University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Student Services Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: Windward Community College
Program: Student Services

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The last comprehensive review for this program was on 2009, and can be viewed at:
http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Student_Affairs/2009/Student_Services_Program_Review_2009.pdf

Program Description

Mission of Windward Community College

Windward Community College offers innovative programs in the arts and sciences and opportunities to gain knowledge and understanding of Hawai‘i and its unique heritage. With a special commitment to support the access and educational needs of Native Hawaiians, we provide O‘ahu’s Ko‘olau region and beyond with liberal arts, career and lifelong learning in a supportive and challenging environment — inspiring students to excellence.

 

Mission of Student Affairs at WCC

The mission of the Windward Community College’s Student Affairs Department is to assist students to matriculate, enabling them to attain their educational and life goals. The department fosters a supportive learning environment and provides services to support students' achievement of their educational goals.

 

Goals of Student Affairs

-To provide students with pre-admission services and advising.

-To empower students to navigate through and be successful in their academic program.

-To provide services to enable students to move into further educational career endeavors.

 

Student Learning Outcome for Student Affairs

Students will access appropriate information and resources to support their academic journey.

 

Structure of Student Affairs

Windward Community College’s Student Affairs is comprised of eight sub departments. These departments are: Outreach, Admissions and Records,

Financial Aid, Counseling, Student Life, Educational Talent Search (TRiO), Student Support Services (TRiO), and Upward Bound (TRiO). The area of Counseling includes Mental Health, Career Services, Disabilities, Supplemental Instruction and First Year Experience. Under Student Life, Student Publications is also included. 

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

 
Demand Indicators Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 Annual Headcount ALL Students 3,424 3,537 3,560
2 Annual Headcount NH Students 1,413 1,472 1,428
3    Actual Percent Change from Prior Year ALL 11% 3% 1%
4    Actual Percent Change from Prior Year NH 30% 4% -3%
5 Annual Headcount of Recent Hawaii High School Graduates 326 265 295
6    Percent of Service Area's Recent High School Graduates 3% 3% 3%
7 Annual Headcount of Students 25-49 Years Old 1,105 891 886
8 Annual Headcount from Underserved Regions 285 205 237
9 Annual Headcount in STEM programs 92 72 88
10a Fall
Semester
Registration Status
New Students 556 531 548
10b Transfers Students 367 262 286
10c Continuing Students 1,069 1,233 1,187
10d Returning Students 160 146 129
10e Home Campus Other 473 533 591
11a Spring
Semester
Registration Status
New Students 203 231 213
11b Transfers Students 193 185 143
11c Continuing Students 1,472 1,512 1,477
11d Returning Students 107 85 76
11e Home Campus Other 458 548 585

Efficiency Indicators Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
12 Pell Participation Rate ALL Students 63% 64% 63%  
13 Pell Participation Rate NH Students 74% 72% 70%
14 Number ALL Students Receiving Pell 1,217 1,258 1,224
15 Number NH Students Receiving Pell 660 679 647
16 Total Pell Disbursed ALL $3,692,641 $3,830,682 $3,863,915
17 Total Pell Disbursed NH $2,050,077 $2,130,116 $2,121,706
18 Overall Program Budget Allocation $3,164,794 $3,085,859 $3,409,062
19 General Funded Budget Allocation $1,781,972 $1,703,037 $1,495,568
20 Special/Federal Budget Allocation $1,382,822 $1,382,822 $1,913,494
21 Cost Per Student $924 $872 $958
Achieving the Dream AtD Fall Cohort
2009 2010 2011
22 FT AtD Cohort (ALL) complete 20 credits first year 113 147 127
23 FT AtD Cohort (NH) complete 20 credits first year 38 67 58
24 PT AtD Cohort (ALL) complete 12 credits first year 73 81 66
25 PT AtD Cohort (NH) complete 12 credits first year 35 26 31
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: March 14, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
26 Persistence Fall to Spring ALL Students 68% 70% 69%  
27 Persistence Fall to Spring NH 70% 71% 72%
28 Degrees & Certificates Awarded ALL 165 164 223
29 Degrees & Certificates Awarded NH 62 74 88
30 Degrees & Certificates in STEM ALL 9 7 39
31 Degrees & Certificates in STEM NH 2 3 8
32 Transfers to UH 4-yr ALL 122 158 153
33 Transfers to UH 4-yr NH 52 68 70

Community College Survey
of Student Engagement (CCSSE)
Survey Year  
2008 2010 2012
34 Support for Learners Benchmark (Percentile) 70 80 80  
Means Summary All Students ( 1 = Not at all/Rarely, 2 = Sometimes/Somewhat, 3 = Often/Very )
35 Academic Advising      
  Frequency Not Reported 1.80 1.80
  Satisfaction Not Reported 2.40 2.40
  Importance Not Reported 2.60 2.63
36 Career Counseling      
  Frequency Not Reported 1.50 1.51
  Satisfaction Not Reported 2.20 2.27
  Importance Not Reported 2.50 2.44
37 Job Placement Assistance      
  Frequency Not Reported 1.20 1.16
  Satisfaction Not Reported 1.90 1.85
  Importance Not Reported 2.10 2.08
38 Financial Aid Advising      
  Frequency Not Reported 2.00 2.07
  Satisfaction Not Reported 2.60 2.54
  Importance Not Reported 2.60 2.57
39 Student Organizations      
  Frequency Not Reported 1.30 1.34
  Satisfaction Not Reported 2.10 2.07
  Importance Not Reported 2.00 1.97
40 Transfer Credit Assistance      
  Frequency Not Reported 1.40 1.47
  Satisfaction Not Reported 2.20 2.10
  Importance Not Reported 2.40 2.34
41 Services for People With Disabilities      
  Frequency Not Reported 1.20 1.33
  Satisfaction Not Reported 2.10 2.21
  Importance Not Reported 2.10 2.13
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: March 14, 2014

Glossary

Part II. Analysis of the Program

Analysis of the Program

1. Demand

Our headcount for both all students and Native Hawaiian students have remained stable over the past year, with a small increase in all students and slight decrease in Native Hawaiian students.  Our headcount of recent high school grads has increased over the past year and continues to be 3% of our pool.  Our 25-49 year old, underserved, and STEM enrollments have also been stable. 

            We have a decreased number of returning students and an increased number of students whose home campus is elsewhere.  Note that returning students are not continuing students, but rather those that have stopped out and then returned.  This decrease in returning students could be due to graduation or retention and would need further analysis before a strategy might be developed.  However, the consistent increase in “home campus elsewhere” students calls for attention.  These students are not necessarily benefitting from WCC student support services such as Frosh Camp, New Student Orientation, mandatory advising, etc.  They also may be less aware of and less able to access our academic support such as tutoring, supplemental instruction,

 

2. Efficiency

Our efficiency indicators have shown stability for Pell participation and cost per student.  We have seen increases in overall Pell disbursed and program allocation, despite decreased general fund support.  This decreased general fund support has been offset by large increases in extramural funding ($530,672.00). 

 

According to system figures given, our Pell given to Native Hawaiians has decreased drastically over the past two years, despite the fact that our overall Pell awarding has been stable to positive in growth.  When our Financial Aid Director utilized Banner to analyze this anomaly, his data conflicted with system reports.  He show stable Native Hawaiian Pell awarding and positive growth in Native Hawaiian Pell disbursement.  This discrepancy has been reported to UH system IR for further consideration.

 

Regarding credit completion for our Achieving the Dream cohorts, Full-time student credit completion has been stable to positive.  Part-time credit completion however displays a negative trend.  Due to this, we have begun to establish interventions for part-time students.  We have established a pilot program for part-time students within our Paipai o KoÊ»olau Castle Foundation grant initiative.  This program includes scholarships and intrusive advising, along with cohort building. 

 

3. Effectiveness

While our persistence measures for both All students and Native Hawaiian students have been stable, our graduation and transfer rates have increased significantly in all categories.  We would like to study this further as our Student Right to Know information (SRTK) indicates a decreasing graduations rate (5% in last cohort).  While our enrollment rate has grown, this increase does not account for the discrepancy.  It seems likely that we are producing more graduates in all strategic plan categories (All, NH, STEM, STEM+NH) as well as more transfers (All, NH)  but graduation is taking longer than the 3 years allotted for SRTK cohorts.  Thus, we must consider how to shorten time to degree.  WCC is currently investigating using stronger Pathways to graduation, where students have more knowledge to chart their course to graduation (via STAR) and a schedule in their first semester which is the best foundation for graduation (via Frosh Cohorts).  All incoming freshman at WCC now participate in a workshop on STAR with simulated exercises at Frosh Camp.  Our Frosh Cohorts, which are mandatory for all incoming freshman in the Liberal Arts program who test into the developmental level, introduce English, Math, and a thematic course as well as a college success course in the first semester for students.  This helps them to complete Math and English requirements, which also serve as prerequisites for other courses, early on.  It also provides skill building through the college success course and peer support through cohort scheduling.  Thus, while our effectiveness indicators are largely positive already, we continue to work to increase effectiveness to best serve students.

 

4. CCSSE

Our current CCSSE data was reported 2 years ago.  It was analyzed in last year’s APRD.  It should be noted that our frequency ratings are lower than 2.0 for each relevant category except Financial Aid.  Therefore, we are working to increase awareness and usage of our services in Student Affairs.  We have founded a Career and Transfer Center, whose counselor presents at Frosh Camp as well as in various classes such as IS 103 Intro to College.  This counselor has worked to increase potential job placement through our CSO software.  WCC had the largest initial registration in CSO for the entire UHCC system when it was first implemented in 2012.  We have mandatory initial counseling for freshman and have mandated counseling for students failing to meet Satisfactory Academic Progress.  Our Student Life and Disabilities counselors have also worked to increase awareness and access, as is discussed below.

 

5. Process Outcomes within Student Affairs

In addition to the above indicators and the Student Learning Outcome attainment reported in the section on Student Learning Outcomes, each area within Student Affairs also has process outcomes which help to ensure we are serving students appropriately and fully.  The process outcomes are discussed for each area below.  Tables with Process Outcomes, benchmarks, results, analysis and proposed actions are included at the end of this section.

 

 

A. Recruitment & Outreach

Recruitment and Outreach meets a demanding schedule with very limited staffing (e.g. 1 APT position).  All process outcomes have been met in 2012-13 (Table 1).  In the past year, target high schools were engaged with 38 campus visits (e.g. Castle 16, Kahuku 8, Kalaheo 4, Kailua 6, Kamakau 2, Hakipu'u 2) and 6 external events at WCC (e.g. Kailua Senior Transition Day , Kahuku Imagine Day, Mock Interview Days, College & Career Fair, La Nohona Hawai'i), and one event at Kaneohe Marine Corps Base (e.g. Castle HS Senior Celebration Day). All four target middle schools were engaged with one visit and 17 of 18 local elementary schools were engaged with 12 on campus visits and 8 visits to schools.  Three targeted financial aid nights (Scholarship 'Aha's) were held in our communities.  Local high school students were educated on financial aid through 12 financial aid outreach events at high schools in partnership with the high schools and PACFAA (e.g. 4 PACFAA nights + 1 non-PACFAA at Hakipu'u in collaboration with ETS, 1 at Kamakau, 2 additional events at Castle including NH opportunities and 1 at Kailua (partnered with KS and NHEA), College Goal Sunday (PACFAA), Kalaheo Scholarship Fair).  These events and outreach opportunities were made possible by our strong partnerships in the community (e.g. OHA, PACFAA, NHEA, KS, Aloha Pacific Federal Credit Union (Castle Celebration, Mock Interview, Frosh Camp), Hui Malama o Ke Kai (Waimanalo Scholarship 'Aha, Gabby Pahinui Fest), QLCC).

Thus, Recruitment and Outreach's staff of ONE PERSON held 79 major events this year and also participated in many on-campus events (Ho'olaule'a, Frosh Camp, Paliku Arts Fest, Mid-month munchies, Peer Mentor Training, etc.).  This demanding workload necessitates additional help.
 

B. Admissions and Records Outcomes

Enrollment at WinCC has steadily increased during the past 6 years.  A&R data reflects this growth and demand.  Since 2007-08, Admissions applications (62%), graduation applications (61%), VA certifications (1.88%), and Enrollment Verification (1.07%) have increased while A&R continues to be staffed at the same level since 2005.

 

In addition, there are several initiatives that are being implemented by the Community College system such as automatic noting of credentials, automatic UH transfer credits, reverse transfer credits, document imaging, ICan program, prior learning credit, re-admit policy, Ka ‘ie ‘ie (Degree Pathway Partnership) that have added and will add to the workload at the Admissions and Records Office. 

 

There was an increase of completed applications received initially compared to the past two years.  The Registrar continued to work with System to revise the application such as the Residency Declaration section because the current format resulted in too many incomplete applications.  Some modifications were made on June 2013.  The summer 2013 application data reflects the result of this change with 81% completed application initially received compared to Summer 2012 59% and Summer 2011 70%.

 

A&R had two major achievements this year.  They went green and became totally paperless.  This was for both the online application, which some institutions print after receiving, and in documentation.  As a team, they developed an in house procedure to deal with all documentation.  Also, A&R also created an Admissions Checklist for prospective students.  Prospective students receive this Admissions Checklist to inform them of required documents and where to go for additional information and forms.  This was implemented for Spring 2014 prospective students. 

 

Despite the increased workload, Admissions and Records met all outcome benchmarks (Table 2).  The outcomes met concerned application processing, medical documentation compliance and satisfaction. They cover a broad range of Admissions and Records activities.

 

C. Financial Aid

Due to the large increases in enrollment witnessed at WCC over the past 7 years, as well as effective Financial Aid outreach strategies, WCC Financial Aid works diligently to meet the needs of a greater number of students.  This year, most outcome benchmarks were met (Table 3).  FAFSA processing times were appropriately efficient (between 2 days to 14 days) and the student loan cohort default rate FY2011 remained acceptably low at 12.3%.  46% of all eligible students had a financial aid award FY2013, which is greater than our target rate of 40%. Based on the 2012-2013 Financial Aid Office Survey, 100% of 3 students surveyed indicated overall satisfaction with the service they received from the Financial Aid office.  This reflects the level of satisfaction we hoped to achieve.  However, it is not a valid sample size.  It was the first time we attempted to do the survey online.  One area of concern this year was that there was one audit finding in the A-133 Student Financial Aid audit FY2012. 

WCC Financial Aid was able to maintain a high level of service and integrity this year due to our recent addition of an APT A Financial Aid Assistant.  This position greatly increased our capacity to both meet student appointment demand and fulfill administrative and system workload demands.

 

D. Counseling

While our enrollment at WCC has stabilized, the outreach of counseling continues to grow.  We met all process outcome benchmarks this year (Table 4), including counseling over 80% of our students, providing New Student Orientation for 88% of all new to college applicants, offering 31 workshops on transfer opportunities, and providing instruction on college success to 169 students.  Furthermore, this year, we offered Frosh Camp to 67.5% of incoming new to college applicants.  While this is a smaller percentage than NSO, we provided outreach to those students who did not attend Frosh Camp which included trainings on components of Frosh Camp learning (e.g. STAR) and counselor interaction to promote resource finding and decision-making.  Holds were placed on student records preventing online registration (but allowing for counselor assisted registration) until the students completed these components.  Gathering of the data to demonstrate outcome achievement has been noted to be labor intensive.  There is a desire to create more efficient access to this data.

 

Counseling achieved all outcomes despite the departure of two highly visible and productive counselors, which presented a major workload increase for the remaining counselors during this evaluation period. However, despite the increase in enrollment and the occasional unexpected challenges, the  counselors have managed, and will continue to manage with selfless generosity and collegiality.

 

 As these positions are filled, there are further opportunities to increase student success through counselor interaction with instruction.  Some counselors are ready, willing and able to be a much-needed resource for many issues that perplex some instructors. For instance, how to handle various classroom management issues from simple absenteeism to disruptive behavior, from stalking and chronic drug use to domestic violence. By working collaboratively on projects with our colleagues in Academic Affairs we can best serve students.  This may entail some reorganization of advising.   It should be noted that the counselors are most proud of sustaining positive relationships with other departments and being active and involved at WCC.  However, this activity across campus must be carefully balanced to prevent crowding out the primary duty of direct interaction with students for advising.  A number of student counseling hours (e.g. 20) might be specified for each counselor so that they can maintain this balance.

 

Supplemental Instruction

In the academic year 2013, SI was attached to 77 sections of 30 different courses, and available to 1602 students.  Of those students, 900 (56.17%) attended at least one SI session.

 

Students succeeded in classes with SI at a rate of 60.05%.  Students who attended at least one SI session succeeded at a rate of 64.66%, almost 11% higher than students who did not (53.71%). 

 

SI also seemed to have a positive affect on GPA.  Overall, students enrolled in courses with SI earned a GPA* of 2.42.  SI attendees earned a GPA of 2.73 as compared to non-SI attendees that earned a 2.04.

 

There was also a positive relationship between attending SI and persistence.  Students who attended SI persisted at a rate of 81.6%, 12% higher than non-SI attendees (69.18%).  Overall, the persistence rate for courses with SI was 78.29%.

 

One issue that was noted was that several sections (11) which were provided SI had little utilization of this service (e.g. 1 student used 1 time).  These sections not only wasted resources but also lowered our overall results (the majority of these students failed).  These outliers create a false perception of SI Success and waste precious funding. 

 

This past academic year, the Supplemental Instruction program has undergone several programmatic changes. The SI program has moved to the new Library Learning Commons, occupying an office space and a study room, which is used by SI leaders for SI sessions and holding office hours. Furthermore, the SI Coordinator has implemented new policies regarding the completion and approval of weekly session plans by SI leaders, and requires SI leaders to hold one office hour per week in the study room. These new policy were implemented in order to increase the effectiveness of SI sessions and to better supervise the SI leaders.

 

In the past year, SI did not meet process outcome benchmarks to increase in-service trainings and secure SI leaders earlier (Table 5).  Next year, we will continue to have our basic training for SI but will also schedule in-service trainings in advance of the semester to attain this outcome.  SI will work with instructors to strive to identify leaders earlier as well.

 

Career Services

Career services met the outcome benchmark of registering over 80 new students on our CSO career services software by registering 100 students at our Frosh Camp.  This is in addition to the over 300 students already enrolled.  However, we suffered a major setback this year in that our Career Counselor has been on extended sick leave.  This is unavoidable but has resulted necessarily in the scaling back of services.  We look forward to his renewed leadership in Spring 2014.

 

Disabilities

We had 149 enrolled students with disabilities during the 2012-2013 academic year. This represents an increase of approximately 15 individuals from the previous academic year.  Of these students, approximately 105 sought services from the disability office at some point during the year. These services included 105 for registration, 73 for testing accommodations, 21 for technology assistance, 15 for notetaking, 43 for consultation with instructors above and beyond provision of accommodations letters.

 

Our Disabilities survey administered in June to students receiving Disabilities counseling indicates that students know their rights, know what services are offered, and have an idea of how to access services.  However, there is further work to be done.  This is illustrated in the following example:

 

When questioned about requesting a tutor, a visually impaired student said she had gone to the tutoring area. The disabilities counselor then sent her back with one of an interns. The intern reported that the student had difficulty reading the print on the Trio application and was embarrassed to disclose this. Sometimes we must persist in helping students access services, even when we

believe they already know or should know what to do.

 

E. Student Life

WCC Student Life and ASUH, our student government, provided strong leadership in increasing student engagement on campus.  2833 instances of participation by students (duplicated count) were tracked over the course of the year at ASUH sponsored events.

 

In addition, Rain Bird, our student journal, and Ka ʻOhana, our student newspaper, maintained their rigorous publication schedule.

 

F. TRiO Educational Talent Search

TRiO-Educational Talent Search (ETS) serves young people in grades six through twelve. This early intervention program helps students to better understand their educational opportunities and options.  The program provides academic, career, and financial aid counseling to its participants and encourages them to graduate from high school and continue on to the postsecondary school of their choice.  Students participate in grade-specific career exploration and college planning activities held at their school, in the community and at college campuses.

 

To meet the ETS-WCC goals and objectives, the program is designed to provide the following services and activities to all ETS participants: career and college awareness, exploration, and planning; college site visits; self awareness skills; life skills and study skills; cultural & academic enrichment; financial aid planning; SAT/ACT & college application fee waivers; college applications and financial aid applications assistance.

 

Delivery of services is conducted on an individual basis and/or group setting. College planning advisors (CPA) report to assigned target schools once a week.  Each CPA is responsible to manage a caseload of approximately 250 participants between three schools. ETS-Honolulu serves Farrington, McKinley, Kaimuki High Schools, Dole and Washington Middle Schools, and Ke Kula Kaiapuni ‘O Anuenue. ETS-Windward serves Kailua, Kahuku, Castle High Schools and Waimanalo, Laie Middle Schools and Hakipu’u Learning Center.

 

Current staffing for both grants include the Program Director, four College Planning Advisors and one Administrative Associate. 

 

ETS met 5 of its 6 outcomes for the 2011-12 reporting year.  Both projects  together served 1,003 participants (benchmark = 500 students per grant).  Over 67% of total served met low-income, first generation college status (LIFG).  Over 90% of students from sixth grade to eleventh grade continued to the next grade level at the end of the academic year. Over 90% of seniors graduated with a regular secondary school diploma within the standard number of years.  Over 60% of graduating seniors enrolled in an institution of higher education by the fall term immediately following high school graduation.  However, ETS failed to meet the goal that 30% of graduation seniors will complete a rigorous secondary school program (i.e., Board of Education diploma).  However, it should be noted that even for this measure, ETS students exceeded comparison groups for the target schools.  Table 6 summarize ETS results for process outcomes.

 

Note that because UH reporting schedule does not coincide with TRiO reporting, UB consistently reports data from one year earlier.  Thus, this annual report presents 2011-12 data for ETS.  Also note, that next year’s data will be influenced by Federal Sequestration, which resulted in a cut to ETS funding.

 

 

G. TRiO Student Support Services

TRiO SSS serves 250 low-income, first-generation, and/or disabled students in order to increase their retention and graduation rates. For the past seven cohorts, there have been 684 participants of which 55% were Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander. 84% qualified as low-income and 86% qualified as first generation with 70% qualifying as both low-income and first-generation. 353 or 51.61% of the participants have received an A.A. and/or transferred to a 4-year institution (50.14% for the Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander participants).

 

For full-time freshmen, 70 or 21.43% have graduated with an A.A. or certificate and transferred to a 4-year institution (16.22% for Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander participants).

 

TRiO SSS met or exceeded all process outcomes for 2011-12 (see Table 7).  100% or 254 of the participants (benchmark = 250) were identified, screened, selected, and assessed for their academic need for services, and retained.  99% (Benchmark = 85%) of the participants maintained good academic standing (2.0 Cumulative GPA on a 4.0 scale).  89% (benchmark = 75%) of all participants persisted from one academic year to the next academic year or graduated and/or transferred to a 4-year institution.  35% (benchmark =10%) of the cohort of new participants graduated with a certificate or associate’s degree and 73% (benchmark = 15%) graduated and transferred to a four-year institution within 4 years.  100% of the program’s key personnel participated in the college’s governance structure to influence institutional policies that affect participants. 

TRiO attained these results despite the various barriers faced by our students, which speaks to the importance they give to their education.  This past reporting year and continuing to the present, we have especially encountered increased issues with homelessness.  This affected at least 5 students in Fall 2013 semester alone.

 

 

H. TRiO Upward Bound

TRiO-Upward Bound (UB) serves students in grades nine through twelve at four Windward High Schools: Castle, Kahuku, Kailua, and Kalaheo. WCC Upward Bound is part of the nation-wide network of over 800 TRIO-Upward Bound programs serving low-income and first-generation bachelor’s degree seekers.

 

To meet the UB-WCC goals and objectives the program is designed to provide the following services and activities to all UB participants: career and college awareness, academic tutoring and selection of high school college-prep coursework; college site visits; study skills and goal setting; cultural & academic enrichment; financial aid planning; SAT/ACT & college application fee waivers; SAT/ACT Prep courses; college applications and financial aid application assistance.  Students participate in grade-specific college planning activities held at their high school and at the WCC campus.

 

Delivery of services is conducted on an individual basis and/or group setting. Guidance Advisors report to assigned target schools once a week and the program hosts monthly Saturday Academies on the WCC campus. 

 

In addition to services offered during the school year UB-WCC provides students with a six-week college experience complete with credit and non-credit courses on the WCC campus and residence hall life on the UH-Manoa campus (four weeks are residential).  Weekly field trips expose students to college and career opportunities as well as cultural and academic enrichment.

 

In May 2012 the WCC Upward Bound program was awarded a five-year grant by the U.S. Department of Education to provide services to students in program years 2012-2017.  The grant is for $262,500 annually or a total of over $1.3M.

 

In 2012-2013, the Upward Bound program served sixty-three (63) Windward Oahu high school students year-round.

 

Summer 2013 credit courses offered by Upward Bound were HIST 151 (Ryan Koo) and THEA 221 (Nicholas Logue).  Summer 2013 non-credit courses offered by Upward Bound were taught by Windward complex high school teachers and included: Pre-Calculus, Algebra II, Geometry, SAT Prep, Literature & Grammar, Chemistry of Food, College Guidance, and Spanish.

 

Upward Bound met all 5 of the outcomes that could be assessed for 2012-13 (Table 8).  The fifth and seventh are still being assessed.  Similar to ETS, UBÊ»s annual federal reporting cycle does not coincide with UH’s, which causes difficulties.  For the other 5 outcomes, our results were excellent.  74% (benchmark = 66%) if the high school students we served were from low-income families and families where neither parent has earned a bachelor’s degree.  82% (benchmark = 80%) of students served had a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better at the end of the 2012-2013 school year.  44% (benchmark = 45%) scored at the proficient level on the 10th grade Hawaii State Assessment exams in both reading/language arts and math.  98% (benchmark = 95%) were promoted to the next grade level or graduated.  94% (benchmark  = 70%) enrolled in college by the fall term immediately following expected high school graduation date.

 

 

 

Table 1

Departmental Goals & Process Outcomes

Department:  Recruitment & Outreach

Goal/outcome

  1. Engage target high schools (6) with 1 campus visit and 1 external event.
  2. Engage target middle schools (4) with 1 campus visit or 1 external event.
  3. Engage Windward elementary schools (18) in college awareness building activities.
  1. Engage Windward Community through 3 targeted community financial outreach events.
  2.  Engage local high school students on financial aid through 6 financial aid outreach events at high schools partnered with the high schools and PACFAA.
  3.  Collaborate with external agencies in order to increase scope and leverage capacity.

Measurement*

  1. 6 campus visits, 6 external events (12 total)
  2. 4 visits or events
  3. 18 elementary school events
  4. 3 Financial Aid outreach events
  5. Participate in 6 High School Fin Aid nights
  6. 5 external partners

Benchmark

1. 80% = 5 visits, 5 external events

2. 80% = 3 visits or events

3. 80% = 14 elementary schools engaged

4. 67% = 2 of 3 events

5. 80% = 5 High School Financial Aid nights

  1.  

Results

  1. 38 campus visits, at least 1 per school (Castle 16, Kahuku 8, Kalaheo 4, Kailua 6, Kamakau 2, Hakipu'u 2).  6 External events at WCC (Kailua Senior Transition Day , Kahuku Imagine Day, Mock Interview Days, College & Career Fair, La Nohona Hawaiʻi), at MCB Castle HS Senior Celebration Day). EXCEEDED
  2. 4 Middle School visits. MET
  3. 17 elementary schools engaged (12 on campus visits, 8 visits to schools).  94%. MET
  4. 3 Windward Scholarship 'Aha's, plus 4 'aha's in other communities. EXCEEDED.
  5. 12 Financial Aid outreach events at high schools (4 PACFAA nights + 1 non-PACFAA at Hakipu'u in collaboration with ETS, 1 at Kamakau), 2 additional events at Castle including NH opportunities and 1 at Kailua (partnered with KS and NHEA), College Goal Sunday (PACFAA), Kalaheo Scholarship Fair. EXCEEDED.
  6. OHA, PACFAA, NHEA, KS, Aloha Pacific Federal Credit Union (Castle Celebration, Mock Interview, Frosh Camp), Hui Malama o Ke Kai (Waimanalo Scholarship 'Aha, Gabby Pahinui Fest), QLCC,  EXCEEDED.

Action Plan

Hire one Recruitment & Outreach Assistant to meet demanding workload.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 2

Departmental Goals & Process Outcomes

Department:  Admissions and Records

Goal/outcome

  1. Initial acceptance letter to be mailed in March for Fall to support Financial Aid awarding
  2. Process acceptance letters every week after initial mail-out
  3. Comply with State of Hawaii Department of Health TB/MMR requirements
  4. Obtain satisfaction rating from student

Measurement*

  1. The date initial acceptance letters generated
  2. The dates of acceptance letter generated via Banner SUAMAIL
  3. The TB/MMR clearance via Banner GOAMEDI of accepted students who registered
  4. Fall 2012 Frosh Camp evaluations

Benchmark

  1. The date initial acceptance letters were generated
  2. The dates acceptance letter generated every week via Banner SUAMAIL
  3. 100% compliance of State of Hawaii Department of Health TB/MMR requirement
  4. Obtain at least 75% satisfaction rate

Results

  1. Fall 2012 initial acceptance letters printed on March 16, 2012
  2. Per Banner SUAMAIL, acceptance letters were generated every week except for one week in June 2012
  3. Per Banner GOAMEDI, all accepted students who registered complied with DOH health clearance policy (note: there was a TB shortage during Summer 2013 intake that allowed students to enter without TB clearance)
  4. A&R obtained 89% satisfactory rate

Action Plan

  • Continue to process applications and notify students  every week
  • Continue to work with UH system for improvement of the online application
  • Create an admissions checklist to be issued to prospective student at A&R and available on A&R webpage
  • Continue to encourage UH system to implement a UH System admissions process to minimize individual campuses admissions workload and to have consistency residency determination
  • Continue to encourage UH system to implement UH System document imaging to share documents within UH System (e.g. health clearances, transcripts)
  • Start internal document imaging of application, health clearances, transcripts

 

 

Table 3

Departmental Goals & Process Outcomes

Department:  Financial Aid Office

Goal/outcome

  1. Process FAFSAs within 2 weeks of receipt/load into Banner.
  2. No audit findings.
  3. The student loan cohort default rate will be below 25%.
  4. 40% of all eligible students will have a financial aid award.
  5. 75% student satisfaction rating.

Measurement*

  1. Number of days to process FAFSA after it is loaded into Banner.
  2. Number of audit findings in the annual A-133 Student Financial Aid audit FY2012.
  3. The student loan default rate for FY2011.
  4. Percentage of unduplicated headcount for Fall 12, Spr 13, Sum 13, that were awarded aid.
  5. 2012-2013 Financial Aid Office Survey.

Benchmark

  1. Decrease number of days to process FAFSA after it is loaded into Banner from previous year.
  2. Zero audit findings.
  3. Below 25%.
  4. 40% of all eligible students will have a financial aid award.
  5. 75% student satisfaction rating

Results

  1. FAFSA processing times were between 2 days to 14 days.
  2. There was one audit finding in the A-133 Student Financial Aid audit FY2012.
  3. The student loan cohort default rate FY2011 was 12.3%
  4. 46% of all eligible students had a financial aid award FY2013.  1793 students were awarded financial aid and the unduplicated headcount FY2013 was 3938.
  5. Based on the 2012-2013 Financial Aid Office Survey, 100% of 3 students surveyed indicated overall satisfaction with the service they received from the Financial Aid office.

Action Plan

  1. We will continue to use the centralized FAFSA data load system and electronic notification letters started in FY2013.  
  2. We will continue to strive for clean audits and will implement corrective action plans for audit findings.   Funding will be sought to help maintain association dues (PACFAA, NASFAA) and provide for professional development where we can learn, exchange, implement best practices, concepts, and delivery of aid in an efficient manner and prevent audit findings.
  3. We will continue to manage the default rate through annual loan entrance counseling requirements, timely exit counseling notification, and use extended default management activities from student loan servicers.
  4. We will continue to notify students in a timely and consistent manner of unsatisfied FAFSA requirements that need completion.  We will send multiple email requests to students with outstanding requirements and assist them in completing the information needed for an award.
  5. FY2013, the Financial Aid Office went paperless in our communication with students.  Students awarded financial aid received an email award notification directing them to complete  a PDF survey form on the Financial Aid homepage.  FY2014, we will email the survey to all awarded students to generate a better response FY2014.

 

 

 

 

 

Table 4

Departmental Goals & Process Outcomes

Department: Counseling

Goal/outcome

  1. Provide Academic advising for every student at Windward Community College.
  2. Provide an Orientation for all new students.
  3. Provide Peer mentoring services for 200 students.
  4. Provide 15 student transfer workshops.
  5. Provide Classroom based student success for 50 students.
  6. 75% Satisfaction Rate

Measurement*

  1. Appointment Attendance Summary Report
  2. Attendance at NSOs.
  3. SARS track
  4. # of transfer workshops
  5. Enrollment in Fall & Spring IS103’s
  6. Counselor survey satisfaction question

Benchmark

  1. 80%
  2. 80%
  3. 200 appointments logged
  4. 15 workshops
  5. 50 students enrolled
  6. 75% satisfied or very satisfied ratings

Results

  1. From 8/1/2012 – 5/1/2013 2,964 students attended counseling appointments.  This over 80% of our student headcount (3560).
  2. 742 Students attended NSO (Nov-July), which is 87.7% of all New-to-College applicants.  422 Students attended Frosh Camp (F12), which is 67.5% of all New-to-College Fall applicants.  All students who did not attend Frosh Camp had holds placed on records until necessary components of FC were made up.
  3. Due to issues with our software which tracks student attendance at peer mentor appointments, this information was harder to track this year.  However, based on information that could be retrieved as well as hours worked, it is clear that the goal was met.
  4. 31 transfer workshops were held.
  5. 150 enrolled Fall 12, 19 in Spring 13.
  6. ??

Action Plan

  1. Continue to offer services.  Promote counseling appointments to students.
  2. Continue with mandatory NSO & Frosh Camp. Ensure that students who do not attend Frosh Camp receive some alternative interventions to promote their success.
  3. Find alternate tracking mechanism for peer mentoring.
  4. Continue transfer workshops.
  5. Continue IS103 in frosh cohorts.
  6. Maintain satisfaction garnering practices, including a student-centered approach to counseling.  Consider instituting a minimal number of counseling contact hours per week for each counselor.

 

 

  1. GET SATISFACTION RATING

 

Table 5

Departmental Goals & Process Outcomes

Department: Supplemental Instruction

Goal/outcome

  1. Increase the number of in-service trainings for SI leaders.
  2. Secure SI leaders 2 weeks prior to the first day of instruction.

Measurement*

  1. Count the number of in-service trainings held.
  2. Number of recommendations received.

Benchmark

  1. 2 In-service training sessions per semester.
  2. 80% of courses with SI will have an SI leader secured prior to the first day of instruction.

Results

  1. 0 In-service trainings.
  2. 50%

Action Plan

  1. Schedule 2 in-service trainings prior to the semester and have the SILs commit to those dates.
  2. Mandate that faculty members provide 2 SI leader recommendations per request.  Contact continuing faculty members one month prior to the following semester.

 

 

 

Table 6

Departmental Goals & Process Outcomes

Department: Educational Talent Search (TRiO)

Goal/outcome

  1. Both projects serve 1,000 participants (500 students per grant.)
  2. 67% of total served must meet low-income, first generation college status (LIFG.)
  3. 90% of students from sixth grade to eleventh grade will continue to the next grade level at the end of the academic year.
  4. 90% of seniors will graduate with a regular secondary school diploma within the standard number of years.
  5. 30% of graduation seniors will complete a rigorous secondary school program (i.e., Board of Education diploma.)
  6. 60% of graduating seniors will enroll in an institution of higher education by the fall term immediately following high school graduation

Measurement*

  1. Actual count of students who have received more or services with the program year (9/1/11 – 8/31/12)
  2. Actual count of students who have received more or services with the program year (9/1/11 – 8/31/12) and are deemed low income and first generation by federal TRIO guidelines.
  3. Actual count of students who have been promoted from one grade to the next.  
  4. Actual count of students who have completed the graduation requirements of a regular secondary school diploma.
  5. Actual count of students who have completed the requirements of the BOE diploma.
  6. Actual count of students who have enrolled in college.  

Benchmark

  1. 1,000 (500 participants grant)
  2. 333 out of 500
  3. 90%
  4. 90%
  5. 30%
  6. 60%

Results

  1. 1003 (503 – Honolulu project and 500 – Windward project)
  2. Honolulu – 73.2%; Windward – 68%
  3. Honolulu – 92%; Windward – 98%
  4. Honolulu – 98%; Windward – 98%
  5. Honolulu – 14%; Windward – 23% (not met, however, higher than comparison data for target schools).
  6. Honolulu – 75%; Windward – 72%

Action Plan

  1. Recruit new participants due to graduation of Seniors. Deliver college and career planning services to continuing participants.
  2. Recruit new LIFG participants due to graduation of Seniors. Deliver college and career planning services to continuing LIFG participants.
  3. Provide required and permissible services to increase student persistence in middle and high school. 
  4. Provide required and permissible services to increase high school graduation with a regular diploma.  
  5. Provide required and permissible services to increase high school graduation with BOE diploma. 
  6. Provide required and permissible services to increase senior college enrollment.  

 

 

 

Table 7

Departmental Goals & Process Outcomes

Department: Student Support Services (TRiO)

Goal/outcome

  1. 100% of the participants (250) that the project is funded to serve will be identified, screened, selected, and assessed for their academic need for services, and retained each year.
  2. 85% of the participants will maintain good academic standing (2.0 Cumulative GPA on a 4.0 scale) each year.
  3. 75% of all participants will persist from one academic year to the next academic year or graduate and/or transfer to a 4-year institution during.
  4. 10% of the cohort of new participants will graduate with a certificate or associate’s degree and 15% graduate and transfer to a four-year institution within 4 years.
  5. 100% of the program’s key personnel shall participate in the college’s governance structure to influence institutional policies that affect participants.

Measurement*

  1. Actual completed TRiO SSS applications.  Number of completed, screened, selected, and assessed applications.
  2. Recording participants’ cumulative GPA from WCCÊ»s transcript at the end of the summer session term.
  3. Recording participants’ Fall registration from WCCÊ»s transcript as of the last day to register for the Fall semester.
  4. Recording participants’ status from National Clearinghouse, UH system, and/or WCCÊ»s transcript for degree or registration status.
  5. Noting participation by program’s key personnel.

Benchmark

  1. 250 participants.
  2. 85% of the participants.
  3. 75% of the participants.
  4. 10% of the participants graduate and 15% graduate and transfer to a four-year institution.
  5. 100% of the program’s key personnel shall participate.

Results

  1. 254 participants.
  2. 99% of the participants.
  3. 89% of the participants.
  4. 35% of the participants graduated and 73% graduated and transferred to a four-year institution.
  5. 100% of the program’s key personnel participated in the governance structure by meeting with campus committees, the Vice-Chancellor for Student Affairs, and/or the Chancellor.

Action Plan

  1. Continue recruiting, screening, selecting, and assessing applications.
  2. – 4. Continue all of TRiO SSS’ services for participants.

5.  Key personnel of program will continue to participate in the college’s governance structure to influence institutional policies that affect participants.

 

 

 

Table 8

Departmental Goals & Process Outcomes

Department: TRIO-Upward Bound

Goal/outcome

  1. Serve high school students from low-income families and families where neither parent has earned a bachelor’s degree.
  2. Students served will have cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better at the end of the 2012-2013 school year.
  3. Students will score at the proficient level on the 10th grade Hawaii State Assessment exams in both reading/language arts and math.
  4. Students will be promoted to the next grade level or will graduate.
  5. Students who graduate high school will complete a rigorous high school curriculum.
  6. Students will enroll in college by the fall term immediately following expected high school graduation date.
  7. Students who enrolled in college during the fall term immediately following high school graduation will earn an associate’s degree or bachelor’s degree within six years of high school graduation.

Measurement*

  1. Family federal tax forms; parental declaration of educational attainment.
  2. Official high school transcripts.
  3. Official HSA scores from high schools.
  4. Official high school transcripts.
  5. Official high school transcripts showing courses completed; AP exam scores.
  6. UH STAR system data; National Student Clearinghouse data.
  7. UH STAR system data; National Student Clearinghouse data.

Benchmark

  1. 66% of students served must be LIFG.  The remaining 33% may be LI only or FG only.
  2. 80%
  3. 45%
  4. 95%
  5. 75%
  6. 70%
  7. 35%

Results

  1. 74% of students served were LIFG.
  2. 82%
  3. 44%
  4. 98%
  5. Data for 2012-2013 are still being gathered on this objective.
  6. 94%
  7. Data for 2012-2013 are still being gathered on this objective.

Action Plan

  1. Continue targeted recruitment and screening.
  2. Continue with intensive academic support and strategic recruiting.
  3. Increase tutoring component of UB program to include math tutoring at Saturday Academies.
  4. Continue with intensive academic support.
  5. Continue with academic advisement on high school course selection.
  6. Continue with intensive program services.

 

 

 

 

Part III. Action Plan

Action Plan

Generally, all areas of Student Affairs are healthy and meeting projected outcomes.  Thus, our current processes will largely continue.  Admissions and Records will also work to refine their paperless environment.  Financial Aid will seek to reach a greater number of students with its satisfaction survey via directly emailing the survey rather than a PDF form.  They will also seek professional development funding to help further learn best practices and resources to avoid audit findings.  Counselors will consider their workloads and the possibility of specifying a given number of hours as minimal student contact hours per week.  Supplemental Instruction will work with faculty to increase SI use through policies (e.g. mandated attendance, incorporating SI in class) and will attempt to schedule earlier to help overcome space issues.  There will also be increased training and supervision of SI.  Disabilities will work to ensure that students, other college counselors, and staff collaborate to utilize all resources that WCC has to offer by promoting our assistive technology lab and providing professional development at convocation for all staff.  Student Life is currently undergoing a renewed visioning process to create a mission statement and outcomes which best reflect their current practice and goals for increased engagement.  Our TRiO programs will work to overcome budgetary shortfalls created by federal sequestration through leveraging partnerships for resources and creating economy where possible rather than cutting services.  TRiO SSS specifically will investigate further resources for homeless students and consider how to best serve their educational needs.  Each of these specific actions with our areas helps to maintain and expand the excellence and services of Student Affairs at Windward Community College.

 

 

Part IV. Resource Implications

Resource Implications

Based on the outcome attainment noted above, Student Affairs seeks funding for a number of positions and resources.  Categories given are personnel and other.  Each category has been ranked by Student Affairs (quarterly meeting vote 11/15/2013), where the most important item is listed first in the category and then so on in descending order.

 

Personnel:

Admissions & Records Assistant Registrar (1.0FTE APT A)

This position supports:

 

Recruitment & Outreach Assistant

This position supports:

Mental Health Counselor

Continued funding for mental health services ($45,000 contractual) to provide and make permanent WCC student mental health services which are on par with other UHCC's.  Mental Health issues are not something that should be dealt with on an ad hoc basis at an institution.  Until we make this position permanent, we are failing students in crisis and those with longer term mental health issues as an institution.  This impacts WCC's ability to meet strategic outcomes for success and graduation (UHCC 2.4, WCC 2.6), retention (WCC 2.5), and transfer (WCC2.7).  It is particularly burdensome given our strategic outcomes for enrollment increases (UHCC 2.1, WCC 2.1).  As we attempt to increase enrollment in line with UHCC strategic outcome (2.1) and WCC action outcome (2.1), we are likely to see an increase in mental health needs at WCC that continues to be unmet.  Once enrolled, it will be difficult for students with these needs to find the services necessary for their mental health needs which will allow them to achieve academic success.  Thus, we will impact the college's ability to meet strateigic outcomes for success and graduation (UHCC 2.4, WCC 2.6), retention (WCC 2.5), and transfer (WCC 2.7).

 

Thus, it is suggested that we permanently allocate funding to contract with UHM for limited services of a mental health professional who will provide regular office hours, limited acute care, collect data to assess mental health needs on campus, and work toward creating protocols and policies for mental health at WCC.  This is a low cost and feasible strategy to begin to pro-actively address a hole in services for students that could create a major liability issue for the college.  It is also an opportunity to provide our students what they need, what every other institution in the system has recognized as critical, and to do so proactively.

 

Assistive Technology Specialist (1.0 FTE APT A)

This position will continue providing assistive technology service for students with disabilities.  Currently, this is provided through a Perkins grant.  Previously, this was provided as a temporary hire that was continually rehired, which is inappropriate.  Disability accommodations are legally mandated by Titles II and III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act.  These provide that public post-secondary programs must provide aids and services to ensure effective communication:

 

Qualified interpreters, assistive listening systems, captioning, TTYs, qualified readers, audio recordings, taped texts, Braille materials, large print materials, materials on computer disk, and adapted computer terminals are examples of auxiliary aids and services that provide effective communication. Such services must be provided unless doing so would result in a fundamental alteration of the program or would result in undue financial or administrative burdens. [Note: According to a 1992 publication on the ADA and postsecondary education by the Association on Higher Education and Disability (AHEAD), the Department of Education has never accepted an argument for undue financial burden under Section 504.] Public entities must give primary consideration to the individual with a disability's preferred form of communication unless it can be demonstrated that another equally effective means of communication exists.

(www.pacer.org/publications/adaqa/504.asp)

 

 

This position supports WCC strategic action outcomes (2.1) to increase enrollment, particularly from underserved groups, (2.3) to increase number of students who complete developmental reading, (2.4) increase...students who complete at least 20 credits in the first academic year with a G.P.A of 2.0 or higher, (2.5) increase the number of students who reenroll in the Spring semester and persist until Fall, and (2.6) increase the number of students who receive degrees or certificates.  Timely and appropriate accommodations, as well as access to assistive technologies, allows students with disabilities to succeed.  This supports all of our General Education and A.A. outcomes.  It specifically supports Gen Ed Outcomes related to Communication and Critical Thinking and Creativity.  It also address the Student Affairs Learning Outcome: Students will access appropriate information and resources to support their academic journey.

 

 

Tutoring Coordinator (1.0 FTE APT A)

A 1.0 FTE eleven-month faculty is required to coordinate tutoring services in the Ka Piko Student Success Center housed in the LLC. This is a restructured service that will be available to all students at the College and meets the crucial need on campus for tutoring and mentoring services to help student succeed. The coordinator will lead and manage the all tutoring services in the Ka Piko Student Success Center. The coordinator will handle initial intake and referral to other offices, provide general tutor training, schedule student staffing of the English, math, speech and possibly other subject labs, conduct assessment activities for annual reports, such as the ARPD, Academic Affairs.

 

 

 

Other:

Tutoring & Supplemental Instruction Student Hours $80,000

Tutoring and Supplemental Instruction, as shown in the above evaluation of process outcomes as well as in the SLO section, consistently increase student academic achievement at WCC. These strategies have a proven success record and are necessary to meet Strategic Outcomes for success and graduation (UHCC 1.4, 2.4, WCC 1.4, 1.6, 2.4, 2.6, 4.8), retention ((WCC 1.5, 2.5), and transfer (WCC 1.7, 2.7).  These services also directly address WCC's action outcome (1.5) to provide tutoring and mentoring activities and (4.9) to increase our support for learners score on CCSSE.  However, both TRiO SSS and SI are completely federally funded initiatives at WCC.  Furthermore, by definition, SSS cannot serve all students at WCC (gap in coverage) and does not technically have the funds to even provide the amount of tutoring currently conducted. A counselor position was kept vacant and the funds were used for tutoring as demand fro tutoring has almost tripled. The original budget was $39,653 and an average of $105,293 was spent on tutor salaries these past two years.

 

Commencement $5000

The request for an annual line item to support the implementation of the annual WCC Commencement Ceremonies including printing, entertainment, supplies, and refreshments.  The event is a highly visible opportunity for students, faculty and the community to recognize the achievement of their degree or certificate.  Participation in the commencement ceremony embodies the culmination and symbolic experience of completing one more step towards their goals.  It supports UH System Strategic Outcome 2.4 (progress and graduation or transfer to baccalaureate institutions).  It also supports WCC Action Outcomes: 2.6 (increase the number of students who receive degrees or certificates) and 2.7 (increase the number of transfers to UH System and non-system baccalaureate institutions who achieve an average GPA of 3.14).

 

Childcare:  While not an immediate budgetary item, Student Affairs would like to investigate needs and potential solutions in 2013-14 to present  for action in 2014-15.

 

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

Yes
Student Affairs Learning Outcome: Students will access appropriate information and resources to support their academic journey.

2

Yes
Recruitment and Outreach: Students participating in all day college awareness event will demonstrate understanding of the college application process.

3

Yes
Admissions & Records: Students will demonstrate mastery of the online application process.

4

Yes
Financial Aid: Students will access financial aid resources.

5

Yes
Counseling Learning Outcome: Students will access accurate and appropriate information with regard to Academic Status, Resource Availability and their Next Step in their Educational Plan.

6

Yes
Counseling Learning Outcome: Students will develop critical thinking through Identifying Resources; Evaluating Options; Establishing Priorities; Designing Education Plans and Implementing Actions.

7

Yes
Student Life:Students will participate in student government, clubs, and sponsored events.

8

Yes
TRiO Area SLO: demonstrate preparation for post-secondary education by submitting an accurate and completed FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid).

9

Yes
Career & Transfer: Students will register with our Career Services software which provides access to resources (e.g. skills inventories, resume builders, employer database).

10

Yes
Disabilities Services: Students with disabilities will demonstrate knowledge of how to access reasonable accommodations.

11

Yes
Supplemental Instruction: Students who teach Supplemental Instruction will recognize potential barriers to first year student success as well as strategies to mitigate these issues.

12

Yes
Frosh Camp STAR Workshops: Students will utilize STAR to inquire about information relevant to their academic planning (e.g. GPA, transfer, and required courses).

13

Yes
Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs: Students will articulate 3 behaviors that can effectively prevent subsequent special requests.

A) Expected Level Achievement

1. The General Student Affairs Learning Outcome is holistically assessed.  It is expected that we will meet benchmarks for 70% of the SLO's assessed within Student Affairs.

2. 70%

3. 90% of previous year’s total

4. Increased percentage of accurate completed FAFSA’s by priority deadline

5. 80%

6. 80%

7. 400 students participate in student government sponsored events

8. 70%

9. 100 students

10. 70%

11. 70%

12. 80% of students complete at least 80% of questions (4/5) correctly

13. 70%

 

B) Courses Assessed

The SLO's are not measured in courses but rather events, activities, and programming.

C) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

  1. Results of assessments for all SLO’s withing Student Affairs
  2. # of completed applications at given event (to at least one UH institution)
  3. # of complete, accurate applications
  4. Number of completed FAFSA applications
  5. Q1 on post-counseling survey, each counselor tracks documents desired/given for information for 1 day in semester
  6. Q3, Q4 post-counseling survey
  7. Scanned i.d.’s at events
  8. Actual completed FAFSA applications.  Number of completed applications.
  9. 100 students register in first year
  10. Post-disabilities counseling survey indicating knowledge of rights (Q1), services available (Q2), and self-report of process for obtaining accommodation (Q3)
  11.  Supplemental Instructor’s Survey
  12. Post STAR training quiz
  13. Oral quiz at end of special request interview for all students selected for interview (e.g. those deemed to have preventable request).

D) Results of Program Assessment

  1. All SLO benchmarks were met for Student Affairs.  Thus, our general Student Affairs outcomes has been exceeded.
  2. 93% (212) of those attending the Castle Senior Day at Kaneohe Marine Corps Base completed an application.
  3. In Fall 2012, the total application processed = 1697, accepted = 1444, denied = 5 (dismissed students), incomplete = 248 (34 were due to Change of Home Institution/already accepted at another CC).  In Spring 2013, the total application processed = 837, accepted = 669, denied = 3 (dismissed students), incomplete = 165 (16 were due to Change of Home Institution/already accepted at another CC). 
  4. In 2009-2010, 721 applications were completed by 4/1, as compared to 1032 in 2010-2011, 1,298 in 2011-2012, and 1,478 in 2012-2013 (3222 total apps).  Slight increase in percentage (44% to 46% between FY2012 and FY2013) and large increase in number of priority deadline complete. 
  5. 100% agree or completely agree.
  6. 93% on Q3 and 93% on Q4 agree or completely agree.
  7. 2833 Total student participation
  8. TBA
  9. 525 students registered with CSO.  (903 total systemwide active contacts with employers)
  10. 100% (8 total) correctly answered Q1 and Q2.  100% agreed or strongly agreed that they knew how to ask for reasonable accommodations (Q3).
  11. 100% (21) Supplemental Instructors surveyed listed 3 barriers to success and three strategies to mitigate these.
  12. 100% (359) of participants at Fall 2013 Frosh Camp STAR workshops were able to complete the assessment with 100% accuracy with minimal prompting.
  13. 100% of students articulated these 3 behaviors at the end of special request interview. 

 

E) Other Comments

Student Affairs has significantly increased Student Learning Outcome assessment in 2012-13.  

 

F) Next Steps

  1. As this was the first year of assessing SLO’s in every department of Student Affairs, next year, as a Division, we must be careful to ensure this process is institutionalized and made sustainable.  We will consider how to assess outcomes on a rotational basis, rather than all 13 per year each year.
  2. A. Consider possibility of future such events for a greater number of area high schools.  (Added Kailua Senior Celebration Day in April 2013)  B. Monitor number matriculated of those who applied.
  3. A. Set as benchmark for next year.  B. Continue to work with system to improve areas in application that have high error rates or cause difficulties.  For example, the Registrar provided significant input on the Residency section in this iteration because it was ambiguous and caused students issues.  It has been improved for next year.
  4. Continue to maintain accessibility and financial aid outreach (TRIO SSS, ETS, UB, PACFAA, ʻAhaʻs, NSO).  Considering the past 4 years, we can see large increases in applications by priority deadline.  At this point, we may be reaching a maximimum and may have to change our benchmark from increasing the percentage to ʻmaintaining the percentage.ʻ  We will observe in FY14.
  5. Need to collect this data once every fall and spring for two weeks.  This way, we can compare results and initiate corrective action, should there be a trend toward lower ratings in any areas. We also agreed to be open to new ideas of even better ways to assess the effectiveness of what we do.
  6. Need to collect this data once every fall and spring for two weeks.  This way, we can compare results and initiate corrective action, should there be a trend toward lower ratings in any areas. We also agreed to be open to new ideas of even better ways to assess the effectiveness of what we do.
  7. Far exceeded projections (2012-13).  Continue events at multiple campus locations with thematic programming.  Discuss increasing benchmark with ASUH in Fall 2013.
  8. Continue financial literacy and access programming.
  9. Continue to promote in conjunction with ASUH sponsored events.  Continue to offer overviews in Intro to College classes.  Present at Frosh Camp regarding Career Services.  Next year goal will be 100 NEW registrants.
  10. Continue effective practices for disabilities counseling.  Consider when to implement survey next year to reach larger number of students.
  11. Continue with rigorous Supplemental Instructor training. 
  12. Continue to offer STAR workshops at Frosh Camp for ALL participants.  Provide additional workshops in semester for those who missed workshops.
  13. Consider creating a web-based version of this topic for those students who receive special requests but do not need to come for interview.