University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: Leeward Community College
Program: Liberal Arts

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Program did not provide date of the last comprehensive review.

Program Description

The Associate in Arts (AA) degree program offers a solid liberal arts and sciences foundation in preparation for transfer to four-year colleges and universities.  The AA degree program also develops critical thinking, technology and information literacy, communication, and problem-solving skills needed for a successful career.

The general education received in the program

Encompasses the common knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed by individuals to be effective as persons, family members, workers, and citizens.

Provides opportunities to develop understanding, abilities, values, and personal attributes which should help students apply their knowledge, skills, and talents to make sound decisions and to analyze and solve problems in a multi-cultural community.

Helps the students gain a more integrated view of knowledge, a more realistic view of life and a more defined sense of community and social responsibility.

Because knowledge leads to action, students should be actively engaged in learning. This holistic point of view provides the student a foundation of lifelong learning in a changing world.

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Cautionary

Majors Included: LBRT     Program CIP: 24.0101

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 Number of Majors 4,033 3,893 3,830 Unhealthy
1a     Number of Majors Native Hawaiian 1,107 1,104 1,141
1b     Fall Full-Time 52% 52% 52%
1c     Fall Part-Time 48% 48% 48%
1d     Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 2% 2% 3%
1e     Spring Full-Time 48% 49% 49%
1f     Spring Part-Time 52% 51% 51%
1g     Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 3% 3% 2%
2 *Percent Change Majors from Prior Year 5.2% -3.4% -1.6%
3 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes 58,794 56,982 57,565
4 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes 28,695 29,450 31,172
5 SSH in All Program Classes 87,489 86,432 88,737
6 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes 2,916 2,881 2,958
7 Total Number of Classes Taught 1,143 1,173 1,289

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
8 Average Class Size 25.7 24.6 22.9 Healthy
9 *Fill Rate 92.9% 91.5% 88.5%
10 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 93.7 89.8 90.5
11 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 43 43.3 42.3
12 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty 30.5 29.2 26.7
12a Analytic FTE Faculty 132.3 133.3 143.6
13 Overall Program Budget Allocation $5,036,846 $12,045,669 Not Reported
13a General Funded Budget Allocation $5,031,110 $11,860,515 Not Reported
13b Special/Federal Budget Allocation $0 $0 Not Reported
13c Tuition and Fees $0 $0 Not Reported
14 Cost per SSH $58 $139 Not Reported
15 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 35 45 76
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
16 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 71% 72% 72% Cautionary
17 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 1,886 1,700 2,060
18 *Persistence (Fall to Spring) 71.4% 71.1% 70.2%
18a Persistence Fall to Fall     47.1%
19 Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded Prior Fiscal Year 460 505 537
19a Associate Degrees Awarded 445 488 517
19b Academic Subject Certificates Awarded 43 41 41
19c Goal 486 500 515
19d *Difference Between Unduplicated Awarded and Goal -8.4% -2.4% 0.3%
20 Transfers to UH 4-yr 261 317 304
20a Transfers with degree from program 106 126 141
20b Transfers without degree from program 155 191 163
20c Increase by 3% Annual Transfers to UH 4-yr Goal 201 207 213
20d *Difference Between Transfers and Goal 30.7% 53.1% 42.7%

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
21 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught 209 207 211

 

22 Enrollments Distance Education Classes 5,728 5,969 5,780
23 Fill Rate 95% 97% 95%
24 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 70% 72% 73%
25 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 395 398 418
26 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education) 63% 60% 58%

Performance Funding Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
27 Number of Degrees and Certificates     517

 

28 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     134
29 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     Not STEM
30 Number of Pell Recipients     1,677
31 Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr     304
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

Strengths and weaknesses in terms of demand, efficiency, and effectiveness based on an analysis of the data.

[Note:  Because the AA Program is not a CTE program, this review will not include any analyses of Perkins IV Core Indicators.]

 

Demand

The increases in enrollment that surged in 2008 to 2011 have slowed down and in recent years, and total headcounts have flattened out.  With the declining total headcounts, in the last two school years (2011-2012 and 2012-2013) we see a clear decrease in demand for majoring in LBRT:  the number of LBRT majors declined by  f 3.5% in AY 2011-2012 and by 1.6% in AY 2012-2013.

 

2008-2009

2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

Majors

3,584

3,832

4,033

3,893

3,830

% Change

5.1%

6.9%

5.2%

-3.5%

-1.6%

 

The following tables summarize the changes in the demand numbers over the last four academic years.

OVPCC Counts & Percentages

AY
2007-2008

AY
2008-2009

AY
2009-2010

AY
2010-2011

AY
2011-2012

AY
2012-2013

% Change
AY 0708 & 1213

% Change
AY 0809 & 1213

LEE CC OVPCC Headcounts

5,790

6,486

7,218

7,534

7,536

7,557

30.5%

16.5%

Percent Increase/Decrease

 

12.0%

11.3%

4.4%

0.0%

0.3%

   

Numbers of LBRT Majors

3,410

3,584

3,832

4,033

3,893

3,830

12.3%

6.9%

Percent Increase/Decrease

 

5.1%

6.9%

5.2%

-3.5%

-1.6%

   

Percentage of Total Headcount

58.9%

55.3%

53.1%

53.5%

51.7%

50.7%

   

UNCL

387

439

477

350

292

229

-40.8%

-47.8%

Percent Increase/Decrease

 

13.4%

8.7%

-26.6%

-16.6%

-21.6%

   

Percentage of Total Headcount

6.7%

6.8%

6.6%

4.6%

3.9%

3.0%

   

OVPCC Not Leeward-Based

934

1,208

1,418

1,599

1,690

1,555

66.5%

28.7%

Percent Increase/Decrease

 

29.3%

17.4%

12.8%

5.7%

-8.0%

   

Percentage of Total Headcount

16.1%

18.6%

19.6%

21.2%

22.4%

20.6%

   

Other Majors

1,059

1,255

1,491

1,552

1,661

1,943

83.5%

54.8%

Percent Increase/Decrease

 

18.5%

18.8%

4.1%

7.0%

17.0%

   

Percentage of Total Headcount

18.3%

19.3%

20.7%

20.6%

22.0%

25.7%

   

 

Headcounts & Percentages

AY
2007-2008

AY
2008-2009

AY
2009-2010

AY
2010-2011

AY
2011-2012

AY
2012-2013

% Change
AY 0708 & 1213

% Change
AY 0809 & 1213

LEE CC Headcounts

7,747

8,646

9,514

9,903

9,998

10,017

29.3%

15.9%

Percent Increase/Decrease

 

11.6%

10.0%

4.1%

1.0%

0.2%

   

Numbers of LBRT Majors

4,342

4,597

4,869

5,074

4,964

4,860

11.9%

5.7%

Percent Increase/Decrease

 

5.9%

5.9%

4.2%

-2.2%

-2.1%

   

Percentage of Total Headcount

56.0%

53.2%

51.2%

51.2%

49.6%

48.5%

   

UNCL

545

623

667

470

416

324

-40.6%

-48.0%

Percent Increase/Decrease

 

14.3%

7.1%

-29.5%

-11.5%

-22.1%

   

Percentage of Total Headcount

7.0%

7.2%

7.0%

4.7%

4.2%

3.2%

   

OVPCC Not Leeward-Based

1,615

2,009

2,348

2,633

2,781

2,592

60.5%

29.0%

Percent Increase/Decrease

 

24.4%

16.9%

12.1%

5.6%

-6.8%

   

Percentage of Total Headcount

20.8%

23.2%

24.7%

26.6%

27.8%

25.9%

   

Other Majors

1,245

1,417

1,630

1,726

1,837

2,241

80.0%

58.2%

Percent Increase/Decrease

 

13.8%

15.0%

5.9%

6.4%

22.0%

   

Percentage of Total Headcount

16.1%

16.4%

17.1%

17.4%

18.4%

22.4%

   

In terms of percentage, whether we count using the OVPCC method or the standard unduplicated headcount method, the results are similar.  Both sets of tables tell us the same kinds of things:

(1)      The growth in number of LBRT majors has slowed and begun to decline.  In the last two years, the numbers of majors has gone down by about 5.1% according to the OVPCC numbers; by about 4.3% using the standard unduplicated headcount method.

(2)      While the net increase from AY 2007-2008 (the year before the latest enrollment surge began) to AY 2012-2013 has been about 30% (using OVPCC type counts), the net increase in LBRT majors has been about 12%.  There have been much larger percentage increases in students home-based at other colleges (about a 66% more now than in AY 2007-2008) and in CTE majors (about 83% over the same time period).  Using OVPCC counts, we find

Net increase (from AY 2007-2008) overall:                30.5%

Net increase in LBRT majors:                                   12.3%

Net increase in students home-based elsewhere       66.5%

Net increase in other majors                                    83.5%

 

If we compare the numbers from the first year of the surge (AY 2008-2009) to the present year (20012-2013), we find a net increase of about 16% overall, 7% in the number of LBRT majors, 29% in the number of those home-based elsewhere, and 55% in the number of CTE majors.

Net increase (from AY 2007-2008) overall:                16.5%

Net increase in LBRT majors:                                    6.9%

Net increase in students home-based elsewhere:      28.7%

Net increase in other majors:                                   54.8%

If we use standard unduplicated headcount numbers, the percentages are very similar.

(3)      The SSH counts sort of indicate completion rates are not improving much.  The net difference between the SSHs taken by LBRT majors in LBRT classes between AY 2007-2008 and AY 2012-2013 is 0%.  Despite significant increases in numbers of majors, the numbers of SSHs taken is not changing very much.

SSHs and FTEs

AY 0708
SSHs & FTEs

AY 0809 SSHs & FTEs

AY 0910 SSHs & FTEs

AY 1011 SSHs & FTEs

AY 1112 SSHs & FTEs

AY 1213 SSHs & FTEs

% Change
AY 0708 & 1213

% Change
AY 0809 & 1213

SSHs LBRT Majors in LBRT Classes

57,563

50,552

54,885

58,794

56,982

57,565

0.0%

13.9%

SSHs Non-Majors in LBRT Classes

23,628

24,190

28,992

28,695

29,450

31,172

31.9%

28.9%

SSHs in All LBRT Classes

81,191

74,742

83,877

87,489

86,432

88,737

9.3%

18.7%

FTE Enrollment in LBRT Classes

2,706

2,491

2,796

2,916

2,881

2,958

9.3%

18.7%

(4)      In terms of all students, LBRT majors make up about half of the students at the college, but the percentage of LBRT majors has been slowly declining since AY 2008.  If we use the OVPCC counts, LBRT majors constituted about an 8 percentage point decline over six years.  The standard headcounts show the same:  beginning with 56.0% in 2007-2008 and ending with 48.5% in 2012-2013.

58.9% of the majors in 2007-2008,

55.3% in 2008-2009,

53.1% and 53.5% in 2009-2010 and 2010-2011,

51.7% in 2011-12, and

50.7% of all enrolled in 2012-2013

 

Efficiency

The overall class fill rate continues to be high:  88.5%, almost the same as last year’s rate and well inside the “Healthy” range.  Average class size—22.9—has decreased slightly from last year’s 24.6 and the previous year’s 25.7.

The majors to FTE faculty ratio—42.3 to 1—is virtually the same as last year’s ratio—and “Cautionary.”

Together, they indicate a “Healthy” program in terms of efficiency.

 

Effectiveness

Although the health call for Effectiveness is “Cautionary,” there has been an improvement  in the degrees and certificates awarded indicator.

Indicator 1:  Increasing the number of Associate Degrees awarded by 3% per year.

The number of students earning degrees and certificates has steadily increased to 517, above the goal of 515.  Although small (an increase of 0.3%) this indicator is considered “Healthy.”

Indicator 2: Increase the number of Transfers to UH 4-year institutions by 3% per year.

The number of transfers to four-year institutions continues to be above goal, with 304 students transferring to a UH 4-year institution.  Although there is a decrease from the prior year, the indicator is 42.7% above goal. This indicator is considered “Healthy.”

 

 

2008-2009

2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

Goal (AA Degrees)

N/A

472

486

500

515

AA Degrees Earned

368

373

445

488

517

% Short of Goal

N/A

-20.9%

-8.4%

-2.4%

+0.3%

% Increase/Decrease

 

1.3%

19.3%

9.7%

5.9%

Undupl Degr & Cert

376

397

460

505

537

           

Goal (Transfers)

N/A

195

201

207

213

Transfers to 4-Yr UH

210

226

261

317

304

% Short of Goal

N/A

15.9%

29.9%

53.1%

42.7%

% Increase/Decrease

 

7.65

15.5%

21.5%

-4.1%

Indicator 3: Persistence from Fall to Spring

Persistence has remained stable over the past three years: 71.4% for 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 and 70.2% in 2012-2013. This indicator is “Cautionary.”  An increase of 4.8% would make it “Healthy.”

The Successful Completion Rate (SRate) continues to improve although slowly:  from 69% in 2008-2009 to 70% in 2009-2010 to 71% in 2010-2011 and 72% in 2011-2012 and 2012-2013.  The movement is somewhat comforting since the overall SRate is just a little above the rate that defines Gatekeeper courses in the UH CC System.

Taken together, the three effectiveness indicators place the program at a “Cautionary” level.

 

Significant Program Actions (new certificates, stop-out; gain/loss of positions, results of prior year’s action plan).

The following discusses significant program actions in certificates, positions, and results of the prior year’s action plan.

New Certificate

The Academic Subject Certificate in Global Studies has just been established.  The Academic Subject Certificate in Global Studies is designed to promote cultural sensitivities and international engagement among students at Leeward Community College.  It builds upon the strengths of our Hawaiian and multi-ethnic communities in the Pacific.  This program aligns well with system-wide efforts to position the University of Hawaii as a preeminent center of international learning.  The purpose of this certificate is to prepare students to meet the challenges of an interconnected and interdependent world as globally conscious and internationally engaged citizens.  Over 20 global lecture series have been offered ranging from Tribal Cultures in the Amazon, Urbanization in China, and Love, Sex, and Religion.  As of this writing, the program has attracted student interest and plans on enrolling students as soon as next semester.

Gain and Loss of Positions

There were four retirements in Engineering, Biology, Reading/Writing and Spanish.

With the rise in Japanese language enrollments and the decline in Spanish language enrollments, the position of a Japanese language instructor was created with the retirement of the Spanish instructor. 

There were five new full-time hires in Language Arts:  instructors in Speech, Developmental English, Writing, and Japanese Language.

There were five full-time new hires in Math and Sciences:  instructors in Engineering, APT Biology Manager, Developmental Math, and Micro-Biology; a Math Lab Manager; and a STEM Counselor assigned from Student Services.

There were two half-time hires in Arts & Humanities:  instructors in Digital Art and Music.

There was one full time hire in the Social Sciences:  an instructor in Anthropology.

Results of the prior year’s action plan:

In 2011-2012, the action plan included (a) the need to coordinate the efforts of the four divisions into systematic assessment on the health indicators; (b) the Student Success reform efforts; and (c) enhanced Developmental Education initiatives.  

(a)      The effort to coordinate the efforts of the four devisions will begin with assessing the twenty-five courses most often taken by AA degree graduates.  The identification and assessment of those courses will lead to the development and assessment of program level outcomes.  The effort will involve the new AA Degree Program Review Coordinator, the Dean of Arts and Sciences, and OPPA. l

(b)      Student Success continues to be a central focus cross campus and within the program. The following summarizes the progress toward the four goals in the initiative:

Goal #1:  Increase the number of graduates and transfers in all areas by 25% by 2015.

Since 2010, there has been an increase of 27 percent for graduates and 32 percent for transfers.

Goal #2:  Eliminate ‘gatekeeper’ courses.

Since 2009, there has been a decrease of 15 percent for ‘gatekeeper’ course.

Goal #3:  Improve student success rates by 10% in all courses with successful completion rates less than 70%.

Since 2009, there has been a 15 percent decrease in the number of courses with less than a 70% successful completion rate.

(c)      Developmental Education initiatives continued to be supported through Developmental Education Coordinators for both English and Math. Courses have been developed to decrease the amount of time spent in developmental education – accelerated ENG21/22, ALP ENG22/100, and ENG24 and Math 9/16, 18 and 82.

Part III. Action Plan

Efforts to improve program health and achieving learning outcomes will be focused in three major areas:  persistence, student success, and program assessment.

Persistence from Fall to Spring

Persistence has remained stable over the past years at around 70%.  This indicator is at the “Cautionary” level.  We would like to increase it to 4.8% to a “Healthy” level.. The college implemented an early alert system (the Maka’ala Program) in Fall 2011 which has become more regularly used by faculty.  Additional support for students is being evaluated.  In Spring 2014, a series of focus groups will be conducted to better understand student’s first year experiences.  The results will inform the design and implementation of a First Year Experience program.

 

Student Success

Continued and broader campus-wide participation is planned to achieve the Student Success goals:  increase the numbers of graduates and transfers to 4-year institutions, eliminate ‘gatekeeper’ courses, improve student success rates, and decrease time spent in developmental education.

 

Program Assessment and Evaluation

A steering committee will provide oversight and facilitate the assessment and evaluation of the AA degree.  The committee consists of the new AA degree Program Review Coordinator; the Dean of Arts and Sciences; the Director of the Office of Planning, Policy, and Assessment (OPPA); and the four division chairs of the program (Arts and Humanities, Language Arts, Math and Science, and Social Sciences).  As a first step in the process, the courses taken most often by degree graduates will be mapped to the program’s learning outcomes.  Key courses will be identified that  represent the program’s seven learning outcomes.

This committee will make decisions on improving the assessment process and review options to increase the rigor of assessment.

Part IV. Resource Implications

The needs of the program get filtered through the Divisions and are articulated in the Planning Lists developed through the Annual Program Reviews.

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

Yes
Make critical judgments and apply critical reasoning to address challenges and solve problems.

2

Yes
Make informed choices about uses of technology and information literacy for specific purposes.

3

Yes
Gather information appropriately and communicate clearly both orally and in writing.

4

No
Use numerical, symbolic, or graphical reasoning to interpret information, draw valid conclusions, and communicate results.

5

Yes
Use writing to discover, develop, and communicate ideas appropriately.

6

Yes
Understand the content and use the methodology of the major areas of knowledge: arts, humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences.

7

Yes
Appreciate the values and beliefs of diverse cultures and recognize responsibility for local, national, and global issues.

A) Expected Level Achievement

The expected level of achievement is that 70 percent of students will meet the learning outcomes

B) Courses Assessed

In 2012-2013, four courses were assessed: ENG 100, PSY 100, HIST 151 and HIST 152. As shown below, these courses are aligned to the following program outcomes: critical thinking, technology and information literacy, oral communication, written communication, arts, humanities, and sciences, and cultural diversity and civics.

 

Course

1. Critical Thinking

2. Technology and Information Literacy

3. Oral Communication

4. Quantitative
Reasoning

5. Written
Communication

6. Arts, Humanities, and Sciences

7. Cultural Diversity and Civics

ENG100

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

PSY100

X

 

 

 

 

X

 

HIST151

X

 

X

 

X

X

X

HIST152

X

 

X

 

X

X

X

 

The following describes the course outcomes assessment and their assessment strategies used.

Course

Course Learning Outcomes

Assessment Strategy

ENG100

Demonstrate effective use of study skills and college success strategies - All ENG 100 students will take the Leeward CC Library's information literacy exam.

25 question multiple choice exam – 72 percent correct to pass

 

PSY100

Apply basic psychological concepts to one's life, e.g., emotions, motivation, memory, learning, sensation and perception, states of consciousness.

Demonstrate an understanding of social influences on behavior.

Embedded Exam Questions – 70 percent correct as benchmark

HIST151

Analyze global processes from prehistory to the present (e.g. human migration, ecological forces, spread of world religions, creation of empires, technological innovation and integration).

Evaluate the historical roots of current events.

Describe major historical events, places, people, and other items of historical import.

Compare and contrast historical experiences across cultures and time.

Summarize key ideas in history, including major world philosophies, religions, and political theories and systems.

Analyze cause/effect relationships in history.

Student Survey – Scale of Mostly, Somewhat or Not at all where ‘Mostly’ = Exceeds Expectations, ‘Somewhat’ = Meets Expectations, and ‘Not at all” = Does not meet expectations.

HIST152

Compare and contrast historical experiences across cultures and time.

Describe major historical events, places, people, and other items of historical import.

Analyze cause/effect relationships in history.

Summarize key ideas in history, including major world philosophies, religions, and political theories and systems.

Evaluate the historical roots of current events.

Analyze global processes from prehistory to the present (e.g. human migration, ecological forces, spread of world religions, creation of empires, technological innovation and integration).

Student Survey – Scale of Mostly, Somewhat or Not at all where ‘Mostly’ = Exceeds Expectations, ‘Somewhat’ = Meets Expectations, and ‘Not at all” = Does not meet expectations.

 

Overall, the assessment results were very positive. As displayed below, of the 15 course learning outcomes assessed, all met or exceeded the 70 percent expected level of achievement.

Course

Course Learning Outcome

Percent Meeting or Exceeding Outcome

Sample Size

ENG100

Demonstrate effective use of study skills and college success strategies - All ENG 100 students will take the Leeward CC Library's information literacy exam.

92

1,565

PSY100

Apply basic psychological concepts to one's life, e.g., emotions, motivation, memory, learning, sensation and perception, states of consciousness.

70

256

PSY100

Demonstrate an understanding of social influences on behavior.

70

256

HIST151

Analyze global processes from prehistory to the present (e.g. human migration, ecological forces, spread of world religions, creation of empires, technological innovation and integration).

99

184

HIST151

Evaluate the historical roots of current events.

97

 

HIST151

Describe major historical events, places, people, and other items of historical import.

98

184

HIST151

Compare and contrast historical experiences across cultures and time.

98

184

HIST151

Summarize key ideas in history, including major world philosophies, religions, and political theories and systems.

96

184

HIST151

Analyze cause/effect relationships in history.

97

184

HIST152

 

Compare and contrast historical experiences across cultures and time.

97

150

HIST152

 

Describe major historical events, places, people, and other items of historical import.

99

150

HIST152

 

Analyze cause/effect relationships in history.

99

150

HIST152

 

Summarize key ideas in history, including major world philosophies, religions, and political theories and systems.

99

150

HIST152

 

Evaluate the historical roots of current events.

96

150

HIST152

 

Analyze global processes from prehistory to the present (e.g. human migration, ecological forces, spread of world religions, creation of empires, technological innovation and integration).

98

150

 

C) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

The overall assessment strategy for the program is the achievement of course learning outcomes among the courses that most AA graduates enroll. These courses (the Top 25) are mapped to the program learning outcomes. Determination of achieving program learning outcomes is based on performance on course level outcomes. Additional assessment strategies are being considered. 

D) Results of Program Assessment

Based on the 2005-2010 Comprehensive Assessment of the AA Degree (2011), the campus has taken several steps to carry out the report’s recommendations. Specifically, “While the data suggest that students are meeting some general education outcomes, and not meeting others, the more solid conclusion is that, overall, the college needs to improve its assessment process.” This includes increasing the rigor and quality of program level assessment.

As of this writing, the following tasks have been taken to meet the recommendation:

E) Other Comments

No content.

F) Next Steps

An analytic framework to guide program evaluation and assessment is being reviewed by the Dean of Arts and Sciences and the Division Chairs of Language Arts, Math and Sciences, Social Sciences, and Arts and Humanities. The guiding evaluation questions are: