University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: University of Hawaii Maui College
Program: Dental Hygiene

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The last comprehensive review for this program was on 2012, and can be viewed at:
http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/arpd/instructional.php?action=analysis&college=MAU&year=2012&program=126
STEM Program

Program Description

Program Description

Program mission statement

The Dental Hygiene Associate in Science Program is a two year program (upon admission to the Dental Hygiene Program) that prepares students to become oral health care professionals whose work will positively impact the oral health status of the Maui County and the neighbor islands.

The mission of the Dental Hygiene program is to prepare students for careers in Dental Hygiene with three major emphases:

 

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Healthy

Majors Included: DH     Program CIP: 51.0602

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 New & Replacement Positions (State) 33 32 40 Healthy
2 *New & Replacement Positions (County Prorated) 3 3 4
3 *Number of Majors 9.5 12 10
3a     Number of Majors Native Hawaiian 0 2 0
3b     Fall Full-Time 0% 18% 0%
3c     Fall Part-Time 100% 82% 100%
3d     Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 0% 0% 0%
3e     Spring Full-Time 0% 92% 0%
3f     Spring Part-Time 100% 8% 100%
3g     Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 0% 0% 0%
4 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes 185 0 210
5 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes 0 0 0
6 SSH in All Program Classes 185 0 210
7 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes 6 0 7
8 Total Number of Classes Taught 9 0 9

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
9 Average Class Size 8.8 0 10 Healthy
10 *Fill Rate 87.7% 0% 100%
11 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 0 1 1
12 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 0 12 10
13 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty 12.2 0 12.9
13a Analytic FTE Faculty 0.8 0 0.8
14 Overall Program Budget Allocation $90,786 $516,240 $171,074
14a General Funded Budget Allocation $81,786 $123,037 $155,707
14b Special/Federal Budget Allocation $0 $0 $0
14c Tuition and Fees $0 $12,082 $15,367
15 Cost per SSH $491 $0 $815
16 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 9 0 0
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
17 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 100% 0% 100% Healthy
18 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 0 0 0
19 *Persistence Fall to Spring 100% 100% 100%
19a Persistence Fall to Fall     0%
20 *Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded 9 0 10
20a Degrees Awarded 9 0 10
20b Certificates of Achievement Awarded 0 0 0
20c Advanced Professional Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
20d Other Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
21 External Licensing Exams Passed   100% Not Reported
22 Transfers to UH 4-yr 0 0 0
22a Transfers with credential from program 0 0 0
22b Transfers without credential from program 0 0 0

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
23 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught 0 0 0  
24 Enrollments Distance Education Classes N/A N/A N/A
25 Fill Rate N/A N/A N/A
26 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) N/A N/A N/A
27 Withdrawals (Grade = W) N/A N/A N/A
28 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education) N/A N/A N/A

Perkins IV Core Indicators
2011-2012
Goal Actual Met  
29 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment 90.00 0 Not Met  
30 2P1 Completion 50.00 0 Not Met
31 3P1 Student Retention or Transfer 74.25 100.00 Met
32 4P1 Student Placement 60.00 88.89 Met
33 5P1 Nontraditional Participation 17.00 0.00 Not Met
34 5P2 Nontraditional Completion 15.25 0 Not Met

Performance Funding Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
35 Number of Degrees and Certificates     10  
36 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     0
37 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     10
38 Number of Pell Recipients     5
39 Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr     0
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

1. PROGRAM'S STRENGTHS

a. Response to Demand Indicators

There are job opportunities in the local dental hygiene profession (#2), and the DH degree program fulfills this request by training an adequate number of majors (#3) contributing to healthy ratios:#degrees/#majors and #degrees/#county positions.

b. Response to Efficiency Indicators

Program Fill Rate is @100%.

c. Response to Effectiveness Indicators

During the academic year 2012-2013, all ten students earned an AS degree in DH and successfully passed external licensing exams.  This corresponds to healthy ratios: #majors and #degrees /#county positions.

2. PROGRAM'S WEAKNESSES

a. Response to Demand Indicators

There are no Native Hawaiian's as Majors.

b. Response to Efficiency Indicators

Regarding line 14; Overall Program Budget of $516,240 is inaccurate.  The Commission on Dental Accreditation mandates that the instructor to student ratio be maintained at 1:5 for all clinical instruction therefore addtional faculty must be hired.  This increases the program costs but not by the amount value represented on line 14.

c. Response to Effectiveness Indicators

To date, all data support student success in the dental hygiene program.

3. RESPONSE TO PERKINS INDICATORS

Regarding line 29; 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment & 2P1 Completion is inaccurate.  All dental hygiene students are required to maintain a 2.0 in didactic course work & 3.0 in clinical skills GPA.  All ten dental hygiene students have completed the curriculum and graduated in May 2013 earning an AS in DH which is the terminal degree.  Data collection process should be amended to reflect that the goals have been met.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Part III. Action Plan

Below are the changes reported in academic year 2012.  These changes have been approved and implemented beginning f2013 & students have responded positively.

Changes made in curriculum or pedagogy to improve student learning and the results of those changes.  Using the Curriculum Management Plan, the following changes are currently in Curriculum Committee. 

o   Removing Psy. 100 as pre-req. Students take Soc. 100 or Anth 200 to fulfill the Social Science Requirement.  Also         offering COM 145 to fulfill the Communication requirement.

o   Created a new DH course, DH 158 Anatomical Science. Additional course in Dental Anatomy and Morphology will increase student confidence by creating a strong foundation for higher order learning.  This course is taught in the beginning of the rigorous curriculum where all other skills with develop and evolve.

o   DH 256 Pharmacology in dentistry, increase from one credit hour to two credit hours to facilitate learning of all systems.

o   DH 268 Radiology, deleting this course due to repetitive course content.  Information from this course will be incorporated in the two remaining radiology courses.

Programs strengths and challenges.

Strengths:

On August 4, 2011, the UHMC DH Program was granted the accreditation status of "approval without reporting requirements."  The next site visit for the program is scheduled for 2018. This is the highest level of accreditation that can be obtained and clearly illustrates the many strengths and quality of the DH Program.

The quality of the curriculum and instruction in the UHMC DH Program is highlighted by the 100% pass rate of both the written and clinical DH Boards by all DH students. All 2013 gradates are currently employed as dental hygienist on Maui & Oahu.

Dental Hygiene is established as a high demand career choice due to the community need for providers and the competitive salary for an Associate Degree graduate.  The Employment Outlook according to the American Dental Association states:

  “According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), “employment of dental hygienists is expected to grow 36 percent through 2018, much faster than average for all occupations, ranking dental hygiene among the fastest growing occupations. This is in response to increasing demands for dental care and the greater utilization of hygienists to perform services previously performed by dentists. Job prospects are expected to be favorable in most areas, but will vary by geographical location.  Because graduates are permitted to practice only in the State in which they are licensed, hygienists wishing to practice in areas that have an abundance of dental hygiene programs may experience strong competition for jobs.”  (http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos097.htm).”

All 2013 UHMC DH graduates are currently employed in Maui County & Oahu.  New UHMC DH Graduates are currently earning 27.00 to 45.00 per hour which is twice the Maui County Per Capita Salary. http://www.metasalary.com/statedata.php?id=Maui%20County,%20HI

Challenges:

The Maui Oral Health Center (MOHC) serves as the clinical teaching facility for all dental programs, Dental Assisting, Dental Hygiene, and Dental Residency. There are 7 functional treatment areas in the MOHC which must be shared by all programs.  This makes scheduling difficult.

The table below summarizes the strengths and challenges of the DH program.

UH Maui College

DH Program Strengths and Challenges Report

STRENGTHS

CHALLENGES

BOR approved establish program

Maintain high level of qualified faculty

Fully Accredited by ADACODA

Limited clinical faculty which is shared by two other dental programs; MOHC & the DA Program

Access to AS degree in Dental Hygiene at UHMC

100% Pass rate

Students serve the underprivileged & poor in our community

Current facility is out dated

Program will move to newly renovated facility on UHMC campus in 2015

Meeting the demands of local dental health providers who need hygienists

Graduates earning high wages

 

Support from strong active community Advisory

Committee

 

    Planning and Policy Considerations

In academic year 2013-2014, Allied Health Counselor, Maggie Bruck and DH Program Coordinator, Rosie Vierra will actively pursue degree completion programs for our students who express interest in completing a baccalaureate degree.  UHM offers a BS degree in DH, UH Hilo has an online BA, Public Admin., Health Care Administration and Pacific University Oregon offers a Bachelors of Health Science (BHS) also an online program.  Providing online options is a highlight with some students who favor staying on Maui so they may continue to work and engage with their families.

The new dental programs facility is expected to be completed in 2015.   The new clinic will be located on the main campus of UHMC. The new dental facility will have 18 state of the art operatories, laboratory, conference room, faculty and staff office.  The new facility will allow UHMC to serve additional uninsured or Medicaid-eligible students and the community at large. It is anticipated that the dental facility will increase the numbers of patients currently served by approximately 30%, providing increase resources for the program.

 

Part IV. Resource Implications

Additional FTE faculty to facilitate admitting one class every year versus every other year upon moving into new facility.  This faculty position will be an 11 month assignment. The approximate cost of additional faculty and lecturers (1.0FT 11 month faculty and 2 0.5FT lecturers) is $130,000.  These funds will be requested in the biennium budget

Investigate purchasing computers/equipment to incorporate electronic health/dental records at new dental facility on campus, $50,000 – 100,000.

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

Yes
Demonstrate their cumulative knowledge and skill by successfully passing both written and clinical dental hygiene board examinations.

2

No
Provide comprehensive dental hygiene care to promote patient/client health and wellness using critical thinking and problem solving in the provision of evidence-based practice.

3

Yes
Provide accurate, consistent, and complete documentation for assessment, and evaluation of dental hygiene services.

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

The Maui dental and dental hygiene communities are collaborative and well represented on the UH Maui College Dental Advisory Committee. Many of the Dental Advisory Members serve as guest lecturers in the dental programs.  

The strong Advisory Committee is clearly a strength of the UH Maui College Hygiene Program.  Members actively engage in promoting employment opportunities, curriculum development, revision, and updates.

 The 2012 Dental Advisory meeting was scheduled for November 14th.  The updated curriculum changes were discussed along with the provisional to established status and the update of the new dental facility.

The 2013 Dental Advisory meeting will be scheduled in academic year 2013-14.  In addition to the strong/supportive dental advisory committee, evidence collected from employer surveys confim that the dentists in the community who hire our graduates are greatly satisfied with the level of expertise that each graduate exhibits.

B) Expected Level Achievement

Exams, projects and homework are graded on the point system in the table below.  Dental Hygiene Students are required to maintain a “B” in the clinical portion of the curriculum and no lower than a “C” in the didactic.

 

A

B

C

D

90-100%

80-89%

70-79%

60-69%

Summative evidence

The evidence used to assess, and the results of the assessment for the program learning outcomes, will be discussed separately for each course that was assessed during this review period.Each program assessment is based on the following scale:

 

 

Exceeds

 

Meets

Needs Improvement

Insufficient

Progress

Grades of A

Grade of B

Grade of C

Grade D

C) Courses Assessed

Program learning outcomes 1 & 3 were assessed in the last academic year.  DH 258, Periodontics was used to assess PLO 3; DH 263, Clinical Dental Hygiene, for PLO 1.  Only dental hygiene majors in the above courses were assessed for evaluating program learning outcomes.

 

Map of Program Learning Outcomes by Course

PLO

1

2

3

DH 150

3

2

2

DH 153

3

3

2

DH 155

3

2

3

DH 156

3

3

3

DH 173

3

2

2

DH 254

3

3

2

DH 255

3

2

3

DH 256

3

2

2

DH 257

3

2

2

DH 258

3

3

2

DH 260

3

3

3

DH 261

3

3

3

DH 262

3

3

3

DH 263

3

3

3

DH 264

3

3

2

DH 265

3

3

1

DH 266

3

3

3

DH 267

3

3

2

DH 268

3

3

2

DH 269

3

3

2

 

Key:   3 Major Emphasis:  The student actively involved (uses, reinforces, applies, and evaluated) in the student learning outcomes.  The    learner outcome is the focus of the class.

          2 Moderate Emphasis:  The student uses, reinforces, applies and is evaluated by this learner outcome, but it is not the focus of the   class.

          1 Minor Emphasis:  The student is provided an opportunity to use, reinforce, and apply this learner outcome but does not get evaluated on this learner outcome.

         0 No Emphasis:  The student does not address this learner outcome.

Dental Hygiene Assessment Plan:  Time Table

PLO

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

1

 

DH 263

Spring

 

DH 263

Spring

 

2

DH 153

Spring

DH 261

Fall

DH 257

Fall

 

DH 150

Fall

3

DH 260

Fall

 

DH 266

Spring

DH 258

Fall

DH 156

Spring

 

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

Assessment tools used to assess PLO#1 in DH 263 Clinical DH:

Assessment tools used to assess PLO#3 in DH 258:

E) Results of Program Assessment

Program Assessment Rubric for DH 258 Periodontics   Fall 2013

 

Exceeds

Meets

Needs Improvement

No Proficiency

Student Learning Outcome

 

 

 

 

 Explain the rational and demonstrate on a typodont or other model, various types of periodontal chemotherapy.

 

8

2

0

Given a client case study, apply the knowledge from this and other dental hygiene courses to perform a comprehensive periodontal assessment and treatment plan appropriate for that client.

 

8

2

0

Define skills needed to implement evidence-based decision making.

 

8

2

0

Number of students assessed:  10

 

 

 

 

Average SLO Score for the Course

 

80%

20%

0%

DH 258 Periodontics

Only dental hygiene majors were enrolled in this course. Evidence was reported on the ten students who completed the course.  For PLO 3, 80% (8 of the 10 students) showed they met expectation and 20% (2 of the 10 students) showed they need improvement.  The competencies continue to build on the past knowledge and thus become more rigorous.   The curriculum is structured to demonstrate higher-order knowledge and application. Content increases in depth and complexity as the program progresses. The two students, who showed a need for improvement, were given the opportunity to participate in case studies and discussion to emphasize proper documentation, acceptable standards of care and the limitations placed on dental hygienist. Dental hygiene practice does increase higher order application of knowledge.

PLO  3:   Provide accurate, consistent, and complete documentation for assessment, and evaluation of dental hygiene services.  Multiple exam questions and clinical experiences were used to assess.

Program Assessment Rubric for DH 263 Clinical DH    Spring2013

 

Exceeds

Meets

Needs Improvement

No Proficiency

Student Learning Outcome

 

 

 

 

Demonstrate their cumulative knowledge and skill by successfully passing both written and clinical dental hygiene board examinations.

10

 

 

 

 Consistently demonstrate professional behavior that shows a high degree of professional ethics and conduct in interactions with clients, fellow students, and faculty.

10

 

 

 

 

Personal & Professional accountability evaluations

 

10

 

 

 

Number of students assessed:  10

10

 

 

 

Average SLO Score for the Course

100%

 

 

 

 DH 263 Clinical Dental Hygiene

Only dental hygiene majors were enrolled in this course. Evidence was reported on the ten students who completed the course.  For PLO 1, 100% (10 of the 10 students) showed they exceeded expectation. 

PLO 1. Demonstrate their cumulative knowledge and skill by successfully passing both written and clinical dental hygiene board examinations.

Students learn and retain information more accurately and adequately when they are engaged and have determined that they need the information that is being taught.  In other words, if it is relevant to their daily life or in this case, to the practice of dental hygiene, they are willing to learn.  Students also appreciate fairness and understand that when they put in the time and effort, the benefits/rewards will follow.

CASLO Analysis-
Written Communication

CASLO ASSESSMENT METHODS

Although students were provided with an outline for the assignment, the topic of having a thesis statement should be

emphasized. Also, it would be helpful to provide a sample for the students to review.

Students should have practice in understanding and analysis prior to this assignment. Look for opportunities to include assignments that require these skills in other courses in the program, and encourage ENG 100 faculty to include analysis of reading in their preliminary assignments.

Students need plentiful practice using analysis of information in the prerequisite course and other WI courses required by the program.

 

IMROVING CURRICULUM, INSTRUCTION, OR STUDENT SERVICES TO BETTER DEVELOP THE WRITING SKILLS NEEDED OF GRADUATES FROM THE PROGRAM

Students need to practice using a “professional voice.” During writing assignments, they should receive feedback from program instructors. This outcome should be built into the competencies. Maybe a phrase like “using vocabulary and a professional voice appropriate for a dental work environment” could be added to the course outline and potentially rubrics for some written assignments.

1. Listening to the needs from industry, in this program they would be the dentists who will hire the dental hygiene

student. Producing industry ready students is a priority. 2. Listening to the needs of the students & instructors who teach specific courses and need additional course work for better preparation. Dental Hygiene is based on higher order learning.  3. Recruit additional tutors (reading & writing) at TLC.

Work with English department to ensure that students enter the program with paraphrasing/summarizing skills. Include an outcome such as "use a voice and vocabulary appropriate for a professional workplace setting in written

communication" in course outlines and rubrics for evaluating assignments. Provide plentiful practice in using workplace appropriate language in assignments throughout the program. Include assignments that require students to read and demonstrate understanding of relevant articles from journals and other work related sources.

 It is imperative to have WI courses as prerequisites for this program. Students should come into the program with the

necessary writing skills, as there is limited/no instruction time allocated for writing once they are in the program. A WI

            health terminology/writing course would be ideal.

ASSESSMENT PRACTICES

I think this assessment is adequate.  The DH Program is only in its 4th year therefore we are testing what works. Early predictors (100%) pass rate on licensing boards in a strong indicator that the programs curriculum and instruction are aligned. Students are learning the necessary skills to become licensed dental hygienist.  Participation of the group was very enthusiastic, but at the beginning of a busy day, it felt a little rushed. Maybe scheduling annual assessment meetings after work would help. This is a small program, but another faculty member and/or advisory member would have added greater breadth to the discussion.

                OTHER COMMENTS OR SUGGESTIONS

Best practices should be encouraged: 1. Data input on “chart assignments” prepares students to use vocabulary of

the dental field in more complex reports like writing observational reports. This is a good activity, especially in early

program courses. 2. Course assignments that reinforce general education outcomes such as evaluating research and

demonstrating understanding of reading through paraphrase, reinforces previous skill development and prepares

students for future coursework. Students struggle with evaluating information in reading material. How can this skill be promoted throughout the college?

Improving reading comprehensive, perhaps if the student better understands what she is reading, the idea of expressing herself in a way that is meaningful, owning the work and being proud of the work, we as instructors would see less material that is either in quotes and cited properly or copied!

 WI courses should require ENG 100 as a pre-requisite. There should be a WI healthcare core that Dental hygiene

             candidates can take as a prerequisite.

 

 

F) Other Comments

Engaged Community

Upon graduation, all DH graduates are industry-ready.  Students provide essential oral care for community members as a part of their training.  The UHMC Dental Hygiene Program contributes highly qualified, motivated practitioners of dental hygiene to the Hawai’i community.  They are ideally oriented to address the unique challenges to oral health in Hawai’i because their training takes place in the community in which they live and which they serve.

The alignment of program outcomes and industry need is monitored and by evaluated by the college through the Program Review Process, the Dental Advisory Committee, Maui County Dental Society, and ADACODA. 

Employer Surveys and Patient Satisfaction Surveys provide additional evidence of Program Quality.

Evidence that results of student learning has been discussed with Program Advisory Board.

The Maui dental and dental hygiene communities are collaborative and well represented on the UH Maui College Dental Advisory Committee. Many of the Dental Advisory Members serve as guest lecturers in the dental programs.  

The strong Advisory Committee is clearly a strength of the UH Maui College Hygiene Program.  Members actively engage in promoting employment opportunities, curriculum development, revision, and updates.

    Recognize and Support Best Practices

The program received a new digital/cephalometric panoramic x-ray unit funded by the Hawai’i Dental Service Foundation.  This unit/instrument takes a digital photograph of head including measurements. The use of digital utilizes less radiation and allows the student to become industry ready.  The use of magnification loupes, considered the standard of care were made mandatory for incoming class.

To meet the needs of students who learn in varied ways, techniques are demonstrated, students are involved in teaching one another, involved in small group discussions, presentations, debates, and role playing activities.  They are complete research activities, and present information with audiovisual aids such as Power Point presentations, DVD’s, CD’s, and other formats using the students’ netbooks. Our current students are technologically savvy and we as faculty find it beneficial to keep up with new methods of how the students learn and retain new knowledge and skills.

G) Next Steps

OUTCOME AND GOAL ACHIEVEMENT

Program Learning Outcomes

                The program learning outcomes for the Dental Hygiene program are the following:  The goals of the dental hygiene program are to prepare the dental hygiene student to competently achieve the PLO’s consistently.

                PLO 1. Demonstrate their cumulative knowledge and skill by successfully passing both written and clinical dental hygiene board examinations.

                PLO 2. Provide comprehensive dental hygiene care to promote patient/client health and wellness using critical thinking and problem solving in the provision of evidence-based practice.

                PLO 3.  Provide accurate, consistent, and complete documentation for assessment, and evaluation of dental hygiene services.

 

Changes made in curriculum or pedagogy to improve student learning and the results of those changes.  Using the Curriculum Management Plan, the following changes have passed through the Curriculum Committee, approved by Administrators and are being implemented f2013.

 

The 2012 CASLO-Written Communication was assessed.  The DH faculty has implemented the policy of weekly journaling by students.  Because the scope of each faculty members expertise, the topics are varied and occasionally students may select a topic of interest to them.  Our goal is to improve the skill of writing through practice.

  The 2013 CASLO- Information Literacy will be assessed in sp2014.

The DH Program helps to influence and shape the college policies and practices by setting high stands of educational effectiveness by the high rate of student success in passing external exams, job placement and by engaging students in active learning.