University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

Select the desired review year, college, and program from the drop down menus. Once a program has been selected, the results will be displayed.

Review Year: College: Program:

College: University of Hawaii Maui College
Program: Hospitality and Tourism

Printer Friendly

PDF PDF

The last comprehensive review for this program was on 2011, and can be viewed at:
http://maui.hawaii.edu/faculty/program_review/2011/Academic_Affairs/HospitalityandTourism.pdf

Program Description

UH Maui College’s Hospitality & Tourism program provides to a diverse community of lifelong learners educational opportunities that focus on student engagement and skills essential for successful employment in leadership positions in the hospitality industry. 

 

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Healthy

Majors Included: HOST     Program CIP: 52.0901

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 New & Replacement Positions (State) 286 101 117 Healthy
2 *New & Replacement Positions (County Prorated) 62 13 19
3 *Number of Majors 59.5 74.5 67.5
3a     Number of Majors Native Hawaiian 8 12 9
3b     Fall Full-Time 64% 39% 46%
3c     Fall Part-Time 36% 61% 54%
3d     Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 0% 1% 3%
3e     Spring Full-Time 48% 32% 36%
3f     Spring Part-Time 52% 68% 64%
3g     Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 0% 5% 2%
4 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes 451 430 408
5 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes 154 151 257
6 SSH in All Program Classes 605 581 665
7 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes 20 19 22
8 Total Number of Classes Taught 17 19 17

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
9 Average Class Size 12.1 10.6 13.9 Healthy
10 *Fill Rate 59.5% 55.9% 62.2%
11 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 1 1 2
12 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 59.5 74.5 33.7
13 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty 35.7 43.7 46.7
13a Analytic FTE Faculty 1.7 1.7 1.4
14 Overall Program Budget Allocation $102,064 $116,133 $116,324
14a General Funded Budget Allocation $102,064 $114,880 $116,122
14b Special/Federal Budget Allocation $0 $0 $0
14c Tuition and Fees $0 $1,253 $202
15 Cost per SSH $169 $200 $175
16 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 4 7 5
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
17 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 58% 73% 70% Cautionary
18 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 10 5 22
19 *Persistence Fall to Spring 80.3% 67.5% 62.3%
19a Persistence Fall to Fall     44.9%
20 *Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded 15 12 12
20a Degrees Awarded 5 8 4
20b Certificates of Achievement Awarded 9 2 6
20c Advanced Professional Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
20d Other Certificates Awarded 12 5 10
21 External Licensing Exams Passed   Not Reported Not Reported
22 Transfers to UH 4-yr 0 3 0
22a Transfers with credential from program 0 0 0
22b Transfers without credential from program 0 3 0

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
23 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught 3 3 5  
24 Enrollments Distance Education Classes 34 33 77
25 Fill Rate 38% 46% 56%
26 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 74% 82% 65%
27 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 2 0 8
28 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education) 85% 100% 62%

Perkins IV Core Indicators
2011-2012
Goal Actual Met  
29 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment 90.00 91.67 Met  
30 2P1 Completion 50.00 50.00 Met
31 3P1 Student Retention or Transfer 74.25 83.33 Met
32 4P1 Student Placement 60.00 60.00 Met
33 5P1 Nontraditional Participation N/A N/A N/A
34 5P2 Nontraditional Completion N/A N/A N/A

Performance Funding Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
35 Number of Degrees and Certificates     10  
36 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     0
37 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     Not STEM
38 Number of Pell Recipients     37
39 Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr     0
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

Based on the Program Quantitative Indicators, overall, the Hospitality & Tourism (HOST) program is “Healthy.”  Although the number of majors decreased slightly (7%) from the previous year, the program faculty continues to actively recruit students locally and internationally.  As part of the program’s expansion to international markets, nine international students from Shanghai Normal University and two students from Mapua Institute of Technology (Philippines) enrolled in the HOST program in 2012-2013.

Goals for the Perkins IV Core Indicators have all been met.  As the economy strengthens, new and replacement positions in the state and county continue to increase and thus HOST graduates are readily employed. In addition, student retention or transfer increased 9%.  This can be attributed to the efforts of the HOST counselor, transition specialist, and HOST faculty in monitoring students, providing group advising sessions, and implementing intervention strategies as needed.  The number of graduates and number of degrees and certificates conferred will continue to increase as the enrollment for the HOST program grows.

Effectiveness Indicators show that the HOST program is “Cautionary.”  Successful completion (equivalent C or higher) decreased 3% and there were significantly more withdrawals than the previous year.  Based on mid-term progress, HOST faculty focused on students who were consistently performing poorly in class by providing additional assistance or informing them of the option to withdraw during the designated period.  Furthermore, persistence from fall to spring also decreased 5.2%.  Recognizing the challenge of persistence within the program, in summer 2013 the HOST program piloted the use of Zoho, a Customer Relations Program that allows faculty to access a database of students who registered in the fall 2012 and spring 2013 semesters but did not register for classes in fall 2013.  Follow up calls were made to students and assistance with registration was provided as needed.

Part III. Action Plan

~~

The HOST Program recognizes its strengths as well as its opportunities of development:

Strengths
•Accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Programs in Hospitality Administration (effective Summer 2011- Summer 2018)
•The development of the Hospitality Academy of Maui Teaching Lab has the support of the county leadership, industry leaders, and community members
•Commitment, expertise, and network of resources for the program advisory committee

•Alignment of the HOST program’s mission statement with UH Maui College’s mission and vision
•The HOST program has developed a HOST Strategic Plan 2010-2015, which documents and measures the program’s progress toward its programmatic mission and UH Maui College’s mission. The document outlines goals, corresponding outcomes, strategies and action agenda items.
•Breadth of experience of the people involved with the overall program implementation
•Articulation agreements are in place with UH Manoa’s School of Travel Industry Management, Kapiolani CC, Hawaii CC, Kauai CC and Leeward CC
•Although the program has limited lab facilities at this time, the two renovated lab units are being used for the Housekeeping Operations class for practicums; instructors have incorporated the HA of Maui into course project design in HOST courses such as HOST 250 (Hospitality Marketing) and HOST 298 (Hospitality Capstone)
•The program has established partnerships with institutions in China and the Philippines that support student/faculty exchange programs
•Developed partnership with the Native Hawaiian Hospitality Association (NaHHA)

 

Weaknesses
•Limited funding resources available to develop, maintain, and sustain the HA of Maui learning lab
•Limited financial resources to sustain growth of program; no percentage of tuition for international internships has been allocated for HOST program over the past three years
•Limited learning resources in the library
•Breadth of HOST classes is limited
•Limited amount of graduates from the Academy of Hospitality & Tourism (AOHT) matriculate to UH Maui College’s HOST program
•No short-term credentialing options for industry professionals seeking professional development
•No database of internship opportunities available for HOST students
•Lack of comprehensive alumni student database (limited responses from surveys)

After evaluating the program's strengths and weaknesses, in last year's program review (2011-201), specific goals were outlined.  The information below discusses the progress made toward attaining the program goals during the past year.
•Work with UHMC leadership and the HOST advisory committee to secure funds to renovate the HA of Maui as well as to sustain overall growth of program

In summer 2013, the state legislature approved $3.5 million to fund the renovation of the HA of Maui lab.Need to continue to seek funding to sustain HA of Maui lab.
•Expand learning resources in library

In progress.
•Continue the development and utilization of online course delivery and hybrid class structures to expand the reach of the program

Offered HOST 101 online since fall 2011; in fall 2013 HOST 101 online class students were invited to participate in an “international classroom” and they collaborated on a class project with tourism management students at Shanghai Normal University via Polycom and Laulima.
•Create an enrollment management strategy to increase student enrollment from AOHT programs

In summer 2013, piloted the use of Zoho, a Customer Relations Program, to track prospective students.Continued to provide orientation/informational sessions for Maui High School students.Need to expand reach to Baldwin and Lahainaluna High School.
•Collaborate with Office of Continuing Education and training to establish short-term credentialing options for industry professionals

In progress.
•Create comprehensive alumni student database

Piloting the use of Zoho to track alumni.In progress.
• Establish the HOST program into a year-round program

Offered HOST 200 as a summer course in 2013 for the first time.Plan to include HOST 100 in summer 2014 and possibly other short-term HOST courses.
•Expand the global reputation and reach of the HOST program with the continuation and development of international student/faculty exchange opportunities with institutions in China and the Philippines

In AY 2012- 2013, seven faculty and retirees from UHMC traveled to Shanghai and taught various courses at Shanghai Normal University. Furthermore, in August 2013, a HOST student went to the DoubleTree Hilton in China to complete a 6-month internship.The HOST program continues to expand its reach in China.
•Expand our marketing and promotional efforts: update website, use of current media (i.e. social networks), collateral material

Through a grant from the Hawaii Tourism Authority, the HOST website is being updated by Gilbert & Associates (Fall 2013).Collateral for the program is also being developed in collaboration with UHMC’s Marketing Director.
•Create a database of internship experience opportunities for HOST students

In progress.
•Use LiveText in all HOST courses

Need to collaborate with department chair.
•Expand scholarship opportunities for HOST students through resource development

Need to work with UHMC Foundation Office to explore funding opportunities.
•Engage faculty in professional development opportunities to support student learning

HOST faculty attended a variety of seminars/conferences to enhance teaching strategies and support student learning.

The HOST program has modified course outlines to interweave key Hawaiian values throughout the curriculum.  HOST faculty participated in training sessions in the fall of 2012 with the Native Hawaiian Hospitality Association (NaHHA) to incorporate host culture training within the current curriculum. We had also included Chinese interns and a Chinese visiting scholar into the NaHHA training. The HOST faculty consulted with NaHHA instructors in the process of integrating the cultural content into HOST curriculum and classroom design.

Liping was selected to be the Wo Learning Champion (WoLC) Generation IX representing UHMC, in the fall of 2012.  The WoLC meetings and activities provide an optimal platform where she could engage in collaborative, collegial campus and system activities.  The opportunities also enable her to share the knowledge and inspire members of our UHMC campus communities to pursue their own professional enrichment.  She serves in the subcommittee for Visiting Exchange Grants, and collaborate with her team members to create methods promoting the grants.

Lorelle attended the League of Innovations Conference in spring 2013. The various workshops, particularly those focused on experiential education and “flipping the classroom,” provided unique strategies and perspectives on curriculum redesign, which will be applied to the HA of Maui teaching hotel.

 

Next Steps - Goals for Program Improvement 2013-2014: 

In addition to working on and achieving the goals developed last year, the HOST program will also focus on the following goals:

Curriculum
•Work with the HOST PCC in aligning HOST courses and identifying transfer opportunities with 4-year colleges
•Continue to network within the community to establish internship opportunities for HOST students within our community; create a database for internship opportunities
•Collaborate with Hospitality & Tourism Program Coordinators from HawCC and KauaiCC to complete research and report required to change the HOST AAS degree to an AS degree.  Report to be presented to the Board of Regents as a system initiative.
•Complete 5-year review of selected HOST classes
•Evaluate curriculum and propose redesign as appropriate to include HAi¿½ lab components; explore LiveText as an assessment tool

 

HA of Maui
•Complete HA of Maui website design and collateral                                                                                                            
•Conduct monthly HOST advisory committee meetings, work in collaboration with the HOST advisory committee to identify/secure resources for HA lab, establish and implement a critical path, develop subcommittees for  HA project, complete renovation of lab

 

China Initiatives
•Enroll international intern students to the HOST program and secure placement for our HOST students to intern in hotels in China.
•Secure additional agreements with hotels and universities in China
•Continue with the faculty exchange program between UHMC and Shanghai Normal University
•Send 3-6 faculty members and retirees to Shanghai Normal University to teach each year
•Coordinate visiting faculty from higher institutions in China to do research and come to UHMC for a 6-12 month period
•Develop international short-term programs (credit and non-credit courses).Specific cultural activities and experiences are to be built in the program. Marketing effort and support resources need to be identified in order to implement the plan.

Part IV. Resource Implications

  1. Budgetary Consideration and Impact

 

Hospitality & Tourism Proposed Budget

 

Item

Cost

Accreditation

 

  Annual Fees

$425.00

  CHRIE Membership

$360.00

Library Resources

$4,000.00

*Cornell Quarterly, professional publications, books, etc.

 

Faculty Professional Development

$6,000.00

*Conferences, travel, professional membership fees

 

Marketing/Collateral

$3,000.00

*Program brochures/collateral, program video, etc.

 

Supplies

 

*Laptops and printers for faculty, printer cartridges, classroom equipment, etc.

$3,500.00

HA of Maui Equipment

 

*Property Mgt System, Telephone System, Electronic Locking System, furniture, classroom equipment for HA of Maui

$75,000.00

International Internships

$3,000.00

*Expenses associated with international interns (documents, certificates, meetings, collateral, etc.)

 

 

Personnel

 

Student Help*

$5,500.00

Lecturers**

 

 Fill behind for Liping (2 classes total for Fall & Spring)

$8,004.00

Fill behind for Lorelle (3 classes total for Fall & Spring)

$12,006.00

Total

$120,795.00

**Based on Step A @ $1334 per credit (estimation does not include fringe)

The program also anticipates the tuition received from the international internship course (i.e. HOST 394v) will be a funding source for the HOST program.

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

Yes
Identify and demonstrate skills essential for successful employment in leadership positions in the hospitality industry through the values of Ho’okipa (hospitality), Laulima (teamwork), and Alaka’i (leadership).

2

No
Demonstrate the skills of a lifelong learner through the values of ‘Ike loa (learning to learn) and Kuleana (civic responsibility).

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

No content.

B) Expected Level Achievement

All students completed a variety of writing and oral presentations.  Oral presentations were assessed by faculty as well as by industry leaders.  For the HOST 394v class, employers were also given evaluation forms to assess the the students' overall work performance

C) Courses Assessed

Program learning outcome evaluated:

#1.  Identify and demonstrate skills essential for successful employment in leadership positions in the hospitality industry through the values of Ho’okipa (hospitality), Laulima (teamwork), and Alaka’i (leadership).

HOST 100 (Hospitality Internship I) and HOST 394v (Hospitality International Internship) were the courses used to assess the PLO.

 

PLO

F 09

 

SP10

F10

SP 11

F 11

S 12

1

HOST 298

 

 

 

HOST 101

 

HOST 20

 

 

 

HOST 298

2

HOST 298

 

HOST 293v

 

 

HOST 270

HOST 192v

 

HOST 150

 

 

PLO

F 12
(new curriculum)

S 13

F13

SP 14

F 14

SP 15

F 15

1

 

HOST 100/

HOST 394v

 

HOST 394v

 

HOST 101/

HOST 270

HOST 150/

HOST 154

HOST 152/

HOST 200

HOST 250/

HOST 298

HOST 260

2

 

 

HOST 100/

HOST 150

 

HOST 101/

HOST 250

HOST 101/

HOST 270

HOST 152/

HOST 154

HOST 270/

HOST 298

 

Analysis of Student Outcome and Goal Achievement

In fall 2011 the Hospitality Internship I class (HOST 100 – previously HOST 192v) was used to assess program learning outcome #1.  Students were assessed on the following:  1) case studies/analysis assignments, 2) completing an e-portfolio 3) completing a mock interview with a community leader, and 4) taking a Customer Service certification exam by the National Restaurant Association.

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

In fall 2011 the Hospitality Internship I class (HOST 100 – previously HOST 192v) was used to assess program learning outcome #1.  Students were assessed on the following:  1) case studies/analysis assignments, 2) completing an e-portfolio 3) completing a mock interview with a community leader, and 4) taking a Customer Service certification exam by the National Restaurant Association.

Also, students in the Hospitality International Internship class (HOST 394v) were assessed on the following:  1) submitting a journal entry every month; 2) submitting required internship forms; 3) completing a student self final evaluation, 4) completing a supervisor final evaluation, 5) giving an oral presentation on their internship projects and accomplishments to hotel executives, and 6) completing a final project (written report/portfolio).

 

E) Results of Program Assessment

Program Learning Outcome #1:  Identify and demonstrate skills essential for successful employment in leadership positions in the hospitality industry through the values of Ho’okipa (hospitality), Laulima (teamwork), and Alaka’i (leadership).

HOST 100 - Hospitality Internship I

Assignment

Exceeds

Grades A-B

Meets

Grade of C

Needs Improvement

Grade of D

Insufficient Progress

Grade of F

Case studies/analysis

 

 

90%

 

 

10%

 

0%

 

0%

E-portfolio

 

80%

10%

0%

10%

Mock Interview

 

80%

10%

0%

10%

Certification Exam

80%

10%

0%

10%

 

The 10 students enrolled in the class were required to analyze hospitality related case studies, which focused on guest service and employee issues.  After analyzing and evaluating the case studies, they completed the assignments individually and discussed their point of views in small groups in class. After each student shared his/her analysis of the issues and discussed possible recommendations, the students collaborated and presented their group’s overall analysis and synthesis of the case studies to their peers.  The case studies were “real” and thus after the students had shared and justified their points of view, the instructor provided information on what was “actually done” in the workplace to resolve the issues.  All students in the class completed these case study assignments successfully.

For the e-portfolio, students developed a personal mission statement, personal statement, cover letter, and resume.  They also prepared interview information and uploaded supporting documents on google sites.  In the past semesters, these assignments were all compiled in a binder and submitted for review.  The e-portfolio allows students to access and update their employment information more easily.  Ninety percent of the students (9 out of 10) in the class completed the assignment successfully.

In order to demonstrate proficiency in employment preparation, students were all required to complete a mock interview with a community or industry leader.  The interviewers were given a rubric to assess the student’s preparedness.  Overall, students who participated in practice interview sessions in class with their peers were prepared for the mock interview with the industry leader.

Students were also required to take a certification exam based on customer service concepts from the National Restaurant Association.  Attendance to class sessions was critical.  Role playing and group sharing activities were utilized to reinforce concepts.

Overall, for the HOST 100 course, the instructor will continue add and integrate “real-life” case studies so that students can put into practice leadership skills that are essential for success in the hospitality industry.

Furthermore, in order to enhance the e-portfolio, the instructor will re-evaluate the specific contents that need to be added or possibly deleted.  This will be done in consultation with a HOST advisory committee member or industry leader.   The mock interview will be enhanced by adding a rubric specifically for behavior-based questions, which are now generally asked in interviews.

The Customer Service certification exam focuses specifically on service procedures specific to F&B operations.  A more general overview of customer service in the hospitality industry is needed and thus the program faculty will re-evaluate the text material required for the course.

In fall 2012 and spring 2013 HOST 394v, Hospitality International Internship, was used to assess Program Learning Outcome #1:  Identify and demonstrate skills essential for successful employment in leadership positions in the hospitality industry through the values of Ho’okipa (hospitality), Laulima (teamwork), and Alaka’i (leadership).

The Hospitality International Internship class was first offered as a special topics course (HOST 390v) in fall 2011.  The course became an official part of the HOST curriculum in fall 2012 (HOST 394v).  HOST 394v in spring 2013 is a continuation of the same course in fall 2012. Nine Chinese intern students who enrolled in the course starting in fall 2012 continued in spring 2013.

Students in HOST 394v were assessed on the following:  1) submitting a journal entry every month; 2) submitting required internship forms; 3) completing a student self final evaluation, 4) completing a supervisor final evaluation, 5) giving an oral presentation on their internship projects and accomplishments to hotel executives, and 6) completing a final project (written report/portfolio).

 

Assignment

Exceeds

Grades A-B

Meets

Grade of C

Needs Improvement

Grade of D

Insufficient Progress

Grade of F

Journal Entry

 

100%

 

0%

 

0%

 

0%

Forms (1-4)

100%

0%

0%

0%

Student Self Final Evaluation

78%

22%

0%

0%

Supervisor Final Evaluation

100%

0%

0%

0%

Oral Presentation

89%

11%

0%

0%

Final Project Report and Portfolio

78%

22%

0%

0%

The students were required to submit a journal entry to describe the nature of the job tasks/projects that the intern was assigned.  They were expected to discuss observations, critical moments, dilemmas, lessons learned, challenges, accomplishments, and opportunities for learning and growth. In addition, they were encouraged to include the service learning activities that the hotel involved the interns’ participation, e.g. beach or highway clean-up, fundraiser events, etc.  Intern students felt safe and comfortable to truthfully reveal their feelings in their journals.  The Human Resources Managers from the Makena Beach & Golf Resort and Kahala Hotel & Resort requested that the instructor forward the interns’ journals to them.  By so doing, the executive committee was able to review the journals and gauge the progress of the interns. If any issues were indentified in the journals, the hotel HR manager would communicate with the instructor and work with the hotel executive team to make necessary adjustment on interns’ supervision and support.  The instructor provided immediate feedback and comments via Laulima to the students.

Internship forms served as binding documents that requires intern students to understand and comply with the college rules and policies. For example, Form 1 - Memo of Understanding, set expectations for the intern students.  To be fair and clear to both parties, Form 2 - Assumption of Risk & Release, was translated into Chinese.  The intern students signed both versions of English and Chinese.

Form 3 - Job Description and Objectives, outlined job responsibilities, working conditions, primary and additional tasks. Performance and project based objectives were also part of Form 3.  By the end of the field experience, the intern student would perform assigned duties and fulfill expectations at the standard designated by the supervisor. In addition, the intern students were expected to be able to explain the mission and vision of the hotel/company (hereafter referred to as company), discuss the company’s organizational structure, describe the department where he/she worked and its role in company operations, discuss his/her duties and discuss the skills needed to be successfully in this position, and consult with his/her internship supervisor in designing learning objectives and a targeted completion date.  Form 4 - Time sheet, documented total hours per week and per month each intern worked.

The student performance self-final evaluation and supervisor final evaluation was collected by the end of the 7-month period, which was in early March 2013.  In the fall 2012 semester, a midterm student self-evaluation and a supervisor midterm evaluation form was collected. The student and supervisor forms were similar.  The evaluation forms included categories such as relations with others, attitude–application to work, judgment, dependability, ability to learn, job knowledge, work production, personal appearance, attendance, and communication skills.  Supervisors were also asked to also include a written assessment of the interns’ overall work performance on the evaluation form.  All items were adapted from UH Manoa’s TIM school internship evaluation and were modified slightly to reflect the context of the international internship.  Two out of nine intern students rated herself/himself as “meets expectations” in their final self-evaluation.  Nevertheless, the overall intern students’ performance ratings by supervisors across five hotels were “superior” or “exceeds expectations”.

Intern students in each hotel were scheduled to give an oral presentation in front of their executive committee before the end of their seven-month internship.  Some of the students used PowerPoint presentations while the majority of them used Prezi presentations.  The outline of the presentation content followed the final internship written report format, which included the completed projects and accomplishments, lessons learned, and experienced gained.  A presentation rubric was used to assess the effectiveness of the student presentation.

The final internship written report served as a reflective paper that examined their experience and the impact it had on their personal and professional development.  A projects summary binder/portfolio was submitted to the instructor.  The paper and projects summary was required to provide an introspective view of the entire internship experience.  Expository writing was expected in this final report.  The analytical section of the paper, which included evaluating and analyzing workplace issues and management/leadership traits, was the crux of the internship report.  This made the intern’s field work a collegiate learning experience as opposed to one in which only technical information was learned. 

Student interns were required to provide a detailed description of workplace issues/observed practices, identifying pertinent internal and external physical and human/socio-economic factors in the analytical section of the report.  The students were advised to focus on practices that were directly observed or experienced that they feel could be later contrasted with theories/concepts that they have learned and found intriguing. Some areas that the student interns had examined were practices that pertain to productivity, service quality, and training. In this analytical section, a narrow but thorough treatment of several practices was preferable to a cursory treatment of many.  This was followed with a description of practice-related theories/concepts that directly relate to the practices they described.  Student interns found this task to be daunting.  Initially, the analytical sections, which required the integration of related theories and the practices, appeared to be weak. Under the patient guidance of the on-the-job supervisor and instructor, the interns eventually managed to complete the entire paper.  Seven students did an exceptional job in the analytical section of the final paper.  In future classes, scaffolding this analytical section is a strategy that can be used to better prepare students to complete this particular section of the final report.

Student interns were also asked to analyze the leadership and management traits of their manager/supervisor/mentor. They were expected to contemplate and provide answers to the questions: “Did the internship provider make a manager/supervisor available to you? Was your manager/supervisor a good role model? What traits did that person possess that you would like to emulate?”  The instructor assured the students that the paper would remain confidential and their thoughts and analysis would not be shared with their internship provider.  This section was intended for the students to provide educated and sound examinations about their experience with the leaders of the company they interned at, and the students were advised to avoid using this section as an avenue to complain.

The intern students reported that the self-reflection final report paper was too demanding amidst their busy work schedule and senior theses requirements; nevertheless, at the end they were glad they accomplished it to a high standard and in a professional manner.  They confided that the final reflection offered them the opportunity to constructively critique all of the work they had done during their actual internship experience.  It also provided them with the opportunity to demonstrate their personal and professional growth, progress, commitment, and vision towards their hospitality career aspirations.

Overall, the intern students reported that 7-month internship was a life-changing experience.  Host hotels spoke highly of the student interns’ contribution to the company. The instructor will continue working closely with the host hotel HR director/manager to monitor the interns’ progress and address potential issues identified by the students and the supervisors.

 

CASLO Analysis

In April 2013, two CASLO team members met with the HOST program coordinator, a HOST lecturer, and two advisory committee members to discuss written communication requirements for the program.  The group compared student work samples from the HOST 298 (Hospitality Capstone) class that demonstrated “minimally passing” writing skills and writing skills “appropriate for the degree.”  The group reviewed the faculty report on CASLO evidence, the correlating course outline, and the written communication rubric and validated that the writing sample used as evidence to demonstrate “appropriate exit-level writing skills” (for the HOST program’s Associate in Applied Science Degree) was aligned with industry requirements.

To further enhance the assessment method, industry leaders suggested the following (summary report is attached):

 

 

 

 

 

Based on these recommendations, in addition to the course focused upon during the discussion (HOST 298 – Hospitality Capstone), other HOST courses will be modified accordingly to further develop the writing skills of HOST students.

 

F) Other Comments

Program Strengths and Weaknesses

Strengths

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weaknesses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

G) Next Steps

The HOST Program recognizes its strengths as well as its opportunities of development:

Strengths

 

Weaknesses

After evaluating the program's strengths and weaknesses, in last year's program review (2011-201), specific goals were outlined.  The information below discusses the progress made toward attaining the program goals during the past year.

In summer 2013, the state legislature approved $3.5 million to fund the renovation of the HA of Maui lab.Need to continue to seek funding to sustain HA of Maui lab.

In progress.

Offered HOST 101 online since fall 2011; in fall 2013 HOST 101 online class students were invited to participate in an “international classroom” and they collaborated on a class project with tourism management students at Shanghai Normal University via Polycom and Laulima.

In summer 2013, piloted the use of Zoho, a Customer Relations Program, to track prospective students.Continued to provide orientation/informational sessions for Maui High School students.Need to expand reach to Baldwin and Lahainaluna High School.

In progress.

Piloting the use of Zoho to track alumni.In progress.

Offered HOST 200 as a summer course in 2013 for the first time.Plan to include HOST 100 in summer 2014 and possibly other short-term HOST courses.

In AY 2012- 2013, seven faculty and retirees from UHMC traveled to Shanghai and taught various courses at Shanghai Normal University. Furthermore, in August 2013, a HOST student went to the DoubleTree Hilton in China to complete a 6-month internship.The HOST program continues to expand its reach in China.

Through a grant from the Hawaii Tourism Authority, the HOST website is being updated by Gilbert & Associates (Fall 2013).Collateral for the program is also being developed in collaboration with UHMC’s Marketing Director.

In progress.

Need to collaborate with department chair.

Need to work with UHMC Foundation Office to explore funding opportunities.

HOST faculty attended a variety of seminars/conferences to enhance teaching strategies and support student learning.

The HOST program has modified course outlines to interweave key Hawaiian values throughout the curriculum.  HOST faculty participated in training sessions in the fall of 2012 with the Native Hawaiian Hospitality Association (NaHHA) to incorporate host culture training within the current curriculum. We had also included Chinese interns and a Chinese visiting scholar into the NaHHA training. The HOST faculty consulted with NaHHA instructors in the process of integrating the cultural content into HOST curriculum and classroom design.

Liping was selected to be the Wo Learning Champion (WoLC) Generation IX representing UHMC, in the fall of 2012.  The WoLC meetings and activities provide an optimal platform where she could engage in collaborative, collegial campus and system activities.  The opportunities also enable her to share the knowledge and inspire members of our UHMC campus communities to pursue their own professional enrichment.  She serves in the subcommittee for Visiting Exchange Grants, and collaborate with her team members to create methods promoting the grants.

Lorelle attended the League of Innovations Conference in spring 2013. The various workshops, particularly those focused on experiential education and “flipping the classroom,” provided unique strategies and perspectives on curriculum redesign, which will be applied to the HA of Maui teaching hotel.

 

Next Steps - Goals for Program Improvement 2013-2014: 

In addition to working on and achieving the goals developed last year, the HOST program will also focus on the following goals:

Curriculum

 

HA of Maui

 

China Initiatives