University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: University of Hawaii Maui College
Program: Human Services

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The last comprehensive review for this program was on 2011-2012, and can be viewed at:
www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/arpd

Program Description

The Human Services Program prepares graduates to enter the social service workforce with the professional Attitudes, Skills and Knowledge necessary to succeed. The program also provides specialized academic certificates for majors and those in the workforce seeking advancement or promotion in their field. As a result the program attracts an academically diverse student population – from first generation college students to those seeking Master’s level continuing education units and certificates to maintain professional licensure/credentials. A significant number of program course offerings provide focused skill practice so that students are able to engage in the provision of effective client services from the first day they are hired in the field.

UHMC's Human Services Program offers two Associate of Science (AS) Degrees: Human Services - General and Human Services - Substance Abuse Counseling Specialization.

Program Mission Statement:

The Human Services Program provides a collaborative, experiential, learner-centered and workforce informed learning environment to prepare students to enter the field with a strong foundation of attitudes, skills and knowledge that support effective helping strategies.  

In addition to our AS in HS degrees, the program offers numerous certificates that address recognized levels of competence for social service agencies in our community (Minimum of 2.0 GPA required in each course comprising the certificate). These include:

Certificate of Completion - Substance Abuse Counseling (21 cr)

Certificate of Completion - Health/Navigator/Community Health Worker (23 cr)

Certificate of Competence  - Aging (9 cr)

Certificate of Competence  - Case Management (9 cr)

Certificate of Competence  - Health Navigation (9 cr)

Certificate of Competence  - Dynamics of Family Violence (9 cr)

Certificate of Competence  - Substance Abuse Counseling I (9 cr)

Certificate of Competence  - Substance Abuse Counseling II (9 cr)

Certificate of Competence  - Youth Practitioner (9 cr)

Upper Division Coursework Development and Mission:

In 2011 the Program Coordinator and Community Advisory Committee affirmed the need for more advanced academic learning opportunities in order to meet the increasingly complex needs of individuals seeking help in our community. Together, we expanded of the program mission to include upper division coursework that will: “Prepare students to provide a range of effective skill-based interventions and services to meet the needs of diverse individuals, families and groups across a variety of complex human needs, challenges and practice settings”. (See Industry Validation and Curriculum Development sections of this document for details)

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Cautionary

Majors Included: HSER     Program CIP: 44.0000

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 New & Replacement Positions (State) 123 184 170 Cautionary
2 *New & Replacement Positions (County Prorated) 11 22 24
3 *Number of Majors 209.5 146.5 115.5
3a     Number of Majors Native Hawaiian 102 81 68
3b     Fall Full-Time 33% 32% 28%
3c     Fall Part-Time 67% 68% 72%
3d     Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 3% 5% 4%
3e     Spring Full-Time 28% 25% 19%
3f     Spring Part-Time 72% 75% 81%
3g     Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 5% 7% 5%
4 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes 462 549 545
5 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes 195 371 520
6 SSH in All Program Classes 657 920 1,065
7 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes 22 31 36
8 Total Number of Classes Taught 12 17 21

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
9 Average Class Size 17.9 17.6 16.4 Cautionary
10 *Fill Rate 87.7% 75.9% 71.3%
11 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 3 3 1
12 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 69.8 48.8 115.5
13 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty 182.5 84.2 51.1
13a Analytic FTE Faculty 1.1 1.7 2.3
14 Overall Program Budget Allocation $94,507 $90,066 $67,740
14a General Funded Budget Allocation $77,203 $89,869 $67,740
14b Special/Federal Budget Allocation $0 $0 $0
14c Tuition and Fees $0 $197 $0
15 Cost per SSH $144 $98 $64
16 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 4 3 1
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
17 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 76% 82% 81% Cautionary
18 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 12 15 19
19 *Persistence Fall to Spring 53.8% 65.6% 69.1%
19a Persistence Fall to Fall     41.5%
20 *Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded 7 14 14
20a Degrees Awarded 8 8 7
20b Certificates of Achievement Awarded 1 8 2
20c Advanced Professional Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
20d Other Certificates Awarded 3 23 14
21 External Licensing Exams Passed   Not Reported Not Reported
22 Transfers to UH 4-yr 8 17 12
22a Transfers with credential from program 3 2 3
22b Transfers without credential from program 5 15 9

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
23 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught 0 0 0  
24 Enrollments Distance Education Classes N/A N/A N/A
25 Fill Rate N/A N/A N/A
26 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) N/A N/A N/A
27 Withdrawals (Grade = W) N/A N/A N/A
28 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education) N/A N/A N/A

Perkins IV Core Indicators
2011-2012
Goal Actual Met  
29 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment 90.00 93.10 Met  
30 2P1 Completion 50.00 20.69 Not Met
31 3P1 Student Retention or Transfer 74.25 72.50 Not Met
32 4P1 Student Placement 60.00 72.34 Met
33 5P1 Nontraditional Participation N/A N/A N/A
34 5P2 Nontraditional Completion N/A N/A N/A

Performance Funding Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
35 Number of Degrees and Certificates     9  
36 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     3
37 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     Not STEM
38 Number of Pell Recipients     104
39 Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr     12
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

Overall Program Health - Cautionary

Demand Indicators – Cautionary. Improved from Unhealthy last year.

This positive improvement results from:

The indicator is ranked at Cautionary as a result of the economic downturn that continues to suppress the annual new and replacement positions available in our community. Few human services workers are leaving their jobs because opportunities for more advanced positions are rare.

Efficiency Indicators – Lowered to Cautionary from Healthy last year.

Effectiveness Indicators – Remained Cautionary.

Strengths:

Weaknesses/Challenges:

Perkins Indicators

1P1 -Technical Skills Attainment. Met.

2P1 Not met. This is in large part because HS students lead complex lives that provide many challenges to timely completion. This standard may be unrealistically high for our student population.

3P1 Not met. Same circumstances as 2P1 apply.

4P1 Met. This indicator has steadily improved.

Part III. Action Plan

~~Results of Plans and Goals from the 2011-12 Program Review:
•The program coordinator maintained contact with the Community Advisory Committee via phone and email while establishing 3 specialized sub-committees - Aging and Health, Child and Family, and Addiction and Mental Health. The Aging and Health Advisory Committee met in June 2013 for the first time.
•The pedagogical and curriculum changes proposed were accomplished.
•Cynthia Cary, the lecturer who taught both courses where PLOs were assessed last year (HSER 245 and 140) implemented the improvement plans.
•In HSER 245 this included ◦involving students in discussions of the assignments in terms of helpfulness of reinforcing the integration and practice of skills and concepts central to the course.
◦the program coordinator also collaborated with Cynthia on the results of student input and brainstorming of ways to improve the assignments.

•HSER 140 improvement plan follow up: ◦Cynthia reworked the assignment by narrowing the core values explored to 6.
◦She led students in a practice example so they could better understand the application of skills process.
◦the program coordinator and Cynthia collaborated on this process.

•Tackling persistence and retention rates ◦The program coordinator, Educational Specialist and lecturer met a number of time over the last year to implement a quicker response to students with sporadic attendance - a kind of early warning system of attempts to re-engage them.
◦Once our course plan for the following semester is known, we provide this information to our students in all our classes and offer to meet with them to help them figure out their next steps on their academic journey.
◦The program coordinator and Ed. Specialist printed out the STAR Journey for every HS major and met with many students for academic advising. In this process we discovered that many students registered as HS majors had never taken a HS course. This led to our reducing the number of actual majors.

•Worked with the Assistant Dean of Instruction to work with program data so that the indicators were more accurate.

Action Plan to Improve PLOs Assessed:

Course and assignment improvement based on PLO analysis - HSER 193V:
1.Print out and review each student's STAR journey prior to the beginning of each semester to increase my awareness of student's academic strengths and challenges. Meet with students early in the semester to discuss the level of preparedness they feel for the practicum and open the door for conversations when they may feel challenged by the level of critical thinking and application of attitudes, skills and knowledge required in their written assignments.
2.Review the grading rubric, element by element with students in the first few weeks and engage them in conversations about the attitudes, skills, and knowledge they already have and how they apply them in their interactions with others already. Guide the conversation toward the writing assignments to increase their understanding of what is expected of them.
3.At the mid-term and end of the semester, ask students for their opinion of what worked well with the written assignments and what did not work so well. Elicit their ideas on how I can clarify and make the assignments easier to understand and ways I can support their success.
4.Involve members on my Community Advisory Committee in reviewing student work in this first level capstone course for their ideas on how to improve the assignment from their perspective.

Course and assignment improvement based on PLO analysis - HSER 293V:
1.Develop student-to-student mentorship opportunities between first and second semester students. Ask for early feedback on the clarity and expectations of course assignments and offer extra credit points for those who are willing to air their ideas and facilitate a short discussion with the class.
2.Involve practicum site supervisor in reviewing and providing feedback on at least 3 student written assignments. Getting this input will significantly strengthen the collaboration between the college and community site as well as the student - supervisor relationship.

Action Plan to Strengthen Student Writing from CASLO Assessment:
•Present students with typical client-related scenarios and engage them in brainstorming activities where, in small groups, they develop a written synopsis of the scenario. Then have groups report out and receive feedback from one another and the instructor.
•Each week the assigned reading is discussed. Add a discussion among students of the content they found most interesting in the reading and how they could apply those concepts in their work with clients. It is hoped that this process will help students more clearly articulate the application of the material in their papers.
•Provide more explicit feedback on organization and application of the material in their papers in the first 4 weeks. If progress is not made, increase incentives for going to TLC.
•Encourage students to read one another's writing and provide objective feedback.

FUTURE PROGRAM GOALS
•Implement the above actions
•Promote upper division courses to UH West Oahu BASS Program ◦The majority of HS graduates who pursue a baccalaureate degree want to remain on Maui. At this time their most viable option is the on-line delivery Baccalaureate of Applied Social Science degree at UHWO.
◦The program coordinator will pursue an articulation agreement with UHWO so that Maui based students can take advantage of our classroom and skill based upper division courses.

•Expand the promotion of upper division courses to the Maui community of service providers for CEUs ◦Explore other professions that may accept CEUs (i.e., Marriage and Family Therapists, etc.)

•Work with the Community Advisory Committee to create two sub-committees: ◦An Assessment sub-committee to evaluate the assessment of student learning.
◦A Persistence, Retention and Completion sub-committee.

 

Part IV. Resource Implications

The Human Services Program has 120 majors with only 1FTE BOR supported faculty member dedicated to the program. The lack of adequate faculty in the program negatively impacts the ability to offer an adequate number of courses for students to complete their degree in a timely manner. This also has clear implications for retention and persistence when students have to wait a semester or two for the courses they require to be offered again. This also impairs the program's ability to meet established community workforce needs and provide courses our students need to get into the workforce.

For the first time, the program has temporarily experienced what having 2 FTE positions would afford the program to do. Since July 1, 2012 the program has had the benefit of grant funds (RDP) to hire a Human Services Educational Specialist, Charlie Schlather, to assist the program coordinator with curriculum development and community outreach. (See Other Comments section for specific details of program expansion as a result). This position ends on February 29, 2014. At that point lecturer funds will allow Charlie to finish out his course load in spring.

The program desperately needs another FTE BOR supported faculty position in order for the program to continue the growth trend this funding has provided. Without a faculty partner the program coordinator will have to cut back on course offerings and maintaining newly developed community connections in the areas of aging and health care. This will disrupt significant momentum we have finally developed. A 2011 comprehensive needs assessment initiated by the HS Program Coordinator indicated a clear need for a Baccalaureate in Applied Human Services at UHMC. In order to continue to build a 2+2 degree, this second faculty member is required. The development of this 4-year degree would meet a significant existing need in our community workforce.

To meet the needs of the program, student majors, and workforce,  $55,000 is requested for an additional FTE BOR supported 9-month faculty position. An additional .5 FTE academic counseling position is also requested as there is no dedicated counselor for program students. This 11-month position requires an additional $30,000.

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

No
Develop interpersonal skills that build appropriate, collaborative, respectful relationships with fellow students, clients and professionals in the community.

2

Yes
Demonstrate the attitudes, skills and knowledge of best-practice strategies across a variety of populations in diverse human service settings.

3

Yes
Identify vulnerable populations and the social conditions that contribute to their vulnerability and consider advocacy strategies to help alleviate those conditions.

4

No
Develop self-awareness of personal values, interpersonal styles, strengths and challenges that influence the development of professionalism.

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

Industry Validation of PLO Assessed

In October 2012, the Program Learning Outcomes were revised and approved by the Community Advisory Committee via email. At that time the 5 PLOs previously approved by the committee in October 2009 were reduced to the 4 listed in this document. The deleted PLO was incorporated into PLO 2 for simplification purposes.

PLO # 3 - Identify vulnerable populations and the social conditions that contribute to their vulnerability and consider advocacy strategies to help alleviate those conditions.

The National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics (2008) states: "The primary mission of the social work profession is to enhance human well being and help meet the basic needs of all people, with particular attention to the needs and empowerment of people who are vulnerable, oppressed, and living in poverty." (Preamble, paragraph 1)

PLO # 2 - Demonstrate the attitudes, skills and knowledge of best-practice strategies across a variety of populations in diverse human service settings.

National Association of Social Work (NASW) Validation of PLO Assessed:

 Cultural Competence and Social Diversity - Social workers should obtain education about and seek to understand the nature of social diversity and oppression with respect to race, ethnicity, national origin, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, marital status, political belief, religion, immigration status, and mental or physical disability.

Industry Validation of AS in HS – Substance Abuse Counseling Degree and Certificates

Through a formal agreement with the State Dept. of Health, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Division, the HS Program provides significant advantages to our students:

Continuing Education Credits Approved by Licensure and Credentialing Entities

State and National Industry Validation of Faculty and Lecturer Credentials:

B) Expected Level Achievement

Descriptive rubrics were used to evaluate the expected level of achievement across the main aspects of each assignment. Points are ascribed based on meeting specific levels of descriptive criteria that relate to the achievement of Exceeding (A or B), Meeting (C), Needing Improvement (D), or Insufficient Progress (F) as illustrated below. 

Exceeds

100-80%

Meets

79-70%

Needs Improvement

69-60%

Insufficient Progress

59%>

Grades of A and B

Grade of C

Grade of D

Grade of F

 

C) Courses Assessed

PLO ASSESSMENT GRID - Program Learning Outcome Emphasis by Course

PL0

101

110

111

130

140

193V

245

248

256

268

270

293V

1

2

2

2

2

3

3

3

3

1

1

2

3

2

2

1

1

2

3

3

3

3

1

2

2

3

3

3

3

3

3

2

3

2

3

3

2

3

3

4

2

2

2

2

3

3

3

3

3

2

3

3

PLO Assessment Plan Timetable

PLO

S 2010

F 10

S 11

F 11

S 12

F 12

S 13

F 13

S 14

F14

1

 

 

 

245

 

 

 

 

248

 

2

248

 

 

 

 

 

293V

 

 

 

3

 

 

110

 

 

193V

 

 

 

130

4

 

 270

 

 

140

 

 

256

 

 

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

PLO # 3 Assessed - Identify vulnerable populations and the social conditions that contribute to their vulnerability and consider advocacy strategies to help alleviate those conditions.

Course Where PLO Assessed - HSER 193V - Work Practicum in Community Service-Fall 2012

The 8 students enrolled in the course were all placed in agencies serving "vulnerable populations" where they would volunteer for 225 hours during the semester. The agencies included: A gender specific addiction treatment center for women and their children; a homeless center; a domestic violence intervention program; a co-ed addiction treatment center; a special education program for middle school students; a program working with the frail elderly; at risk youth at the Boys and Girls Club; a program for the economically disadvantaged.

Application Writing Assignments - HSER 193V (WI). As this is a writing intensive (WI) class, the reading and writing assignments give students the opportunity to critically think about, integrate and articulate new concepts when working with clients. They provide the opportunity to:

Assignment Guidelines for Students:

You will write ten (10) 2-page minimum (single-spaced) papers based on the assigned readings As you read and write about these resources, you should do so with the unique circumstances and needs of your client population and practicum site in mind. These assignments are to be viewed as “mini research and application papers”, not personal reflection papers. You are asked to synthesize what you have gleaned from your past course work, your client population, and the current reading and express how these will (or do) impact your work with clients. These assignments are your opportunity to demonstrate that you are integrating what you have learned into what you actually do with clients. 

Assignment # 6Using Strengths and Empowerment Strategies with Clients.

For this assignment students read a journal article, Exploring the Strength/Empowerment Perspectives and answer the questions below in a narrative format:

1. Discuss the essential philosophy of the Strengths Perspective. Compare and contrast this with problem-focused approaches.

2. How is, or isn’t, the strengths perspective integrated into the agency’s approach to working with clients at your site?

3. How does the obvious presence or lack of this perspective impact your work with clients and the progress you see clients make?

4. How can you integrate your use of the empowerment principle of the Strengths-Perspective with your clients? Be specific.

5. What advocacy strategies are used at your site and what other advocacy strategies you think should be considered? Provide 1 or 2 examples.

6. What is your next small step in using this information in your practicum setting?

 



 

 

Expectations and Grading Rubric

HSER 193V

Application Writing Assignments

20 Points Possible

 

 

Grading Criteria

 

Exceeds

100-80%

A to B

 

Meets

79-70%

C

 

Needs Improvement

69-60%

D

 

Insufficient Progress

59%>

F

 

Application of Attitudes, Skills, Knowledge

 

 

 

 

(8 points)

Thorough discussion of applicability of content in practicum setting. Specific examples provided.                      

 

(8 – 6.5 points) 

Good to Average discussion of applicability of content in practicum setting. Adequate examples provided.              

 

(6.4 – 5.5. points)

Little discussion/ applicability of content in practicum setting and/or few examples.                               

(5.4 – 4.8)

Important elements missing or lost points due to lateness or not turned in.

 

 

(4.7 - 0)

Integration of Appropriate Information and Application in Assignment

(8 points)

Clear description of integration of content understanding applied to setting and well referenced.                                                                 

 (8 – 6.5)

Good to Average description of content understanding applied to setting and referenced.

 

(6.4 – 5.5)

Vague or overly generalized description of content and inadequate integration of information to site.       

(5.4 – 4.8)

Important elements missing or lost points due to lateness or not turned in.

 

(4.7 – 0)

Paper Organization

 

 

 

(2 points)

Information is very organized with well-constructed paragraphs.                   (2)

Good to Average organization of information and construction of paragraphs.

(1)

Poor organization of information and organization unclear.

 

(.5)

Paper disorganized, lot points due to lateness or not turned in. 

(0)                      

Grammar, format, spelling correct

 

 

 

(2 points)

Excellent grammar, format, spelling, etc.                                 

 

 

 

 

(2)

Good to average grammar, format and spelling.

 

 

 

 

(1)

Some errors in grammar, format and spelling.

   

 

 

 

(.5)

Significant errors in format grammar, spelling or points lost due to lateness or not turned in.

(0)

 

Late assignments lose 1 point per day

PLO # 2 Assessed - Demonstrate the attitudes, skills and knowledge of best-practice strategies across a variety of populations in diverse human service settings.

Course Where PLO 2 Assessed - HSER 293V (WI)- Work Practicum in Community Service - Capstone Course - Spring 2013

The 9 students enrolled in the capstone course were all placed in agencies serving diverse populations where they would volunteer for 225 hours during the semester. The agencies included: A continuing placement at a gender specific addiction treatment center for women and their children; a wellness program of seniors; a continuing placement at a co-ed addiction treatment center; a continuing placement at a special education program for middle school students; a continuing placement at a program working with the frail elderly; a continuing placement at an at risk youth at the Boys and Girls Club; a program for clients with mental illness seeking support for their young children; Hui Malama - a literacy program for intermediate and high school students; a domestic violence advocacy agency for victims.

Application Writing Assignments-HSER 294 – Writing Intensive - Objective:

Assignment Procedure:

You will write ten (10) 2.5 page papers based on the assigned readings  and applied to your client population and agency. Topics and due dates are found in the Course Calendar section in the Syllabus. As you read and write about these resources, you should do so with the unique circumstances and needs of your client population and internship site in mind, much as you did in your HSER 194 practicum. However, the expectations of your depth of integration and application of the concepts has increased significantly as this course is your final capstone of the Human Services Program. These assignments are to be viewed as “mini research and application papers”, not personal reflection papers. You are asked to synthesize what you have gleaned from your past course work, your client population and the current reading and provide specific examples of how these will (or do) impact your work with clients. These assignments are your opportunity to demonstrate that you are integrating what you have learned into your practice efforts at a more advanced level than in HSER 194. 

Assignment Requirements:

Assignment #8 Cultural Competency

Read: Critical Issues in the Development Culturally Competent Interventions for Specific Minority Groups

  1. Describe the variety of cultural and minority diversity that you see in the client population at your agency.
  2. Analyze the components of cultural competence required to best serve these populations.  
  3. Evaluate your level of cultural competence exemplified by your ability to relate effectively with diverse clients and peers during the delivery of services. Give examples of your interactions that reveal your specialized awareness and ability to respond effectively.   
  4. Assess what you could do to further develop your level cultural competence across the diverse populations at your site.
  5. What is your next step in integrating this information with clients and among your colleagues in the practicum setting? In what ways will the information you have learned be helpful to you, your clients and colleagues?
  6. What is your next step toward developing greater cultural competence in your setting? Provide examples.

Expected Level of Achievement

 



 

 

Expectations and Grading Rubric

HSER 293V (WI)

Application Writing Assignments

20 Points Possible

 

 

Grading Criteria

 

Exceeds

100-80%

A to B

 

Meets

79-70%

C

 

Needs Improvement

69-60%

D

 

Insufficient Progress

59%>

F

 

Demonstrated Application of Attitudes, Skills, Knowledge from reading

 

 

(8 points)

Thorough discussion of applicability of content in practicum setting. Specific examples provided.                      

(8 – 6.5 points) 

Good to Average discussion of applicability of content in practicum setting. Adequate examples provided.               

 

(6.4 – 5.5. points)

Little discussion/ applicability of content in practicum setting and/or few examples.                              

(5.4 – 4.8)

Important elements missing or lost points due to lateness or not turned in.

 

 

(4.7 - 0)

Clear Integration of Appropriate Information and Application in Assignment

(8 points)

Clear description of integration of content understanding applied to setting and well referenced.                                                                 

 (8 - 5)

Good to Average description of content understanding applied to setting and referenced.

 

(6.4 – 5.5)

Vague or overly generalized description of content and inadequate integration of information to site.       

(5.4 – 4.8)

Important elements missing or lost points due to lateness or not turned in.

 

(4.7 – 0)

Paper Organization

 

 

 

(2 points)

Information is very organized with well-constructed paragraphs.                  

 (2)

Good to Average organization of information and construction of paragraphs.

(1)

Poor organization of information and organization unclear.

 

(.5)

Paper disorganized, lot points due to lateness or not turned in. 

 (0)                      

Grammar, format, spelling correct

 

 

 

(2 points)

Excellent grammar, format, spelling, etc.                                 

 

 

 

 

 (2)

Good to excellent grammar, format and spelling.

 

 

 

 

(1)

Some errors in grammar, format and spelling.

 

 

 

 

(.5)

Significant errors in format grammar, spelling or points lost due to lateness or not turned in.  (0)

 

Late assignments lose 1 point per day

E) Results of Program Assessment

E) Results of Program Assessment

PLO and CASLO Assessment Results

Both PLOs were assessed in the first and second Practicum in Community Services courses, HSER 193V and 293V that comprise the capstone experiences of our AS in Human Services Degree and a number of our certificates. Each semester 193 and 293 are offered concurrently with a cap of 10 students. It is notable that for both semesters the enrollment for the single course being assessed had 8 and 9 students - very near the cap of the merged class, thereby significantly exceeding the cap both semesters. Another point of interest is that 4 students (50%) enrolled in 193 in Fall 2012 continued on to their more rigorous second practicum in Spring 13.

PLO # 3 Assessed - Identify vulnerable populations and the social conditions that contribute to their vulnerability and consider advocacy strategies to help alleviate those conditions.

ASSESSMENT RESULTS – HSER 193V (WI) FALL 2012 - ASSIGNMENT #6 - 8 STUDENTS

Exceeds

100-80%

A and B

Meets

79-70%

C

Needs Improvement   

        69-60%

             D

Insufficient Progress 50%->

F

5 students.

3 at 90% and above.

2 at 80-89%

2 Student.

1 at 78%, 1 at 75%

1 student at 65%

 

Analysis of results:

Discoveries related to student learning and goal achievement:

  1. Student grades on this assignment correlate well with each student's overall course grade with the exception of the student "needing improvement."
    1. This student experienced a significant personal challenge early in the semester and was able to bounce back and bring her grade up to a "C". This is a pattern that has persisted throughout her journey in the program.
  2. Student grades in the course also correlate well with their GPA as program majors.
  3. There are 10 written assignments in this class, all of which require students to describe the application of the attitudes, skills and knowledge from each reading to their client population. Some students struggle with this aspect of the assignments up to the middle of the semester when they seem to "get" what this actually requires.

Course and assignment improvement based on PLO analysis:

  1. It is clear from this analysis that student performance in the practicum is frequently correlated with their overall performance in the program. I will (program coordinator is the instructor for both practicum courses) print out and review each student's STAR journey prior to the beginning of each semester to increase my awareness of student's academic strengths and challenges. I will then meet with students early in the semester to discuss the level of preparedness they feel for the practicum and open the door for conversations when they may feel challenged by the level of critical thinking and application of attitudes, skills and knowledge required in their written assignments.
  2. I will review the grading rubric, element by element with students in the first few weeks and engage them in conversations about the attitudes, skills, and knowledge they already have and how they apply them in their interactions with others already. I will guide the conversation toward the writing assignments to increase their understanding of what is expected of them.
  3. At the mid-term and end of the semester I will ask students for their opinion of what worked well with the written assignments and what did not work so well. I will elicit their ideas on how I can clarify and make the assignments easier to understand and ways I can support their success.
  4. I will involve members on my Community Advisory Committee in reviewing student work in this first level capstone course for their ideas on how to improve the assignment from their perspective.

PLO # 2 Assessed - Demonstrate the attitudes, skills and knowledge of best-practice strategies across a variety of populations in diverse human service settings.

ASSESSMENT RESULTS – HSER 293V (WI) SPRING 2013 - ASSIGNMENT #6 - 9 STUDENTS

Exceeds

100-80%

A and B

Meets

79-70%

C

Needs Improvement   

        69-60%

             D

Insufficient Progress 50%->

F

6 students.

4 at 90% and above.

2 at 80-89%

3 students.

 

 

Analysis of results: 

Discoveries and course and assignment improvement based on PLO analysis:

  1. Four students in this course (293) completed their first practicum the previous semester. I asked I asked them to mentor their colleagues in 193 during this semester of our joined class. This proved to be a significant improvement in collaboration among students and is something I will continue to encourage.
  2. I will continue to develop student-to-student mentorship opportunities between first and second semester student. I will ask for early feedback on the clarity and expectations of course assignments and offer extra credit points for those who are willing to air their ideas and facilitate a short discussion with the class. I also asked these students to help first semester student to use the knowledge they gained in the previous semester to help their 193 colleagues develop their practicum goals and objectives. This was done in small groups so that I could observe the interactions, help them stay on track, and intervene if there were challenges. 
    1. Students reported that this peer-to-peer collaboration was very interesting and constructive. It gave the second semester students the opportunity and responsibility to pass on what they learned previously, and provided the first semester students to both learn and prepare to become mentors when they take their second practicum.
  3. The reading assignments and written work expectations of second semester students is more rigorous. It appears that the appropriate scaffolding of learning and expectations is supportive of the increased rigor.
  4. I am now aware that a significant voice missing in the assessment of the assignments in this advanced practicum is that of the site supervisor. While I am aware of the scarcity of adequate supervisory time at our sites, I believe that asking supervisors to read a minimum of 3 student papers throughout the semester will provide many advantages. The student and the HS program will receive important feedback on the relevance of the reading and the student effort. In addition, this will deepen the connection between the supervisor (i.e., agency) and the HS program. I am very excited about piloting this in Spring 2014 in both practicum courses.

CASLO Assessment - Written Communication

HSER 293V Fall 2012 - Work Practicum in Community Service - Program Capstone Course

Assignment Background: Students in this Writing Intensive capstone course are required to write twelve 2.5-page papers. The first 11 papers require the application of content from reading assignments to their practicum setting. The 12th and final assignment was the one assessed - "Evaluating My Performance". This goal of this paper from the instructor point of view was to have students distill the most appropriate experiences into concise paragraphs to allow the reader to get a clear sense of her/his growth over the semester. A topical outline of expected content areas was provided to students to organize the paper. The course has a prerequisite of ENG 100 with a grade of C or better. The following was designed into the course as scaffolding for this assignment:

CASLO ANALYSIS - Assessment Findings:

Five individuals evaluated the assignment, rubric and sample of student writing at the "minimal level". 80% of the evaluators felt the evidence demonstrated student achievement at the "minimally passing" at the level appropriate for the degree; 20% did not agree. The process provided the program coordinator and 2 lecturers a rich opportunity to explore ways to better prepare students to succeed and strengthen the assignment through revision.

Action Plan to Strengthen Student Writing:

F) Other Comments

EVIDENCE OF AN ENGAGED COMMUNITY

The Human Services Program Community Advisory Committee

The Human Services Program is closely linked to workforce needs through our Community Advisory Committee. Members represent 30 different non-profit and governmental agencies. Because our field serves individuals with a broad array of challenges, we have concentrated our committee into three specialized service areas that reflect our focused academic tracks: Aging and Health, Child and Family, and Addiction and Mental Health. The program coordinator and lecturers meet with each group in order to focus and respond to specific challenges and needs in each practice area. There is regular phone and email interaction between the program coordinator and committee members.

Our first Health and Aging Advisory Committee Meeting was held on June 27, 2013 with 7 members in attendance. Our main focus was on workforce and community service needs and emerging trends in the field to inform curriculum development and training opportunities. At that time persistence, retention and completion data was discussed.

In 2010-11 the Program Coordinator with the support of the Community Advisory Committee, initiated a comprehensive Maui focused workforce needs assessment involving over 70 social service program administrators and staff. The results indicated a clear need for an applied human services baccalaureate degree. The Advisory Committee affirmed the expansion of the program mission to include upper division coursework that will: “Prepare students to provide a range of effective skill-based interventions and services to meet the needs of diverse individuals, families and groups across a variety of complex human needs, challenges and practice settings”.

Program and Advisory Committee Partnership in Curriculum Development

As evidence-based best practices emerge, and funding and accreditation requirements change, the collaboration with the advisory committee informs course content innovation in and responsiveness to workforce needs. Through this close partnership the HS program has developed lower and upper division courses designed to meet the increasingly complex needs of our community members seeking services from our agencies.

In Fall 2012 five new courses were developed and approved through the curriculum process:

In Spring 2013 the Human Services and Allied Health Programs developed a 23-credit Certificate of Completion in Health Navigator/Community Health Worker. Members of the Aging/Health Advisory Committee collaborated in this effort.  

This continuous exchange of ideas and collaborative problem solving with the advisory committee keeps the program direction relevant for our students while anticipating and meeting workforce needs.

Advisory Committee Member Agencies Directly Support Student Learning

Partnering with agencies across practice settings also affords our students exceptionally rich and diverse practicum placement opportunities when they are completing the last year of their AS degree. We have agreements with agencies across our three academic tracks: Aging and Health; Child and Family; Addiction and Mental Health. While our students bring a basic foundation of best-practice attitudes, skills and knowledge to their placement, they in turn receive excellent supervision in their field of interest. Of further benefit to our students is that diverse service providers are regularly invited as guest speakers in five of our courses. We have a long standing, vibrant and mutually beneficial partnership with our community of service providers, and it continues to grow and deepen.

The Advisory Committee is sent the annual Program Review and is informed of efforts related to student assessment of learning. We arranged for a member to be present for our CASLO assessment, but she had a last minute conflict and could not attend.

RDP GRANT FUNDING FOR UPPER DIVISION COURSEWORK DEVELOPMENT

What a Second FTE Program Faculty Can Do to Benefit the Human Services Program, Students and Our Community

The Program Coordinator (Lee Stein) secured funds to hire a full-time Human Services Educational Specialist (Charlie Schlather, LCSW, CSAC) to assist with course development, instruction, and building new and important alliances with the community of service providers in the fields of aging and health care. Charlie is the first and only FTE partner in the development of the program since Lee was hired in January 2001 even though program majors have increased from 33 to 118. This has become an incredibly dynamic and productive partnership. Some of the highlights of this collaboration include:

Unfortunately the funds for the Educational Specialist Position (and the following short term positions) expire on Feb. 28, 2014. At that time lecturer funds will allow the specialist to complete his teaching responsibilities for the remainder of the spring 2014 semester.

At that point, the 1 FTE BOR appointed faculty will be have to scale back the tremendous progress that has been made in the program. This will be especially problematic for the newly energized aging and health focus of the program.

Other RDP Grant Funded Temporary Positions:

INNOVATION AND BEST PRACTICES IN TEACHING

G) Next Steps

PROGRAM PLANS AND GOALS
Results of Plans and Goals from the 2011-12 Program Review:

Action Plan to Improve PLOs Assessed:

Course and assignment improvement based on PLO analysis - HSER 193V:

  1. Print out and review each student's STAR journey prior to the beginning of each semester to increase my awareness of student's academic strengths and challenges. Meet with students early in the semester to discuss the level of preparedness they feel for the practicum and open the door for conversations when they may feel challenged by the level of critical thinking and application of attitudes, skills and knowledge required in their written assignments.
  2. Review the grading rubric, element by element with students in the first few weeks and engage them in conversations about the attitudes, skills, and knowledge they already have and how they apply them in their interactions with others already. Guide the conversation toward the writing assignments to increase their understanding of what is expected of them.
  3. At the mid-term and end of the semester, ask students for their opinion of what worked well with the written assignments and what did not work so well. Elicit their ideas on how I can clarify and make the assignments easier to understand and ways I can support their success.
  4. Involve members on my Community Advisory Committee in reviewing student work in this first level capstone course for their ideas on how to improve the assignment from their perspective.

Course and assignment improvement based on PLO analysis - HSER 293V:

  1. Develop student-to-student mentorship opportunities between first and second semester students. Ask for early feedback on the clarity and expectations of course assignments and offer extra credit points for those who are willing to air their ideas and facilitate a short discussion with the class.
  2. Involve practicum site supervisor in reviewing and providing feedback on at least 3 student written assignments. Getting this input will significantly strengthen the collaboration between the college and community site as well as the student - supervisor relationship. 

Action Plan to Strengthen Student Writing from CASLO Assessment:

FUTURE PROGRAM GOALS