University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

Select the desired review year, college, and program from the drop down menus. Once a program has been selected, the results will be displayed.

Review Year: College: Program:

College: Leeward Community College
Program: Hawaiian Studies

Printer Friendly

PDF PDF

The last comprehensive review for this program can be viewed at:
First Year of Existence. No CRE available at this time.

Program Description

The Associate in Arts in Hawaiian Studies (AAHS) is a 60-credit degree program intended to provide the first two years of a baccalaureate program in Hawaiian Studies and/or a qualification that would be beneficial in the workforce or other areas of study where a knowledge of the host culture or alternative approaches to problem-solving are desired.

Program learning outcomes:

  1. Describe Native Hawaiian linguistic, cultural, historical and political concepts.
  2. Explain Native Hawaiian concepts as expressed in the broader areas of science, humanities, arts or social sciences.
  3. Use writing to discover, develop, communicate and reflect on issues relevant to the Native Hawaiian community.

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: To Be Determined

Majors Included: HWST     Program CIP: 05.0202

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 Number of Majors     18 To Be Determined
1a     Number of Majors Native Hawaiian     16
1b     Fall Full-Time     40%
1c     Fall Part-Time     60%
1d     Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System     0%
1e     Spring Full-Time     54%
1f     Spring Part-Time     46%
1g     Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System     4%
2 *Percent Change Majors from Prior Year      
3 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes      
4 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes      
5 SSH in All Program Classes      
6 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes      
7 Total Number of Classes Taught      

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
8 Average Class Size       To Be Determined
9 *Fill Rate      
10 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty      
11 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty      
12 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty      
12a Analytic FTE Faculty      
13 Overall Program Budget Allocation      
13a General Funded Budget Allocation      
13b Special/Federal Budget Allocation      
13c Tuition and Fees      
14 Cost per SSH      
15 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes      
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
16 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher)       Cautionary
17 Withdrawals (Grade = W)      
18 *Persistence (Fall to Spring)     70%
18a Persistence Fall to Fall     40%
19 Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded Prior Fiscal Year     1
19a Associate Degrees Awarded     1
19b Academic Subject Certificates Awarded     0
19c Goal      
19d *Difference Between Unduplicated Awarded and Goal      
20 Transfers to UH 4-yr     0
20a Transfers with degree from program     0
20b Transfers without degree from program     0
20c Increase by 3% Annual Transfers to UH 4-yr Goal      
20d *Difference Between Transfers and Goal      

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
21 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught      

 

22 Enrollments Distance Education Classes      
23 Fill Rate      
24 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher)      
25 Withdrawals (Grade = W)      
26 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education)      

Performance Funding Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
27 Number of Degrees and Certificates     1

 

28 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     1
29 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     Not STEM
30 Number of Pell Recipients     13
31 Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr     0
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

Preface

The Associates in Arts in Hawaiian Studies degree (AAHS) is the first joint degree in the University of Hawai’i Community Colleges (UHCC) system with 7 participating colleges (Hawaii CC, Honolulu CC, Kapiolani CC, Kauai CC, Leeward CC, Windward CC and UH Maui College).  The 7 campuses agreed on 4 existing core required classes; HWST 107: Hawaii in the Center of the Pacific, HWST 270: Hawaiian Mythology, and Hawaiian Language 101 and 102.  Students are also required to fulfill all of the General Education Core Areas required for their respective campus Associate in Arts in Liberal Arts degrees. 

Inspired by the successful collaboration that produced the AAHS, a dedicated group of faculty continued to meet during the 2012-2013 AY to manage the AAHS degree by working on:

The main goal of these multi-campus meetings is to improve student persistence and retention in subsequent courses, facilitate transfers among participating colleges as well as to baccalaureate institutions in the UHCC system.

While preparing for the first Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD), the group discovered that because the 4 core-required courses also fulfill requirements for the AA in Liberal Arts degrees, the data for these courses was available only to the Liberal Arts Programs.  The UHCC system institutional research office is addressing the problem. 

In the meantime, each participating college asked their respective Institutional Research office to pull many of the program quantitative indicators individually.  For Leeward Community College, the data for the following courses was included in an amended report: HWST 107, 160, 261, 270, 291 and HAW 101, 102.

The amended sections for Leeward Community College are under each category (added values are in blue italics):

Demand:  To be determined

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 Number of Majors     18 To be determined
1a Number of Majors Native Hawaiian     16
1b  Fall Full-Time     40%
1c Fall Part-Time     60%
1d Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System     0%
1e Spring Full-Time     54%
1f Spring Part-Time     46%
1g Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System     4%
2 *Percent Change Majors from Prior Year      
3 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes     102
4 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes     4,934
5 SSH in All Program Classes     5,036
6 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes     168
7 Total Number of Classes Taught     61

 

The demand health call is undetermined because the 2012-2013 AY was the first year of the Associates in Arts in Hawaiian Studies (AAHS) Program, therefore “Percent Change Majors from Prior year” (#2) data is unavailable. 

The system-wide Instructional Program Review Committee, as well as HWST faculty, is currently discussing what kind of data might be useful to figure out program health.  Because a large number of non-majors enrolling in the core course HWST 107 to fulfill the AA in LBRT requirement, how we interpret the demand numbers, especially those related SSH, and the criteria used to assess program health in terms of demand and efficiency becomes a little problematic.  

The Hawaiian Studies faculty have increased marketing and recruitment by participating in campus and community events and creating a website and Facebook page.

An indication that our recruitment efforts might be working is the enrollment for Fall 2013.  There were 29 students identifying themselves as HWST majors--a 50% increase over AY 2012-2013. That number will probably increase in Spring 2014.

 

Efficiency: To be determined

Effeciancy Indicators Program Year Effeciency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
8 Average Class Size     26.7 To be determined
9 *Fill Rate     91.3%
10 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty     5
11 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty     3.6
12 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty     2.5
12a Analytic FTE Faculty     7.1
13 Overall Program Budget Allocation      
13a General Funded Budget Allocation      
13b Special/Federal Budget Allocation      
13c Tuition and Fees      
14 Cost per SSH      
15 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes      

 

Using data from the amended report, the fill rate is a healthy 91.3%, however the ratio of faculty to majors is low at 3.6.  Given these numbers, the efficiency health call is cautionary. 

 

Effectiveness: Cautionary

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
16 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher)     76.4% Cautionary
17 Withdrawals (Grade = W)     78
18 *Persistence (Fall to Spring)     70%
18a Persistence Fall to Fall     40%
19 Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded Prior Fiscal Year     1/17
19a Associate Degrees Awarded     1
19b Academic Subject Certificates Awarded     0/17
19c Goal      
19d *Difference Between Unduplicated Awarded and Goal      
20 Transfers to UH 4-yr     0
20a Transfers with degree from program     0
20b Transfers without degree from program     0
20c Increase by 3% Annual Transfers to UH 4-yr Goal      
20d *Difference Between Transfers and Goal      

 

The effectiveness health call is cautionary based on the first data point used to determine the effectiveness health call, persistence from fall to spring (#18).  As mentioned under Demand, however, because at least one HWST course (HWST 107) is taken by large numbers of AA LBRT majors to fulfill two requirements, ALL of the faculty who teach ALL HWST courses were counted to calculate the faculty to majors ratio.  That is why the ratio is so low (1 to 3.6).  Discussions are currently under way to figure out how to more accurately determine program health.  The other two data points, #19d “Difference between unduplicated awarded and goal,” and #20d “Difference between transfers and goal” are unavailable. 

In May 2013, the AAHS program awarded its first Associates degree.

The number of Academic Subject Certificates in Hawaiian Studies is incorrect because there is a duplicate alpha designation for the Hawaiian Studies ASC in the STAR system – HWST (listed as Hawaiian Studies) and HAWN (also listed as Hawaiian Studies).  The ASCs in Hawaiian Studies were entered as HAWN and not HWST.  Thus, the wrong data set was pulled to fill this field (19b).  The actual number of ASCs in Hawaiian Studies awarded in the 2012-2013AY (listed erroneously under the category HAWN) is 17.

Persistence and completion rates are good to average. 

This lower persistence rate could be partially attributed to a high demand for the course HWST 107 by non-majors.  A majority of students who take this course do so because it fulfills two requirements for the AA in Liberal Arts degree and do not intend to become AAHS Program majors.

 

Distance Education

Distance Education: Completely On-line Classes Program Year
10-11 11-12 12-13
21 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught     11
22

Enrollments Distance Education Classes

    370
23 Fill Rate     100%
24 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher)     289/82.3%
25 Withdrawals (Grade = W)     0
26 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education)     64.5%

 

The HWST Program offered 2 different courses via distance education: HWST 107 and HWST 261: Hawaiian Literature.  Of the 11 distance education classes offered, 10 were HWST 107 and 1 was HWST 261.

This lower persistence rate could be partially attributed to a high demand for the course HWST 107 by non-majors.  A majority of students who take this course do so because it fulfills two requirements for the AA in Liberal Arts degree and do not intend to become AAHS Program majors.

 

Performance

Performance Funding Program Year
10-11 11-12 12-13
27 Number of Degrees and Certificates     1/18
28 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     1/18
29 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     Not STEM
30 Number of Pell Recipients     13
31 Number of Transfers to     0

 

The “Number of Degrees and Certificates” (#27) awarded at the end of the 2012-2013AY was 18 (see Effectiveness section for full explanation).  100% of the students who earned a degree or certificate were Native-/Part-Hawaiian in ethnicity.

Part III. Action Plan

The University of Hawaii (UH) has an extensive and long standing commitment to support the advancement of aboriginal Hawaiian language, culture, history and practice.  This is demonstrated in Board of Regents policy,[1] the UH System and UH Community Colleges Strategic plans (2008-2015),[2] as well as in Leeward Community College’s mission and strategic plan.[3]  Leeward Community College service area includes some of Oahu’s highest concentrations of Native Hawaiians and is in an excellent position to offer a 2-year Hawaiian Studies degree.  The first-year data for the AAHS program reflects the high demand for this program among Native Hawaiian students.  We hope that this program will prove valuable in both positioning the University of Hawaii System as one of the world’s foremost indigenous serving universities as well as increasing recruitment, retention and graduation among Native Hawaiians.

Increase marketing and recruitment activities

Increase retention

To support the University’s goals regarding increasing Native Hawaiian student success, it is critical to provide additional support. 

Facilities

To support the University’s goals regarding increasing Native Hawaiian student success and the recommendations of the Hawaii Papa o Ke Ao Report (2012), we recommend that a Native Hawaiian Student Success Center be built on the Leeward Community College campus.

 

 


[1] Regents Policy (BOR Policy) defines and shapes the University’s commitment by recognizing the unique condition of HawaiÊ»i and Hawaiians as the aboriginal people of Hawaii.

[2] “Native Hawaiian Educational Attainment: To position the university as one of the world’s foremost indigenous serving universities by supporting the access and success of Native Hawaiians.”

[3] The Leeward Community College mission: At Leeward Community College, we work together to nurture and inspire all students. We help them attain their goals through high-quality liberal arts and career and technical education. We foster students to become responsible global citizens locally, nationally, and internationally. We advance the educational goals of all students with a special commitment to Native Hawaiians. The Leeward strategic plan mirrors the UHCC strategic plan on this point.

Part IV. Resource Implications

Personnel:

Capital Improvement Project (CIP):

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

No
Describe Native Hawaiian linguistic, cultural, historical and political concepts.

2

No
Explain Native Hawaiian concepts as expressed in the broader areas of science, humanities, arts or social sciences.

3

No
Use writing to discover, develop, communicate and reflect on issues relevant to the Native Hawaiian community.

A) Expected Level Achievement

No content.

B) Courses Assessed

No content.

C) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

No content.

D) Results of Program Assessment

No content.

E) Other Comments

No content.

F) Next Steps

No content.