University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Student Services Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: Honolulu Community College
Program: Student Services

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The last comprehensive review for this program was on The last comprehensive 5-year program review for Student Services was completed for the academic years 2005-2006 through 2010-2011., and can be viewed at:
http://programs.honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/node/1149

Program Description

Student Services Mission Statement
Honolulu Community College Student Services is committed to empowering our students to achieve their academic, career, and life goals. We fulfill this commitment through providing support, advocacy, advising and teaching with an innovative, comprehensive approach for our ever-changing population. 

Program Description
The division of Student Services is responsible for planning, developing, and implementing various support services for our prospective, new, and continuing students. Services are provided to teach students the steps needed to succeed in their academic, career, and employment goals at the college. Programs and functions within Student Services collaborate with other faculty, staff, and administrators to help students adjust to college and maximize their experience at the college. The units in the re-organized Student Services Division are: Admissions & Records, Counseling, Mental Health & Wellness, Career & Employment Counseling, Financial Aid, Student Life & Development, Student Health Services, and Outreach & Orientation. All units assist the college in meeting its goals and objectives in various areas, particularly those related to student success. The role of the Dean of Student Services is to:
•    Provide vision, leadership, and support for innovative and on-going efforts
•    Lead the unit in its plans and Program Review
•    Prepare unit budgets and supervise expenditures
•    Assist and support faculty and staff to better serve students
•    Take the lead in recruiting, hiring, and evaluating faculty and staff
•    Handle student grievances
•    Take the lead in communicating the efforts and accomplishments of the faculty and staff in Student Services to the rest of the college and community

Admissions & Records
Admissions & Records is responsible for providing admission services, student record keeping for academic and contact information for college use, and Veterans Affairs (benefits). The office:
•    Coordinates student admission and disseminates information to prospective students
•    Manages the record keeping of registration of new students into credit programs
•    Assists in dissemination of information such as the use of college catalog and clarification of policies and regulations or transfer information
•    Assists in the evaluation of academic credentials for students
•    Approves students for graduation 
•    Maintains student records for both credit students and non-credit students whose transactions are processed by other offices
•    Assures that grades are properly recorded and students are notified 
•    Certifies student enrollment and VA benefits
•    Evaluates academic credentials for students
•    Orders diplomas and notifies students of graduation status

Counseling
The Counseling Office provides academic counseling services for new and continuing students. This office:
•    Assists students with the proper guidance in their class registration
•    Assists students in adjusting to college life through counseling services
•    Assists in dissemination of information such as the use of the college catalog and clarification of policies and regulations, or transfer information
•    Suggests referral to community resources for specific services, information, etc.
•    Coordinates assistance to special target groups
•    Assists in evaluating academic credentials for students
•    Provides counseling support services to enable all students to succeed
•    Performs graduation audits and approves students for graduation
•    Provides program information and requirements
•    Teaches students how to seek the information needed, such as college policies, procedures, registration, graduation, transfer information, etc.,  to reach their academic goals
•    Teaches students the importance of communication with others to ensure success in their academic plans
•    Counsels students who are not in good academic standing which includes reassessing their goals, teaching practical study skills, and directing students to appropriate resources
•    Provides general guidance in searching for scholarships
•    Evaluates and expedites transcripts from other campuses to determine transfer credits awarded
•    Evaluates graduation checks and approves students for graduation
•    Participates in recruitment activities such as college and career fairs, middle and high school visits, and other outreach activities
•    Works collaboratively with faculty, staff, and administrators to address students’ concerns and issues
•    Writes letters of support for scholarships, admission, and other reasons

Financial Aid
The Financial Aid Office provides financial assistance and coordination of disbursement of aid and/or scholarships to qualified students. The office:
•    Coordinates Federal, State, and private financial aid programs including: student loans, scholarships, grants, tuition waivers, and work-study employment
•    Serves as liaison between students and scholarship donors
•    Provides financial aid counseling and assistance for students

Student Life and Development
The Student life and Development Office provides enrichment opportunities to students through social, cultural, recreational, and leadership opportunities. This office:
•    Assists with new student orientation activities
•    Oversees the activities of the Student Media Board, which publishes the student newspaper and literary magazine
•    Advises the student government and other chartered student and special needs organizations
•    Plans and coordinates co-curricular, club and athletic activities
•    Supervises the expenditure of student activity funds
•    Serves as a liaison between student groups and college administration
•    Assists in the development of information regarding student affairs
•    Assists in developing policies relating to student conduct, behavior, and activities on campus

Career and Employment Office
The Career and Employment Office is responsible for providing career counseling and job placement services for students. This office:
•    Coordinates career related materials
•    Performs career outreach activities to expose students to alternatives and options
•    Provides counseling services to students for career exploration, including interest and skills inventory assessment
•    Assists students in adjusting to college life through counseling
•    Assists in dissemination of student employment information
•    Manages to SECE database for student employment
•    Suggests referral to community resources for specific services, information, etc. 
•    Manages student employment programs
•    Assists the college in meetings its goals and objectives in various areas, particularly those related to student success

Mental Health and Wellness
The Mental Health and Wellness office provides preventative and emergency support services to students with mental health needs. This office:
•    Supports the campus entire campus community with mental health related issues and concerns
•    Implements programs to ensure that the college complies with mental health and educational laws and requirements
•    Assists students in adjusting to college life through counseling services
•    Assists in dissemination of mental health support information
•    Suggests referrals to community resources for specific services and information around mental health and other support services
•    Assists the college in meetings its goals and objectives in various areas, particularly those related to student success

Health Office
The Health Office is responsible for promotion of a health, safe and accessible college community. This office:
•    Coordinates and assists in campus safety initiatives including emergency procedures, subscriptions to the UH Alert System, updating of student emergency contact information and related areas to increasing safety on campus
•    Provides limited nursing care and makes appropriate referrals as needed
•    Serves as the designated office for responding to medical emergencies on campus along with Security personnel
•    Assists Mental Health Counselor, Student ACCESS (disability services) and Security as needed in health and safety situations and in making recommendations to improve access, services and facilities
•    Completes and maintains health service records and required accidental illness/injury and other reports related to activities and functions of the Health Office
•    Advises and assists with implementing programs to ensure that the College complies with government health requirements in the areas of (1) post-secondary health clearance (TB and MMR) records and documentation, (2) public health disease prevention and pandemic planning, and (3) other health-related policies
•    Implements and provides opportunities in the areas of health education and wellness through on-line resources and events

Outreach & Orientation
The Outreach & Orientation Office is responsible for the recruitment and new student orientation process for the college community. In conjunction with college partners, this office:
•    Coordinates functions and events related to new student outreach with high schools and the community
•    Coordinates planning of new student orientation: Passport2College
•    Supervises, trains, and leads work of Student Ambassadors
•    Participates in various committees on and off campus focusing on outreach and retention efforts

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

 
Demand Indicators Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 Annual Headcount ALL Students 6,213 6,039 5,878
2 Annual Headcount NH Students 1,638 1,603 1,543
3    Actual Percent Change from Prior Year ALL -1% -3% -3%
4    Actual Percent Change from Prior Year NH 29% -2% -4%
5 Annual Headcount of Recent Hawaii High School Graduates 567 522 483
6    Percent of Service Area's Recent High School Graduates 6% 5% 5%
7 Annual Headcount of Students 25-49 Years Old 2,308 1,573 1,540
8 Annual Headcount from Underserved Regions 1,639 1,115 1,033
9 Annual Headcount in STEM programs 819 626 539
10a Fall
Semester
Registration Status
New Students 853 777 679
10b Transfers Students 451 518 538
10c Continuing Students 2,094 2,080 2,103
10d Returning Students 225 282 274
10e Home Campus Other 1,102 943 988
11a Spring
Semester
Registration Status
New Students 315 308 282
11b Transfers Students 339 386 324
11c Continuing Students 2,407 2,470 2,435
11d Returning Students 167 139 161
11e Home Campus Other 1,064 950 889

Efficiency Indicators Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
12 Pell Participation Rate ALL Students 27% 33% 37%  
13 Pell Participation Rate NH Students 35% 41% 42%
14 Number ALL Students Receiving Pell 940 1,171 1,282
15 Number NH Students Receiving Pell 317 386 396
16 Total Pell Disbursed ALL $2,828,498 $3,589,905 $4,179,558
17 Total Pell Disbursed NH $982,742 $1,179,456 $1,291,239
18 Overall Program Budget Allocation $1,867,590 Not Reported $1,710,022
19 General Funded Budget Allocation $1,867,590 Not Reported $1,710,022
20 Special/Federal Budget Allocation $0 Not Reported $0
21 Cost Per Student $301 Not Reported $291
Achieving the Dream AtD Fall Cohort
2009 2010 2011
22 FT AtD Cohort (ALL) complete 20 credits first year 227 224 258
23 FT AtD Cohort (NH) complete 20 credits first year 35 44 56
24 PT AtD Cohort (ALL) complete 12 credits first year 99 124 159
25 PT AtD Cohort (NH) complete 12 credits first year 21 37 37
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: March 14, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
26 Persistence Fall to Spring ALL Students 67% 69% 69%  
27 Persistence Fall to Spring NH 67% 67% 66%
28 Degrees & Certificates Awarded ALL 559 565 551
29 Degrees & Certificates Awarded NH 146 147 136
30 Degrees & Certificates in STEM ALL 177 174 169
31 Degrees & Certificates in STEM NH 51 57 55
32 Transfers to UH 4-yr ALL 172 195 190
33 Transfers to UH 4-yr NH 29 40 34

Community College Survey
of Student Engagement (CCSSE)
Survey Year  
2008 2010 2012
34 Support for Learners Benchmark (Percentile) 80 60 90  
Means Summary All Students ( 1 = Not at all/Rarely, 2 = Sometimes/Somewhat, 3 = Often/Very )
35 Academic Advising      
  Frequency 1.80 1.83 1.83
  Satisfaction 2.28 2.23 2.26
  Importance 2.58 2.51 2.51
36 Career Counseling      
  Frequency 1.62 1.56 1.63
  Satisfaction 2.21 2.12 2.13
  Importance 2.48 2.39 2.38
37 Job Placement Assistance      
  Frequency 1.35 1.36 1.37
  Satisfaction 1.97 1.91 1.84
  Importance 2.12 2.16 2.15
38 Financial Aid Advising      
  Frequency 1.56 1.58 1.77
  Satisfaction 2.06 2.07 2.21
  Importance 2.31 2.28 2.32
39 Student Organizations      
  Frequency 1.35 1.36 1.43
  Satisfaction 2.03 1.99 2.07
  Importance 1.93 1.93 1.96
40 Transfer Credit Assistance      
  Frequency 1.54 1.51 1.53
  Satisfaction 2.03 2.04 2.02
  Importance 2.20 2.19 2.25
41 Services for People With Disabilities      
  Frequency 1.28 1.30 1.33
  Satisfaction 2.00 1.97 2.02
  Importance 2.08 2.05 2.11
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: March 14, 2014

Glossary

Part II. Analysis of the Program

Honolulu Community College continues to see a decline in Demand Indicators. Enrollment in all areas dipped slightly again in Academic Year (AY) 12-13. The college is well aware of the decline and this year is aggressively working on a plan to increase enrollments and numbers in all Demand Indicators areas. This plan includes the creation of a College Recruitment Plan, the newly created Director of Secondary Programs, and several improved retention efforts. These efforts do not fall alone on the shoulders of Student Services. The entire college needs to be engaged and involved in recruitment, retention, and completion efforts. 

In addition to the data provided, the campus also ran numbers on the difference between number of students who submitted applications, those that were then accepted, and then those that ultimately enrolled with the college. In Fall 2012 Honolulu Community College had 2,851 applications. Of those only 2,848 were accepted (meaning they had complete applications). From this number only 1,538 students enrolled, producing a yield rate of 54%. In Spring 2013 the college had 1,132 new applicants. From this, only 1,128 were accepted and then only 669 ended up enrolling, which equates to a yield rate of 59.3%. The college will need to look more closely at these numbers in an effort to increase the actual number of students that apply and ultimately enroll. This will become a key part in a comprehensive recruitment plan.

Pell participation rates looked strong in AY 12-13. As the college continues to improve Financial Aid processes and procedures with the system, we expect this area to continue to grow and improve. According to college run data, the number of FAFSA applications increased from AY 2012 to AY 2013. In AY 2012 the applications were at 7,930 compared to 10,056 in AY 2013. AtD data continues to improve slowly in all indicator areas. This could be attributed to efforts in several areas of student services and in academic support areas. Effectiveness Indicators and CCSSE data remain similar to prior years. 

Last year, the Student Services Division implemented a Student Satisfaction Survey. The results of this survey were combined with an Accreditation Action Plan to address areas of improvement in Student Services. A large focus of the action plan was rooted in the development or enhancement of Student Learning Outcomes and Assessment. Each unit is actively working off of the plan and in doing so also making adjustments to services, procedures, and in some cases policies. 

Part III. Action Plan

In regards to the action plans outlined in AY 12-13 all items were completed, or are still in progress. The then new Dean of Student Services completed an Initial Needs Assessment shortly after the start of Spring Semester 2013. This was followed closely with the creation of the Accreditation Action Plans for the division and units that incorporated outcomes and assessment work (referred to in last year’s ARPD report as Student Success and Completion Framework). The Student Satisfaction Survey was deployed and completed in before the end of the academic year. 

The 2012-2013 ARPD report also outlined action plans for the following areas: (a) Outreach & Orientation, (b) Admissions, Registration and Records, (c) Financial Aid, and (d) Behavioral Intervention Team. Over the remainder of the academic year and into the 2013-2014 academic year, each of action plans for these areas were either completed or still in progress. Specific updates are:
(a)    Outreach & Orientation – changes were made to the orientation process over Spring 2012 and implemented over the summer and early fall. Currently the new process for orientation and registration is set to go live in conjunction with new students coming for Spring Semester 2014.
(b)    Admissions, Registration, and Records – Hiring of staff is still not complete due to turnover. However, two key positions were filled before the start of Fall Semester 2013 – the Registrar and the Associate Registrar for Admissions. Given the staffing issues, the area has just begun work to streamline process, procedures and policies. Much progress has also been made in regards to participation in system initiatives such as Reverse Transfer and evaluations. 
(c)    Financial Aid – Before the start of Fall Semester 2013 the number of students awarded was significantly higher than the year before. The college showed a 272% increase in awarding, or over 2 million dollars awarded to students. The office is still working on filling one vacancy due to turnover, and is continuing to work with the system to improve processes and procedures. 
(d)    Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) – The BIT began meeting in January of 2012 and since that time has developed process to proactively intervene with students of concern. The BIT also has worked on internal procedures that will continue to be a going process as it involves partnering with Administrative Services; a division that is currently undergoing leadership changes. Over the summer the BIT also finalized training for the campus and has since run the training session twice. 

For AY 13-14 there are several Action Plans within the division of Student Services at Honolulu Community College. In regards to meeting the needs of accreditation, the division and units under it all have action plans that focus on the following: student learning outcomes, assessment, improvement of services based on assessment, procedural changes, and in some cases policy changes. These plans were first developed in middle of the Spring 2013 semester with the intent of being ongoing and active plans of action into AY 13-14. 

Review of completion, recruitment, and Demand Indicator data suggest that the college should create a comprehensive action plan to address shortfalls. To this extent, Student Services is working on two overarching action plans. The first centers on the goal to meet system benchmarks for completion of degrees and certificates of achievement. This plan includes getting the college up to date and participating in several system initiatives around reverse transfer, automated transcript evaluation, as well as taking a look at internal practices within our Student Records Office. The second action plan centers on the goal to increase our student enrollment, specifically students graduating from high school. This will require a comprehensive College Recruitment Plan. This plan will be developed over Fall Semester 2013 and put into place over the next two years. Both of these overarching plans should help to increase the numbers and improve our performance in various indicators as outlined by the Annual Report for Program Data.

Part IV. Resource Implications

Part of building a culture of evidence in Student Services through systematic development of student learning outcomes and assessment is to help guide the division in terms of resource requests, implications, and decision-making. For the past several years the division has carried over the following resource implications:
•    1.0 Mental Health Counselor (Faculty), $55,000
•    1.0 Student Activity Coordinator (APT), $45,000
•    1.0 Outreach & Orientation Support (APT), $45,000

While these resources are still vitally important to the division and still reflect gaps in service and support needed, the division will need to review priority of resources and look at implications based on our findings at the end of AY 13-14. By the end of Spring Semester 2014, each unit will have engaged in some type of assessment. Data from these assessments will then be used to complete an internal report and each unit will be asked about resource implications. At that point, the division will work closely with the Dean of Student Services to determine division-wide priorities. Added to this challenge are possible anticipated budget reductions.

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

Yes
Student Learning Outcomes The following are student learning outcomes for each area within Student Services: Counseling - As a result of using the services provided by the Counseling Department, students will be able to create and follow an academic plan that reflects their program requirements and leads to registration into appropriate classes. Counseling - As a result of using the services provided by the Counseling Department, students will be able to identify and effectively use MyUH Portal to achieve academic goals by registering and accessing STAR for academic planning. Counseling - [For students on Academic Probation] As a result of using the services provided by the Counseling Department, students will be able to identify, interpret, and correctly follow academic policies that directly impact their academic progress. Career & Employment - As a result of using the services provided by the Career and Employment Centers, students will be able to identify various career/major options based on their interest, values, skills, and educational goals. Career & Employment - As a result of using the services provided by the Career and Employment Centers, students will be able to use a multitude of career resources to identify and research various occupations and develop an action plan that connects their program of study to their career goals. Career & Employment - As a result of using the services provided by the Career and Employment Centers, students will be able to identify and utilize pre-employment skills and resources to seek employment. Career & Employment - [For students seeking on-campus employment] As a result of using the services provided by the Career and Employment Centers, students will be able to follow the policies and procedures necessary to obtain student employment at Honolulu Community College. Student Life & Development - Students will be able to contribute to a positive organizational environment through active participating and cooperation with other. (Ethnical Leadership) Student Life & Development - Students will be able to gather relevant situational information. (Critical Thinking) Student Life & Development - Students will be able to recognize the Tuckman and Jensen model and identify the stages of group development. (Teams & Groups) Student Life & Development - Students will be able to exhibit effective interpersonal communication in a variety of settings. (Interpersonal Communication) Student Life & Development - Students will be able to articulate the mission and goals for their organization. (Mission, Vision, & Goals) Health Office - As a result of participating in the Health Office’s educational efforts, students, faculty, and staff will be able to identify appropriate healthy and safe actions/behaviors that contribute to supporting their educational experience and goals in life. Health Office - As a result of participating in the Health Office’s educational efforts, students, faculty, and staff will be able to participate (directly and in-directly) in activities that support and build stronger healthier communities. Health Office - As a result of participating in the Health Office’s educational efforts, students, faculty, and staff will be able to articulate the appropriate steps to take before, during and after a medical emergency at HonCC and synthesize and apply these concepts of prevention and preparedness to better plan and protect themselves and their families for future emergencies. Health Office - As a result of the participating in the training and performing the duties for a Health Office Student Assistant, students will be able to apply learned skills in order to independently and successfully complete a major project on time. Health Office - As a result of the participating in the training and performing the duties for a Health Office Student Assistant, students will be able to apply skills learned to collaboratively work as a team to successfully plan, execute and debrief a campus-wide activity. Health Office - As a result of the participating in the training and performing the duties for a Health Office Student Assistant, students will be able to demonstrate persistence and progress toward mastery in utilizing Microsoft Office, Excel, Word, UH Laulima, and UH Google email in office operations. Mental Health & Wellness - As a result of using the services provided by the Mental Health & Wellness Office students will be able to identify and access mental health services/resources on-line and in-person to obtain information that will enhance academic progress and personal growth and development. Mental Health & Wellness - As a result of using the services provided by the Mental Health & Wellness Office students will be able to identify various proactive behaviors that will increase their knowledge of wellness-related behaviors, positive symptom management and personal safety and well-being as a result of participating in mental health related programming. Mental Health & Wellness - As a result of using the services provided by the Mental Health & Wellness Office students will be able to develop a greater understanding of mental health conditions and be able to recognize situations that may impact their academic performance and emotional well-being as a result of participating in brief individual counseling, crisis counseling, and/or enrichment groups. Mental Health & Wellness - As a result of using the services provided by the Mental Health & Wellness Office students will be able to develop and implement a wellness plan to support individual needs and goals. Wellness plans include identifying behaviors to improve academic progress, physical and emotional well-being, social interactions and personal safety. Mental Health & Wellness - As a result of using the services provided by the Mental Health & Wellness Office students will be able to identify signs and symptoms of college mental health conditions and its impact on academic performance, personal and emotional well-being. Outreach & Orientation - As a result of completing the new student orientation process, students will be able to locate, identify, and demonstrate a basic understanding of college and academic policies and procedures. Outreach & Orientation - As a result of completing the new student orientation process, students will be able to identify campus resources and utilize those that are appropriate to their needs. Outreach & Orientation - As a result of completing the new student orientation process, students will be able to identify and navigate technological and on-line resources to support their educational goal. Outreach & Orientation - As a result of completing the new student orientation process, students will be able to identify ways to access and engage in the campus community, opportunities, and activities. Outreach & Orientation - As a result of completing the new student orientation process, students will be able to identify and select appropriate funding options to meet their educational goals based on their financial need. Financial Aid - As a result of using the services provided by the Financial Aid Office students will be able to identify needs and concerns in order to ask appropriate questions in verbal and written form related to their Financial Aid in order to resolve problems. Financial Aid - As a result of using the services provided by the Financial Aid Office students will be able to utilize financial aid budgetary tools and resources to create and maintain a budget appropriate to their financial status. Financial Aid - As a result of using the services provided by the Financial Aid Office students will be able to utilize organizational skills in a timely manner to accurately complete forms and produce necessary documents in the home, work place, and greater community. Admissions & Records - As a result of using the services provided by the Admissions & Records Office students will be able to identify and interpret applicable policies and procedures, including anticipating consequences of non-compliance and adhering to deadlines. Admissions & Records - As a result of using the services provided by the Admissions & Records Office students will be able to identify and/or utilize appropriate resources, forms, referrals, and online tools as provided by the Admissions & Records Office to complete transactions that support their academic journey.

A) Expected Level Achievement

The student learning outcomes listed above were finalized over the summer of 2013. Over AY 13-14 each of the units will be identifying which outcomes to assess. Work on assessment tools and collection of data is already underway. Outcomes were developed and/or honed after a three-day training that took place in April 2013. The foundation of the training was rooted in the work of Dr. Ruth Stiehl and Dr. Les Lewchuk. The basic philosophical approach of Stiehl and Lewchuk’s work is to start with the development of robust outcomes. Stakeholders within and outside the program or department help to create the outcomes through an affinity process of brainstorming concepts and issues, clustering of themes, and eventual development of written outcomes. The outcomes are then honed and edited in order to make sure they are robust enough to speak to the overall mission or goals of a program or department, but specific enough so that they are measurable. Only after the development of the outcomes are assessment tools designed. The assessments include the traditional quantitative and qualitative tools (surveys, open-ended questions, and numerical data) as well as new tools that may not traditionally be used in areas like Student Services (rubrics, checklists, and process checklists). Based on this approach, we expect that the outcomes developed are obtainable and measureable in order to meet the expected level of achievement.

B) Courses Assessed

Each unit in Student Services will be selecting outcomes to assess over AY 13-14. At the end of the year, each unit will then prepare an internal assessment report. 

C) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

Each unit in Student Services will be using assessment instruments unique to the particular learning outcome they are measuring. This work is being completed over AY 13-14 and will culminate in assessment data at the end of the year. As stated earlier, the work began in the Spring Semester 2013 with focus on outcomes development and refinement. 

D) Results of Program Assessment

Because of the timing of when outcomes were finalized and reviewed results of program assessment are not complete at this time. As stated earlier, an action plan is in place to complete assessments in all area by the end of AY 13-14. Additionally the assessment of outcomes will become a yearly practice for the division and tied directly into program, resource, and strategic planning. 

E) Other Comments

The division of Student Services had made great strides in the area of outcomes and assessment. Much of the timeline and work was driven by the college’s action plan around meeting accreditation standards. Because of this, assessments for AY 12-13 did not occur as planned. However, the new timeline and adoption of philosophy and practice will ultimately be integrated into everyday practice and the division will begin to see significant increases in data that can be used for planning and adjustments to services provided. 

F) Next Steps

Units within Student Services will be following their individual action plans under the direction of unit leads and the Dean of Student Services.