University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Student Services Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: Kapiolani Community College
Program: Student Services

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The last comprehensive review for this program was on 2013, and can be viewed at:
http://ofie.kapiolani.hawaii.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/cpr2013studentservices1.pdf

Program Description

Counseling Services Overview

The College provides counseling and advising services through a decentralized organizational model, with counselors assigned to departments and units as follows:

•Maida Kamber Center (career, transfer and graduation advising services) – 7.0 FTE positions

•Business, Legal, and Technology Education: Culinary Arts; and Hospitality – 4.0 FTE positions

•Emergency Medical Services, Health Sciences, and Nursing – 4.0 FTE positions

•Kahikoluamea, First Year and Pathways Student Support Services Program  - 5.0 FTE positions

•International Programs – 2.0 FTE positions

 

Counselors assigned to the Student Services Unit provide specialized and targeted services in response to student needs as follows:

Student Services Program (Targeted Populations Counseling) – 13.0 FTE positions

Our mission is to provide student-centered services and activities and to collaborate with other campus units to promote the understanding of our student needs and support student holistic development. We accomplish our mission through an integrated approach designed to address the needs of our diverse student population and engagement in the learning process by:

*Providing services and activities to support and retain students in our target populations;

*Assisting students in the identification, pursuit, and attainment of their educational, career and life goals;

*Encouraging student self-development by supporting the acquisition of individual skills; and

*Fostering a climate which respects diversity and encourages self-exploration and learning.

Student Services consists of programs which are funded and assessed individually. They are:

Kuilei Outreach Program: Kuilei provides a package of integrated services with the goal of increasing the number of high school students who enter into postsecondary education integrating campus tours, financial aid counseling services, COMPASS testing at the high school, and early career awareness to streamline the transition of students into our first-year experience program. Kuilei also provides early college awareness opportunities to select middle schools. 

Single Parents/Displaced Homemaker Program:  The Single Parents and Displaced Homemakers program provides support and services to single parents or displaced homemakers to help them gain marketable skills that will lead to economic self-sufficiency. Services include assistance in completing federal financial aid forms, career and personal counseling, textbook assistance, scholarship search assistance and referrals to community resources in areas such as child care, welfare assistance, domestic violence, legal services and housing. Violence prevention and sexual assault prevention activities are also integrated into this program.  Assistance with campus employment for Department of Human Services First to Work recipients is also provided under the Bridge to Hope program.

Transfer Year Experience Program: The Transfer Year Experience Program provides college-wide assistance to students transferring to Kapi`olani Community College through the matriculation process. Program services to transfer students include outreach and assistance through the admissions and financial aid processes, orientation to the College, and academic advising. The mission of the Transfer Year Experience Program is to create proactive, diversified, and comprehensive services that support transfer students through matriculation to Kapi`olani Community College.

Military and Veterans Program (MVP): To provide services for the military service members, veterans, and dependents of veterans.  These services include: (1)To ensure all eligible Veterans of the United States Armed Forces and their eligible dependents are informed of the Veterans educational benefits available through Kapi‘olani Community College; (2) To provide for efficient and orderly processes of application for and certification of Veterans educational benefits, the evaluation of all prior coursework from previously attended educational institutions, and the application of that coursework to their current educational program as mandated by the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs; (3) Answer all related military questions such as Tuition Assistance, Kicker, and other similar benefits; and (4) To adhere to all applicable federal laws, regulations, and policies. 

Disability Support Services Office (DSSO):
Kapi‘olani Community College (KCC) is committed to a barrier-free campus, ensuring that all students have equal access to education. KCC agrees to make academic adjustments to ensure non-discrimination of students with disabilities. This commitment is in accordance with applicable state and federal laws, including the Americans with Disabilities Act, and Sections 504 and 508 of the Rehabilitation Act.

TRIO Student Support Services: TRIO helps students attain their academic goal of graduation or graduation and transfer to a baccalaureate institution within four years. To be eligible, students must qualify as low-income as defined by the federal government or be a first-generation student (parent or legal guardian do not have a baccalaureate degree) and/or have a documented disability and be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident. Students must take an English placement test and place at the English 22 level or higher, enroll as a full-time student and have academic need as defined by the program. The program is funded by the U.S. Department of Education.

Kulia Ma Kapi‘olani, or the Native Hawaiian Career & Technical Education Project: The Native Hawaiian Career and Technical Education Project is a federally funded partnership between Alu Like Inc. and Kapi‘olani Community College. The goal of the project is to assist native Hawaiian students to successfully gain admission to, graduate from, and find employment in a career and technical education program. “Native Hawaiian” is defined as any individual whose ancestors were natives of the area that now comprises the State of Hawai‘i, prior to 1778. Services include academic & tutorial support, computer resources, peer mentoring, financial aid and scholarship application assistance, internship development/stipend assistance and job readiness services.

First Year Experience: The college offers a First Year Experience Program under the Kahikoluamea Department. The program sets out to welcome sutdents from all levels of preparedness and experience and serves as a bridge for their transition into colelge. The program provides sutdents with the learning tools, training, and support necessary for the jouney toward academic and personal success. Upon completing the first year, students will have the direction and the skills necessary to move forward on their learning and personal paths. FYE activities include high school liaison, new student orientation, prescriptive advising into required courses on a reserved searing basis during the first semester, summer bridge for transition into KCC as well as college skills classes. 

In total, 31.0 FTE student support services personnel positions are funded by general funds and 4.0 FTE are funded by federal funds.

In this decentralized model, student services personnel in the academic clusters share the responsibility for student success with instructional faculty. Discussions about student access, progress, learning and success take place in department meetings. 

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

 
Demand Indicators Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 Annual Headcount ALL Students 12,054 11,628 11,181
2 Annual Headcount NH Students 2,170 2,166 2,007
3    Actual Percent Change from Prior Year ALL 2% -4% -4%
4    Actual Percent Change from Prior Year NH 30% -0% -7%
5 Annual Headcount of Recent Hawaii High School Graduates 907 852 917
6    Percent of Service Area's Recent High School Graduates 8% 8% 8%
7 Annual Headcount of Students 25-49 Years Old 4,273 2,888 2,627
8 Annual Headcount from Underserved Regions 2,218 1,460 1,299
9 Annual Headcount in STEM programs 1,100 847 836
10a Fall
Semester
Registration Status
New Students 1,421 1,295 1,470
10b Transfers Students 1,243 1,065 1,079
10c Continuing Students 4,243 4,228 4,008
10d Returning Students 449 456 450
10e Home Campus Other 1,945 1,979 1,885
11a Spring
Semester
Registration Status
New Students 373 361 391
11b Transfers Students 656 652 620
11c Continuing Students 5,295 5,032 4,921
11d Returning Students 296 274 292
11e Home Campus Other 2,116 2,036 1,721

Efficiency Indicators Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
12 Pell Participation Rate ALL Students 28% 30% 33%  
13 Pell Participation Rate NH Students 33% 33% 37%
14 Number ALL Students Receiving Pell 1,665 1,718 1,898
15 Number NH Students Receiving Pell 357 375 413
16 Total Pell Disbursed ALL $5,172,415 $5,505,467 $6,181,247
17 Total Pell Disbursed NH $1,101,577 $1,176,645 $1,342,938
18 Overall Program Budget Allocation $1,791,961 $1,388,939 $1,355,578
19 General Funded Budget Allocation $1,196,834 $863,735 $822,064
20 Special/Federal Budget Allocation $0 $0 $0
21 Cost Per Student $149 $119 $121
Achieving the Dream AtD Fall Cohort
2009 2010 2011
22 FT AtD Cohort (ALL) complete 20 credits first year 385 441 395
23 FT AtD Cohort (NH) complete 20 credits first year 45 76 72
24 PT AtD Cohort (ALL) complete 12 credits first year 231 247 249
25 PT AtD Cohort (NH) complete 12 credits first year 42 47 51
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: March 14, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
26 Persistence Fall to Spring ALL Students 70% 69% 69%  
27 Persistence Fall to Spring NH 67% 66% 68%
28 Degrees & Certificates Awarded ALL 851 987 1,193
29 Degrees & Certificates Awarded NH 115 139 149
30 Degrees & Certificates in STEM ALL 238 281 307
31 Degrees & Certificates in STEM NH 32 42 48
32 Transfers to UH 4-yr ALL 388 499 535
33 Transfers to UH 4-yr NH 58 74 87

Community College Survey
of Student Engagement (CCSSE)
Survey Year  
2008 2010 2012
34 Support for Learners Benchmark (Percentile) 70 40 40  
Means Summary All Students ( 1 = Not at all/Rarely, 2 = Sometimes/Somewhat, 3 = Often/Very )
35 Academic Advising      
  Frequency 1.71 1.72 1.70
  Satisfaction 2.31 2.19 2.25
  Importance 2.54 2.59 2.60
36 Career Counseling      
  Frequency 1.51 1.50 1.48
  Satisfaction 2.19 2.10 2.15
  Importance 2.39 2.50 2.49
37 Job Placement Assistance      
  Frequency 1.18 1.25 1.17
  Satisfaction 1.91 1.76 1.72
  Importance 1.94 2.14 2.14
38 Financial Aid Advising      
  Frequency 1.44 1.53 1.62
  Satisfaction 2.09 2.01 2.06
  Importance 2.33 2.37 2.43
39 Student Organizations      
  Frequency 1.25 1.31 1.31
  Satisfaction 2.06 1.89 1.98
  Importance 1.90 1.97 1.96
40 Transfer Credit Assistance      
  Frequency 1.52 1.50 1.48
  Satisfaction 2.09 1.98 2.02
  Importance 2.38 2.36 2.39
41 Services for People With Disabilities      
  Frequency 1.20 1.28 1.23
  Satisfaction 1.94 1.99 1.96
  Importance 2.01 2.16 2.16
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: March 14, 2014

Glossary

Part II. Analysis of the Program

Analysis of Demand Indicators (Cautionary)

Analysis of college enrollment demand data indicates that student headcount declined by 447 (-4%) in 2012-13 from the previous year. This is the second year in a row that enrollment has declined by a factor of 4%. As predicted last year, enrollment is on a slow decline which is consistent and has triggered a closer look at campus plans for activities to improve this picture.

Native Hawaiian enrollment at the college declined by 159 (-7%) indicating that a larger share of the overall enrollment decline is from this targeted group. The decline in Native Hawaiian enrollment was also seen at the three other Oahu UHCC campuses, although the decline was greatest at Kapi`olani.  At the same time, the Pell participation rate for Native Hawaiian students declined for the third year in a row (26%, 18%, 16%) while the overall Pell participation rate remained steady at 33%. The lack of financial aid support could perceivably account for the leveling off of Native Hawaiian enrollment. The Native Hawaiian Career Technical Educational Project (NHCTEP) has been exceptionally successful in achiveing persistence rates of 98% for its population and the Project Coordinator monitors GPA rates of its participants. The College also offers a donor-funded Lunalilo Scholars program, predominantly serving Native Hawaiian students, which has also achieved exceptional success rates for first year students. Both NHCTEP and Lunalilo offer case management approaches to student success. Given the success rates of NHCTEP and Lunalilo Scholars, the College just recently took steps to allocate 2.0 FTE positions to establish a Native Hawaiian Student Success Program which expands support services to Native Hawaiian students through expansion of the college's best practice models for student support services.

Kapi`olani  has maintained a solid 8% rate in the percentage of high school graduates in our service area attending the college. ARPD data indicates a slight increase in the total number of student graduating from our service area  high schools although it’s unclear whether this increase is part of a trend on Oahu or unique to the geographic area covered by the college.  Overall enrollment of high school graduates coming directly to Kapi`olani from all public and private high schools increased by 96 students which suggests that our Kuilei Outreach Program to our local service area schools is making a difference in working with students from an early age to improve college readiness..

Unlike other Oahu campuses, Kapi‘olani has experienced a decline in students from underserved regions which would be the Leeward Coast.for the third year in a row. The enrollment growth at UH West O‘ahu may be a factor in this decline for this campus as more students find classes they need closer to their home. This is a strategic plan goal that this campus has not invested in terms of marketing or outreach strategies and will need more study in the future to determine what direction is needed if we are to meet system goals.

Finally, Kapi`olani maintained its STEM enrollment after a significant decline in the previous year which can be attributed to the outstanding quality of our STEM Program in attracting majors during a period of decline in other STEM fields such as nursing and certain health science areas.

In terms of student type:

 

Based on the data, the college is experiencing enrollment decline specifically in continuing and not home-based students. These trends in particular are not seen at other Oahu campuses which indicates that a different marketing and outreach strategy is needed for this campus. The college is currently working with a local research firm to do a marketing study and will build a plan to recapture enrollment in targeted areas for the 2014-15 academic year.

As a result of last year's ARPD request, the college allocated 1.0 FTE position to the  FYE program to improve entry services to first year students with the goal of improving their persistence from the fall to fall. Given that the number of first year students is increasing, the college will be placing emphasis on improving processes and procedures for making stronger connections from high school to college. Currently 60% of our first year students come directly from high school.

Analysis of Efficiency Indicators (Healthy)

Analysis of College efficiency data indicates a steady 3% improvement in the awarding of financial aid although the number of Native Hawaiian students receiving aid at the college shows a continued decline. The college is in the second year of the “centralized financial aid awarding pilot project” which began in July 2012. The College received assistance from two UH system staff members and was able to double the number of recent high school graduates receiving aid by August 1st in comparison to the previous year, going from 20% to 40%. Although this is a significant accomplishment at the College, we continue to remain below standard when compared to other campuses within the UH community college system. This is an area that needs further improvement including improved training to staff members given the continuous turnover among the five full time positions allocated to that unit.

Analysis of AtD cohort  reveals that full time students did not make gains in the completion of 20 credits in the first year for both categories  - all students and Native Hawaiian students. For part time students, however, the picture differs. Overall gains have been modest at 1% for all students and 10% for Native Hawaiian students. Conducting surveys and focus groups of full time versus part time Native Hawaiian students may reveal differences in characteristics which might account for the difference in credit attainment.

Analysis of Effectiveness Indicators (Healthy)

The college's student persistence from fall to spring was level for all students and up 2% for Native Hawaiian students. In contrast, both cohorts showed an increase for a second year in a row in degrees/certificates earned at 21% for all students and 7% for Native Hawaiian students. STEM degrees and certificates increased by 9% for all students and 14% for Native Hawaiian students. Recent improvements in the awarding process, including auto-graduation and reverse transfer, have resulted in more students receiving degrees/certificates that they were not aware they had earned. Recent improvements to STAR Advisor have made a positive impact on students’ abilities to self-advise their course selection process during registration by establishing STAR Journey plans to chart their course toward graduation in a timely manner.

Transfer rates continue to have a positive trend with an approximate 7% increase in transfers for all students and 17% increase for Native Hawaiian students. The college’s investment in additional staffing at the MKC Transfer Center and the recent hiring of a UHM Transfer Counselor who is located at the college have boosted the efforts began in 2008 to establish Ka`ie`ie Degree Pathway and other two-to-four year transfer pathways to four year campuses in the system.

The effectiveness of the college’s support for learners is reflected in the CCSSE scores which for the 2012 survey was benchmarked against institution in the category of “large colleges”. Several patterns emerge in the analysis of the data. The next CCSSE survey will be administered in 2012 and will be analyzed in the 2014 ARPD.

The FYE and TYE programs have collected historical data on both populations given the increasing numbers of new students entering the college in both spring and fall semesters. For both programs, the Coordinators have been focusing on increasing the percentage of students who complete their Foundation Writing and Symbolic Reasoning courses in the first year, increasing the number of students who receive their financial aid awards before the first day of instruction, increasing time to degree by enrolling on a full time basis, improving persistence rates, and completing all classes enrolled for that term. Achievement data provided below assists the Coordinators in making program-related decisions based on student performance measures.

First-Year Student Performance Measures

 

Fall 2009 Cohort

Fall 2010 Cohort

Fall 2011 Cohort

Fall 2012 Cohort

Fall 2013 Cohort

Number of Students in Cohort

1,395

1,373

1,244

1,374

1,297

Students with 67% or More of Their Courses with a C or Better in the Fall Term

774 / 1,395

(55.48%)

817 / 1,373

(59.50%)

804 / 1,244

(64.63%)

875 / 1,374

(63.68%)

February

Students with 67% or More of Their Courses with a C or Better in the Spring Term

569 / 1,091

(52.15%)

593 / 1,050

(56.48%)

578 / 963

(60.02%)

615 / 1,044

(58.91%)

July

 

         

Mean and Median GPA During Fall Term

2.059 / 2.250

2.287 / 2.500

2.345 / 2.679

2.295 / 2.600

February

Mean and Median GPA During Spring Term

2.013 / 2.250

2.153 / 2.400

2.287 / 2.538

2.260 / 2.500

July

Mean and Median GPA During First Academic Year at KapCC

1.967 / 2.091

2.141 / 2.316

2.226 / 2.500

2.187 / 2.426

October

Students Completing FW (Foundation Written Communication) Requirement by the End of the First Academic Year

AtD Goal 2 

562 / 1,395

(40.29%)

585 / 1,373

(42.61%)

584 / 1,244

(46.95%)

586 / 1,374

(42.65%)

October

Students Completing FS (Foundation Symbolic Reasoning) Requirement by the End of the First Academic Year

AtD Goal 2 

226 / 1,395

(16.20%)

268 / 1,373

(19.52%)

269 / 1,244

(21.62%)

286 / 1,374

(20.82%)

October

Fall to Spring Reenrollment

AtD Goal 4 

1,091 / 1,366

(79.87%)

1,050 / 1,351

(77.72%)

963 / 1,226

(78.55%)

1,044 / 1,351

(77.28%)

February

Spring to Fall Reenrollment

 

737 / 1,030

(71.55%)

710 / 988

(71.86%)

709 / 900

(78.78%)

735 / 972

(75.62%)

October

Recent HS Graduates Enrolling in 12 or more Credits in the Fall 

551 / 931

(59.18%)

519 / 866

(59.93%)

464 / 800

(58.00%)

558 / 869

(64.21%)

530 / 783

(67.69%)

Recent HS Graduates Awarded Federal Financial Aid Before First Day of Instruction 

163 / 931

(17.51%)

160 / 866

(18.48%)

146 / 800

(18.25%)

367 / 869

(42.23%)

385 / 783

(49.17%)

Recent HS Graduates Awarded Federal Financial Aid Before August 1st

139 / 931

(14.93%)

121 / 866

(13.97%)

95 / 800

(11.88%)

181 / 869

(20.83%)

335 / 783

(42.78%)

 

Transfer-In Student Performance Measures

 

Fall 2011 Cohort

Spring 2012 Cohort

Fall 2012 Cohort

Spring 2013

Cohort

Fall 2013 Cohort

Number of Students in Cohort

1,065

652

1,079

620

1,036

Number of Students with Transfer Credits Awarded

655 / 1,065

(61.50%)

456 / 652

(69.94%)

721 / 1,079

(66.82%)

453 / 620

(73.06%)

748 / 1,036

(72.20%)

Mean and Median Transfer Credits Awarded

32.15 / 25.00

35.43 / 25.00

33.62 / 27.00

34.84 / 28.67

34.67 / 27.00

Students with 67% or More of Their Courses with a C or Better in the Transfer Term

668 / 1,065

(62.73%)

403 / 652

(61.81%)

661 / 1,079

(61.26%)

429 / 620

(69.19%)

February

Students with 67% or More of Their Courses with a C or Better in the Next Term

448 / 647

(69.24%)

235 / 348

(67.53%)

456 / 679

(67.16%)

February

July

 

         

Mean and Median Credits Earned During Transfer Term

6.12 / 6.00

6.04 / 6.00

6.13 / 6.00

6.10 / 6.00

February

Mean and Median Credits Earned During Next Term

6.92 / 6.00

6.50 / 6.00

6.85 / 6.00

February

July

Mean and Median GPA During Transfer Term

2.507 / 3.000

2.550 / 3.000

2.424 / 2.833

2.622 / 3.000

February

Mean and Median GPA During Next Term

2.650 / 3.000

2.625 / 3.000

2.502 / 3.000

February

July

Mean and Median GPA During First Academic Year at KapCC

2.465 / 2.857

2.511 / 3.000

2.387 / 2.667

February

October

Students Completing FW (Foundation Written Communication) Requirement by the End of the Transfer Term

AtD Goal 2 

446 / 1,065

(41.88%)

307 / 652

(47.09%)

484 / 1,079

(44.86%)

312 / 620

(50.32%)

February

Students Completing FS (Foundation Symbolic Reasoning) Requirement by the End of the Transfer Term

AtD Goal 2 

330 / 1,065

(30.99%)

221 / 652

(33.90%)

362 / 1,079

(33.55%)

238 / 620

(38.39%)

February

Reenrollment in Next Term

AtD Goal 4 

647 / 1,005

(64.38%)

348 / 594

(58.59%)

679 / 1,025

(66.24%)

327 / 551

(59.35%)

February

Transfer Students Awarded Federal Financial Aid Before First Day of Instruction

79 / 1,065

(7.42%)

54 / 652

(8.28%)

240 / 1,079

(22.24%)

130 / 620

(20.97%)

321 / 1,036

(30.98%)

Transfer Students Awarded Federal Financial Aid Before August 1st (Fall Cohort) or December 1st (Spring Cohort)

35 / 1,065

(3.29%)

24 / 652

(3.68%)

65 / 1,079

(6.02%)

60 / 620

(9.68%)

269 / 1,036

(25.97%)

           

Part III. Action Plan

1. Enrollment Marketing:  In response to declines in demand in some areas, Student Services is collaborating with the College's marketing coordinators on a plan that seeks to develop a brand for the college and reach out to new target populations. A survey was conducted by SMS Research in spring 2013 and the findings have been discussed collegewide with input being forwarded through administrative and governance channels to determine marketing and outreach strategies/steps to be taken by the college.

2. Financial Services: The College will continue to work in collaboration with UHCC staff on improving the Financial Aid Centralizatio Project. Financial Aid student participation rates for first year students and transfer-in students have increased as a direct result of the centralization efforts (see FY and TY data tables above) and will be tracked during the 2014-15 award year. The decline (line 15) in Native Hawaiian students received Pell Grants, however, needs to be addressed.

3. Auto-Graduation and Reverse Transfer: In terms of program effectiveness, the College will continue its participation in reverse transfer degree processing, auto graduation of degrees/credentials and  Ka`ie`ie, all of which have served to boost our transfer and graduation rates over the past three semesters. 

4. Targeted Populations Action Plans based on analysis of program data: 

Action Plans for TRIO, Mental Health and Native Hawaiian Student Services are avaialble through their Program Coordinators.

Part IV. Resource Implications

At the college level, funds are needed for strategies to boost enrollment which could include more outreach and marketing support. For 2013-14, focus will be on incoming high school student population and we are requesting a permanent 1.0 FTE position for our Kuilei Outreach Program to implement action strategies with our Department of Education partners, under the umbrella of the P-20 program. P-20 has adopted a definition of College, Career and Community Readiness in Hawaii. With the requested position in Kuilei, Student Services will be able to provide leadership to KCC in moving forward on implementing approaches that support college readiness ithrough our partnership work with the DOE.

To further improve the momentum in the areas of first-year student enrollment (lines 12-17 and lines 24-25), 2.0 permanent FTE positions for our FYE program (to replace the current unbudgeted temporary positions) are being requested in order to keep pace with the growth in the FYE and Lunalilo student cohorts, with particular attention to be paid to increasing the number of Native Hawaiian students receiving Pell Grants.

For the Student Services Targeted Populations counseling programs, the unit is requesting 3.0 FTE Student Services support positions to strengthen services for Single Parents/Homemakers, MIlitary/Veterans, and the transfer-in student cohort (TYE program) which is made up largely of part time students who face unique barriers to persistence, graduation, and transfer.

Assessment evidence in support of these requests is incorporated in the Student Services Comprehensive Program Review for 2013-2016.

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

No
TRIO program: Financial literacy is one of the mandatory services the program must provide to all of its students. USA Funds currently offers online financial literacy modules.

2

No
Single Parent Displaced Homemaker Program: Students will be able to identify their next step(s) as a result of attending a SPDH info session.

3

No
Kuilei Outreach Program: Competency Statement #1- Students will be able to successfully complete an University of Hawaii System application. Competency Statement #2 -Students will be able to complete the Free Application for Student Aid (FAFSA) and receive an award. Competency Statement #3- Students will take the Compass Placement Test scores and apply the results to their first semester academic plan.

4

No
Native Hawaiian Technical Education Program: #1- Eligible Native Hawaiian students who continued in the program from AY10 to AY11. #2- Native Hawaiian students who successfully completed a service learning, work experience, co-op, or internship.

5

No
Disability Services Office: #1- Student Notetaker will be able to complete all requirements for employment as a DSSO notetaker. #2- Student Notetaker will be able to comprehend the duties and responsibilities of notetaking.

6

No
Military Veterans Program: Students will be able to successfully complete the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) application, 1990 paper version, or online version (VONAPP) to receive Certificate of Eligibility (COE).

A) Expected Level Achievement

There are no new expected levels of achievement to report for this year.

B) Courses Assessed

There are no new course learning assessment reports for this year.

C) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

There are no new program learning outcomes assessment strategy/instruments to report for this year.

D) Results of Program Assessment

There are no new program learning outcomes assessment results to report for this year.

E) Other Comments

Two counseling SLOs were first developed in 2010 during a two-day retreat held with a student affairs assessment consultant.  These SLOs provided the basis for the assessment of student learning across student affairs programs during the 2010-12 academic years. On November 21 and 22, 2013, a Student Affairs Assessment retreat was held to revise the existing counseling SLOs based on results of the first program assessment cycle. The revised SLOs will be assessed after the completion of the next assessment cycle. 




 

 




 

F) Next Steps

The Targeted Populatios Counselors will continue their learning outcomes assessment and program review work following the timetable below. Any updates to this schedule will be reflected in the upcoming 2014 ARPD and can be obtained from the Targeted Populations Assessment Leader.

For the 2013-14 academic year, the Student Affairs Coordinator will be serving as (1) an "Assessment Coach" working with FYE, TYE, MHW, Native Hawaiian Student Success, student life and peer mentoring to create SLOs , assessment strategies and rubrics for each unit to begin their first cycle of assessment, and (2) an Assessment Coordinator working across all Student Affairs areas (targeted populations counseling, KISC, Kahikoluamea, student life) to ensure that the Office of Student Affiars is progressing steadily toward meeting the sustainable and continuous quality improvement level of learning outcomes assessment.

 

TARGETED POPULATIONS AND FYE STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT SCHEDULE

 

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

SPDH

X

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

Kuilei

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

 

NHCTEP

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

FYE

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

 

TYE

X

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

DSSO

X

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

MHW

X

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

TRIO

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

 

MVP

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NHSS

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

 

TARGETED POPULATIONS AND FYE COMPREHENSIVE PROGRAM REVIEW SCHEDULE

 

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

SPDH

X

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

Kuilei

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

 

NHCTEP

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

FYE

X

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

TYE

 

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

DSSO

 

X

 

 

X

 

 

X

MHW

 

X

 

 

X

 

 

 

TRIO

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

 

MVP

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

 

NHSS

 

 

X

 

 

X