University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: University of Hawaii Maui College
Program: Sustainable Science Management

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The last comprehensive review for this program was on August, 2012, and can be viewed at:
http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/arpd/instructional.php?action=analysis&college=MAU&year=2012&program=165
STEM Program

Program Description

Progra

 

 

 

DESCRIPTION

 

The Sustainable Science Management (SSM) program, leading to a baccalaureate degree, provides a variety of options to students seeking employment in the rapidly expanding field of Sustainability. The coursework covers important contemporary topics including but not limited to energy, ecology, business and management, water and wastewater, agriculture, waste-management, economics, policy, the built environment, and social science; all in the context of case studies in the larger interdisciplinary field of sustainability. As well, the program develops thinking and analytic skills enabling graduates to apply learned principles to the changing and complex issues coming in the future. The BAS in Sustainable Science Management program is designed to equip students with the fundamental skills necessary in order to bridge the disciplines and to facilitate sustainable solutions and operations for any organization or community.

 

Due to the early-adopter status of sustainability as a policy guide, historic job positions were limited to titles such as sustainability coordinator, sustainability specialist, environmental scientist, etc. However, as the critical significance of sustainability as a fiscal, environmental and social benefit has become known, the term ‘sustainable’ has often been dropped while the efficiency and projection skills of sustainable analysis have been broadly incorporated into jobs such as energy technicians and planners, planning at every level, long term fund management, resort operations and NGO leadership. A student graduating with a BAS in Sustainable Science Management will have career options in local, state, and federal agencies; utility companies; energy efficiency consulting; non-profit organizations; hospitality and tourism; transportation; wildlife and conservation agencies; international environmental consulting and auditing; “green” contracting and construction management; and educational work in schools, museums, and parks; as well as seeing a continued growth in the field.

 

 

MISSION

 

The mission of the BAS in Sustainable Science Management program is to produce graduates who will maximize the benefits of sustainable practices across multiple disciplines by being aware of the interconnectedness of human and natural systems, understanding the role and function of technology development and implementation, possessing the ability to establish new partnerships, and by using resources creatively, wisely and responsibly in order to add value and to uncover solutions to persistent problems both now and for the future.

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Unhealthy

Majors Included: SSM     Program CIP: 46.0000

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 New & Replacement Positions (State) 0 19 25 Unhealthy
2 *New & Replacement Positions (County Prorated) 0 2 5
3 *Number of Majors 0 0.5 1.5
3a     Number of Majors Native Hawaiian 0 0 0
3b     Fall Full-Time 0% 0% 100%
3c     Fall Part-Time 0% 0% 0%
3d     Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 0% 0% 0%
3e     Spring Full-Time 0% 0% 50%
3f     Spring Part-Time 0% 100% 50%
3g     Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 0% 0% 0%
4 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes 0 3 21
5 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes 0 357 426
6 SSH in All Program Classes 0 360 447
7 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes 0 12 15
8 Total Number of Classes Taught 0 9 15

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
9 Average Class Size 0 13.3 9.9 Unhealthy
10 *Fill Rate 0% 47.8% 41.3%
11 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 0 1 1
12 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 0 0.5 1.5
13 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty 0 0.5 1.0
13a Analytic FTE Faculty 0 1 1.6
14 Overall Program Budget Allocation Not Yet Reported $83,433 $116,073
14a General Funded Budget Allocation Not Yet Reported $82,889 $116,073
14b Special/Federal Budget Allocation Not Yet Reported $0 $0
14c Tuition and Fees Not Yet Reported $544 $0
15 Cost per SSH Not Yet Reported $232 $260
16 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 0 5 10
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
17 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 0% 74% 86% Unhealthy
18 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 0 11 5
19 *Persistence Fall to Spring 0% 0% 0%
19a Persistence Fall to Fall     0%
20 *Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
20a Degrees Awarded 0 0 0
20b Certificates of Achievement Awarded 0 0 0
20c Advanced Professional Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
20d Other Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
21 External Licensing Exams Passed   Not Reported Not Reported
22 Transfers to UH 4-yr 0 0 1
22a Transfers with credential from program 0 0 0
22b Transfers without credential from program 0 0 1

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
23 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught 0 0 0  
24 Enrollments Distance Education Classes N/A N/A N/A
25 Fill Rate N/A N/A N/A
26 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) N/A N/A N/A
27 Withdrawals (Grade = W) N/A N/A N/A
28 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education) N/A N/A N/A

Perkins IV Core Indicators
2011-2012
Goal Actual Met  
29 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment 90.00 100.00 Met  
30 2P1 Completion 50.00 0.00 Not Met
31 3P1 Student Retention or Transfer 74.25 0.00 Not Met
32 4P1 Student Placement 60.00 0 Not Met
33 5P1 Nontraditional Participation 17.00 100.00 Met
34 5P2 Nontraditional Completion 15.25 0 Not Met

Performance Funding Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
35 Number of Degrees and Certificates     0  
36 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     0
37 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     0
38 Number of Pell Recipients     2
39 Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr     1
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

1. PROGRAM'S STRENGTHS

 

a. Response to Demand Indicators

 

  1. #1 & #2 Replacement positions – The data demonstrates an uptick in positions from the previous year. While this is a healthy sign, it is very unlikely that generic job classification data has kept up with the broader opportunities for sustainability trained graduates.  

 

  1. #3 Majors – While this pervasive data point is accurate technically, the identification of only 1 SSM major results from a quirk in the initial program map, which creates undue barriers to declaring an SSM major. In a recent poll of students who have taken SSM course, 52 self-declared as majors. Pending curriculum revisions will allow this to be reflected in program data.

 

  1. #7 Program enrollment – As a new program commenced in 2011, all enrollments are is rising from year to year. Additionally, it is common that upper division enrollments, which constitute the bulk of SSM courses, are smaller than lower division as students begin to specialize their degree path.

b. Response to Efficiency Indicators

 

  1. #9 Average class size is likely accurate, however should not be considered a reflection of fewer students in SSM courses. During 2012 several courses were offered for the first time and one was added as a program elective. These also had prerequisites which many students had not yet met. The result would be some smaller enrollment classes disproportionately impacting class size average. It is anticipated that class sizes will show a steady increase for the future as overall SSM course enrollment has risen each year.
  2. #12 & #13 – Majors to Faculty indicators are misleading due to the underestimation of program majors as described above.

 

c. Response to Effectiveness Indicators

 

  1. #17 – Rates for successful completion of course has increased by approximately 12% from the prior year.

 

  1. #18 – Rates for withdrawals from courses has dropped by 50% from prior year numbers.

 

2. PROGRAM'S WEAKNESSES

a. Efficiency Indicators

  1. #9 & #10 - It is anticipated that average class sizes will gradually increase, but remain under class maximums in the near term.
  2. #16 – Some classes are likely to be considered “Low enrolled” for reasons stated above.

 

b. Effectiveness Indicators

  1. #20 – The first SSM graduate is expected to be awarded his degree in December of 2013. While the pipeline is filling, it will likely be at least three more years before a consistent level of graduates will be seen.

 

3. RESULTS OF PRIOR YEAR'S ACTION PLAN (Prior Year Actions in italics)

DEMAND INDICATORS:

Increase number of majors in classes by designating enrollment classification to lower division or by other means to account for students enrolled in freshman and sophomore years

Work to increase declared majors is underway through Curriculum Central. It is anticipated these changes will go into effect in fall 2014.

• Increase enrollment in classes by additional marketing

Marketing materials including brochures, media spots and program information has begun to be disseminated across the state of Hawaii. Additional marketing nationally, and perhaps internationally will be emphasized once program curriculum changes are completed and materials reflective of them.

 

EFFICIENCY INDICATORS:

Increase average classroom size by additional marketing, student engagement, and program cohort meetings.

• Increase fill rate with additional marketing, student engagement, and program cohort meetings

• Report for numbers 14-17

As described above.

 

EFFECTIVENESS INDICATORS

Increase successful completion to above 74% by reviewing and revising pedagogy

2013 numbers provide that successful completion rates increased to 86%.

Increase persistence by pedagogy review and revision

Data for this measure is difficult to obtain due to the lack of SSM major data.

 

DISTANCE EDUCATION

Increase number of distance education courses and enrollment.

This issue has yet to be addressed as the program has grown in other areas.

 

4. RESPONSE TO PERKINS INDICATOR 4P1 (student placement, does not meet the goal)

While the program has not yet seen its first graduates, there have been strong indications from internship and work service opportunities that SSM students are well-trained and easily adapted to current workforce demands.

Part III. Action Plan

The following Action Strategies are intended to address weaknesses in the SSM program in the short term, and to increase its value and effectiveness over the coming near term horizon:

 

 

Short Term Strategies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Long Term Strategies

 

 

 

Part IV. Resource Implications

The part-time counseling position in the approved program proposal has not been funded by the campus general fund. This has resulted in voluntary increased counseling loads and students being referred to the program coordinator by the counseling department. The referral was necessary because the counseling department does not have the resources to support this program. Without adequate funding for counseling student progress may be stifled. This may affect enrollment and successful student experiences. $25,000 needed.

 

Past year SSM interns contributed to updating program materials and particularly the SSM website, but this works remains incomplete. Marketing the program off-island will require additional updating and improvements and interns are the most cost-effective resource to do so. $3000 needed.

 

The program has operated without general funding for important student/faculty amenities such as conference attendance, continuing education, marketing  and travel. It is estimated that these could total approximately $10,000/year. The program will seek to open a UH Foundation account to provide optional funding sources, though this funding does not entirely match this need. $10,000 needed

 

As SSM reaches a full complement of courses, faculty teaching capacities are being fully absorbed. However, additional course opportunities are apparent, particularly in association with other established programs. This may lead to the need for additional faculty, though the program will attempt to mitigate this need by up to 80% by combining faculty resources with other programs wherever possible. This appears to have potential as other programs realize the relevance of sustainability principles in their disciplines.  $25,000 needed for SSM share.

 

The SSM program is currently sponsoring the implementation of sustainability screening, assessment and implementation through the UHMC Sustainability Committee. A potential project of that group is the establishment of a UHMC Sustainability Center in concert with the Sustainable Living Institute of Maui and other potential partners. Components of this enterprise could affect SSM operational costs though it is anticipated that progress overall on this initiative will be driven by the success of fundraising through UH Foundation contributions and grants.

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

No
Examine ways in which the features and functions of multiple systems are interconnected, and explain how one system can be optimized without degrading other systems or depleting natural resources.

2

No
Investigate, discover and summarize federal, state, local and industry codes, standards, laws, regulations, and guidelines.

3

No
Assess the feasibility of investing in sustainability measures using simple payback, return on investment, and life cycle costing techniques.

4

No
Describe the unique sustainability challenges faced by island communities

5

No
Identify, outline and illustrate the fundamentals of existing and emerging technologies in energy production, distribution and management; water supply; wastewater treatment; and waste management; their applications, processes and requirements.

6

No
Appraise, evaluate, summarize, and explain the economic, social, cultural, political, and scientific features that make a system, process, practice, or business sustainable and consolidate that information into a sustainability profile.

7

No
Propose and justify creative solutions to sustainability challenges that are scientifically sound.

8

No
Demonstrate skills related to managing sustainability projects including defining scope, selecting achievable goals, evaluating ethical implications, working with diverse teams, making presentations, and preparing reports.

9

No
Apply academic learning to real-world demands and activities.

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

As SSM is not a CTE program this section is not addressed.

B) Expected Level Achievement

Expectation Exceeds Meets Inadequate Unacceptable
Letter Grade A, B C D F
Percentage 80+% 70-79% 60-69% < 60%

 

C) Courses Assessed

There was no schedule for P-SLO review in the prior program report. The first program assessment is underway which will assess data compiled for the fall 2013 semester. This is consistent with the overall schedule which mandates that all SSM courses and P-SLOs be reviewed by 2018. 

SSM courses apply Student-Program Learning Outcomes at the following levels:

SSM S-PLO Levels by Course

 

PLO 1

PLO 2

PLO 3

PLO 4

PLO 5

PLO 6

PLO 7

PLO 8

PLO 9

SSM 101

2

1

1

2

1

1

2

1

1

SSM 201

2

2

3

2

2

2

2

2

2

SSM 202

3

1

2

3

1

2

2

2

2

SSM301

3

2

3

3

3

3

3

2

3

SSM302

2

2

2

2

2

3

2

2

2

SSM 375

2

1

3

2

3

3

2

2

3

SSM 393V

2

1

2

3

2

2

2

2

2

SSM 401

2

3

2

3

2

3

3

2

3

SSM 402

2

2

3

2

3

3

2

2

3

SSM 403

2

1

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

SSM 424

3

2

2

3

2

3

3

3

2

 

 

Assessment Schedule

Due to the newly establsihed status of the SSM program, course and S-PLO assessments are due to be completed by year 2018. The schedule for future annual assessments is posted below. The first formal assessments are underway but will not be completed until after data from the Fall 2013 semester is compiled.

SSM Course S-PLO Assessment Plan

PLO

Fa 2013

Sp 2014

Fa 2014

Sp 2015

Fa 2015

Sp 2016

Fa 2016

Sp 2017

Fa 2017

Sp 2018

1

SSM 101

 

 

 

 

 

 

SSM 424

 

 

2

 

 

 

SSM 302

 

 

 

 

 

SSM 401

3

 

SSM 496

SSM 301

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

 

SSM 393

SSM 495

 

 

 

SSM 401

5

 

 

SSM 375

 

 

 

SSM 403

 

 

 

6

SSM 101

 

 

 

 

 

SSM 403

 

 

 

7

 

 

 

 

 

SSM 495

 

SSM 424

SSM 201

 

8

 

 

 

SSM 302

 

 

 

 

SSM 201

 

9

 

SSM 496

 

 

SSM 393

 

 

 

 

 

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

Assessment tools which will be used to assess PLO #1 and #4 in SSM 101:

 1) Participation in class discussions

 2) Testing results

 3) Presentations

    

    

 

E) Results of Program Assessment

Assessments for SSM course will begin with course offered in fall 2013. Course will then be assessed according to a schedule which ensures that all PLOs and courses will be assessed consistently by 2018. The following represents the format for the assessment once completed.

Course Assessed

Program Learning Outcome (PLO) Assessed

Assessment Tool

Exceeds

Meets

Inadequate

Unacceptable

 

 

SSM 101

PLO # 1 -Examine ways in which the features and functions of multiple systems are interconnected, and explain how one system can be optimized without degrading other systems or depleting natural resources.

Class Participation

 

 

 

 

Testing

 

 

 

 

Presentations

 

 

 

 

Overall PLO Score

 

 

 

 

Overall PLO %

 

 

 

 

F) Other Comments

Engaged Community

The crux of SSM program interaction with the community is the SSM Advisory Committee. This is an active group of 8-15 Maui professionals who engage in both SSM program academic considerations and in the pursuit of increased SSM-related sustainability practices across the Maui community.

The SSMAC met monthly throughout the 2012-13 academic year. The meetings culminated in a half day retreat held at the Grand Wailea in May of 2013. members worked to devise a strategy for complementing SSM program goals by networking and helping educate communities about sustainability issues, encouraging and increasing internship and employment opportunities for SSM student within the Maui working community and identifying specific industry sectors which could be targeted for each of these purposes.

In October of 2013 the SSMAC met specifically for the purpose of reviewing proposed SSM curriculum revisions, but this meeting was effectively postponed until the end of October as a scheduling convenience. Previous to this, the committee had been provided course descriptions as well as explanation of overall SSM program goals. A 'mixer' for the SSMAC and the SSM student cohort is planned for early 2014.

Community engagement is also very effectively evidenced by the ongoing SSM required internship program. Students must achieve a minimum of three credit hours (225 clock hours) of internship related to sustainability. Each semester between 6 and 10 students have been involved. Some students have elected to use an elective credit more additional hours. Overall SSM students have received very strong reviews from internship sponsors, and on at least three occasions have received work offers as a result.

 

Results from Previous Year Plans and Goals

The 2012 Program Review for the Sustainability Science Management program was the first for SSM. It included a list of S-PLOs and stated that all course and PLOs were assessed, though it appears this was inaccurate. Several foundational elements were not in the report, including:

    - The SSM course-PLO map showing levels at which PLOs are addressed by course

     - A description/table describing assessment rubrics

     - A schedule of assessments for PLOs by SSM course

These elements are included above in this year's report.

The 2012 SSM report also listed plans and goals in the Action Plan. These can be broken down to the following targets:

     1) Increase class sizes/enrollment in the SSM program through marketing, student engagement and student cohort meetings,

     2) Increase the number of majors in the SSM program,

     3) Increase student completion rates, and

     4) Increase student persistence rates.

As noted by report data and above, SSM class sizes decreased slightly due to new course offerings to a limited upper level student cohort which drew down the overall program averages. Student completion rates increased by approximately 80+%. Data is unavailable to determine persistence at this time.

Perhaps the most significant data point for the program is the number of majors, which is reported as only 1 student in the 2013 data. It is known that this result derives from the narrow program entry map, a point verified by an informal poll of students who responded that at least 52 UHMC students consider themselves to be SSM majors. The means of rectifying this discrepancy are described below in Next Year's Plans.

G) Next Steps

Next Year's Plans

There are several steps underway to improve the SSM program pedagogy and to better correlate program realities with the program evaluation system. These fall into the broad categories of curriculum revisions, student engagement and broader campus community involvement.

Curriculum

A significant revision to the SSM curriculum is currently in process with the Curriculum Review Committee and Curriculum Central. These revisions to coursework, program requirements and path options were driven by three areas of recommendation from students in the program, generally described as:

     1. Concerns that the lower division requirements of the program were too rigid and contained too many business courses at the expense of student interested in more natural science or other related opportunities.

     2. The inability of students to declare an SSM major until they had completed all requirements and obtained a degree, the default being an AS in Business Careers. This is coupled with the exacerbating dynamic that many students have taken upper level courses in SSM before completing the degree, even though they could not declare as an SSM major. As a result there may be SSM majors who are essentially ready to graduate but without ever being an SSM major.

      3. The desire that students could shape upper division coursework to provide for recognized concentrations work in a desired field within the Sustainable Science degree. Sustainability as a field is exceedingly wide, even arguably as much a core competency as much as a defined discipline. SSM core courses focus on skill development and coursework in other fields such as energy, water or, ocean studies, for example could be focused  through electives and options to provide additional expertise.

The curriculum revisions underway address each of these issues, though #3 will also require additional revisions in later years.

Lower division requirements in the program map are proposed to be revised to include more stringent levels of sciences, more options to meet general education requirements, and less required business coursework. Other path alternatives provide a choice between technical versus management typical coursework.

The program map as proposed for revision is consistent with other UHMC four-year degree programs to provide that students may declare an SSM major upon completion of essential college level basics in math, English, computer skills and Introduction to Sustainable Sciences. Upon enactment in fall 2014, this should allow an immediate uptick in SSM major counts.

A new set of course options in Ocean/marine Studies has also been offered for the program. Ultimately this may lead to a certification, or even a concentration in this field as the full array of coursework is developed. In the meanwhile, some new courses have been added to the SSM curriculum and students interested in this field will have options by way of electives in addition to required SSM core courses.

Student Engagement

Providing SSM students with opportunities to gather and share interests and experiences in the field has proven a strong opportunity for reinforcing and even marketing the program. Beginning in spring 2012 the SSM student club, now the Student Ohana for Sustainability (SOS), was resurrected after a period of dormancy. It has met with mixed successes in terms of achievement due to other circumstances, but appears to be gaining momentum as a program and campus voice. This effort has been complemented by the conduct of SSM student cohort meetings organized around diverse issues relating to curriculum, campus practices, Earth Day and the like. These will continue to be held consistently and provide opportunities to share and collect student input in the program.

Marketing

Discussions about marketing the SSM program more broadly have been underway and have been evidenced by promotions via new brochures, radio appearances and participation in campus television broadcasts. It is anticipated that more intensive efforts will be conducted beginning in 2014 once curriculum changes can be incorporated into program materials and the web site. Together these will provide a clearer picture of the strengths of the program when compared to others regionally and nationally, and allow the readiness of campus facilities for an increase in resident student populations.

Campus Community Involvement

Sustainability is a common buzzword on the UHMC campus, and the SSM program is deeply involved in its promotion and education amongst the campus ohana. The SOS is continually working to determine targets for improving campus sustainability practices. Beyond that, SSM faculty has driven the convention of the UHMC Sustainability Committee, which was also inactive for a period, but is chartered to pursue sustainability at UHMC. SSM faculty and students participate on the committee, and their expertise in the field is vital to its success.