humanities division and the Science and Math division), nurture relations between the department/division and the broader Kaua'i community.  This position will be assigned to the Hawaiian Studies department with the following general duties: designs and maintains educational materials for the Hawaiian Studies department supporting educational and community programs, this may include archival and digitizing tasks, work with the library staff to staff the Pila Kikuchi Center, maintain the Center’s materials, assist students and community members in use of the materials, provide student support in the researching materials of the Pila Kikuchi Center, assist counselors and faculty in nurturing community relations, assisting other support staff of the SAM and LAH divisions, and other duties as assigned.  The filling of this position would obviously address UH Goal-4, Investment in faculty, staff, students, and their environment and KCC Goal-4, Personal Development, and especially the goal of increasing the efficiency, effectiveness, and sustainability of the KCC environment.   In addition, this position will address UH Goal-1 Educational Effectiveness and Student Success and KCC Goals 1&2 – Access, and Learning and Teaching.  Especially in the areas of improving success of Native Hawaiian students, increasing transfer rates by strengthening 4-year pathways, and relevant curriculum development.  In addition, this would assist in increasing outreach to the K – 12 populations.

Action Plan – 3

In reviewing previous plans, our continued collaborative effort (in cooperation with the SAM division and the Library) on establishing the Pila Kikuchi Center is still at the forefront.  Display cases, bookshelves, filing cabinets, tables, chairs, and other equipment will need to be purchased to house these books, documents, and artifacts to address this project.  This project dovetails with Action Plan – 2 relating to the establishment of an Education Specialist to staff and maintain the Center.  The establishment of this Center will strengthen KCC's goal-2, Learning and Teaching.  Specifically, the establishment and subsequent availability of these items within the Center will strengthen the four-year degree pathways for our student’s as they will have available primary research materials and assist in the overall retention and persistence to graduation or transfer.  In addition, this would also address the KCC goal-4, "Enriching student experiences". 

Action Plan – 4

A strength of the program has always been the use of “outside” of the classroom environments.  A primary site has been the lo’i area of the campus.  This site also highlights the “Hawaiian” aspect of the campus, along with the Hawaiian Studies building.  In past years, the imu activity has taken place at another area of the campus.  However, this activity will take place alongside the lo’i this year.  The maintenance and production of this area will need constant and consistent resources.  A second site that has come under the Hawaiian Studies department has been a language computer lab.  This lab was first created with the support of a grant for the language programs of Liberal Arts.  However, the Spanish and Japanese programs have elected not to utilize computer language programs in their curriculum.  Thus only Hawaiian has continued to use the computer language lab as part of their coursework.  Because of this, the department has staffed the lab, maintained the computers and other equipment, updated the computers (both hardware and software), and provided supplies.  In addition, the lab also serves as a “Macintosh” computer lab for all students who prefer this particular operating system.  In reference to maintenance and upkeep, the department has been the primary supporter of the “radio station”.  This has included the purchasing and installation of equipment and supplies that are needed to produce broadcast ready content.  We have been able to operate the program through the resources of an annual equipment and supplies budget of  $30,000.  Nearly half of this budget (approx. $15,000) has supported 3 – 5 student workers who have tutored, monitored, produced educational content, and maintained these “outside” classroom environments.  The remaining funds have purchased everything from fertilizer, soil amendments, irrigation supplies, to updated computer hardware and software, recording and broadcasting equipment, as well as the maintenance of various equipment located throughout the program.  Along with these types of uses, the funds also have supported the acquisition of various educational materials e.g. books, periodicals, DVD titles.  The department is requesting the continued support of this resource in the coming year. 

This addresses the University’s Goal – 1: Educational effectiveness and student success, as well as KCC’s goal 1 & 2 of Access and Learning.  Specifically this would assist in the recruitment and retention of Native Hawaiians, increasing completion of degrees, increase retention and persistence, and increase our outreach to the community.  In addition, the continued support and usage of these areas within the Hawaiian Studies department has addressed UH Goal 3: A Model local, regional, and global university and KCC Goal – 6 Diversity.  Within this specific area the use of these areas, especially the lo’i, has generated much interest and activity with the department’s involvement with international programs and has been an integral part of our outreach with community groups and schools. 

Action Plan – 5

The establishment of a permanent and health department approved, site for an "imu" has been an item in our previous APRU's.  The planning of this site has been a cooperative project involving Hawaiian Studies and the Culinary Arts department.  There is a need for this item by both departments.  Of course, the obvious being the Culinary program which has Hawaiian cuisine as an integral aspect of their curriculum.  The Hawaiian Studies program also utilizes the imu as an aspect of the curriculum in the courses that deal with Taro, the Ohana, and the Hawaiian lifestyle.  A permanent imu site will also address department of health issues in regards to food preparation and sanitation.  This item will address KCC goal-2, Learning and teaching by increasing opportunities for potential students to experience KCC, address the completion of Program Learning Outcomes, and address health and safety issues.  In addition, this action will address Goal 3: A Model Local, Regional, and Global University in terms of promoting “Global understanding and Intercultural Competence” through the medium of culinary diversity.  It is important to understand that we are still attempting to gain external support for this project.  But, institutional support will also be needed in order to leverage support from the community.  Chef Mark Oyama of the Culinary department and Dennis Chun of Hawaiian Studies are the primary leaders in this project. 

Action Plan – 6

The final plan involves a major CIP project that would expand the current Hawaiian Studies facilities.  Currently, as stated in Action Plan – 1, the program is housed in two structures that are in need of repair.  Additionally, the department has use of only one classroom.  This classroom is in use from 8:00am till 2:30pm and then again from 4:30pm to 7:30pm throughout the week.  The current structure of the AA in Hawaiian Studies also requires a new course that we do not currently offer.  We will be developing this new course in the coming semester and hope to offer the course next year.  This new course, as well as the offering of courses and sections to expand the course offerings in addressing the AA degree will require classroom space (this will also include expanded facilities in the lo’i area).  Existing facilities (throughout the campus) are currently at their maximum capacity.  The facility would also allow the housing of office space and resource materials for classroom and teaching support.  This Center (including the existing facilities) will house not only the academic area of Hawaiian Studies, but also the identified student support services of academic advising, counseling (career and personal), financial assistance, and tutoring services.  These are all activities that focus on the both University Goal – 1: Educational effectiveness and Student success and the KCC Goals 1 & 2: Access & Learning and Teaching.  Within these goals the completion of an expanded Hawaiian Studies facility will assist in recruitment, retention, persistence, and graduation rates, both campus-wide and system-wide.

 

 

 

Action Plan(s)

Program Goal & Campus

Strategic

Priority or Goal

Action Item

Resources Needed

Person(s) Responsible

Timeline

Indicator of Improvement

PLO impacted

Status

UH Goal 5:  Resources and Stewardship

KCC Goal 5 Community Development

Strategic Goals:

  • Reduce Deferred Maintenance
  • Address Health and Safety Issues
  • Promote Sustainability

1. Repair and maintenance of existing Hawaiian Studies facilities.

Funding

Dennis Chun, Brandon Shimokawa

2014 - 16

30% repairs completed by 2014.  100% completed by 2016

PLO - 2

Ongoing

UH Goal 1:  Educational Effectiveness and Student Success

KCC Goal 1: Access &

KCC Goal 2: Learning and Teaching

Strategic Goals: Student Recruitment, Retention and Success of All Students and Particularly

  • Native Hawaiian students
  • Increased Completion of Degrees, Certificates, and Licensure
  • Improve partnerships with K-12 to improve college preparation and to ensure that students are aware of specific opportunities that KCC provides
  • Increase transfer rates by strengthening four-year pathways, particularly in STEM fields

UH Goal 4:  Investment in Faculty, Staff, Students and Their Environment

KCC Goal 4: Personal Development

Strategic Goals:

  • Professional Development Directed to Any of the Above Goals
  • Enriching Student Experience, Particularly Directed to Any of the Above Goals

Increasing the Efficiency, Effectiveness and Sustainability of the KCC Environment

2. Education Specialist Position

$42,492 annually

Dennis Chun

2014

60% completion of Kikuchi Center.

20% increase in use of research materials by Hawaiian students.

30% increase of educational multimedia materials.

PLO-2 & 3

Continuing

KCC Goal 2: Learning and Teaching

Strategic Goals: Student Recruitment, Retention and Success of All Students and Particularly

  • Native Hawaiian students
  • Increased Completion of Degrees, Certificates, and Licensure
  • Improve partnerships with K-12 to improve college preparation and to ensure that students are aware of specific opportunities that KCC provides
  • Increase transfer rates by strengthening four-year pathways,

KCC Goal 4: Personal Development

Strategic Goals:

  • Professional Development Directed to Any of the Above Goals
  • Enriching Student Experience, Particularly Directed to Any of the Above Goals

 

3. Kikuchi Center furnishing and equipment

$8,000

HWST Dept.

2014

85% of furniture and equipment purchased and installed

PLO – 2 & 3

Continuing

UH Goal 1:  Educational Effectiveness and Student Success

KCC Goal 1: Access &

KCC Goal 2: Learning and Teaching

Strategic Goals: Student Recruitment, Retention and Success of All Students and Particularly

  • Native Hawaiian students
  • Increased Completion of Degrees, Certificates, and Licensure
  • Improve partnerships with K-12 to improve college preparation and to ensure that students are aware of specific opportunities that KCC provides.

UH Goal 3:  A Model Local, Regional and Global University

KCC Goal 6 Diversity

Strategic Goals:

  • Fostering Global Understanding and Intercultural Competence
  • Increased Enrollment and Success of International Students

4. Equipment and supplies

$30,000 annually

Dennis Chun

2014

100% operation of HWST educational sites.

PLO – 1, 2, & 3

Ongoing

UH Goal 1:  Educational Effectiveness and Student Success

KCC Goal 2: Learning and Teaching

Strategic Goals: Student Recruitment, Retention and Success of All Students and Particularly

  • Native Hawaiian students
  • Increased Completion of Degrees, Certificates, and Licensure
  • Improve partnerships with K-12 to improve college preparation and to ensure that students are aware of specific opportunities that KCC provides.

UH Goal 3:  A Model Local, Regional and Global University

KCC Goal 6 Diversity

Strategic Goals:

  • Fostering Global Understanding and Intercultural Competence
  • Increased Enrollment and Success of International Students

5. Permanent Imu site

$250,000

Dennis Chun Mark Oyama collaborative effort with Culinary dept.

2014 - 2016

100% of design and specs completed by 2014.  100% of project complete by 2016

PLO – 1 & 2

Continuing

UH Goal 1:  Educational Effectiveness and Student Success

KCC Goal 1: Access &

KCC Goal 2: Learning and Teaching

Strategic Goals: Student Recruitment, Retention and Success of All Students and Particularly

  • Native Hawaiian students
  • Increased Completion of Degrees, Certificates, and Licensure
  • Improve partnerships with K-12 to improve college preparation and to ensure that students are aware of specific opportunities that KCC provides 

 

Relevant Curriculum       Development

  • Sustainability /Green Jobs

                     *  Health              

UH Goal 3:  A Model Local, Regional and Global University

KCC Goal 6 Diversity

Strategic Goals:

  • Fostering Global Understanding and Intercultural Competence
  • Increased Enrollment and Success of International Students

UH Goal 4:  Investment in Faculty, Staff, Students and Their Environment.  

 

Increasing the Efficiency, Effectiveness and Sustainability of the KCC Environment     

 

UH Goal 5:  Resources and Stewardship

KCC Goal 5 Community Development

Strategic Goals:

  • Reduce Deferred Maintenance
  • Address Health and Safety Issues
  • Promote Sustainability

6. HWST facilities expansion

$10 million

HWST dept.

2014 - 2020

Design funding in 2015.  Project completion by 2020.

PLO 2 & 3

Continuing

Part IV. Resource Implications

Part IV. Resource Implications

Resources needed to address the action plans 1 through 6 above are related to funding resources.  The estimated costs have been outlined in the action plan section.

As stated in our Action Plans, the maintenance and refurbishment of the existing HWST facilities has become a health and safety issue.  This action should be completed within the next 2 years.  The total cost would need to be determined by the estimation of a contractor. 

Our request to fill an Educational Specialist position, as described earlier, would not only support Hawaiian Studies, but other Liberal Arts courses that are part of the Hawaiian Studies program, the Library, and the Pila Kikuchi Center.

The continued maintenance and operation of the lo’i area, the language computer lab, the Kikuchi Center, and the radio station is an essential aspect of the HWST programs and department.  Funding to cover equipment, supplies, and student workers is needed for continued operations. 

The plan to construct a permanent “all weather” imu site in conjunction with other “outdoor” ethnic culinary facilities is a joint project between HWST and the Culinary program.  Prof. Mark Oyama has specific details and specifics that relate to the facility.  Hawaiian Studies is requesting a portion of the needed funds ($250,000).  As stated earlier, and in previous APRU’s, this is a project that will not only benefit both programs, but the campus and community in general.

The major CIP project for the expansion so the HWST facilities is expected to be a midrange plan to address the growth of the number of students enrolled and the number of courses/sections offered each year.  The department is embarking on a proactive approach in addressing a facilities limit that has peaked and is anticipated to be overloaded within the next few years.  We are seeking funds to begin the process (design funds) within the next 2 years and then construction funds to follow with a completion date in 2020.

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

No

2

No
AAHS Program Student Learning Outcomes Upon successful completion of the Associate in Arts degree in Hawaiian Studies, the student will be able to: 1. Describe aboriginal Hawaiian linguistic, cultural, historical and political concepts. 2. Apply aboriginal Hawaiian concepts, knowledge and methods to the areas of science, humanities, arts and social sciences – in academics and in other professional endeavors. 3. Engage, articulate and analyze topics relevant to the aboriginal Hawaiian community using college-level research and writing methods.

A) Expected Level Achievement

No content.

B) Courses Assessed

No content.

C) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

No content.

D) Results of Program Assessment

No content.

E) Other Comments

Because this has been the first year of this program, we have not yet developed the assessment tools to assess the PSLO's.  We are in discussions with representatives of all the community college Hawaiian Studies coordinators in determining the assessment tools.

F) Next Steps

No content.