University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: University of Hawaii Maui College
Program: Dental Assisting

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The last comprehensive review for this program was on 2012, and can be viewed at:
http://maui.hawaii.edu/faculty/program_review/2007/dentalprogramreview07.pdf
STEM Program

Program Description

Program Mission Statement

The UH Maui College Dental Assisting Program is dedicated to educating and preparing dental assisting leaders for careers in a diverse and changing health care environment and providing a liberal education as well as outstanding clinical experiences.

The curriculum reflects the core values of the dental profession in private and public health settings.  The program is committed to creating a humanistic, educational environment that will facilitate the development of responsible, ethical, oral health professionals who are sensitive to patient needs and competent in all areas of dental assisting.  The program strives to produce graduates who are confident and compassionate in their profession and competent in self-assessment in preparation for lifelong learning.

Educational and clinical services provided by dental assisting students include dental health education, disease prevention, and promoting the highest standards of oral health care for a diverse population of patients.

Introduction

The University of Hawaii Maui College Dental Assisting Program began in fall 2002 in response to community need for dental auxiliaries (dental assistants and dental hygienists) and an urgent need to increase the number of oral health providers in Maui County.  Dental and oral health are priorities of the Surgeon General and the Hawaii Health Department.  Hawaii is below the national average for access to oral health care.  Lorrin Pang, M.D., Maui County Health Officer estimates 33 percent of Maui County residents do not have adequate access to dental health care.  The issues are complex and include lack of public water fluoridation, inadequate reimbursement for dental care, and shortage of dental auxiliaries. On the whole, Neighbor Islands, where the rates of poverty, lack of insurance, and Medicaid coverage are highest, have greater needs and fewer available dentists than O’ahu.  The entire island of Maui is recognized by the federal government as a Dental Health Professional Shortage Areas and continues to need qualified dental assisting professionals.

The UH Maui College’s Dental Assisting Program is a two-semester program that provides students with the skills needed to succeed in the dental profession.  Accredited by the American Dental Association Commission on Dental Accreditation (ADACODA), the Dental Assisting Program offers classroom instruction and hands-on clinical training at the Maui Oral Health Center and private dental offices on Maui.

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Healthy

Majors Included: DENT     Program CIP: 51.0601

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 New & Replacement Positions (State) 73 69 64 Healthy
2 *New & Replacement Positions (County Prorated) 9 10 9
3 *Number of Majors 10.5 17 18
3a     Number of Majors Native Hawaiian 3 7 5
3b     Fall Full-Time 15% 100% 100%
3c     Fall Part-Time 85% 0% 0%
3d     Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 15% 0% 0%
3e     Spring Full-Time 13% 6% 50%
3f     Spring Part-Time 88% 94% 50%
3g     Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 0% 29% 11%
4 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes 46 388 414
5 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes 385 220 6
6 SSH in All Program Classes 431 608 420
7 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes 14 20 14
8 Total Number of Classes Taught 9 20 9

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
9 Average Class Size 18.7 13 18.2 Healthy
10 *Fill Rate 93.3% 93.5% 98.7%
11 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 2 2 1
12 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 5.2 8.5 18
13 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty 12.3 10.2 21.1
13a Analytic FTE Faculty 0.9 1.7 0.9
14 Overall Program Budget Allocation $85,055 $773,071 $128,390
14a General Funded Budget Allocation $67,055 $107,992 $124,467
14b Special/Federal Budget Allocation $0 $0 $0
14c Tuition and Fees $0 $16,144 $3,923
15 Cost per SSH $197 $1,271 $306
16 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 0 2 0
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
17 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 99% 100% 100% Healthy
18 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 0 0 0
19 *Persistence Fall to Spring 61.5% 100% 100%
19a Persistence Fall to Fall     0%
20 *Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded 17 14 18
20a Degrees Awarded 0 0 0
20b Certificates of Achievement Awarded 0 0 0
20c Advanced Professional Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
20d Other Certificates Awarded 17 14 18
21 External Licensing Exams Passed   100% Not Reported
22 Transfers to UH 4-yr 2 0 0
22a Transfers with credential from program 0 0 0
22b Transfers without credential from program 2 0 0

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
23 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught 0 0 0  
24 Enrollments Distance Education Classes N/A N/A N/A
25 Fill Rate N/A N/A N/A
26 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) N/A N/A N/A
27 Withdrawals (Grade = W) N/A N/A N/A
28 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education) N/A N/A N/A

Perkins IV Core Indicators
2011-2012
Goal Actual Met  
29 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment 90.00 100.00 Met  
30 2P1 Completion 50.00 77.78 Met
31 3P1 Student Retention or Transfer 74.25 90.00 Met
32 4P1 Student Placement 60.00 66.67 Met
33 5P1 Nontraditional Participation 17.00 0.00 Not Met
34 5P2 Nontraditional Completion 15.25 0.00 Not Met

Performance Funding Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
35 Number of Degrees and Certificates     0  
36 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     0
37 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     0
38 Number of Pell Recipients     9
39 Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr     0
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

  1. Demand Indicators

Demand health call for the UH Maui College Dental Assisting Program is Healthy. 100% of the 18 2013 Dental Assisting graduates are working in dental offices and/or attending or pursuing admittance to the UHMC Dental Hygiene Program. 14 of the18 total students are employed in a dental office, working as a dental assistant. Two students are enrolled in the UH Maui College Dental Hygiene Program and two students are pursuing admittance in the UH Maui College Dental Hygiene Program, taking pre-requisite courses in preparation to apply. Student employment placement and demand has remained steady and all UH Maui College Dental Assisting Program graduates were able to secure dental jobs.

  1. Efficacy Indicators

Efficacy health call for the UH Maui College Dental Assisting Program is Healthy. The Dental Assisting Program has maintained a high number of qualified applicants due to determined promotion at monthly general orientation meetings advertised in the local newspaper, a high school career-shadowing program, high school career fairs, and dental program orientations at local high schools and at UH Maui College. 

Due to American Dental Association Commission on Dental Accreditation (ADACODA) accreditation requirements, the maximum class size is 18 students. There is only one full-time faculty member.

 

F12

F13

Number of qualified applicants

42

38

Number of students starting fall semester in DA program

(Maximum capacity is 18 students)

18

18

Budget constraints and lack of clinical space has been a weakness for the Dental Assisting Program. The program completes pre-clinical and clinical requirements at the Maui Oral Health Center. The UH Maui College Dental Assisting and Dental Hygiene Programs, Lutheran Medical Residency Program, and the Maui Oral Health Center share 7 operatories at an off-campus site. Clinical courses have been arranged to accommodate the 18 students in the 4 operatories allotted to us by dividing the class into 2 groups. The American Dental Association Commission on Dental Accreditation (ADACODA) requires a 1:6 instructor to student ratio in all pre-clinical and clinical sections. These requirements lead to high lecturer costs. The program is working on acquiring another faculty member and a larger clinical facility.

The UH Maui College Dental Advisory Committee and industry employers require dental assistants to be trained in the most current technology and equipment. Local dentists and dental supply companies have donated needed equipment and materials, grants have been secured, and students are assessed a supply fee. Despite these efforts, there remains major equipment and supply costs. Dental materials are costly and perishable.

The UH Maui College Dental Assisting program looks forward to the remodel of the existing Noi‘i building, with an estimated move in date of spring 2015. This facility will allow the UH Maui College Dental Assisting and Hygiene Programs to share 10 operatories, allowing increased space and time in the clinical area and efficiency in utilizing our lecturers.                

  1. Effectiveness  Indicators

Effectiveness health call for the UH Maui College Dental Assisting Program is Healthy. In spring 2013, the University of Hawai‘i Maui College granted 18 DENT major students the Certificate of Completion certificate. 100% of the dental assisting graduates are working in the dental office, attending UH Maui College Dental Hygiene Program or completing courses in the pursuit to be accepted in the UH Maui College Dental Hygiene Program.

In working with UH Maui College and the Dental Assisting National Board, Dental Assisting students have access to computer testing of the Dental Assisting National Board Exam at UH Maui College, resulting in convenience in the testing process and increased student success.  In spring 2012, the DANB board announced a change to their testing policy where assess to testing on Maui would not be allowed beginning January 2013. I requested an exception to this new policy due to financial hardship and strain in having to travel to the closest Pearson Professional Testing Center on Oahu. It was a pleasure to receive an exception to the DANB policy, where students will be allowed to test at the Kahului site.

Due to our historically high DANB passing rate and scores, in spring of 2013, Dental Assisting textbook publisher Elsevier offered our students complimentary pilot review exams for preparation for the DANB exam. UH Maui College Dental Assisting students participated in this pilot program and received valuable test-taking experience and remediation services which contributed to the 100% DANB passing rate.

In academic year 2012-2013, 18 of 18 (100%) students received national DANB certified dental assistant certification.

Dental Assisting National Board Exam, 1/1/2012-6/30/2013

 

UH Maui College average performance

Average Performance of other candidates

General Chairside Assisting (GC)

485

458

Infection Control (ICE)

483

449

Radiation Health and Safety (RHS)

490

438

Perkins IV Core Indicators 2012-2013 Analysis

Dental Assisting National Board (DANB) Performance Report

 

Total # Students Taking DANB Exam

# Students Passed Overall (all 3 parts) Certified Dental Assistant Certification (CDA)

2012-2013

18

18

Part III. Action Plan

  1. Program Plans and Goals

The Outcomes Assessment Plan will continue to be implemented for the current students.  Surveys will continue to be sent to graduates and their employers. 

Students will be assisted in the facilitation of DANB testing, including computer mock testing and material review.

Program will continue to heavily recruit students at high school career fairs, service-learning activities, UH Maui College Biology 100 classes (prerequisite to DA program), high school and program orientations, and career shadowing programs.

Clinical experiences will begin in the fall semester and continue into the spring semester.  Increased hours of clinical practice will be made available and strongly encouraged for students at the Maui Oral Health Center, shadowing and assisting staff dentists.

The highly successful iPad and Livetext assessment project will continue, allowing students access to researching various topics in the dental operatory and classroom; assess to course information, Powerpoints, outlines, discussion groups, announcements; real-time assessment and remediation of procedure and skill mastery; and practical experience using industry  iPad applications such as Dentrix and patient education application DDS GP. Students will continue to utilize LiveText assessment and field study application (assessment of externship practicum), develop student ePortfolios, and master iPad use for the dental office setting.

Service-learning will continue with emphasis on community education. The Baby Dental Packet Project will continue to provide dental health information to all babies born at MMMC and at pediatric offices and clinics on Maui as well as community service experiences at area schools and health fairs.

Access to the on-campus Dental Facility in the renovated science building will significantly enhance clinical learning opportunities for DA and DH students.  The faculty will have 10 operatories dedicated to the DA/DH programs and a separate x-ray teaching room, having 3 radiography chairs.  The additional operatories will allow more opportunity for hands-on practice and make instruction more efficient. The addition of new equipment, x-ray teaching manikins and digital x-ray units in every operatory, will provide students with experience using these important diagnostic tools in dental practice.  The additional 8 operatories on the service side of the facility will allow more students to complete the spring practicum working with dentists at the Maui Oral Health Center facility. The new facility will also allow admission of DH students annually, which will provide increased opportunity for the DA graduates to continue to DH Program.

Part IV. Resource Implications

  1. Budgetary Consideration and Impact

The Dental Assisting program requires significant resources due to the need for a clinical facility, national accreditation requirements for 1:6 instructor: student ratio (high lecturer costs), required annual attendance of all faculty members to at least one regional or national dental education conference, required methodology training in the area of instruction at least every 3 years, and costly equipment and materials.

Presently, the operatories at the Maui Oral Health Center is shared by the UH Maui College Dental Assisting and Dental Hygiene Programs, Lutheran Medical Residency Program, and the Maui Oral Health Center. The Dental Assisting Program is assigned 4 operatories for 18 students during clinical courses. The 1:6 instructor to student ratio and limited clinical space, necessitates dividing the students in two groups, requiring significant instructor resources. A second full-time faculty is needed to offset the great number of lecturers hours needed.

In fall 2013, the Dental Assisting Program hired 4 new lecturers. Extensive teaching strategies, curriculum, and course methodology training has been ongoing. Attendance to faculty development workshops is crucial in developing a strong team. The American Dental Education Association (ADEA) is the premier ADACODA association for all accredited dental programs in the United States. The ADEA annual Conference will be held in March 2014 in San Antonio, Texas and will feature the UH Maui College Dental Assisting Program Coordinator in an ePortfolio roundtable presentation.

The Dental Assisting Program continues to garner external support for our program and our students’ success. The Maui Oral Health Center provides students with the opportunity to participate in patient care and gain hands-on clinical skills. A number of community and government grants provide the resources needed to support the facility requirements.  The community need for oral health services provides strong justification for the commitment of resources.  The impact of the dental programs on community oral health is validated by the financial support UHMC has received during the 2014 Academic Year.

            County of Maui                    $250,000

                        Maui Oral Health Center Rent

                        Maui Oral Health Center Staff

                        UHMC Staff

            HMSA Foundation $100,000

                        Community Oral Health Screening

            Hawaii Dental Service Foundation  $66,903

                        Equipment for MOHC- awarded in 2013-$66,903

Equipment  request for 2014, $323,061-Partial award is expected in November 2013

Two Carl Perkins grants were awarded to the Dental Assisting Program in 2013 for faculty and student support in procuring iPads and Livetext technology ($13,940. and $4,652.) Kaiser Permanente Community Benefit awarded the program $13,523.63 and $1,155. to support the Baby Dental Packet Project and the Maternal Home Visit Project in 2013, respectively.

UH Maui College Dental Program Priorities:

Lecturer costs – 41 fall, 45 spring = 86 X Step A ($1374)

$118,64

Marketing, student recruitment, website maintenance

$470

Annual ADEA American Dental Education Association – accreditation organization $125 per faculty

$750

Library resources – books, magazines, software

$635

Faculty Development- attend conference to complete ADACODA accreditation requirements of providing funding attend regional or national conference yearly and to complete methodology course in their specialty, at least every 3 years

$12,525

Faculty travel for student supervision

$1700

Renovation of Noi’I – funds and contract awarded and renovation will occur AY 2014-2015

 

Instructional materials, Dental Materials, clinic supplies, office supplies and miscellaneous supplies

$6,782

17 Dexis digital radiographic sensors/system

$150,815.

3 intraoral cameras – IRIS DigiDoc

$20,000

5 valo curing light – educational price $920.69 each

$4603.45

1 ultra vacuum former educational price $183.89

$183.89

3 DXTTRIII – Dental x-ray training manikins

$36,000

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

Yes
PLO 1 - Demonstrate an understanding of dental assistant roles including the legal, professional, and ethical responsibilities within the community.

2

Yes
PLO 2 - Demonstrate basic theoretical knowledge and skills in biological science, dental radiology, chairside dental assisting, and business office procedures to support dental assisting practice and build the foundation for an associate degree dental hygiene program.

3

No
PLO 3 - Demonstrate a commitment to life-long learning and advancing competency over a lifetime of clinical practice.

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

Industry Validation

The dental community on Maui is extremely supportive of the UH Maui College Dental Assisting Program. Dental experts share their expertise in the classroom (32 dental experts), provide externships in their offices (11 dentists and dental clinics), provide in-kind donations of supplies, and financial support for equipment and supplies. Community dentists invite our students into their office for specialized training on the most up-to date equipment and processes. In 2012-2013, 37 dental professionals shared their expertise with my students.

100% of the 18 2013 Dental Assisting graduates who seek employment are working in dental offices, working as dental assistants. Local dentists often contact the program coordinator seeking UH Maui College Dental Assisting graduates. This year, one office even mentioned UHMC graduates preferred in their employment advertisement. Student employment placement and demand has remained steady and all UH Maui College Dental Assisting Program graduates were able to secure dental jobs.

In discussion with UHMC Dental Advisory Board members, UH Maui College CASLO Written Communication results were discussed in detail, with 100% agreement in rigor and suggestions of various teaching strategies.

Students and faculty participated in 25 community health fairs, high school events, and service projects, working collaboratively with local dental professionals. The Maui County Dental Society and Maui County Dental Hygienists’ Association contributed funds to the UHMC Dental Assisting Program for the purchase of toothbrushes and paste used for community service events.

In addition, Maui dentists are generous in their support of student travel to the annual Hawaii Dental Association Convention on Oahu and have established two-$500. scholarships for Dental Assisting graduates entering the Dental Hygiene Program every other year. UH Maui College Dental Assisting Program is grateful for this affirmation of industry support.

B) Expected Level Achievement

Expected Level of Achievement

Exams, projects and homework are graded on the point system in the table below.  Dental Assisting Students are required to maintain a “B” in the clinical portion of the curriculum and no lower than a “C” in the didactic.

A

B

C

D

91-100%

81-90%

71-80%

61-70%

Summative evidence

The evidence used to assess, and the results of the assessment for the program learning outcomes, will be discussed separately for each course that was assessed during this review period. Each program assessment is based on the following scale:

 

Exceeds

 

Meets

Needs Improvement

Insufficient

Progress

Grades of A

Grade of B

Grade of C

Grade D

 

UH Maui College Dental Assisting Program Curriculum Evaluation Guide

 

Goal or Objective #1

Professional Responsibilities

Goal or Objective #2

Knowledge & Skills

Goal or Objective #3

 Lifelong Learning

Evaluation mechanism

Student Exit Survey

Graduate  Survey

Employer Satisfaction Survey

Students’ scores on program

     examinations

Students’ scores on certifying exam

Student Satisfaction Survey

Graduate Satisfaction Survey

Employer Satisfaction Survey

Students’ scores on program examinations

Students’ scores on certifying exam

Service Learning scores

Graduate Survey

How often conducted

Annual

Annual

Annual

Date to be conducted/ finished by

 

May-August

Student Exit Survey

Graduate  Survey-6 months

     after graduation

Employer Satisfaction Survey-6      months after graduation

May-August

 

May

Results expected

 

75% Response

Average ranking

 4 on 1- 5 point scale=

Satisfaction with Program

85% 1st time pass rate

75% Response

Average ranking

 4 on 1- 5 point scale=

Satisfaction with Program

85% 1st time pass rate

75% Response

Average ranking

 4 on 1- 5 point

scale

 

50% continue to Dental Hygiene

Results achieved

Yes

Yes

Yes, 86% service-learning completion certificate; No, 39% continue to Dental Hygiene - 11% entered UHMC DH program, 28% pursuing entrance to DH Program

Curriculum revision based on results

Increased number of orthodontic practicum hours and started dental office management practicum in fall 2013.

Continue Livetext iPad project and various teaching pedogogy.

Continue commitment to rigorous community service and professionalism program. Students’ working as dental assistants is considered a success, as trained and certified dental assistants are much needed dental professionals.

Person responsible

 

Program Coordinators

Faculty

Program Coordinators

Faculty

Program Coordinators

Faculty

Program improvement as a results of data analysis

 

Pending for dental office management results. Even with increased number of orthodontic practicum hours, visitation and instruction by two separate orthodontists, and typodont bracket placement, employer results remain mixed.

Program satisfaction and national board certification scores and passing rates remain high (100%).

Dental Assisting program continues to be considered by their employers and our community as dental professional and service oriented.

Next date of completion

May-August

May-August

May-August

C) Courses Assessed

Program Map: UHMC Dental Assisting Student Learning Outcomes Grid

Grid of Maui Community College Student Learning Outcomes- Dental Assisting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KEY:  3    Major Emphasis: The student is actively involved (uses, reinforces, applies, and evaluated) in the student learning outcomes. The learner outcome is the focus of the class

 

 

 

 

 

 

          2   Moderate Emphasis: The student uses, reinforces, applies and is evaluated by this learner outcome, but it is not the focus of the class.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

         1   Minor Emphasis: The student is provided an opportunity to use, reinforce, and apply this learner outcome but does not get evaluated on this learner outcome.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

         0   No Emphasis: The student does not address this learner outcome.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dental Assisting Educational Standards

DENT 120

DENT 150

DENT 151

DENT 152

DENT

 154

DENT 164

DENT 165

DENT 176

DENT 177

I  Demonstrate an understanding of dental assistant roles including the legal, professional, and ethical responsibilities within the community.

2

3

3

3

 

1

1

1

1

1

II  Demonstrate basic theoretical knowledge and skills in biological science, dental radiology, chairside dental assisting, and business office procedures

3

3

3

3

 

3

3

3

3

3

     to support dental assisting practice and build the foundation for an associate degree dental hygiene program

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

III Demonstrate a commitment to lifelong learning and advancing competency over a lifetime of clinical practice.

1

2

1

3

 

1

1

1

1

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General Education Standards

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Standard 1 - Written Communication

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DENT 120

DENT 150

DENT 151

DENT 152

DENT

154

DENT 164

DENT 165

DENT 176

DENT 177

Outcome 1.1  Use writing to discover and articulate ideas

3

3

2

3

0

0

0

1

1

Outcome 1.2   Identify and analyze the audience and purpose for any intended communication

3

3

2

3

0

0

0

1

1

Outcome 1.3  Choose language, style, and organization appropriate to particular purposes and audiences.

3

3

3

3

0

0

0

1

1

Outcome 1.4  Gather information and document sources appropriately.

3

3

3

0

0

0

0

1

2

Outcome 1.5 Express a main idea as a thesis, hypothesis, or other appropriate statement

1

3

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

Outcome 1.6  Develop a main idea clearly and concisely with appropriate content

1

3

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

Outcome 1.7  Demonstrate a mastery of the conventions of writing, including grammar, spelling, and mechanics

3

3

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

Outcome 1.8  Demonstrate proficiency in revision and editing

3

3

0

1

0

0

0

1

1

Outcome 1.9  Develop a personal voice in written communication

3

3

0

3

0

0

0

1

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Standard 2  Quantitative Reasoning

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outcome 2.1 Apply numeric, graphic, and symbolic skills and other forms of quantitative reasoning accurately and appropriately

3

1

3

3

3

0

0

3

3

Outcome 2.2  Demonstrate mastery of mathematical concepts, skills, and applications, using technology when appropriate

3

0

3

3

2

0

0

3

3

Outcome 2.3  Communicate clearly and concisely the methods and results of quantitative problem solving

3

2

3

3

2

0

0

3

3

Outcome 2.4  Formulate and test hypotheses using numerical experimentation

0

2

0

0

2

0

0

3

3

Outcome 2.5  Define quantitative issues and problems, gather relevant information, analyze that information, and present results

2

3

0

0

2

0

0

3

3

Outcome 2.6  Assess the validity of statistical conclusions

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Standard 3  Information Retrieval and Technology

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outcome 3.1  Use print and electronic information technology ethically and responsibly

3

3

3

3

1

0

0

1

2

Outcome 3.2  Demonstrate knowledge of basic vocabulary, concepts, and operations of information retrieval and technology

3

3

0

2

1

0

0

1

2

Outcome 3.3  Recognize, identify, and define an information need

3

3

0

3

1

0

0

1

2

Outcome 3.4  Access and retrieve information through print and electronic media, evaluating the accuracy and authenticity of that information

3

3

0

1

1

0

0

1

2

Outcome 3.5  Create, manage, organize and communicate information through electronic media

3

3

0

0

1

0

0

1

2

Outcome 3.6  Recognize changing technologies and make informed choices about their appropriateness and use

2

3

2

2

1

0

0

1

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Standard 4  Oral Communication

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outcome 4.l Identify and analyze the audience and purpose of any intended communication

3

3

3

3

1

2

2

3

3

Outcome 4.2  Gather, evaluate, select, and organize information for the communication

3

3

3

3

1

2

2

3

3

Outcome 4.3  Use language techniques, and strategies appropriate to the audience and occasion

3

3

3

3

1

2

2

3

3

Outcome 4.4  Speak clearly and confidently, using the voice, volume, tone, and articulation appropriate to the audience and occasion

3

3

3

3

1

2

2

3

3

Outcome 4.5  Summarize, analyze, and evaluate oral communications and ask coherent questions as needed

3

3

3

3

1

2

2

3

3

Outcome 4.6  Use competent oral expression to initiate and sustain discussions

3

3

3

3

1

2

2

3

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Standard 5  Critical Thinking

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outcome 5.1  Identify and state problems, issues, arguments, and questions containing in a body of information

3

3

3

3

2

2

2

3

3

Outcome 5.2  Identify and analyze assumptions and underlying points of view relating to an issue or problem

3

3

3

3

2

0

0

3

3

Outcome 5.3  Formulate research questions that require descriptive and explanatory analyses

0

2

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

Outcome 5.4  Recognize and understand multiple modes of inquiry, including investigative methods based on observation and analysis

1

3

3

3

2

0

0

3

1

Outcome 5.5  Evaluate a problem, distinguishing between relevant and irrelevant facts, opinions, assumptions, issues, values, and biases through the use of appropriate evidence

0

3

3

3

0

2

2

1

1

Outcome 5.6  Apply problem-solving techniques and skills, including the rules of logic and logical sequence

3

3

3

3

2

2

2

3

3

Outcome 5.7  Synthesize information from various sources, drawing appropriate conclusions

3

3

3

3

2

2

2

3

3

Outcome 5.8  Communicate clearly and concisely the methods and results of logical reasoning

3

3

3

3

2

2

2

3

3

Outcome 5.9  Reflect upon and evaluate their thought processes, value system, and world views in comparison to those of theirs

3

3

3

3

2

2

2

3

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Standard 6  Creativity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outcome 6.1:  Generate responses to problems and challenges through intuition and non-linear thinking.

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Outcome 6.2:  Explore diverse approaches to solving a problem or addressing a challenge.

3

3

3

2

1

1

1

2

2

Outcome 6.3:  Engage in activities without a preconceived purpose.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Outcome 6.4:  Apply creative principles to apply and express new ideas.

2

0

0

0

0

2

2

3

3

Outcome 6.5:  Demonstrate the ability to trust and follow one’s instincts in the absence of external direction.

2

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

1

Outcome 6.6:  Build upon or adapt the ideas of others to create unique expressions or solutions.

2

1

0

2

0

0

0

2

2

100% of UHMC Dental Assisting Program courses have student learning outcomes that are aligned with the Program Learning outcomes.

Assessment Plan

Map of Program Learning Outcomes by Course

 

DENT

DENT

DENT

DENT

DENT

DENT

DENT

DENT

DENT

DENT

120

150

151

152

154

164

165

176

177

99v

PLO 1

2

3

3

3

1

1

1

1

1

3

PLO 2

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

PLO 3

1

2

1

3

1

1

1

1

1

2

3    Major Emphasis: The student is actively involved (uses, reinforces, applies, and evaluated) in the student learning outcomes. The learner outcome is the focus of the class.

2   Moderate Emphasis: The student uses, reinforces, applies and is evaluated by this learner outcome, but it is not the focus of the class.

1   Minor Emphasis: The student is provided an opportunity to use, reinforce, and apply this learner outcome but does not get evaluated on this learner outcome.

0    No Emphasis: The student does not address this learner outcome.      

                                          

Plan for Assessment Timetable

 

PLO

FL 2009

SP 2010

FL 2010

SP 2011

FL 2011

SP 2012

FL 2012

SP 2013

FL 2013

SP 2014

1

DENT 150

 

 

 

DENT 151

 

 

DENT 152

 

 

2

 

DENT 152

DENT 176

 

 

 

DENT 164

 

 

DENT 154

3

 

 

 

DENT 152

DENT 150

 

 

 

 

DENT 152

  1. Analysis of Student Outcome and Goal Achievement

           In fall 2012, PLO 2 was assessed in DENT 164. In spring 2013, PLO 1 was assessed in DENT 152.

DENT 164 Oral Biology I – PLO 2

The student learning outcomes for DENT 164 include understanding the general anatomy of the head and neck  including the bones of the skull; musculature;  arteries, veins, lymphatics and the nervous structures. In addition, the student learning outcome include understanding the oral cavity, teeth, normal periodontal tissues, oral mucous membranes, salivary glands, anatomy and identification of teeth, the eruption sequence of teeth, classifications of occlusion, oral microbiology and oral pathology.

DENT 152 Chairside Dental Assisting – PLO 1         

The student learning outcomes for DENT 152 include perform all dental assisting functions as defined in the Dental Practice Act, with no soft or hard tissue trauma and present information accumulated during a dental examination in verbal or written form, documenting information in a clear, accurate, and  appropriate manner.  Program Learning Outcome 1 of Dental Assisting Program Learning Outcomes was assessed in this course by evaluating students’ performance in externship practicum. In addition to the dental assisting program outcomes, the student was assessed on the following general education standards: written communication, information retrieval and technology, oral communication, and critical thinking.

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

Evidence and Results of Student Learning

DENT 164 Oral Biology I – PLO 2

Program Learning Outcome 2 of dental assisting learning outcomes was assessed by evaluating various skill competencies, exams, and learning skills lab exercises and projects.  In addition to the dental assisting program outcomes, the student was assessed on the following general education standards: critical thinking oral communication, written communication, information retrieval and creativity.

In DENT 164, five exams, one final exam, one power point presentation, two learning skills lab exercise, class attendance and class participation were used to assess PLO 2 (Demonstrate basic theoretical knowledge and skills in biological science, dental radiology, chairside dental assisting, and business office procedures to support dental assisting practice and build the foundation for an associate degree dental hygiene program).  Students were assessed on competency skills, including dental photography and placement of orthodontic brackets and bands on the typodont teeth.  Students are assessed by an instructor, a peer, and themselves.

Proficiency in general learning outcomes: oral communication, written communication and creativity were assessed in the skills competencies and the power point presentation for oral pathology. Proficiency in information retrieval and critical thinking were assessed in the examinations. The students performed well in all aspects (100% exceeded or met expectation).  All of the students were proficient in these general education standards at a level necessary for their intended role as dental assistants.

DENT 152 Chairside Dental Assisting – PLO 1         

Only dental assisting majors were enrolled in this course; therefore the summative results reflect the Spring 2013 dental assisting graduates’ achievement of the program learning outcomes. Evidence was reported on the eighteen students who completed the course.  For PLO 1, 88.88% (16 of the 18 students) showed exemplary understanding of the legal, professional, and ethical role of the dental assistant and 11.11% (2 of the 18 students) met expectations.

Professional behavior evaluations during externship practicum were used to assess PLO 1 (Demonstrate an understanding of dental assistant roles including the legal, professional, and ethical responsibilities within the community). Students practice clinical dental assisting at 4 different dental sites for 3 week intervals. Students are assessed for professionalism and ethical practice by their supervising dentist.

Proficiency in written communication was assessed utilizing a written communication rubric for patient procedure notes. The students performed well in all aspects (88.88% exceeded expectation and 11.11% met expectation). Oral communication was assessed utilizing a rubric for a dental education project, with 100% of students exceeding expectation.  Critical thinking was assessed in case study evaluations with 83% exceeding expectation and 16% meeting expectation. Information retrieval was assessed by dental product review and assessment rubric, with 100% exceeding expectation. All of the students were proficient in these general education standards at a level necessary for their intended role as dental assistants.


 

E) Results of Program Assessment

DENT 152 Chairside Dental Assisting – PLO

 

Summative Evidence

 

 

 

Program Assessment Rubric

 

 

             

 

 

 

Exceeds

 

Meets

 

Needs Improvement

 

Insufficient Progress

 

N/A

 
                       

DENT 164 Oral Biology I

PLO 2 - Demonstrate basic theoretical knowledge and skills in biological science, dental radiology, chairside dental assisting, and business office procedures to support dental assisting practice and build the foundation for an associate degree dental hygiene program.

 

 

18

 

 

             
                       

Average PLO Score for the course

 

18

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

0

 
                       

 

                     
                       

General Education Standards

                     
                       

Critical Thinking

 

100%

                 
                       

Oral Communication

 

100%

                 
                       

Written Communication

 

 100 %

                 
                       

Information Retrieval

 

100%

                 
                       

Quantitative Reasoning

                     
                       

Creativity

 

100%

                 
                       

a. Explanation of Assessment Evidence

100% of the Dental Assisting students have met or exceeded expectations in Dental Assisting Program Learning Outcomes 2.  100% of dental assisting students met or exceeded in expectations in General Education Standards, written and oral communication, quantitative reasoning, and critical thinking.

b. Student Learning Discovery

Effective student learning can be achieved by using a variety of learning strategies that speak to our students who are diverse in their cultural backgrounds, experience, learning styles, and challenges.  The use of various learning strategies enables students to develop the knowledge and skills they will need to provide culturally competent health care to a diverse population.

DENT 152 Chairside Dental Assisting – PLO 1         

Summative Evidence

 

Program Assessment Rubric

 

Exceeds

Meets

Needs Improvement

Insufficient Progress

N/A

DENT 152 Chairside Dental Assisting

PLO 1 - Demonstrate an understanding of dental assistant roles including the legal, professional, and ethical responsibilities within the community.    

 

16

 

 

2

 

 

 

Average PLO Score for the course

16

2

0

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

General Education Standards

 

 

 

 

 

Critical Thinking

83%

16%

 

 

 

Oral Communication

100%

 

 

 

 

Written Communication

88%

11%

 

 

 

Information Retrieval

100%

 

 

 

 

Quantitative Reasoning

 

 

 

 

 

Creativity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Results of Student Learning

  1. Explanation of assessment evidence

100% of the Dental Assisting students have met or exceeded expectations in Dental Assisting Program Learning Outcome 1.  100% of dental assisting students met or exceeded in expectations in General Education Standards, written and oral communication, critical thinking, and information retrieval.

  1. Student learning discovery

Effective student learning can be achieved by using a variety of learning strategies that speak to our students who are diverse in their cultural backgrounds, experience, learning styles, and challenges.  The use of various learning strategies enables students to develop the knowledge and skills they will need to provide culturally competent health care to a diverse population.

CASLO Analysis

Seven members of the UH Maui College Dental Advisory Committee (5 were dentists) reviewed and discussed the Faculty Report on CASLO Evidence, the correlating course outline, and the Written Communication rubric. Seven of the 7 (100%) members agreed that the "minimally passing" evidence demonstrated student achievement of the Written Communications CASLO is at a level of skill appropriate for the certificate and dental assistant position in industry.

 

After reviewing the Faculty Report on CASLO Evidence, the correlating course outline, and the Written Communication rubric, 100% of the members agreed that the evidence presented in this assessment activity shows that students develop and demonstrate relevant writing skills that they will need as graduates of the program.

 

A variety of suggestions were discussed to improve this CASLO assessment method so that students are prompted to demonstrate exit-level skills that are relevant to the needs of graduates of the program. These included 1- to initiate S.O.A.P. assignments, or projects to improve students professional writing skills; 2- provide written examples of above the just passing guideline for the students to see; 3- use videos or present a demonstration and have them record it; 4- Create scenarios that replicate "real world", on the job scenarios; 5- Create templates of notes to shows record the treatment; 6-  Video patient's visit described by student and evaluated for comprehension of the patient's chief complaint, grammar, spelling and legal relevancy; 7- Dictation

 

The suggestions for improving curriculum, instruction, or student services to better develop the writing skills needed of graduates from the program were 1- Organize writing workshops; 2- Spelling and grammar and attention to detail are important; 3- Student Services could offer a service to students that has a primary focus on the mechanics in writing assignment or offer an English class that works in conjunction with and in support of the Dental Assisting program and that would focus on the English course SLOs through content-specific writing needed for the Dental Assisting field; 4- Practice in a group of taking procedural notes. Self-grading of their progress. List of terminology that they will be responsible for that period; 5- Learn the concept of using and modifying computer template notes on a computer; 6- Become familiar with the SOAP concept.

Suggestions for assessment practices that are aligned to curriculum and instruction with the needs of students were 1- Reviewing students writing at end of term; 2- Give written examples of the criteria you are looking for; 3- Have students analyze other students notes; 4- Have a different assessment form for the CTE programs with "work focused" language; 5- Maintain contact with the dental community in order to fulfill the actual needs of a dental office: what qualities and abilities are desired; 6- Emphasize EMR's as this will be the legal requirement in the near future;7- Constant exercises in writing and evaluation are paramount. Repetition and emphasis on increasing the value of an employee in order to maintain a job in the dental field should be stressed (employee should strive to make oneself indispensable); 8- Take a grammar diagnostic test at the beginning of the program then attend to the grammar areas they did not score adequately on before the end of the semester/program before program completion.

Students completed a variety of the suggested teaching strategies recommended. We continue to utilize these suggestions on a weekly basis to improve written communication skills of the dental assistant to provide clear and concise patient notes

F) Other Comments

  1. Engaged Community

The UH Maui College Dental assisting Program is fully engaged with our community partners. Dental experts share their expertise in the classroom (32 dental experts), provide externships in their offices (11 dentists and dental clinics), provide in-kind donations of supplies, and financial support for equipment and supplies. Community dentists invite our students into their office for specialized training on the most up-to date equipment and processes. In 2012-2013, 37 dental professionals shared their expertise with my students.

The results of student learning were extensively discussed with UHMC Dental Advisory Board members, with formal discussion and documentation. Dentists and other dental professionals routinely discuss program goals and curriculum with the Dental Assisting Coordinator and faculty. UH Maui College CASLO Written Communication results were discussed in detail, with suggestion for improvement offered. In fall 2013, 3 patient charting teaching strategies were implemented in DENT 151 (pp. 11-12.)

Students and faculty participated in 25 community health fairs, high school events, and service projects, working collaboratively with local dental professionals. The Maui County Dental Society and Maui County Dental Hygienists’ Association contributed funds to the UHMC Dental Assisting Program for the purchase of toothbrushes and paste used for community service events.

In addition, Maui dentists are generous in their support of student travel to the annual Hawaii Dental Association Convention on Oahu and have established two-$500. scholarships for Dental Assisting graduates entering the Dental Hygiene Program every other year.

Community supporter Sara Jean Tokunaga has shown her support in the establishment of the Donald and Alice Tokunaga Scholarship, which awards two-$500. scholarships to Dental Assisting Program graduates entering the Dental Hygiene Program every other year. Kihei Sunrise Rotary club also awarded a UHMC Dental Assisting scholarship to fund students’ certification exam.

The Dental Assisting Program students and faculty actively participate in community service and oral health education by attending health fairs, school recruitments, and other community activities. 

Since 2009, the Dental Assisting Program initiated, obtained funding, and organized the Baby Dental Packet Project at Maui Memorial Medical Center (MMMC) and pediatric offices and clinics on Maui. Dental Assisting faculty and students work closely with community partners to educate our community about proper oral health. Kaiser Permanente Community Benefit funded this project in 2013 and has renewed their support for 2014.

In 2013, the UH Maui College Dental Assisting Program will initiate and organize a “Keep Your Smile” Dental Informational packet project for seniors will be funded by the Doyle Foundation and Kaiser Permanente Community Benefit. This project will bring oral health education to Maui’s elderly population and service opportunities to our students.

  1. Recognize and Support Best Practices

The Dental Assisting Program has led the campus in implementing innovative teaching techniques, innovative use of technology, and incorporating “best practices” into pedagogy. Through Perkins funding, in spring 2013, Dental Assisting faculty assess students in real-time using Livetext assessment. This assessment tool allows assessment in the clinical areas using iPads. Students are able to view their progress and make necessary remediation, if needed, immediately. Students are also able to create ePortfolios, which highlight student work during the program when seeking employment or pursuing higher education.

Through Perkins funding, iPads were put in the hands of students, increasing access to curriculum, researching of pertinent clinical issues in the operatory, course content understanding, and practical use in patient education, as they do in the dental office. Students report increased understanding of course material and ease in tracking their progress and knowing immediately if remediation is needed for skill mastery.

Faculty routinely utilize Turning Point Technology (Clickers) in theory review. Students report increased understanding of course material by using this non-confrontational method of reviewing material and gauging student understanding.

Dental assisting students learn from industry experts in the classroom and in the dental office. Students visit every specialty dental office, including oral and maxillofacial surgery, periodontics, orthodontics, endodontics, pedodontics, and prosthodontics, to experience industry settings. Students draw posters depicting radiographic processing and exposure errors; fabricate bleaching trays and mouth guard appliances; research, conduct, and judge debates on current dental ethical dilemmas; prepare for employment by participating in mock interviews with community members serving as perspective employers; create a marketing program for a fictitious dental office; experience hands-on training in the clinical setting using manikins and then proceed to patients; and other hands-on, real-world learning strategies.

The UHMC Dental Assisting Program was awarded the grant funding for Livetext and iPads for faculty and all dental assisting students, the Baby Dental Packet Project, and the Maternal Home Visit Project in 2013. The Dental Assisting Program Coordinator was invited to facilitate an ePortfolio roundtable presentation at the American Dental Education Association annual conference in San Antonio, Texas in March 2014.

G) Next Steps

  1. Program Plans and Goals

The Outcomes Assessment Plan will continue to be implemented for the current students.  Surveys will continue to be sent to graduates and their employers. 

Students will be assisted in the facilitation of DANB testing, including computer mock testing and material review.

Program will continue to heavily recruit students at high school career fairs, service-learning activities, UH Maui College Biology 100 classes (prerequisite to DA program), high school and program orientations, and career shadowing programs.

Clinical experiences will begin in the fall semester and continue into the spring semester.  Increased hours of clinical practice will be made available and strongly encouraged for students at the Maui Oral Health Center, shadowing and assisting staff dentists.

The highly successful iPad and Livetext assessment project will continue, allowing students access to researching various topics in the dental operatory and classroom; assess to course information, Powerpoints, outlines, discussion groups, announcements; real-time assessment and remediation of procedure and skill mastery; and practical experience using industry  iPad applications such as Dentrix and patient education application DDS GP. Students will continue to utilize LiveText assessment and field study application (assessment of externship practicum), develop student ePortfolios, and master iPad use for the dental office setting.

Service-learning will continue with emphasis on community education. The Baby Dental Packet Project will continue to provide dental health information to all babies born at MMMC and at pediatric offices and clinics on Maui as well as community service experiences at area schools and health fairs.

Access to the on-campus Dental Facility in the renovated science building will significantly enhance clinical learning opportunities for DA and DH students.  The faculty will have 10 operatories dedicated to the DA/DH programs and a separate x-ray teaching room, having 3 radiography chairs.  The additional operatories will allow more opportunity for hands-on practice and make instruction more efficient. The addition of new equipment, x-ray teaching manikins and digital x-ray units in every operatory, will provide students with experience using these important diagnostic tools in dental practice.  The additional 8 operatories on the service side of the facility will allow more students to complete the spring practicum working with dentists at the Maui Oral Health Center facility. The new facility will also allow admission of DH students annually, which will provide increased opportunity for the DA graduates to continue to DH Program.

Goals for Program Improvement