University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Student Services Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: Kauai Community College
Program: Student Services

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The last comprehensive review for this program can be viewed at:
http://info.kauai.hawaii.edu/admin/prapru.htm#pr

Program Description

Kaua‘i Community College Student Services is committed to providing students and the community with open access to comprehensive programs in a nurturing environment, empowering students to take initiative and responsibility for their educational, professional, and personal development.  The Student Services mission is aligned with the college’s mission to support open access to higher education and training.

Student Services Statement of Commitment:

• Student Services is student centered and believes in the dignity, uniqueness and growth of the individual and the fundamental right of each person to realize his or her fullest potential.

• Student Services is an integral part of the total learning experience of Kaua‘i Community College.

• Student Services professional environment nurtures respect, responsibility, integrity, caring, and fairness while assisting students in achieving academic excellence.

Student Services at Kaua‘i Community College has 5 major units: Counseling & Advising, Financial Aid, Admissions & Records, Student Life and Marketing & Enrollment Management.  Each unit has developed and is assessing service outcomes.

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

 
Demand Indicators Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 Annual Headcount ALL Students 1,766 1,718 1,801
2 Annual Headcount NH Students 503 522 560
3    Actual Percent Change from Prior Year ALL 2% -3% 5%
4    Actual Percent Change from Prior Year NH 32% 4% 7%
5 Annual Headcount of Recent Hawaii High School Graduates 190 217 208
6    Percent of Service Area's Recent High School Graduates 27% 30% 30%
7 Annual Headcount of Students 25-49 Years Old 556 410 452
8 Annual Headcount from Underserved Regions 42 24 42
9 Annual Headcount in STEM programs 167 123 139
10a Fall
Semester
Registration Status
New Students 330 420 474
10b Transfers Students 153 125 104
10c Continuing Students 716 708 744
10d Returning Students 173 148 103
10e Home Campus Other 56 32 70
11a Spring
Semester
Registration Status
New Students 103 134 132
11b Transfers Students 97 53 39
11c Continuing Students 956 999 1,019
11d Returning Students 117 85 76
11e Home Campus Other 54 48 96

Efficiency Indicators Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
12 Pell Participation Rate ALL Students 40% 50% 51%  
13 Pell Participation Rate NH Students 50% 59% 67%
14 Number ALL Students Receiving Pell 486 611 633
15 Number NH Students Receiving Pell 182 234 277
16 Total Pell Disbursed ALL $1,544,508 $1,965,463 $2,101,309
17 Total Pell Disbursed NH $567,097 $742,027 $901,161
18 Overall Program Budget Allocation $1,114,620 $1,361,485 $1,243,716
19 General Funded Budget Allocation $875,620 $969,853 $988,440
20 Special/Federal Budget Allocation $0 $300,819 $255,276
21 Cost Per Student $631 $792 $691
Achieving the Dream AtD Fall Cohort
2009 2010 2011
22 FT AtD Cohort (ALL) complete 20 credits first year 123 89 108
23 FT AtD Cohort (NH) complete 20 credits first year 20 27 35
24 PT AtD Cohort (ALL) complete 12 credits first year 33 43 58
25 PT AtD Cohort (NH) complete 12 credits first year 3 11 15
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: March 14, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
26 Persistence Fall to Spring ALL Students 70% 73% 73%  
27 Persistence Fall to Spring NH 68% 70% 72%
28 Degrees & Certificates Awarded ALL 208 196 216
29 Degrees & Certificates Awarded NH 42 59 39
30 Degrees & Certificates in STEM ALL 69 47 53
31 Degrees & Certificates in STEM NH 9 13 3
32 Transfers to UH 4-yr ALL 35 61 74
33 Transfers to UH 4-yr NH 8 17 21

Community College Survey
of Student Engagement (CCSSE)
Survey Year  
2008 2010 2012
34 Support for Learners Benchmark (Percentile) 70 40 90  
Means Summary All Students ( 1 = Not at all/Rarely, 2 = Sometimes/Somewhat, 3 = Often/Very )
35 Academic Advising      
  Frequency 1.94 1.79 1.95
  Satisfaction 2.22 2.26 2.33
  Importance 2.60 2.59 2.67
36 Career Counseling      
  Frequency 1.59 1.54 1.64
  Satisfaction 2.06 2.13 2.19
  Importance 2.49 2.42 2.42
37 Job Placement Assistance      
  Frequency 1.26 1.18 1.21
  Satisfaction 1.77 1.85 1.89
  Importance 2.29 2.15 2.09
38 Financial Aid Advising      
  Frequency 1.64 1.69 1.88
  Satisfaction 2.08 2.22 2.36
  Importance 2.41 2.49 2.58
39 Student Organizations      
  Frequency 1.41 1.36 1.40
  Satisfaction 1.93 2.03 2.12
  Importance 2.01 1.97 2.07
40 Transfer Credit Assistance      
  Frequency 1.47 1.47 1.44
  Satisfaction 2.13 2.05 2.10
  Importance 2.25 2.30 2.30
41 Services for People With Disabilities      
  Frequency 1.51 1.27 1.24
  Satisfaction 2.17 2.12 2.12
  Importance 2.16 2.22 2.14
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: March 14, 2014

Glossary

Part II. Analysis of the Program

According to the Program Quantitative Indicators, Student Services, overall, is Healthy.  There are a few areas that will be examined to determine what can be done to improve the indicators: Native Hawaiian Pell awards, Native Hawaiian degrees and certificates awarded, and Native Hawaiian STEM degrees and certificates awarded. Tentative plans have been discussed on improving these indicators.

Student Services has had several personnel changes over the past years, however not all positions have yet been filled. The financial aid office has two new personnel and one position still unfilled. When filled by the end of next month, the office will be fully staffed with three personnel.  In counseling, the special needs counselor transferred over to the newly created, job placement/career counseling position.  Before being advertised the special needs position was modified to include mental health services, a service that is greatly needed.  The enrollment management/marketing person vacated the position in summer 2013 and is slated to be filled by end of October.  One of the priority this year is to develop and enrollment management plan.

Through the C3T2 grant, Students Services received a half-time transcript evaluator (upgraded to a full-time position in October), a data resource position, and a veteran’s and career/transfer counselor.  The data resource position was advertised four times with no qualified applicant.

Admission and Records has been able to maintain timely services even with the increase in enrollment over the past several semesters.  Student satisfaction has remained high.  With the additional transcript evaluator position, the goal of having transcripts evaluated prior to registration has become achievable.

Counseling and Advising has instituted several changes based on data to empower students to take initiative and responsibility for educational, professional, and personal development.  The use of the educational plan (Academic Planner) has been proven to impact retention and persistence.  The second service outcome of utilizing the Contract for Academic Success Strategy for probationary students is showing that it increases student success.

Despite the changes in personnel and unfilled position, financial aid has seen a significant increase in the number of FAFSA applications processed, the number of Pell Grant recipients, the number of scholarships awarded, and many other key markers for success.

Student Life located at the Kauai Community College Campus Center, continues to play a vital role in the holistic development of students. The area serves as the central hub for the Associated Students of the University of Hawaii –Kauai Community College Student Government, the Student Activities Council and Registered Independent Campus Organizations.  It is an area where ordinary students can emerge as leaders of the community through leadership training and development, a place to explore and create programs that meet diverse needs, and a haven for student engagement and interaction. 

Analysis of Demand Indicators:   (HEALTHY)

Both the annual headcount for all students and for Native Hawaiian students increased by 5% and 7% respectively. Only demand indicator that declined (by 9 students) was the headcount of recent Hawaii High School graduates, although the percent of Service Area’s Recent High School Graduates remained the same at 30% from the previous year.

The headcount of Students 25-49, Underserved Regions, and STEM Programs, all increased over the previous year.

The Fall and Spring Semester Registration Status shows the differences between the fall and spring students in terms of New, Transfer, Continuing, Returning, and Home Campus.  There were more than 3.5 times New Students in the fall compared to spring, and 2.5 times more Transfer Students in the fall compared to spring.

Analysis of Efficiency Indicators: (Cautionary)

Analysis of the College efficiency data indicates weakness in serving the Native Hawaiians in term of Pell Participation rate, number receiving Pell, and Total Pell disbursed.  For the total student population, all these indicators increased, but not for the Native Hawaiians.  Our efforts in the past years to increase Native Hawaiian participation, through the Waialeale Project has worked as seen by the increasing number of Hawaiian students.  The reasons for the decrease in Pell are numerous.  One reason is students do not follow through and complete the financial aid process for several different reasons.  With a full staff and analysis of students who applied but didn’t complete the entire process will result in increasing these numbers.

Concerning the budget, Overall Program Budget Allocation decreased, resulting in Cost per Student decreasing from the previous year.  Although there was a decrease in Special/Federal Budget Allocation, the General Funded Budget Allocation increased.  Part of the reason was less Perkins funding for services for special needs students that had to be made up with general funds.

Analysis of Achieving the Dream Data:  (Healthy)

All four categories, for both all the students, and Native Hawaiians, increase over the previous year for 12 and 20 credits completed.  In terms of percentages, more Native Hawaiians completed both 12 and 20 credits categories, compared to all the students.

Analysis of Effectiveness Indicators:  (Healthy)

Five of the eight effective indicators increased over the previous year.  The two indicators that decreased were Degrees and Certificates awarded to Native Hawaiian students, and Degrees and Certificates in STEM for Native Hawaiian students.  The Persistence Fall to Spring for all students remained the same at 73% and persistence for Native Hawaiians increased to 72% from previously 70%.  The transfers to UH year increased for both all and Native Hawaiian Students.

In the effort to increase STEM majors, (Nursing and Electronics majors),  especially for the Native Hawaiian students, the nursing counselor is focusing on outreach into the community, including setting up a booth at the Farmers Market on the campus on Saturdays.

Analysis of Community College Survey of Students Engagement  (CCSSE):  (Healthy)

Overall, Student Services did very well on the CCSSE.   Of the 21 items, only 4 declined, 2 stayed the same, and 15 increased in mean scores.

The four categories with declining means were Job Placement Assistance Importance, Transfer Credit Assistance frequency, and Services for People with Disabilities frequency and importance.  An analysis of these items will be done to determine how they can be improved.

Overall, students were satisfied with the services provided.

Part III. Action Plan

 

Program Goal & Campus

Strategic

Priority or Goal

 

Action Item

Resources Needed

Person(s) Responsible

Timeline

Indicator of Improve-ment

PLO impacted

Status

 

Student Services

Goal 1:  Access and Goal 2:  Learning and Teaching

 

In line with KCC’s goal of improving partnerships with K-12, Student Services (Admissions, Counseling,, Financial Aid and Student Life) and the KCC Campus-Wide Marketing Committee will lead the campus in revitalizing a one day all-community outreach similar to “A Taste of College.”

 

Food & beverage for 150 @ $10 per person; $1,500  (to be requested from UH Foundation)

 

Incentives and marketing supplies

$500

 

Marketing Director, Student Services (Admissions, Counseling, Financial Aid, Marketing & Student Life), Division Chairs & interested faculty, Campus Marketing Committee

 

Planning – Fall 2014

 

Implementation – Spring 2015

 

The benchmark for success will be participation of 75 individuals seeking access to College.

 

The Service outcome for Marketing & Enrollment Management is that KCC Student Services strengthens the College’s presence in the community through outreach and marketing efforts.

 

 

The Marketing Director  position has been vacant since summer 2013. Student Services, in the absence of the Director will work with the Marketing Committee to start planning process.

 

Counseling & Advising Goal 1:  Access and Goal 2:  Learning and Teaching

 

 

Counselors will implement mobile advising through the use of laptop computers and in cooperation with academic divisions and computer services will develop strategies to increase access to academic advising for students by 10% every semester.  Specifically, counselors will work with Computer Services to utilize laptops to schedule appointments and review academic planners on line and away from the traditional office setting while insuring confidentiality of student records and conversations.  Additionally, group sessions will be designed and overhead projection will be utilized.

 

 

4  Samsung Chromebook laptop computers; 1 visual presenter; WORD, SARS and STAR programs for each laptop, 1 portable  Wi-Fi wireless printer

 

$300 per notebook

$400 for visual projector

$200 for wireless printer

 

$1,800 estimated total for mobile advising equipment

 

 

 

Counselors, Computer Services, Academic Divisions

 

Fall 2014

 

 

 

 

 

Increase student access to academic advising and completion of academic planners by 10%.

 

The Counseling & Advising unit’s service outcome is Student Services guides and supports students in developing an educational plan (Academic Planner) and pursuing that plan.

 

Pending allocation of funds.

 

Counseling & Advising Goal 1:  Access and Goal 2:  Learning and Teaching

 

 

Counselors will collaborate with students, with an emphasis on academic probationary students, to develop an academic plan and/or contract for academic success and increase retention (fall to fall) and graduation rates by 10%.

 

 

No cost

 

Counselors, Academic Divisions, Financial Aid, Admissions & Records

 

 

The benchmark for success is a comparison between students on the CAS and those without. The goal is to retain no less that 10% of those students on contract, compared to those not on contract.

 

The second Counseling & Advising SO is KCC Student Services academic advisers collaborate with all students, with an emphasis on academic probationary students, to develop an academic plan and/or contract for academic success.

 

Developing a data collection system for implementation by Spring 2014.

 

 

Counseling & Advising Goal 4:  To provide opportunities for professional development for faculty and staff. 

 

 

 

 

The opportunity for counselors to attend a national conference in their field of expertise will provide professional development opportunities to maintain currency in their professional responsibilities, and to transfer newly acquired information and strategies towards meeting department and college goals.

 

 

Fund 1 counselor to attend the NACADA National Conference in 2014.  “NACADA is the leader within the global education community for the theory, delivery, application and advancement of academic advising to enhance student learning and development.” http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/

 

Estimated from 2013 information:             $2,600

 

Registration:             $600 Transportation:       $1,000

Hotel & MI&E:       $1,000 

 

 

Earl Nishiguchi, VCSA & Counselor selected to attend national conference

 

 

Fall 2014

 

 

Counselor will provide in-service training within 6 months of return from Conference

 

 

 

Goal 4

 

 

Pending allocation of funds.

 

Counseling & Advising Goal #5:  Address Health & Safety Issues

 

Replace barrier which has fallen on students (between student waiting area and registration arena) with permanent wall with a door for accessibility.

 

 

With approval, the Carpentry program may take this on as a student-driven project. The instructor estimated the cost of materials at $1,000.

 

 

Brandon Shimokawa (VCAA), Duke Lang (Carpentry Instructor) and Earl Nishiguchi, (VCSA)

 

Fall 2014

 

Safe room divider.

 

Goal 5

 

Pending allocation of funds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Counseling & Advising Goal #5: Address Health & Safety Issues

 

Purchase equipment to provide “white music” throughout Counseling & Advising. Presently conversations pass through office doors, corridors, waiting area, testing center & registration arena.

 

 

Estimated cost $60.00 each for 4 units.  Approximately $240.00.

 

Earl Nishiguchi, VCSA

 

Fall 2014

 

Maintain greater confidentiality for students and counselors.

 

Goal 5

 

Pending allocation of funds.

 

Financial Aid Goal #5: Address Health & Safety Issues

 

Purchase 5 computer black screens for student computer work stations.  Presently when more than one student is using office computer workstation to complete sensitive FA information, there is no screens to protect student personal information. 

 

Cost approximately
$1250 for 5 - 12” x 16” screens.

 

Financial Aid Manager, Jeff Anderson and  financial aid staff

 

Fall 2014

 

Maintain greater confidentiality for students utilizing Financial Aid Computer stations

 

Goal 5

 

Pending allocation of funds.

 

Financial Aid Goal #1:  Access and #4: Enriching Student Experience and increasing the efficiency, effectiveness and sustainability of the KCC environment. 

 

Purchase inkjet copier/printer/scanner for the financial aid office.  Our office Cannon printer-scanner-copier broke in January 2013 and currently students need to wait while staff goes across to Counseling Office to make individual copies required for FA verifications. If only one staff is working, the office needs to be locked & the student left to wait outside. 

 

Cost approximately
$500 for model to replace Cannon Image Class M6560 or equivalent.

 

Financial Aid Manager, Jeff Anderson and  financial aid staff

 

Fall 2014

 

Offer greater individual and immediate  service to students

 

Goals 1 & 4

 

Pending allocation of funds.

 

Student Life – ASUH-KCC SG

 

Goal 1: Access

Goal 4: Personal Development

Goal 5: Community Development

 

 

 

a. Develop on-going leadership training and development plan offered in Fall semester. A professional leadership trainer will be contracted to assess and present workshops that focus on individual leadership skills that is relevant to the campus.

 

b. Leadership binders of each admin. and senator roles will be created and filed and presented to newly elected members. Additional training will be provided through state-wide and national conferences.

 

c. Increased effort for public relations through the improvement of the Student Life website.  On-going monthly meetings with constituents in their divisions will be practiced. 

 

d. Installing new dedicated bulletin boards in all divisions of the campus will be installed.

 

e. Work closely with the Ka Leo O KCC newspaper on presenting news and info. about ASUH-KCC SG and student leader interviews.

 

f. Work with HASLA on developing Student Life SLO’s. UH System will adopt an existing model from Texas A&M

 

a. $2000 for Consultant Fee

 

b. No cost

 

c. $400 for Consultant Fee

 

d. $1500 for six secured bulletin boards

 

e. No Cost

 

f. No Cost

 

 

 

 

 

John Constantino

 

a. Spring 2014

 

b. Spring 2014

 

c. Spring 2014

 

d. Fall 2014

 

e. Fall 2013

 

f. Spring 2014

 

 

 

a.Completion of training

 

b.Completion of Binders

 

c. Student Life Website updated and current

 

d. Leadership Information posted on bulletin boards.

 

e. ASUH-KCC SG information printed in Ka Leo O KCC Newspaper

 

f. Student Life SLOS’ implemented and assessed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Student Life outcome is that KCC Student Services works to enhance the student experience at the College by actively supporting KCC student government and by encouraging student participation in the campus’ extra-curricular activities and clubs.

 

 

Pending allocation of funds from ASUH-KCC SG

 

Student Life- UH Caucus

Goal 1: Access

Goal 4: Personal Development

Goal 6: Diversity

 

 

 

a. On-going ASUH-KCC SG representation to UH Caucus.

 

b. Develop a leadership training plan offered in the Fall semester. A professional leadership trainer will be contracted to assess and present pertinent workshops on developing individual leadership skills.

 

c. On-going additional training through statewide and national conferences.

 

 

a. No Cost

 

b. $2000 for Consultant Fee

 

c. $5000 for travel

 

John Constantino

 

a. Ongoing

 

b. Fall 2013

 

c. Ongoing

 

a. Adequate representation on UH Caucus

 

b. Completion of training

 

c. Completion of training

 

d. Adequate representation from RICO leaders

 

The Student Life outcome is that KCC Student Services works to enhance the student experience at the College by actively supporting KCC student government and by encouraging student participation in the campus’ extra-curricular activities and clubs.

 

 

Pending allocation of funds from ASUH-KCC SG

 

Student Life – Student Activities Council

 

Goal 1: Access

Goal 4: Personal Development

Goal 5: Community Development

Goal 6: Diversity

 

 

 

 

a. Encourage student participation from each campus academic division, and from each RICO. This is needed to collectively brainstorm from all facets of the campus community, to prioritize activities and events and encourage new students to participate in SAC. 

 

b. Update and improve Student Life webpage to keep info. relevant and current. Effort will be placed on media programs to announce campus activities.

 

c. Develop a working relationship with  Ka Leo O KCC Newspaper so that upcoming events can be properly advertised in advanced.

 

d. Increase student participation in SAC by establishing a continued presence at NSO and Club Day.

 

e. Purchase Digital Sign Boards that are strategically placed around campus so that information is quickly uploaded and shared with the student body in an efficient manner.

 

 

a. No Cost

 

b. $400 for Consultant Fee

 

c. No Cost

 

d. No Cost

 

e. $2000 per Digital Board. One board will be acquired each semester for a maximum of 4.

 

 

John Constantino

 

a. Fall 2014

 

b. Ongoing

 

c. Ongoing

 

d. Ongoing

 

e. Spring 2014

 

 

 

a. 1 RICO rep. from each active club

 

b. Current and relevant information posted on website

 

c. Current information about Student Life included in newspaper

 

d. Increase SAC participation to 10 students

 

e. Digital Sign Boards established at Cafeteria, Student Life Center, One Stop Center, Learning Resource Center, KCC Bookstore

 

The Student Life outcome is that KCC Student Services works to enhance the student experience at the College by actively supporting KCC student government and by encouraging student participation in the campus’ extra-curricular activities and clubs.

 

 

Pending allocation of funds from ASUH-KCC SG

 

Student Life – Registered Independent Campus Organizations

 

Goal 1: Access

Goal 4: Personal Development

Goal 5: Community Development

Goal 6: Diversity

 

 

 

 

a. Ongoing update of  RICO Handbook to be in-line with the Board of Regents Chapter 7 Policy on the University’s relationship with campus clubs.

 

b. Reactivate Club Social that will be offered during the beginning of each semester to review grant application processes, review of roles and responsibilities for club members and advisors, and financial accountability.

 

c. Advocate for the need of adequate meeting spaces on the second floor of the Campus Center to meet the increasing requests of space reservations for campus clubs.

 

d. Include in APRU request to hire a full-time clerk who is responsible for processing requisitions, filing, student travel requests, maintaining reservations, filing and daily operations. This will transfer clerical responsibilities away from the Student Life Coordinator.

 

 

a. No Cost

 

b. No Cost

 

c. No Cost

 

d. To be addressed at a future APRU

 

 

 

John Constantino

 

a. Spring 2014

 

b. Spring 2014

 

c. Fall 2013

 

d. Fall 2014

 

a. Handbook is distributed to each active RICO in Fall semester

 

b. 100% participation from all club leaders and advisors

 

c. Unassigned rooms are utilized by RICO groups and SAC

 

d. Full time Clerk  approved and hired by the college

 

The Student Life outcome is that KCC Student Services works to enhance the student experience at the College by actively. supporting KCC student government and by encouraging student participation in the campus’ extra-curricular activities and clubs.

 

 

 

Pending allocation of funds from ASUH-KCC SG

 

Student Life – Student Life Center

 

Goal 1: Access

Goal 6: Diversity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

a. Continue to work with architects and designers on the renovated spaces.

 

b. Reupholster old furniture to be placed in the renovated spaces.

 

c. Prepare APRU to request and hire full-time clerk/manager of the Student Life Center.

 

d. Contract a Vending Machine company.

 

e. Install an ATM Machine at the Student Life Center.

 

f. Expand co-curricular activities by purchase outdoor sports equipment.

 

g. Create a Student Employee Handbook and checklist to manage the Student Life Center.

 

h. Annual production of the Student Life Handbook and Planner.

 

 

a. No Cost

 

b. $6000

 

c. To be addressed at a future APRU.

 

d. No Cost

 

e. No Cost

 

f. $2000

 

g. No Cost

 

h. $2500

 

John Constantino

 

a. Fall 2013

 

b. Fall 2013

 

c. Fall 2014

 

d. Spring 2014

 

e. Spring 2014

 

f. Spring 2014

 

g. Spring 2014

 

h. Summer 2014

 

a. Completion of renovated spaces

 

b. Furniture reupholstered

 

c. Research and budget completed for review, approval and placed on APRU

 

d. Vending machine installed in Student Life Center

 

e. ATM machine installed in Student Life Center

 

f. Equipment purchased and used by student body

 

g. Student Employee Handbook completed and submitted to new student hires

 

h. Ongoing, Student Life Handbook and Planner distributed at NSO

 

The Student Life outcome is that KCC Student Services works to enhance the student experience at the College by actively supporting KCC student government and by encouraging student participation in the campus’ extra-curricular activities and clubs.

 

 

Pending allocation of funds from ASUH-KCC SG

Part IV. Resource Implications

 

 

APRU Resource Request

Action Plan and Goal

 

Purchase inkjet copier/printer/scanner for the financial aid office.  Our office Cannon printer-scanner-copier broke in January 2013 and currently students need to wait while staff goes across to Counseling Office to make individual copies required for FA verifications. If only one staff is working, the office needs to be locked & the student left to wait outside.   

Resource Request

 

Cost approximately
$500 for model to replace Cannon Image Class M6560 or equivalent.

Analysis of Program SLO

 

Goals 1 & 4

Criteria

 

Alignment

 

1 - The request is aligned to one of the Strategic Goals but not to one of the priority goals

 

Mainly related to goal #1 - Access to the FA office and #4 - enriching student experience and increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of the FA office.

Outcomes

 

1 - The outcome is specific and measurable and aligned with one of the College’s measures or one of the UHCC measures.

 

"Aiming to provide a more efficient and effective financial aid office that provides faster service to our students"

Evidence

 

2 - The program gathers and analyzes at least one type of data to support its request.

 

"Report from SARS will show amount of student's that use the lab"

Impact

The expected outcomes will affect a large number of the students on campus.

 

"Many but not all of the students utilizing FA come into the lab to use the computers". (FAFSA, PIN, MPN, EC, Erefund, Taxes, verification, etc)

Collaboration



 

1 - The request demonstrates collaboration with one other department within the same division.

"Request would allow FA to operate in a more efficient manner and provide better service.  Students would no longer need to wait around while staff leaves office to use another departments printer/copier"


 
 

APRU Resource Request

Action Plan and Goal

 

Purchase 5 computer black screens for student computer work stations.  Presently when more than one student is using office computer workstation to complete sensitive FA information, there is no screens to protect student personal information.  

Resource Request

 

Cost approximately
$1250 for 5 - 12” x 16” screens.

Analysis of Program SLO

 

Goal 5


 

Criteria

 

Alignment

 

1 - The request is aligned to one of the Strategic Goals but not to one of the priority goals

 

Mainly related to Goal 5, by addressing student safety and preserving Personal Identifiable Information, thus reducing risk of identity theft

Outcomes

 

2 - The outcome statement describes how and when the outcome will be measured.

 

"Our outcome is to protect Personal Identifiable Information.  By adjusting our reporting parameters in SAR's we will be able to track the number of students utilizing the lab in a given time period.  We will be able to measure the effectiveness of the privacy screens"

Evidence

 

The program gathers and analyzes at least one type of data to support its request.

 

"Report from SARS will show amount of student's that use the lab"

Impact

The expected outcomes will affect a large number of the students on campus.

 

"Many but not all of the students utilizing FA come into the lab to use the computers". (FAFSA, PIN, MPN, EC, Erefund, Taxes, verification, etc)

Collaboration



 

The request demonstrates collaboration with more than one other division or college department outside of the division.

 

"Collaboration occurs when presenting financial information in the IS classes, giving information to the new student orientation group, as well as student's included in the Wai'ale'ale project.


 
 

APRU Resource Request

Action Plan and Goal

 

Replace barrier which has fallen on students (between student waiting area and registration arena) with permanent wall with a door for accessibility.


 

Resource Request

 

With approval, the Carpentry program may take this on as a student-driven project. The estimated cost of materials is $1,000.00.

Analysis of Program SLO

 

Goal #5: Address Health & Safety Issues

Criteria

 

Alignment

 

UH Goal 4:  Investment in Faculty, Staff, Students and Their Environment

KCC Goal 4: Personal Development

Strategic Goals:

  • Professional Development Directed to Any of the Above Goals

UH Goal 5:  Resources and Stewardship

KCC Goal 5 Community Development

Strategic Goals:

  • Address Health and Safety Issues

Outcomes

 

The outcome is specific and measurable and aligned with one of the College’s measures or one of the UHCC measures.  Safety – No further incidents and possible injuries.

Evidence

 

The program gathers and analyzes at least one type of data to support its request.

Incident #1: Nov 2012-A student sat on corner section of wall divider and caused divider to fall.

Incident #2: Student pushed stroller into divider and divider fell onto the computer tables.  We were fortunate that no one was sitting at the table at the time.

Impact

 

The expected outcomes will affect most of the students on campus.


 

Collaboration



 
 

Brandon Shimokawa (VCAA)

Duke Lang (Carpentry Instructor)

Earl Nishiguchi (VCSA)

 

APRU Resource Request

Action Plan and Goal

Counselors will implement mobile advising (including outreach to schools & community) through the use of laptop computers. In cooperation with academic divisions and computer services, counselors will develop strategies to increase access to academic advising by 10% every semester. Specifically, counselors will work with computer services to utilize laptops to schedule appointments and review academic planners online and away from the traditional office setting while insuring confidentiality of student records and conversations. Additionally, group sessions will be designed and overhead projection will be utilized.

Resource Request

4 Samsung Chromebook laptop computers; 1 visual presenter, SARS program for each laptop, 1 portable Wi-Fi printer.  Cost for items: $300 per notebook, $400 visual projector, $200 wireless printer  Total cost:$1,800.00 estimate

Analysis of Program SLO

This service outcome will be assessed by collecting data on student persistence (Chart A & D), completion rates (Chart C) and student educational plan completion (Chart B).  See attached charts.

Criteria

 

Alignment

 

The request is aligned to more than one priority goal. 1) Increase outreach to K-12 to improve college preparation and to ensure that students are aware of specific opportunities that KCC provides. 2) Increase overall retention and persistence to graduation or transfer (identify goals and track by disaggregated groups), with an additional focus on STEM degrees and certificates.

Outcomes

 

The outcome is relevant to meeting the priority goals.  Our goal is to increase retention (Fall to Fall) and graduation rates by 10%.

Evidence

 

See Chart A & B attached

Impact

 

The expected outcome will affect most of the students on campus.

Collaboration



 
 

Counselors

Division Programs

Computer Services

 

APRU Resource Request

Action Plan and Goal

 

The opportunity for counselors to attend a national conference in their field of expertise will provide professional development opportunities to maintain currency in their professional responsibilities, and to transfer newly acquired information and strategies towards meeting department and college goals.

Resource Request

 

Fund 1 counselor to attend NACADA national conference in 2014. “NACADA is the leader within the global education community for the theory, delivery, application and advancement of academic advising to enhance student learning and development.” http://www.nacada.ksu.edu  Estimated cost from 2013 information:$2,600.00  Registration: $600.00, Transportation: $1,000.00, Hotel & MI&E: $1,000.00

Analysis of Program SLO

 

UH Goal 4:  Investment in Faculty, Staff, Students and Their Environment

KCC Goal 4: Personal Development

Strategic Goals:

  • Professional Development Directed to Any of the Above Goals

Criteria

 

Alignment

 

UH Goal 4:  Investment in Faculty, Staff, Students and Their Environment

KCC Goal 4: Personal Development

Strategic Goals:

o    Professional Development Directed to Any of the Above Goals

Outcomes

 

An evaluation will be created and handed to those in attendance at the in-service workshop.

Evidence

 

There will be an in-service training within 6 months of the conference for all faculty & staff.  A survey will be distributed to attendees.

Impact

 

The expected outcomes will affect a large number of the students and the campus.

Collaboration



 
 

Earl Nishiguchi (VCSA)

Counselor(s)

Collaboration & networking with other UH Campuses and Community Colleges outside of Hawai‘i.


 

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

Yes
The Counseling & Advising Office guides and supports students in developing an educational plan (Academic Planner) and pursuing that plan.

2

No
The Counseling and Advising Office collaborates with all students, with an emphasis on academic probationary students, to develop an academic plan and/or contract for academic success.

3

Yes
The Admissions and Records Office provides a clear, systematic process by which students may apply for admission, receive credits for accredited and/or articulated prior learning, and register for KCC classes.

4

Yes
The Financial Aid Office assists students to receive all financial aid for which they are eligible in a timely manner and to understand the processes and procedures of the financial aid system.

5

Yes
Students receive all financial aid for which they are eligible and understand the processes and procedures of the financial aid system.

6

Yes
The Student Life Office works to enhance the student experience at the college by actively supporting KCC student government and by encouraging student participation in the campus’ extra-curricular activities and clubs.

7

No
The Marketing Enrollment Management Office strengthens the College’s presence in the community through outreach and marketing efforts.

A) Expected Level Achievement

No content.

B) Courses Assessed

No content.

C) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

ADMISSIONS & RECORDS

The service outcome for Admissions & Records is that KCC Student Services provides a clear, systematic process by which students may apply for admission, receive credits for accredited and/or articulated prior learning, and register for KCC classes. The assessments that will be used to judge the progress on this outcome are measurements of enrollment process completion, timeliness, availability and convenience, student satisfaction, and the number of transcripts that are processed.

The average percentage of students completing the KauaÊ»i Community College enrollment process for the past six semesters is 68.5% with the exception of Spring 2011 when it dropped to 63.6%.  In the Spring 2013 semester the yield rate was 61.1%, the highest among the seven Hawaii community colleges.  The average yield for the system is 53.9%.  Contributing to the high yield rate is prompt follow-up on all incomplete applications and prompt processing of the applications.  Although it is a time-consuming process, the follow-up with the incomplete applications is crucial for enrolling students in a timely manner.

Timeliness is measured by looking at the turnaround time for student applications.  The application form is now online and a log for the applications indicates the date when the application is submitted and when it is approved.  In the Fall 2013 semester, the department will retrieve and use the data to measure against a two day turn-around benchmark which was set as a goal. Availability and convenience is measured through CCSSE questions specifically about Admissions & Records.  Students found the services somewhat or very useful (89%) but 78% of the students sometimes or rarely used the service. Office hours, website instructions, and the new online application form (available 24x7) seem to meet student needs given the usage pattern. 

Satisfaction was measured by two different surveys, the CCSSE and the ASUH-KCC Student Survey.  The students who participated in the CCSSE survey rated services at 81% for very or somewhat satisfied with services which includes processes and customer service. Students who took the student government survey showed a 67% satisfaction rate. Both of these ratings have some room for improvement in customer service and response time which are current Admissions & Records’ goals.  The recent addition of a student hire assisted with these goals.

On the average, 200 transcripts are processed per year. Typically transcripts are analyzed once the student has attended the college for a full semester.

COUNSELING & ADVISING

Counselors and Student Services strive to provide students and the community with open access to comprehensive program in a nurturing environment, empowering students to take initiative and responsibility for educational, professional, and personal development. 

Prior to the Banner Student Information System and implementation of the STAR Academic Journey program, the Counseling department required mandatory advising for all new and continuing students.  During this process counselors utilized a triplicate Academic Planner to assist students in developing a strategic plan to reach their academic/career goals.  Once Banner and STAR were instituted in the early to mid 2000’s, self-advising and self-registration became the norm.  Although highly encouraged, continuing students were no longer required to obtain academic advising prior to registering.   The intent of the STAR Academic Journey program is to provide an electronic snapshot of student progress towards completion of their particular degree or certificate program.  While this is a valuable tool which details graduation requirements, it does not sequence courses towards timely program completion. Counseling & Advising applies a strategy of an education plan that sequence courses.

The Counseling & Advising unit’s first service outcome is Student Services guides and supports students in developing an educational plan (Academic Planner) and pursuing that plan. This service outcome will be assessed by collecting data on student persistence (see Charts A& D), completion rates(see Chart C), and student educational plan completion (see Chart B).  This outcome impacts retention and persistence and is in alignment with University of Hawaii Goal 1 on Educational Effectiveness and Student Success and KCC Goals 1: Access and 2: Learning and Teaching.

In 2013 a web-based data collecting system was created.  Counseling & Advising has collectedacademic planners for new and continuing students (see table on Education Plans Completed by Semester).  The academic planner data will provide abetter understanding of student persistence and goal completion which are performance indicators for the college’s goals. 

Chart A: Persistence Data (Side by Side Comparison)

 

%

% with Planners

Persistence Rate: Students with Planners

Persistence Rate: Students Without Planners

Fall 2007

1%

50%

53%

Fall 2008

1%

100%

53%

Fall 2009

4%

100%

53%

Fall 2010

4%

77%

47%

Fall 2011

15%

96%

47%

Fall 2012

24%

70%

47%

The first chart above reflects the Fall to Fall persistence rate of those students who have academic planners compared to those students without planners. The data shows that the persistence rate is consistently higher for those students who use planners. The collection of data on the planners in the earlier years was admittedly low with 1%-4% of students with planners but in 2011 it rose to 15% and in 2012, 24%.  

Chart B:  Education Plans Completed by Semester (2007-2013)

 

Term

No. of Students

Percentage Completed

Fall 2007

8

0%

Spring/Summer 2008

4

0%

Fall 2008

12

1%

Spring/Summer 2009

17

1%

Fall 2009

34

2%

Spring/Summer 2010

37

2%

Fall 2010

77

3%

Spring/Summer 2011

127

6%

Fall 2011

184

8%

Spring/Summer 2012

260

12%

Fall 2012

308

14%

Spring/Summer 2013

319

14%

Fall 2013

812

37%

The use of planners is an effective way to keep students on track to graduate or achieve their other goals. The staff will continue to implement this strategy to measure their Service Outcome (SO) in the future. Consistent collection of the planner information should reveal significant numbers.  Other directions under discussion are measurements of actual student goals such as transfer, work goals, or professional development.

 

Chart C:  Graduation Data (2007-2012)

Kauai Community College Graduates by Fiscal Year

Degree or Certificate

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

AA

27

43

52

59

60

68

AS

30

25

29

21

43

25

AAS

34

37

34

45

46

47

CA

44

34

48

37

59

56

CC

21

35

17

32

56

77

CO

11

41

13

37

66

92

ASC

2

4

8

2

4

3

All degrees

91

105

115

125

149

140

All* certificates

76

110

78

106

181

225

Chart C above indicates that there has been an overall steady increase in college graduates.

 

Chart D:  KCC to UH 4-Year Transfer

Measure

Weight

Haw

Hon

Kap

Kau

Lee

Mau

Win

Degrees & Certificates

35

35

15

35

35

35

35

35

Native Hawaiian Degrees & Certificates

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

STEM Degrees & Certificates

5

0

0

5

4

5

5

5

Pell Grant Recipients

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

Transfers to UH 4 Year

40

40

40

40

40

40

40

40

Total $ Allocation %

100%

95%

75%

100%

99%

100%

100%

100%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As indicated by Chart D above, KCC has met the transfer performance goal of the UHCC System.

 

The second Counseling & Advising SO addresses the retention of probationary students, utilizing the Contract for Academic Success Strategy.  The SO states, “KCC Student Services academic advisors collaborate with all students, with an emphasis on academic probationary students, to develop an academic plan and/or contract for academic success.”Academic success contracts will be completed, then Counseling and Advising will measure the amount of students who are removed from probation and continued on to the next semester.

In Spring 2012, the counselors committed to a formal implementation of the CAS intervention and began collecting CAS data.  Counselors aim to have contracts for at least 50% of the students on probation every semester. Since this is a new initiative, the benchmark for success for this service outcome is that students on contract will be retained at a 10% higher rate than students not on contract.

In Summer 2013, counselors further developed the progress for implementing the Contract for Academic Success and a time line (See Chart E). The counselors developed the new timeline to reflect follow up visits with the students during the semester.  This timeline will take into consideration the student’s academic progress and recommended remediation if any.Currently registration holds have been placed on the academic records of probationary students who were identified as registered and classified.  The registrar will keep these holds in place through Late Registration meaning the students would have to see a counselor to approve any curricular actions (including dropping/adding). 

 

As of Fall 2013, steps 1 to 3 of 5 have been completed.  A system to track this service outcome is under discussion and will be implemented by Spring 2014.

 

Chart E:  Contract for Academic Success Process & Time Line

Service Outcome (SO) Procedure To Track and Retain Students on Probation

FALL

TASK

Step 1: Late June (probation/suspension students identified)

>Administrative Assistant/Student Workers call students

to make an appt with counselor.

(Probation letters mailed to alert students who registered priorprobation/suspension notification that they must see their counselor to remove their Academic hold)

Mandatory Advising>CAS (contract for academic success)

     Identification of students using the Probation/Suspension List compiled

by Registrar/IRO for Counselors.

     50% of all returning students on Academic Probation status will be put on contract.

 

Step 2: September:  Follow up appt with student 3-5 weeks into semester

Reminder letter sent by Administrative Assistant

see your advisor  before last day to withdraw.

            (Earl’s signature)

Review/assess student’s progress and contract compliance

Refer to other campus/community resources

     Refer to 12:05 Success Series Workshop (45 minutes)

     Refer toBrainfuse

     Listen and troubleshoot

Step 3:  October:  2nd appt just prior to withdrawal date               

 

Assess student’s assessment of current grades for each class

   Send out to instructors or give to student Mid Term Grade Check Forms

Step 4:  Semester End

Once grades posted, all counselors will assess if student(s):

     Continued Probation

     Suspended

     Taken off probation

     Counselor to submit their data to Administrative Assistant for data

         Compilation BEFORE the “W” deadline.

SPRING

TASK

Step 5:  December (mid) (probation/suspension students identified)

         Administrative Assistant/Student Workers call

         Students to make an appt with their counselor.

(Probation letters mailed t alert students who registered priorprobation/suspension notification that they must see their counselor to remove their Academic hold)

Repeat Step 1.

 

*Despite the short time frame between Fall & Spring semesters we will strive for 100%.

Step 6: February:  First appt with student 3-5 weeks into semester

Repeat Step 2

Step 7: March:  2nd appt just prior to withdrawal date             

Repeat Step 3

Step 8:  Late June:  >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Repeat Step 4

Counselor to submit their data to Administrative Assistant for data

         Compilation BEFORE the “W” deadline.

Step (:  Late June:  Follow Fall Procedure

The Probation/Suspension Data Form will be used to track the academic year’s progress.  Form will be posted on ssDocs>Counselors>SLO after each academic year.  Cycle will repeat again in Fall

 


FINANCIAL AID

The Financial Aid Office’s outcome is that KCC Student Services assists students to receive all financial aid for which they are eligible in a timely manner and to understand the processes and procedures of the financial aid system.  To assess this outcome Financial Aid is tracking the number of Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) forms are submitted by the deadline, the amount of disbursements and the number of KCC scholarship applications. In addition to these measures, students are surveyed for information about deadlines, satisfaction with services, etc.

The Financial Aid Office has seen a significant increase in the number of FAFSA applications processed, the number of Pell Grant recipients, the number of scholarships awarded, and many other key markers for success.  The number of FAFSA applications that were completed on time (by April 1) has increased substantially in the past 4 years from 382 in AY 2009-2010 to 782 in the past year.  Between Fall 2010 and Fall 2012 the disbursements increased 134% from $569, 334 to $1,332,331.  The number of scholarship that were completed has doubled in AY2011-2012 since it was at 110 in 2009-2010, and continues to grow with more awareness throughout our student population.

Student Outcome #3:Students receive all financial aid for which they are eligible and understand the processes and procedures of the financial aid system.

Assessments: Number of FAFSAs submitted by deadline, track whether students receive aid “on time,” increase in # of KCC scholarship applications.

Number of FAFSA Applications Completed

AY

Total Number of Applications

Percentage of Increase

Total Applications by Deadline

Percentage of Increase

09-10

1,144

Baseline

296

Baseline

10-11

1,359

18.79%

395

33.45%

11-12

1,565

15.16%

541

36.96%

12-13

1,771

13.16%

682

26.06%

13-14

TBD

TBD

719

5.43%

FAFSA applications completed had greatest increase of 57.36% in 2009-2010 AY continuing with a steady increase, 13.16% with an additional 206 applications received in 2012-2013 AY. To continue increasing the number of students who fill our FAFSA applications correctly, our office priority is to present an open door environment using a more personal approach assisting students and their families in navigating the often confusing financial aid process.  

There has been a constant increase in the amount of FAFSA applications received by the April 1st Priority Deadline as indicated by the increase from 296 applications received in 2009 to the 719 applications received in 2013 over a 143% upward trend which has shown a small increase of 5.43% up 37 applications for the 1314 AY. 

Total FAFSA Applications Completed compared to Applications completed on or Before April 1st  (Priority Deadline):

AY

Total Number of Applications

Number of Applications Received by Priority Deadline

Percentage of Completed Applications

09-10

727

296

40.72%

10-11

1,144

395

34.56%

11-12

1,359

541

39.81%

12-13

1,565

682

43.58%

Comparing the total number of FAFSAs completed to number of applications completed on or before April 1st deadline there was a slight drop in applications completed ontime dropping from 40.72% in AY 0910 to 34.56% in 1011 which may be attributed to the dramatic increase in applications, 727 in 0910 up to 1144 in 1011.  From 1112 to 1213 we continue to demonstrate an increase as shown  AY 1112 up 39.81% to a 43.58% in AY 1213.  

Funds Disbursed on Fall Disbursement Date (on-time):

AY

Amount Disbursed

Percentage of  Increase

10-11

$569,334

Baseline

11-12

$1,332,331

134%

12-13

$1,265,818

-5%

13-14

$1,455,932

16%

There was a dramatic increase in the number of Fall 2012 disbursements rising 135%. The -5% decrease for FALL 2012 is attributed to staffing issues experienced during this disbursement period.  Getting back on track with the student outcome goal tracking whether students receive aid on time, a 16% increase is indicated with a total of $1,455, 932 funds disbursed on the Fall 2013 Disbursement Date.

Scholarship Applications Completed (KCC Scholarship Application and Merit Applications):

AY

Scholarship Applications Received

Percentage of Increase

09-10

110

Baseline

10-11

133

20.90%

11-12

220

65.41%

12-13

257

16.82%

13-14

 243 as of 10/01/2013

Pending

 Scholarship applications have steadily increased with a large increase in 2012 65.41% and a 16.82% increase in 2013 with a total of  278 Applications.    The Financial Aid Office attributes these increases to more outreach to the community and better campus advertisement of scholarship opportunities and deadlines.

AY

UH Common Scholarship       Applications Received

Completed Scholarship Applications Received 

Percentage of Completed Applications 

11-12

165

Information not available

N/A

12-13

179

54

30.17%

13-14

 177

83

46.89%

For 2013 academic year, 179 students submitted a KCC General Scholarship application. The application was only available from January 2012 to September 2012 to allow for the UHCC System FA Office to merge our KauaiCC General Scholarship application with the 2013-14 UHCC Common Application by January 1, 2013. Comparatively, for the entire 11-12 academic year, 165 students submitted the online application between January 2011 and February 12. This shows a 8.4% increase in online applications over a 5 month shorter period of time. Combined with the merit applications, there was an increase of 16.81% with a total of 257 applications received.

These statistics indicate that we are receiving more than 50% incomplete applications.  In 1213 AY 30.17% ( 54 out of 179) and 1314 AY 46.89%  applications were filled out correctly and completely for submission,.  To increase number of applicants and Scholarship applications filled out correctly and completely, our office staff , in concert with the UH Common Scholarship opening / closing dates  12/1/2013-03/01/2013 plan to offer small scholarship workshops assisting our current students, and members in the community with opportunities to receive assistance navigating the UH Common Scholarship website  to provide guidance in navigating the site and to improve their confidence in applying for scholarships.

Financial Aid Audit

Over the past three years, the Financial Aid Office has been working to reduce the number of A-133 Federal Audit Findings received by Kauai Community College. For the 2009-10 Audit, Kauai CC received four audit findings. In 2010-11, an interim audit identified only one repeat finding. In July 2012, auditors did not identify a single error during a full A-133 Federal Audit. Errors have been eliminated in the office through the creation of written policies and procedures, cross-training employees, and creating an office processing calendar.  No audits currently scheduled for our 1213 academic year.

In the most recent APRU process, a new Financial Aid Assistant position was approved, however our KauaiCC financial aid staff turnover remains a constant challenge. Our goal to hire and maintain office staff is the cornerstone of being able to offer these additional services. The Financial Aid Office receives sufficient training to process in accordance with Federal regulation and in a manner consistent with current trends. The office has seen a dramatic reduction in its adverse findings from the annual audit (from four in AY0910 to one in AY1011 and zero in AY 1112). This is a direct result of changes to policies and procedures learned through professional development.  It is recommended that funding and training opportunities continue to be available at the current rate.

Outreach

The Financial Aid Office participates in various activities to promote awareness of financial aid opportunities for students and families to pay for higher education. These events are not limited to the campus, but, rather, are open to the entire island community, including Financial Aid nights held at our local high schools.  The office directly markets to the campus and community through a variety of methods, including handouts, flyers, brochures, regularly updated website, email blasts, and occasional radio and newspaper advertisements. The office sees itself as the island’s resource for financial aid information.

The Financial Aid Office  plans and executes several yearly events to educate the community on financial aid opportunities.  The first event is the High School Counselor Workshop held at our Kauai Community College campus, where all area high school counselors and other community members who are involved in the FAFSA process are invited to receive training to assist their students, clients etc., with completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and scholarship applications. In the fall months, the office holds Financial Aid Nights at each of the three public high schools and Island School. At this event, office staff explain the financial aid process to graduating seniors and their parents. The average number of persons reached at all of these events each year is approximately 500 to 600.  Our financial aid staff  attends the annual ‘Aha Hawaiian Scholarship event that services over 150 students and their families.Though the Financial Aid Office is very pleased with the results of these current outreach activities, it would like to begin offering additional services to students and the community.  Such activities include workshops on financial literacy topics, scholarship workshops assisting students in navigating the UH Common Scholarship website with essay writing assistance, debt management, and other topics related to financial aid.  We also plan to attend high school career fairs and to work closely with school counselors to create  additional FAFSA events.

We also plan to network and  collaborate with community agencies that service potential college students (ie, Workforce Development,  Hale Opio – Foster youth who are aging out of the system, and Child and Family Service’s  Nana’s House, Hale Ho’omalu and Independent Living Programs) and will be  joining with our Student Services “A Taste of College” Spring 2014 community event.

With our new Financial Aid Manager, the financial aid office will include a focus on areas that include default prevention and management and the conversion of incomplete FAFSA applications  to completed (including the verification process), providing detailed information about college expenses and give support to each student through the financial aid process.  

Professional Development

Our Financial Aid office has been faced with 100% staff turnover in the 1213 academic year. With new staff on board and the ongoing updates to Federal Regulations, it is imperative that the financial aid staff stay  informed of all new regulations and receive adequate training to process financial aid in accordance with the law.   Meeting with other UH Campus Financial Aid Staff is an important part of the learning process as well as attending national financial aid trainings. 

The financial aid office staff participates in training opportunities provided by the UHCC System and local associations. Typically, the office staff participates in the following annually:

UH System Banner Training: Once a semester; UH System Financial Aid Officers Meetings: Once a semester;  UHCC System Financial Aid Officers Meetings/Trainings: Twice a semester;  Pacific Financial Aid Association (PACFAA) Conferences: Once a semester.

It will be beneficial to have professional development trainings directly from our mainland Western Association of Financial Aid Administrators (WASFAA) and National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA). 

 


MARKETING & ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT 

The Service outcome for Marketing & Enrollment Management is that KCC Student Services strengthens the College’s presence in the community through outreach and marketing efforts.

In Fall 2012, the College hired our first Marketing and Enrollment Management Director. During the year that the Marketing Director worked at the College, the emphasis was to develop publicity materials for credit and non-credit programs and to begin developing a marketing strategy.  The Marketing Director vacated the position in the summer of 2013 and the College is currently filling the position and will look for input from the new Director to develop service outcome measurements.

One of the major goals for this year with the filling of this position is to form an enrollment management committee to develop an enrollment management plan for achieving the College’s enrollment goals.  One area for growth that Student Services and the College support is international education, both non-credit as well as the credit programs.  With the hiring of the International Education Coordinator, recruiting more F1 students is one of our enrollment goals.

Another priority goal is to attract students, local, out of state, and international, to the College and to promote and enhance the public image of the College.  It would be difficult to increase enrollment growth with only the local population.


 

STUDENT LIFE

The Student Life outcome is that KCC Student Services works to enhance the student experience at the College by actively supporting KCC student government and by encouraging student participation in the campus’ extra-curricular activities and clubs.

Student Life Program Description and Background

Student Life is located on the second floor of the Kauai Community College Campus Center.  The program is the central hub for five major themes.  1) Associated Students of the University of Hawaii – Kauai Community College Student Government (ASUH-KCC SG),2) University of Hawaii System Caucus (UHSC), 3) Student Activities Council (SAC), 4) Registered Independent Campus Organizations (RICO),and 5) Student Life Center.

Student Life is supported by fees collected each semester from students registered in KCC credit courses.  These activity fees are then allocated and administered by ASUH-KCC SG, a student run division of the college.  This organization is chartered and sanctioned by the University of Hawaii - Board of Regents to independently account for student activity fee monies and is charged with developing co-curricular programs for the student body.

Fees are managed by ASUH-KCC SG student leaders in the senate that is made up of representatives for each of the five academic divisions at KCC.  Senators and the Administrative Council are elected into their position during the spring semester and serve a one-year term during the following academic year.

The five major areas supported by fees includes: 1) ASUH-KCC SG - governance leadership training and development; 2) University of Hawaii System Caucus –system advocacy; 3) Student Activity Council – co-curricular activity planning; 4) Registered Independent Campus Organizations – grants and support; 5) Student Life Management – Access and rejuvenation. 

In addition, fees cover stipends, leadership and development workshops, statewide and national conferences, operations and maintenance, supplies, public relations and advertisement of co-curricular programs and dissemination of campus and systemic information.

Student Life patterned its goals with the following Student Affairs general goals to support the campus mission.  The goals include: 1) Access – publications, online, in-person services which include disability services and financial aid, community liaison 2) Personal Development – workshops on financial literacy, leadership training, time management and study skills, 3) Campus Leadership – Student Government, Division Liaison and Academic Building, 4) Diversity - Student Activities/Clubs.

Student Life incorporated three of the Student Affairs goals into its annual program review. 1) Personal Development, 2) Campus Leadership and 3) Diversity.Below is a breakdown and brief discussion of the five areas that make up Student Life. 

ASUH-KCC STUDENT GOVERNMENT – Leadership Training and Development           

Student Services Goal: Personal Development – Leadership Training, Campus Leadership – Student Government

College Goal: Access, Personal Development, Community Development

The Associated Students of the University of Hawaii – Kauai Community College Student Government (ASUH-KCC SG) was chartered by the University of Hawaii – Board of Regents to give students the ability to practice governance and work alongside the administration, faculty, staff and students to accomplish college and systematic goals and mission.  

The two primary functions of ASUH-KCC SG is governance. Firstly the senate provides student leadership and representation on various campus, state committees and national groups and is the recognized vehicle for constituents to voice needs and concerns to the administration and faculty.  Secondly, student government sponsors and supports co-curricular programs through activities to support diverse needs of all KCC students.  These activities are supported through funds derived from student activity fees. 

Student leaders are encouraged to participate in state and national groups to address both systemic and national issues and educational trends.  Institutional support from the Hawaii Student Life Advisors (HASLA), American Student Association of Community Colleges (ASACC) and the Association of College Unions International (ACUI). These groups provide students with personal and leadership development, training and support.

Student governance plays an important role in the overall well being of the KCC Campus.  Each leader is tasked to serve in specific campus divisions to listen and address concerns of all constituents.  As such, each leader is required to serve in several campus committees to ensure that the voice of students are included in the decision making process for institutional matters that directly affect students.

Table 1 records a list of student leader participation from academic years 2007 to 2012. The data shows a steady growth of student participation. The constant participation is important, as it maintains longevity and helps with a smooth transition to the next group of student leaders.

Recruitment for potential student leaders begins during the summer when New Student Orientations occur in June, July and August.  During these sessions, current leaders are given an opportunity to talk about various areas that make up Student Life.  The one-on-one informal talk sessions cultivate positive relationships with incoming new students to encourage participation in clubs, committees, ASUH-KCC SG or SAC.

                        TABLE 1

ACADEMIC YEAR

Number of Student Participation (ASUH-KCC) Student Government

2013

21 leaders

2012

23 leaders

2011

19 leaders

2010

19 leaders

2009

17 leaders

2008

16 leaders

2007

11 leaders

A major responsibility of Student Government leaders is active participation in both campus and state committees. Within these committees students are able to practice leadership skills in communication and negotiation, share opinions and thoughts, gain better insight on how the college operation, and build life-long professional relationships along side faculty, staff and administration. Students are then able to transfer these valuable skills to all facets of their personal and professional lives.

In addition, student leaders are required to meet regularly meet with constituents within the division they serve.  Each month, informal “talk-story” sessions are held to gain general insights of students. A student life survey was distributed during these talk story periods (Table 2).

 

Student Life/Student Government Informal Qualitative Survey 2013

TABLE 2

  1. How would you like to spend your $30 Student Activity Fee?
  1. What events or activities would you like us to host/provide?
  1. Foam Party/Movie Night = 2
  2. Food = 4
  3. Room for the Ping Pong Table
  4. Concerts
  5. School needs
  6. I think $30 well spent
  7. ATM Machine = 3
  8. More Activities = 3
  9. Books = 2
  10. I don’t Know = 4
  11. Sure
  12. Any way you want
  13. Provide snacks
  14. Other materials for my own course
  15. Coffee in class
  16. I like that part of the money goes to bus passes = 2
  17. Info for school activities
  18. RC/Cars Airplanes/Helicopters to be flown in behind lounge
  19. More pool Stuff
  20. School festivals
  21. To clubs
  22. A dance, food, or coffee
  1. A dance/concert
  2. Drive thru movie night
  3. End of semester Party w/activities
  4. More food stuff
  5. Coffee outside the Library
  6. A covered skate rink please….
  7. Hosting more events introducing more of Kauai culture
  8. Info on GMO, educating our students/ Staff
  9. Culinary
  10. Tennis
  11. More Free Food!!!!!
  12. Social Events/Pool Parties
  13. Open Mic Night/Talent Shows
  14. Ping pong table, DDR, Friday Karaoke, Air Hockey
  15. Parties
  16. Ping Pong Tournaments
  17. Basketball, Football
  18. Toga Party
  19. Drag Racing, Golf, Surfing, Welding camp, Motor Performance

 

 

  1. Are there any bands/dj’s/ performers you like-local or mainland?
  1. What improvements you’d like to see at the Student Life Center (Student Lounge)?
  1. The Green  = 8
  2. Soja = 3
  3.  Steel Pulse
  4. Jesus Music
  5. NikiMinaj  = 2
  6. Rebel Souljah
  7. Eminem, Lil Don, JT
  8. Jack Johnson
  9. Ooklah the Moc
  10. Army of Jah
  11. Reggae
  12. Local Band
  13. Revolution
  14. Auggie T
  15. Cool Magicians
  16. Daryl Gonsales
  17. Miley Cyrus
  18. Dance Crew Poreotics/Choreocookies
  19. Beyonce
  20. Alica Keys
  21. Sammy 
  22. Akoastikz, Pepper
  23. Steve Aoki
  24. Krewella
  1. It’s Great Already = 2
  2. Water Fountain
  3. ATM = 4
  4. Theme for every week
  5. More Activities
  6. Study Area
  7. Put out the X-BOX & PS3 Consoles that has been here for the past 2 years.
  8. Zumba
  9. Positive Mentors with available times
  10. The Game Room, more games please = 2
  11. More Tables
  12. Bring out Ping Pong tables = 3
  13. Open Bathroom Downstairs
  14. Computers
  15. More Fun
  16. AC Cooler?
  17. Construction to be done
  18. Vending Machine with food and drinks

 

 

  1. What is your favorite thing about KCC?
  1. What is your least favorite thing about KCC?
  1. Wi fi good learning environment
  2. The student Lounge
  3. Nothing Really
  4. The pool table
  5. Freedom of doing your own thing
  6. Relaxing and everyone is nice
  7. A/C in all classes = 2
  8. Friends and clubs = 2
  9. Friends = 2
  10. The students
  11. Location
  12. Well balanced environment
  13. Friendly Staff
  14. The parking my teacher
  15. Library
  16. Native plants on campus
  17. Library
  18. The classes
  19. Late evening classes
  20. Tutoring
  21. Not so rigorous classes
  22. People = 3
  23. Staff
  24. I DON’T KNOW
  25. How everyone is willing to help
  26. Having helpful teachers/ tutors = 2
  27. What is it you mean?
  28. Something
  29. Nothing
  30. It one Kauai
  1. Parking = 5
  2. No skate boarding on campus
  3. Something
  4. What is it you mean?
  5. The time the lounge closes
  6. No Ping Pong
  7. Smell smoke when you walk out the library = 2
  8. No activities
  9. Smoking to close to building’
  10. Not enough sheltered spots when it rains
  11. People
  12. Not much of a college feeling
  13. No covered walk ways
  14. Nothing
  15. The homework
  16. Location I live on the north
  17. A/C to cold during the day
  18. Waste of resources
  19. I hate how everything is internet bases
  20. Long Classes
  21. No ATM
  22. Class time
  23. Motivation for students
  24. The construction
  25. Lee gives to much homework

 

 

  1. If you could change or improve anything about KCC, what would it be? Why?

 

  1. Wifi it slow = 3
  2. Nothing Really = 12
  3. More pool tables
  4. ATM SO I CAN EAT LUNCH = 3
  5. Expand parking
  6. More Parking = 4
  7. A/C being to cold in classrooms
  8. More friendly smiles in the One Stop Center
  9. Classes offered on the north
  10. Math 26 exam to be in class instead of test area
  11. More resources
  12. Intelligence of teachers and respect
  13. The time bathrooms should be open
  14. Classrooms more colorful
  15. Cafeteria food prices lowered
  16. Activities its boring
  17. Need room for ping pong table = 2
  18. More Events
  19. More social Stuff/Events
  20. Bigger parking area

 

 

The results from 40 informal interviews collected in 2013 resulted in the following: In question #1, students believed that offering more food at events, and establishing an ATM machine should be a priority.   Question #2 indicated that students want a variety of activities.  Ping pong also garnered requests.  Question #3 shows that students want the band “The Green” to perform followed by Soja. In Question #4, students want to see the establishment of an ATM machine at the Student Life Center.  Question #5 indicates that AC in classrooms and having friends is a favorite at KCC.  Question #6 indicates that parking is an issue on campus.  For the most part in Question #7, students were satisfied with the KCC environment.  While the data in Table 2 is subjective, it does reveal the pulse of students and gives some indication of what should be addressed in Student Life. 

 

The efforts of ASUH-KCC SG meeting and talking with students is fruitful.  A number of initiatives were accomplished through direct communication with students.  Examples of this success include 1) establishing a two year agreement with the County of Kauai starting in Fall 2013 to implement a KCC bulk rate Bus Pass.  This gives students the opportunity to ride the Kauai Bus for $20 per semester.  This is the first collaborative effort in the neighbor islands to initiate such a plan. 2) Re-activating the KCC Board of Publications and the Ka Leo O KCC Newspaper in Spring 2013 was also an accomplishment.  Both initiatives originated with student government in which student leaders played an active role in garnering support from the students, working with the college administration and negotiating with external entities to make it happen.

 

Aside from working with constituents, student leaders volunteer in campus and state committees and attend national conferences.  Table 3 shows a list of student participants from 2007 to 2013.

 

CAMPUS COMMITTEES

TABLE 3

                 

COMMITTEES

07

08

09

10

11

12

13

14

TOTAL

Accreditation/Self Study

       

19

15

   

34

ACUI - Region 15 Conference

5

         

8

 

13

ACUI Conference

5

4

 

4

       

13

ASACC

   

4

 

4

     

8

Assesment

       

1

 

1

 

2

BOR Excellence in Teaching

2

3

3

3

3

3

3

 

20

Campus Safety & Operations

   

2

2

2

1

3

 

10

Chancellor's Award for Outstanding Service

     

2

2

     

4

College Council

1

2

2

2

2

2

2

 

13

Curriculum

1

1

1

1

1

1

   

6

Commencement

2

2

3

3

3

3

3

 

19

Fall New Student Orientation

 

7

8

7

12

15

18

 

67

Francis Davis Award

 

1

 

1

       

2

HASLA Conference

 

12

 

16

 

19

18

 

65

Hawai`i College & Career Fair

5

5

7

8

6

7

7

 

45

Health & Wellness

       

8

 

3

 

11

International Education

           

2

 

2

Kaua`i Community College Blood Drive

2

 

4

 

6

     

12

KCC Fund Board of Trustees

1

1

2

1

0

0

0

 

5

KCC New Student Orientation

       

2

1

2

 

5

Makaloa Council

           

1

 

1

Marketing & Enrollment Management/Outreach

           

2

 

2

Spring New Student Orientation

7

6

7

9

12

9

8

 

58

Student Conduct

4

3

4

4

4

4

4

 

27

Sustainability

       

5

2

2

 

9

UH CC Student Leadership Seminar

   

2

3

3

3

3

 

14

UH System-wide Strategic Planning

2

2

2

3

2

1

1

 

13

GRAND TOTAL

37

49

51

69

97

86

91

0

480

 

The total student leader participation from 2007 to 2013 is approximately 480.  In 2013, a total of 91 students serve on committees, the second highest participation rate in a 7 year period. The lowest combined committee participation rate is 37 in 2007.  Fall New Student Orientation remains the highest student participation rate from 2007 to 2013 with a collective participation rate of 67.

 

In addition to serving on numerous institutional committees, students are required to participate in community non-profit organizations to fulfill their mission of service to the community.  This connection serves as a mechanism to create long-term external relationships that positively market KCC.  Students also gain important skills in communication, logistical planning and learn to be compassionate to the needs of others in the community. Below is an approximate list of community activities student leaders were involved with in 2012.

 

  1. Marine Core League - Toys 4 Tots collection and distribution
  2. Military Blood Drive
  3. University of Hawaii Warrior Football Day
  4. Veterans Day Parade
  5. Veterans Day Clean-up
  6. Wilcox Foundation Fundraiser
  7. Zonta Club of Kauai – Eat Dessert First Fundraiser
  8. YWCA – Alternative to Violence
  9. Hui O Laka – Removal of invasive black berries
  10. Niamalu Service Project – Removal of invasive mangrove species

 

Overall, Student Government plays an integral part of the campus and provides a symbiotic relationship with the general community.  Through the groups continuous involvement in all levels of the decision making process, student leaders will continue to provide valuable institutional input to help the college reach its overall mission.

 

Strengths

The strength of Student Government is the high student participation rate.  This is attributed to the positive reinforcement and professional support they receive from the Student Life Office. In 2012, Student Government focused on strengthening its recruitment methods, in which a consorted effort was made to actively participate in New Student Orientations held in June, July and August and Club Day held each semester. Student leaders actively availed themselves to constituents in their respective divisions, the administration and the community, which is important in building a trusting and collaborative relationship.

 

Areas Needing Improvement

  1. In 2012 student leaders felt that finding the right balance of fulfilling obligations of student government, campus committees, community service, academic studies and personal life was a concern.  To address this issue, students were informed and encouraged to attend college success seminars offered during the semester. A Student Leader Contract was developed to inform potential students of the necessary commitment needed to serve in Student Government.  The contract helps new student leaders determine if they have the time, energy and commitment to be involved in campus leadership.  Also important was the development and inclusion of Associate Members.  These members do not have voting rights in student government, but allows potential leaders to participate without the added responsibilities.  Associate members can serve in committees, assist with planning and attend leadership conferences. This gives them ample time to determine if they want to elevate their roles and responsibilities by running for a senate seat, or step down to allow others who can commit to the important role. The addition of the contract and the development of the associate member positionshas proven to be successful and will continue to be used for future recruitment.

 

At a recent service review retreat held in October 2013, student leaders agreed on the following goals for 2013:

  1. On-going recruitment and retention of prospects through New Student Orientations and Club Day.
  2. Establishing a leadership training and development plan held at the beginning of each semester.
  3. Create and implement a public relations plan. 

UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII SYSTEM CAUCUS- Advocacy

  1. Student Services Goals:  Personal Development – Leadership Training; Campus Leadership – Student Government
  2. Campus Goals: Access; Personal Development; Diversity

 

ASUH-KCC Student Government appoints two student delegates to serve on the University of Hawaii System Caucus.  The caucus includes members from the seven public community colleges and three universities.  The UH Caucus is officially sanctioned by the University of Hawaii - Board of Regents and is tasked to address systemic concerns and issues. The caucus also conducts advocacy training in leadership and lobby the state legislature for UH funding and support student initiatives.

 

KCC student delegates have fought for a number of systematic issues. Notable were legislative actions to increase campus security watch twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week across the University of Hawaii system; support for the construction of a new campus for the University of Hawaii – West Oahu; repair and rejuvenation of the Hawaii Community College campus; and addressing important proposals such as tuition fee increases and research.   Below is a list of student delegates appointed throughout the last six years:

 

University of Hawai`i Student Caucus

Strengths

In 2012, Kauai Community College student delegates performed well in their roles and responsibilities as representatives of KCC.

 

Areas Needing Improvement

  1. It was mentioned from a 2012 mid-term report from the University of Hawaii Student Caucus President, that campus led leadership training and development is needed in the areas of critical thinking and conflict management.
  2. Adequate dissemination and discussion of time sensitive information to all student government.

 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES COUNCIL–Co-curricular Activity Planning

  1. Student Services Goals: Personal Development – Leadership Training; Campus Leadership – Student Government; Diversity – Student Activities/Clubs
  2. College Goals: Access; Personal Development; Community Development; Diversity

 

Student activities play a vital role in an individual’s overall educational experience at KCC.  Participation in clubs and assisting with organizing or producing an event, can bring forth valuable knowledge in interpersonal development, communication, and leadership skills that contribute to the establishment of a well-rounded foundation.  These skills are necessary to build personal confidence and gain positive organizational experiences that can be transferred to leadership roles in the community and employment. 

 

Since Student Life is responsible for creating programs that meet the broad interests and needs of all students, it was decided to remove student life activities from the responsibility of student government.  The Student Activity Council (SAC) was formed specifically to focus on co-curricular activities.  In Fall 2010, SAC was officially chartered with its primary objective of planning and implementing activities for the campus community.  This gave students the opportunity to join either co-curricular activities or governance that relates to personal interest.

 

To gain a better understanding of student needs, SAC explored the interests of students through informal student interviews and focus groups.  In addition, survey results collected from 2010 provided SAC leaders a better understanding of activities they should focus on in successive semesters.

 

                     TABLE 4

Informal Quantitative Survey Collected

Fall 2010

                Type of Activity

Number of Responses

Club Awareness/Participation

77

Multi-Cultural Performance

56

Arts and Crafts

74

International Awareness

35

Ethnic Dances

51

Inspirational Speakers

53

Authors

25

Independent/Feature Films

78

Political Speakers

24

Choir Performances

32

Club Nights

54

Musical Performances

79

UH Football

51

UH Wahine Volleyball

42

UH Women’s Soccer

21

Ping Pong Tournament

29

Entertainment/Technology

67

College Bowl

19

UH Men’s Volleyball

21

UH Men’s Basketball

20

Pool Tournament

37

Poetry Slam

28

Seasonal Events

76

Karaoke

62

Environmental Awareness

73

Island music

1

Legislative

1

June Jones

1

Acting class skits

1

Chess tournament

1

 

With the results of the survey in Table 4, SAC organizers implemented a number of activities to satisfy student interests. In addition, student leaders supported KCC institutional goals such as sustainability and zero waste initiatives and the establishment of the Board of Publications to help the college realize campus priorities.

 

  1. Weekly Coffee Breaks
  2. Karaoke Thursdays
  3. R.I.C.O. Club Days
  4. County of Kauai Candidate Forum
  5. Kauai Island Utility Cooperative Forum
  6. College Night
  7. Club Social
  8. Hell’s Exam Week
  9. Earth Day Awareness and Celebration
  10. Halloween Event
  11. St. Patrick Day
  12. Snack Night
  13. Afternoon Recess
  14. KCC Blood Drive
  15. Movie Night Under the Stars
  16. Spring Festival
  17. Suicide Prevention and Awareness Workshops
  18. Funds to support Journalism Program and Ka Leo O KCC newspaper
  19. Sustainability and zero waste initiatives
  20. Production and distribution of the KCC Student Handbook
  21. Student Life Web-site
  22. New Student Orientation Success packets
  23. Ongoing Satellite Exhibits with the Kauai Museum
  24. Co-curricular Advertisement of events and activities
  25. KCC Bus Pass

 

Aside from these activities, Table 5 shows a collective list of popular and re-occurring events and activities recorded from Fall 2007 to Spring 2012.  The data includes an approximate number of student participation documented from mandatory sign-in sheets for each event.  The data shows a total of 20,694students participated in Student Life sponsored activities over a period of seven years.

 

Table 5 shows that in 2012, 19 events were sponsored for a total of 2356 participants.  The highest attendees was the Spring Festival with 624.  In this annual event, both the community and students enjoyed the day long activity. The lowest number of attendees was the June New Student Orientation with 27.

 

The most attendees within a six year period was generated from a one time performance by Matisyahu concert with 5691 attendees.  While big name performances is a high attraction.  The production costs and resources from both external sponsors and the college is not feasible for SAC planners. Currently SAC is concentrating on smaller, more manageable events for the existing board of 7 members.

 

Student Attendance Data Collection 2007-2013

Table 5

                 
                   

MONTH & EVENT TITLE

07

08

09

10

11

12

13

14

Total

AUGUST

                 

FA New Student Orientation

   

130

121

127

136

98

 

612

SEPTEMBER

                 

Club Day

89

111

96

127

149

132

214

 

918

Global Warming Seminar

31

             

31

Show Your Wheels

505

             

505

Club Social

   

31

42

       

73

OCTOBER

                 

KCC Blood Drive

101

     

144

     

245

Halloween Bash

125

89

75

147

86

81

106

 

709

Movie Night Under The Stars

 

104

98

136

       

338

NOVEMBER

                 

C of K Candidate Forum

 

132

 

147

       

279

Afternoon Recess

56

49

123

119

 

62

   

409

Snack Night

89

72

79

113

121

83

   

557

DECEMBER

                 

Lights on Rice Parade

   

35

47

25

39

   

146

College Night

       

130

     

130

JANUARY

                 

SP New Student Orientation

43

35

40

39

42

37

17

 

253

Club Day

56

77

81

72

102

149

142

 

679

HoopiliHou State Conference

 

152

     

155

   

307

FEBURARY

                 

Club Social

     

33

42

     

75

Club Day

         

82

   

82

KIUC Forum

   

106

120

135

117

   

478

KCC Blood Drive

106

             

106

MARCH

                 

St. Patrick's Day Celebration

 

63

71

60

75

84

81

 

434

Movie Night Under The Stars

129

             

129

APRIL

                 

KCC Blood Drive

     

110

       

110

Earth Day Awareness

   

202

245

341

229

238

 

1255

Spring Festival

325

309

343

369

451

624

691

 

3112

Student Government Election

136

124

113

157

123

119

80

 

852

Afternoon Recess

62

79

68

56

74

76

73

 

488

Snack Night

77

91

84

94

112

82

62

 

602

Movie Night Under The Stars

135

   

115

       

250

MAY

                 

College Night

   

227

 

268

     

495

JUNE

                 

FA New Student Orientation

     

35

30

27

21

 

113

Matisyahu Concert

5691

             

5691

JULY

                 

FA New Student Orientation

     

72

81

42

36

 

231

GRAND TOTAL

7756

1487

2002

2576

2658

2356

1859

0

20694

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strengths

The chartering of the Student Activities Council in Fall 2010 helped student planners to effectively work on projects specific to their interests, and allowed greater participation from the student body at large.  This reduced significant responsibility on student government as they were no longer required to sponsor all activities.

 

Areas Needing Improvement

  1. Research other ways to advertising and communicate with students.  The data in Table 5 shows that participation in activities is not necessarily increasing, but remains relatively steady.  With proper advertising and looking at other ways of disseminating information can boost future student enrollment. 
  2. An additional full time clerk is requested to expedite SAC requisitions, vendor maintenance, and other clerical duties. 

REGISTERED INDEPENDENT CAMPUS ORGANIZATIONS – Grants and Support

  1. Student Services Goals:  Personal Development –Leadership Training; Campus Leadership – Student Government; Diversity – Student Activities/Clubs
  2. College Goals: Access; Personal Development; Community Development; Diversity

 

To meet KCC’s goal of personal development and cultural diversity, Student Life strives to inspire and support a broad array of campus clubs.  The importance of infusing and encouraging student participation in clubs helps to complement a student’s overall campus life experience, fosters global understanding and appreciation of diverse cultures, and gives students new perspectives and access to different opportunities both at the college and the community that can compliment the overall college experience.

 

To assist club recruitments, Student Life along with Student Government sponsors a series of opportunities to encourage student participation.  This includes the bi-annual Club Day that all students gather to obtain information regarding the mission, goals and commitment of each club.  Other club activities include Club Socials in which Registered Independent Campus Organizations (RICO) groups get together to learn about each other’s clubs participate in friendly games, fellowship and leadership training.  Student Life also provides support to each organization on annual registration, liability advice, reservation of conference rooms, recruitment strategies, constitution and bylaw revisions, steps to creating new clubs and effective public relations. Table 6 contains a listing of 27 RICO groups formed since 2007.  In 2012, a total of 19 clubs were registered with an annual participation rate of 227 members for the year.  A general increase each year since 2007 indicates that students are finding an interest in RICO groups to compliment their overall college experience.  Overall, a total of 1019 students participated in RICO since 2007.

 

Registered Independent Campus Organizations

Table 6

RICO

Designation

07

08

09

10

11

12

13

14

TOTAL

Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship

Religious

   

9

12

18

17

18

 

74

Club Math

Academic

 

6

 

10

14

12

15

 

57

Culinary Arts Club

Academic

20

17

21

18

30

23

11

 

140

Electronics Club

Academic

         

9

   

9

Healing Club

Health & Wellness

   

9

         

9

HOSA Club

Health Careers

           

8

 

8

Ho`okui Career Club

Occupations

         

7

6

 

13

Hui O Hana Po`okela

Hospitality & Tourism

   

12

12

10

9

   

43

International Club

Culture & Language

11

6

           

17

Kauai Auto Tech Club

Academic

           

13

 

13

Kauai Catholic Campus Ministries

Religious

         

7

   

7

KCC Accounting Club

Academic

         

15

14

 

29

KCC Anime Manga Club

Entertainment

       

4

6

6

 

16

KCC Choral Music Club

Entertainment

         

21

   

21

KCC Dance Club

Entertainment

       

40

23

15

 

78

KCC Film Club

Entertainment

       

3

     

3

Ku Pono I Ho`okahi

Culture & Language

8

         

9

 

17

La Turtulia Espanola Club

Culture & Language

 

4

10

8

8

7

8

 

45

Music, Theatre, Arts Club

Entertainment

     

4

       

4

Na Liko Aloha O KaHui

Culture & Language

         

12

15

 

27

NihongoKurabu

Culture & Language

20

7

4

8

4

5

11

 

59

Nursing Club

Academic

5

16

22

21

32

23

34

 

153

Pamantasan Club

Culture & Language

7

 

10

13

13

15

10

 

68

Phi Theta Kappa

Honor Society

4

12

12

11

18

10

12

 

79

Radio Club

Communication

       

4

     

4

Rotaract Club

Service

13

             

13

Student Vets of America

Military Veterans

         

6

7

 

13

                     

GRAND TOTAL

 

88

68

109

117

198

227

212

0

1019

 

Two goals for RICO in 2012 were 1) Adding two new clubs per academic season.  Student Life exceeded this goal by supporting the creation and activation of five new clubs.  This includes the Kauai Automotive Technology Club, Student Veterans of America, Na Liko Aloha O KaHui Hula Club, HOSA Club and the Ho`okui Career Club.  The second goal was to create a resource handbook.  In Fall 2012, a comprehensive RICO Club Handbook was developed and approved to assist both current and new clubs with the annual registration process, grant funding procedures, liability information and campus services. In addition, a parliamentary handbook was created to address business matters.

 

Strengths

RICO groups receive dedicated support from club advisors along with leadership and development training from Student Life.  

 

Areas Needing Improvement

  1. Grant funding mistakes and not understanding the general policies and regulations of the campus for registration continues to be an issue.
  2. The lack of additional manpower hinders the efficiency of the Student Life Coordinator to process grant proposals in a timely manner.
  3. At a recent Student Life service review retreat held in October 2013, student leaders agreed that in addition to offering instructional workshops to RICO groups, dedicated private spaces must be addressed to support groups requesting spaces for meetings and private events
  4. Develop a sustainable plan to help newly activated clubs with longevity.

STUDENT LIFE CENTER – Access and Rejuvenation

  1. Student Services Goals:  Access; Personal Development – Leadership Training; Diversity
  2. College Goals: Access; Diversity

 

The Student Life Center located on the second floor of the Campus Center is the central hub for student activities, governance and club participation.  There are three distinct areas that include a student lounge, game room, student government offices, conference/activity spaces. Below is a brief description of these spaces.

 

  1. Student Lounge

The Student Lounge contains a sitting and relaxation spaces, study sections, an educational gallery, flat panel televisions, free internet connection, a Student Life Booth that lends out gaming equipment and produces free official University of Hawaii identification cards that also serves as the Kauai Bus Pass. Students also have access to a Karaoke system and a coffee and snack station.

 

  1. Game Room

The 700 square feet Game Room houses a number of equipment for student enjoyment, social interaction, or to release some stress after a day of academic studies.  Equipment includes a professional grade ping pong table, a soccer foosball, two billiard pool tables, gaming equipment for Xbox, Play Station and Wii, and two 42 inch flat panel television that broadcast major sporting events.  Also available are spaces for dance practices, performances and wellness classes.

 

  1. Student Government Office and Conference Rooms

The Student Government Offices serves as the official location for student leadership.  These offices have undergone major renovations to accommodate 19 student leaders.  Each space is equipped with computers, efficient desk spaces, work areas to create advertisements and large banners, and a usable conference room to accommodate large meetings, a flat panel television to broadcast educational programs and a vehicle to communicate with students across the state.

 

Maintenance of the area requires constant repairs and rejuvenation of spaces to keep up with the number of daily student visits shown in TABLE 7. 

 

Most recent renovations include: reupholster of two billiard pool tables; purchase of a professional grade ping pong table; refurbishment of the foosball game; purchase of five flat panel televisions; yearly contract with DirecTV satellite transmission; renovation of the Student Life/I.D. Room; removal of carpet with simulated wood floors; replacement of outdated desks to provide some space for 19 student leaders; purchase and replace outdated computers with new ones; expansion of storage spaces; purchase of new student identification system.

 

To maintain the multiple facilities, Student Life hired part time student employees under the Bridge to Hope Program to assist with managing the center.  In addition, student government leaders volunteer two hours per week.  While the additional staff is appreciated, student workers are not consistently reliable.  The bulk of the clerical responsibilities falls heavily on the Student Life Coordinator who is also responsible for other student life programs.  A permanent staff member would greatly help in the administrative side of Student Life.

 

TABLE 7

Student Life Center

Sign-Ins

Academic Year

Number of Sign-Ins

2013-2014

In progress

2012-2013

3985

2011-2012

3229

2009-2010

4110

2008-2009

3412

2007-2008

2107

               

The number of sign-ins in Table 7 indicates a general increase of usage of the Student Life Center.  The table shows that the campus population is adequately using the space and appreciates the current set-up.  This also shows that students are attuned to the activities student leaders plan and initiate.  With the consistent upgrades and rejuvenation of the spaces, Student Life is able to provide steady activities, along with the increase of student club reservations.  In 2012 the Student Life Center held numerous activities that included workshops, forums, community events and RICO functions.

 

  1. Weekly Free Coffee/Tea Breaks
  2. Karaoke Thursdays
  3. New Student Orientations
  4. Kauai Island Utility Cooperative (K.I.U.C.) Forums
  5. Earth Day Panel Discussions
  6. Phi Theta Kappa, Alpha Pi Xi Induction Ceremonies
  7. KCC Dance Club Practices
  8. Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship weekly meetings
  9. Anime and Manga Club shows
  10. Radio Club weekly meetings
  11. Student Life Committee
  12. ASUH-KCC Student Government weekly Meetings
  13. Blood Drive Sign-ups
  14. Halloween Bash
  15. St. Patrick Day Celebration
  16. Suicide Prevention and Awareness Workshops
  17. Open Mike at the Lounge
  18. Student Film/Video Presentations
  19. Kauai Museum Satellite Exhibits
  20. Armed Forces Recruitment
  21. Dance Club Practices
  22. Excellence in Education Day
  23. Afternoon Movie showings
  24. Waialeale Appreciation Activities

 

Strengths

The strength of the Student Life Center lies within the design of the floor plan that easily connects Student Government, Student Lounge and the Game Room.  This allows student leaders to manage and monitor several spaces more efficiently. 

 

During the past few years, Student Life has witnessed steady growth of student participation.  This is attributed to an increase of the general student population and focused efforts on marketing and public relations that Student Government prioritized in Fall 2011.  This has resulted in increased usage from campus clubs, group reservations for meeting rooms and spaces for campus events, community functions and state conferences.

 

To resolve the need for additional spaces for student needs, the college agreed to support the expansion of student life by renovating the “Old Student Services” area located on the second floor of the Campus Center. The proposed plan include a multi-collaboration/study area, an additional multi-use classroom, expanded storage areas, printing and supply room, Board of Student Publication workroom, several offices and an ADA compliant restroom. These multi-use additions will not only attract more students to the Campus Center, but it will provide additional venue spaces for new and innovative activities.  The renovation project is still in the building phase and the expected completion date is March 2014.

 

Areas Needing Improvement

  1. Providing adequate private spaces for multiple groups to use.
  2. Manager whose duties will be to run the day-to-day operations of the Student Life Center.
  3. A Clerk that can help with completing requisitions a timely basis.
  4. Vending machines to serve students when the cafeteria closes at 1 pm.
  5. ATM Machine for students needing cash to purchase meals at the Cafeteria.
  6. Work on campus sports equipment to expand outdoor co-curricular activities.
  7. Adequate management training of student employees.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Student Life located at the Kauai Community College Campus Center, continues to play a vital role in the holistic development of students. The area serves as the central hub for the Associated Students of the University of Hawaii –Kauai Community College Student Government, the Student Activities Council and Registered Independent Campus Organizations.  It is an area where ordinary students can emerge as leaders of the community through leadership training and development, a place to explore and create programs that meet diverse needs, and a haven for student engagement and interaction. 

 

 

D) Results of Program Assessment

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E) Other Comments

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F) Next Steps

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