University of Hawaii

Institutional Effectiveness Report 2002 Update

This version of the U H Institutional Effectivess Report is designed to promote accessibility for people with disabilities in compliance with Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. To ensure proper functioning of assistive technology tools such as screen readers, Hawaiian diacriticals were not included and spaces between selected acronyms were added (e.g., U H). We apologize for any inconvenience.

The President’s Message

The University of Hawaii is pleased to share with the Hawaii State Legislature, the people of Hawaii, and alumni and friends near and far this report on the effectiveness of the University of Hawaii system. We have organized this report around regional accreditation standards, mindful that those standards encompass the directions and goals set forth in the University’s recently adopted Strategic Plan, The University of Hawaii System Strategic Plan: Entering the University’s Second Century, 2002–2010.

The University of Hawaii Institutional Effectiveness Report, 2002, updates the 2000 Benchmarks/Performance Indicators Report. The title of this report has been changed to reflect the importance the University places on linking University goals with evidence of specific achievements. This report is responsive to Board of Regents’ policy that requires regular and systematic assessment of programs, services, campuses, and the University system as a whole. As required by Act 161 of the 1995 legislative session, the Board of Regents acted in an earlier year to adopt benchmark/performance indicators that continue to form the basis for this biennium report.

This report honors the University’s commitment to be accountable to the people of Hawaii. The taxpayers, donors, and families who support the University of Hawaii and the students who enroll for instruction deserve to know they are receiving maximum value for time and resources invested.

We are pleased to have this opportunity to step back and review the performance, effectiveness, and many achievements of our faculty, students, and administrators. The indicators we report on reveal progress over time, at intervals, and against standards/practices used elsewhere. For each publication of this report, the University has refined and added measures and narrative that help demonstrate the effectiveness of programs and services. We do this not only to satisfy accountability concerns but also to inform our improvement efforts.

In recent years, the people of Hawaii have placed greater trust in their university by granting it additional measures of flexibility and autonomy. This report is just one of many ways in which the University will continue to prove worthy of that trust. In the months and years ahead, the stature and reputation of the University of Hawaii will continue to grow and we will be accountable to the public that has placed its trust in us.

Evan S. Dobelle
President
University of Hawaii

Table of Contents

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President’s Message

Contents

Introduction

Standard 1: Defining Institutional Purposes and Ensuring Educational Objectives

Standard 2: Achieving Educational Objectives Through Core Functions Standard 3: Developing and Applying Resources and Organizational Structures to Ensure Sustainability Standard 4: Creating an Organization Committed to Learning and Improvement

Introduction

Founded in 1907 under the auspices of the Morrill Act, the University of Hawaii is a land-grant, sea-grant, and space-grant institution. As Hawaii’s sole state public university system, it is governed by a single Board of Regents and is composed of graduate/research, baccalaureate, and community college campuses. In addition, the University of Hawaii operates an Employment Training Center, three University Centers, multiple learning centers, and extension, research, and service programs at more than 70 sites in the state of Hawaii. The University is also engaged in instructional, research, and service activities at hundreds of Hawaii schools, hospitals, and community sites, and carries out these activities across the Pacific islands and in foreign countries.

The University of Hawaii system’s special distinction is found in its Hawaiian, Asian, and Pacific orientation and its position as one of the world’s foremost multicultural centers for global and indigenous studies. University of Hawaii attendees are members of student populations in which no one ethnic group constitutes a majority, and the educational experience is enriched by the diversity of their classmates.

During the 2002–03 academic year, the University’s Manoa, Hilo, and West Oahu campuses and the system offices will be visited by accreditation teams from the Western Association of Schools and Colleges regional accrediting body. To assist that effort, this Institutional Effectiveness Report, 2002 Update, is organized around the four major regional accreditation standards. These standards have much in common with the goals of the recently adopted University of Hawaii System Strategic Plan: Entering the University’s Second Century, 2002–2010. While evidence related to strategic plan goal achievement is spread throughout this report, specific accreditation standards and strategic purposes and goals are linked as follows.

Accreditation Standard 1, Defining Institutional Purposes and Ensuring Educational Objectives, provides the opportunity to present evidence and information relevant to our vision, mission, commitments/core values, and how we function as a system. Indicators relating to student access, affordability, the implementation of the University’s distinctive Hawaiian, Asian, and Pacific advantage, and its role in economic development round out this section of the report.

Accreditation Standard 2, Achieving Educational Objectives Through Core Functions, and Accreditation Standard 4, Creating an Organization Committed to Learning and Improvement, provide a framework for reporting on an array of information on teaching and learning, student performance and satisfaction, diversity, workforce development, scholarship, program review, management and assessment information, distinctions and achievements, and related evidence responsive to strategic plan goals 1, 2, and 3.

Accreditation Standard 3, Developing and Applying Resources and Organizational Structures to Ensure Sustainability encompasses the intent of strategic plan goals 4 and 5. This section of the report focuses on the University’s faculty, fiscal, physical, and information technology resources, as well as private giving.

Standard 1

Defining Institutional Purposes and Ensuring Educational Objectives

The vision, purpose, and goals of the University of Hawaii system are clear. The system has a conscious sense of its commitments and core values and its relationship to society at large.

Institutional Purposes
Vision

The University of Hawaii System embraces a vision grounded in the ahupuaa practice of sharing diverse but finite resources for the benefit of all. Working together for the betterment of all the diverse ethnic populations that are now part of this state, the University of Hawaii system will ensure the survival and prosperity of Hawaii’s people and these beautiful islands for generations to come.

System Mission

The common purpose of the University of Hawaii system is to serve the public by creating, preserving, and transmitting knowledge in a multicultural environment that takes advantage of Hawaii’s unique attributes. Functioning as a system, the University provides all qualified people in Hawaii equal opportunity through a variety of entry points and the flexibility to move among parts of the system to achieve educational goals. As a system the University advances missions that pursue distinctive pathways in response to state needs and participation in the global community.

Commitments and Core Values

Overarching commitments reflect the core values that bind University of Hawaii faculty, staff, and students together and contribute to realization of the University’s vision and mission. These include aloha; collaboration and respect; academic freedom and intellectual rigor; institutional integrity and service; access, affordability, and excellence; active learning and discovery; diversity, fairness, and equity; leveraged technology; Hawaiian and Asian-Pacific advantage; innovation and empowerment; accountability and fiscal integrity; and malama aina sustainability.

Functioning as a System

How do U H campuses function as a system in service to the state?

U H MANOA is a research university with selective admissions. It offers:

U H HILO is a comprehensive, primarily baccalaureate institution, offering professional programs based on a liberal arts foundation and selected graduate degrees. It offers master’s programs in education, Hawaiian language, China-U.S. relations, and counseling psychology and baccalaureate degrees in business, humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, agriculture, nursing, and computer science.

U H WEST OAHU is an upper division institution that will eventually become a four-year campus. It offers baccalaureate degrees in selected humanities, social science, and business and public administration fields.

U H COMMUNITY COLLEGES are open-door, low-tuition institutions offering associate degrees and certificate programs in academic, technical, and occupational subjects.

HAWAII COMMUNITY COLLEGE offers a strong liberal arts program, including basic skills, and a comprehensive vocational program that includes business, nursing, trades technology, and public service career fields.

HONOLULU COMMUNITY COLLEGE offers a strong liberal arts program in addition to the largest number of vocational/technical offerings in Hawaii, including programs that are not offered at any other campus, e.g., marine technologies, cosmetology, refrigeration and air conditioning, aeronautic maintenance, and commercial aviation pilot training.

KAPIOLANI COMMUNITY COLLEGE offers a comprehensive liberal arts program. This campus is a statewide leader in health services education with nine unique programs in allied health professions; it offers the state’s only legal assisting program and an extensive food service and hospitality education program.

KAUAI COMMUNITY COLLEGE offers a comprehensive liberal arts program and vocational programs in fields such as business education, health care, and the visitor industry.

LEEWARD COMMUNITY COLLEGE offers an extensive liberal arts program, combined with selected vocational offerings, and provides courses in 67 disciplines; unique programs include television production and information and computer sciences. Courses are also offered on-site in Waianae.

MAUI COMMUNITY COLLEGE offers a strong liberal arts program and a comprehensive vocational program that includes business, nursing, trade technology, and public service career fields; courses offered over cable TV and a campus interactive television system provide instruction to Molokai, Lanai, and Hana.

WINDWARD COMMUNITY COLLEGE offers a strong comprehensive liberal arts program and selected vocational education programs, including business education and agriculture.
The EMPLOYMENT TRAINING CENTER located at Windward CC provides job training for “at risk” populations in high-demand areas such as food service, auto repair, construction occupations, and office technology.

UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII CENTERS on Maui and Kauai and in West Hawaii establish a University of Hawaii presence in communities that otherwise lack access to programs offered elsewhere in the U H system. University Centers are system entities that are assigned for administrative purposes to existing University campuses. The courses and credentials offered at these Centers are those of the existing accredited U H campuses.

Accreditation

What is the status of accreditation at the University of Hawaii and what does it mean?

All ten campuses of the University system are separately and regionally accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC). Regional accreditation means that, as the result of an external review process, the University is judged to be fulfilling its stated purposes and can be expected to continue to do so. Students and the public can be assured that University of Hawaii campuses have met standards of quality across the entire range of institutional activities.

In 1999, the University of Hawaii at Manoa’s accreditation was fully reaffirmed by WASC. The WASC commission indicated that the Manoa campus excels in several areas, including the dedication of faculty and staff, efforts to strengthen the undergraduate curriculum, an increase in research generated by the faculty, and a highly enviable 11 to 1 student-faculty ratio—rare among nationally ranked research universities. The commission will conduct a follow-up visit in 2003.

U H West Oahu is fully accredited by WASC as is U H Hilo. Both campuses are preparing for WASC visits in spring 2003.

In addition, nearly 50 University of Hawaii academic programs hold separate professional accreditation. These programs have been subjected to rigorous external reviews that ensure high standards of professional practice. As a result, the U H credentials conferred convey a special merit of quality within these specialized fields of study.

At U H Manoa, 27 external professional accrediting organizations examine various programs every five to ten years. Among the accredited professional programs at U H M are law, medicine, architecture, business, travel industry management, social work, engineering, journalism, chemistry, dental hygiene, nursing, dietetics, library and information studies, clinical psychology, microbiology, audiology, speech-language pathology, education, medical technology, music, and urban and regional planning.

Twenty Community College programs hold separate accreditation, including nursing and a variety of food service programs at multiple campuses, aeronautics maintenance, automotive maintenance, cosmetology, fire science, motorcycle safety, legal assistant, medical assistant, medical lab technician, occupational therapy, physical therapy, radiologic technology, and respiratory care.

The nursing and education programs at U H Hilo are separately accredited, and the business program is a candidate for accreditation.

Access and Student Participation

What is the status of access to the University of Hawaii for recent Hawaii high school graduates?

Rapid growth in the post-war era was followed by an extended period of stable, mildly declining enrollment. Expanded access has helped the U H system post modest overall gains since the early 1970s. Enrollment increased 3.2 percent in 2001 to nearly 46,000 students and will grow to more than 50,000 by 2008. Program and facilities development could increase this projection to 56,000-plus.

Graph entitled “Historical and Projected Enrollment, by Unit.” Depicts enrollment by campus, fall semesters, from 1907 projected through 2008. Hardcopy and tabular data available by request from the Office of the VP for Planning and Policy.

ovppp@hawaii.edu

The going rate of recent Hawaii high school graduates into the University of Hawaii campuses has declined since the mid-1990s.

Graph entitled “Going Rates to U H, by Unit.” Depicts the going rates (in percent) into U H Manoa, U H Hilo, and U H Community Colleges from 1991 to 2001. Hardcopy and tabular data available by request from the Office of the VP for Planning and Policy.

ovppp@hawaii.edu

Note on sources: Where otherwise not referenced, student and enrollment data are from U H Management and Planning Support (MAPS) reports. Other data originate with U H senior vice presidents/chancellors’ and other campus offices.

What are the chances of a Hawaii resident being admitted to the University of Hawaii system?

Acceptance rates demonstrate that there is a place within the U H system for students who prepare themselves for post-secondary education.

Table: U H Admission Activity by Residents, by Level
Fall 2001
2-year4-yearGraduate
Division
Accepted/Enrolled 63%53%55%
Accepted/Declined 36%28%14%
Denied 1%19%31%

What is the status of off-campus access to U H credit programs?

In fall 2001, the number of distance learning classes being delivered to students in-state and out-of-state increased by 290, or 55 percent since fall 1999. These 814 classes accounted for over 7,300 registrations in a variety of disciplines, including 50 graduate, bachelor, associate, and certificate programs.

Major technology delivery systems include 2-way interactive video, cable television, the internet, and mixed modes. Strategically, the U H continues to leverage interactive television and cable TV, while aggressively moving to the internet to make learning more accessible throughout the state and beyond.

Although technology is used to deliver over half (55%) of the University’s distance learning classes, off-site instruction, such as classes on military installations or faculty travelling to another island, continues to be a major method of delivery.

Table: Receive Sites by County/Region
HONOLULUHAWAIIKAUAIMAUIU.S. & FOREIGN
Honolulu CC
Kapiolani CC
Leeward CC
U H Manoa
Waianae Education
 Center
Correctional
 Facilities
Hospitals
Military Bases
Public Schools
Individual Homes
Hawaii CC
U H Hilo
University Center,
 West Hawaii
Correctional
 Facilities
Hospitals
Public Schools
Individual Homes
Kauai CC
Hospitals
Public Schools
Individual Homes
Maui CC
University Center, Maui
Educational Centers,
 Hana, Lanai, Molokai
Hospitals
Public Schools
Individual Homes
Asia
Pacific Basin
U.S. Mainland

Table: Distance Learning Credential Programs
GRADUATEBACHELOR’SASSOCIATE/CERTIFICATE
  • Business Administration
  • Educational Foundations, Interdisciplinary
  • Educational Administration
  • Educational Counseling & Guidance, Vocational Rehab
  • Information & Computer Science
  • Kinesiology & Leisure Science
  • Library & Information Studies
  • Nursing, Clinical Systems Management
  • Teacher Education & Curriculum Studies
  • Certificate in Technology Information Resource Management
  • Business Administration
  • Certificate in Substance Abuse Studies
  • Computer Science
  • Elementary/Special Education
  • Elementary Education
  • English
  • Hawaiian Language
  • Hawaiian Studies
  • Information & Computer Science
  • Liberal Studies
  • Marine Sciences
  • Social Sciences
  • Accounting
  • Administration of Justice
  • Agricultural Careers
  • Applied Trades
  • Associate of Arts
  • Building Maintenance
  • Business
  • Electronic Computer Engineering
  • Deaf Studies
  • E-commerce
  • Early Childhood Education
  • Emergency Medical Technician
  • Fire & Environmental Emergency Response
  • Food Service and Hospitality
  • Food Science
  • Hawaiian Lifestyles
  • Hotel Operations
  • Human Services
  • Liberal Arts
  • Medical Assisting
  • Nursing
  • Office Administration & Technology
  • Opticianry
  • Practical Nursing
  • Pre-Engineering
  • Pre-Nursing
  • Welding

Registered nurses can now earn a bachelor’s degree in nursing or a master’s in clinical systems management online. The U H Manoa School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene distance learning program combines “real time” technical capabilities, such as chat room discussions, teleconferences, and video conferencing, with “any time” instruction using e-mail, web pages, electronic bulletin boards, CD-ROM, and video streaming.

An extensive review of distance learning was completed in 1997–98. This resulted in a comprehensive plan and policy base and University system-wide coordination of distance learning policy and planning activities.

Table: Number of Distance Education Classes
by Receive Sites, Fall 2001
(Student Registrations in Parentheses)
Tech-AssistedOn-Site
Oahu194 (1,530)109 (1,283)
Kauai63 (212)13 (115)
Maui91 (726)16 (188)
Molokai36 (116)0 (0)
Lanai27 (32)0 (0)
North Hawaii2(3)3(54)
West Hawaii44 (206)54 (769)
UHH38 (107)1 (19)
Military0 (0)67 (1,111)
Out-of-State2 (2)19 (371)
Unspecified35 (477)0 (0)

What is the status of remedial education at the University of Hawaii?

In fall 2001, seven University of Hawaii Community Colleges (UHCCs) offered adult basic education in English and mathematics resulting in over 2,600 class registrations. This is approximately 400 less than the 1999 volume of registrations.

The UHCCs remain committed to the open door concept and to the provision of remedial education for students who are not prepared to pursue learning at the post-secondary level. It is recognized that federal and state support for the most basic level of remediation—Adult Basic Education (ABE)—is provided to the Department of Education’s (D O E) Adult Community Schools. The UHCCs work collaboratively with the
D O E Adult Community Schools to ensure that adult basic education classes are available to all students in need of such instruction.

Do Hawaii residents have sufficient opportunities to enroll in education and training at U H beyond high school?

In fall 1999, the proportion of the Hawaii 18–24 year old population served by U H slipped below the national average. The share increased in each of the last two years.

Running Start, a national program, allows some high school juniors and seniors to take community college classes while working toward their high school diplomas. The program is a joint-credit collaboration between the Department of Education and University of Hawaii whereby students can complete an associate degree and a high school diploma at the same time.

Table: Undergraduates Aged 18–24 as a
Percentage of Population Aged 18–24 Years
University of Hawaii and the Nation (Public Sector)
Fall Semester
1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2000 2001
University of Hawaii 21.4% 23.3% 23.4% 21.6% 21.3% 21.6% 22.2%
U.S. Public Sector 21.2% 22.7% 22.9% 23.6% 23.8%
Note: National data available for odd-numbered years only; national figure for fall 2001 unavailable.

The proportion of Hawaii’s 25–49 year old population enrolled as part-time undergraduates at U H was close to the national average in 1999, but has declined since then.

Table: Part-time Undergraduates Aged 25–49 Years
as a Percentage of Population Aged 25–49 Years
University of Hawaii and the Nation (Public Sector)
Fall Semester
1997 1999 2000 2001
University of Hawaii 1.8% 1.9% 1.5% 1.6%
U.S. Public Sector 2.2% 2.0%
Note: National data available for odd-numbered years only; national figure for fall 2001 unavailable.

What are the opportunities for continuing education credit and non-credit instruction across the U H system?

The diversity and volume of U H continuing education programs and offerings, both credit and non-credit, are considerable and serve 100,000 students annually.

PLEASE NOTE: While there has been some decline in continuing education enrollment, differences in the quality of continuing education data in earlier years and changes in reporting procedures allow for only a general comparison over time. Data quality has improved in recent years.

Graph entitled “Continuing Education Enrollment.” Depicts enrollment in credit and non-credit continuing education programs and offerings in calender years 1991 through 2001. Hardcopy and tabular data available by request from the Office of the VP for Planning and Policy.

ovppp@hawaii.edu

Affordability

How affordable is higher education at U H for students and their families?

The share of income Hawaii’s poorest families pay for tuition at U H community colleges is about as low as that for the best performing states.

U H Top States
Share of income that poorest families need to pay for tuition at lowest 2-year colleges 10% 9%
Source: The National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education, “Measuring Up 2000” © 2000

A recent study completed by the Lumina Foundation for Education found that only in Alaska, Arkansas, Hawaii, Kentucky, and Wyoming are all four-year public colleges affordable for low-income dependent students. Additionally, Hawaii is one of only 11 states identified as “most consistently accessible,” i.e., loan free accessibility at state public institutions for low- and median-income students. The foundation based its criteria on admission standards, federal loan limits, income, and available financial aids.
Source: Lumina Foundation for Education, 2002

How do U H tuitions compare with like institutions elsewhere?

Undergraduate resident tuition rates at all U H campuses remain below WICHE averages. Undergraduate non-resident tuition is below or equivalent to WICHE averages for all U H campuses except Hilo (upper division) and the Community Colleges. Graduate tuition rates approximate or are below WICHE averages. U H M Medicine resident tuition exceeds the WICHE average, while non-resident tuition is equivalent.

Table: 2001–02 U H Tuition and Required Fees
as a Percentage of 2001–02 WICHE Averages
ResidentNon-Resident
U H M Undergraduate94% 75%
U H M Graduate100%78%
U H M Medicine121% 100%
UHH Lower Division56% 93%
UHH Upper Division85% 102%
UHH Graduate96% 93%
U H W O71% 92%
UHCC71% 113%
Note: WICHE = Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education
Effective 2000–01, WICHE no longer has law tuition comparisons.

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Hawaiian, Asian, and Pacific Education and Leadership

What are the opportunities for a U H student to have access to international, especially Asian/Pacific, programs, faculty expertise, travel, etc.?

The University of Hawaii supports international education through the on-campus presence of international students, trainees, faculty, and scholars; foreign language offerings; internationally focused courses and certificate programs; international exchange; and study abroad opportunities.

HIGHLIGHTS

Quote:
“Our university system should be the leader when it comes to language study, initiatives in foreign exchange, and building links to Asian universities.”
Evan S. Dobelle
President, University of Hawaii

How is the University of Hawaii strengthening its Asia-Pacific focus?

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ENROLLMENT/COURSES

Of the 2,290 international students from 88 countries enrolled in the U H system, 86 percent are from the Asia-Pacific region. At U H Manoa, 83 percent of international students are from Asia-Pacific; at U H Hilo 86 percent are from Asia-Pacific; and at the U H Community Colleges 93 percent are from the Asia-Pacific region.

In the academic year 2000–01, international student enrollment at U H Community Colleges increased 14 percent, double the national average.
Source: Institute of International Education

U H Hilo ranked 14th nationally among 4-year liberal arts colleges in the category of Most International Students (10% in 2001).
Source: U.S. News & World Report, 2001

The percentage of Asia-Pacific students has increased at all campuses since fall 1999.

Table: Enrollment of Degree-Seeking International Students
UH System (Fall 2000)
Asia Europe Americas Oceania Africa/
Middle East
Total
Enrollment
Percent70% 8% 5% 16% 1%
Number Enrolled1,599 179 112 373 272,290

In fall 2001, instruction in more than 16 Asia-Pacific languages was offered; 67 percent of language enrollment across the U H system was in Hawaiian, Asian, and Indo-Pacific languages. Over 800 courses offered by the U H system focus on the Asia-Pacific region.

OVERSEAS STUDY/RESEARCH PROGRAMS

Of the 605 students who participated in the international study/research programs, 397 (or 66%) went to the Asia-Pacific region.

In the academic year 2000–01, the number of U H students studying in Oceania more than tripled over the previous year, and there was a 30 percent increase in those studying in Asia.

Table: Student Participation in Education Abroad
U H System, Annual Year 2000–01
Asia Europe Americas Oceania Africa/
Middle East
Total
Students
Percent57% 31% 3% 8% 1%
Number Enrolled345 186 19 52 3605

FORMAL AGREEMENTS

Of the university’s 160 formal relationships with institutions overseas, 88 percent are with institutions in the Asia-Pacific region. These linkages, which have increased by 19 percent since academic year 1999–2000, provide opportunities for faculty and student exchange, short-term training, library exchanges, collaborative research, and the development of international programs that benefit the University. The largest increase in cooperative agreements has been with institutions in Korea and China.

Table: International Agreements
Distributed by Region
East Asia Europe Oceania South Asia Southeast
Asia
Americas Total Formal
Agreements
Percent65% 9% 8% 1%14%3%
Number of
Agreements
103 15 13 2 234160

How is the University of Hawaii demonstrating its international leadership role?

VISITING SCHOLARS AND INTERNATIONAL FACULTY

In academic year 2000–01, 478 international faculty and visiting scholars taught, participated in international exchanges, and conducted research in the U H system. This represents a 55 percent increase over the previous year.

Of the 439 faculty under U H immigration sponsorship, the majority (56%) were from Asia, about a third (32%) were from Europe, and the remainder were from countries in Africa, the Americas, the Middle East, the Pacific, and Oceania.

Table: Visiting Scholars and International Faculty
Distributed by Region (Annual Year 2000–01)
Asia Europe Pacifica/
Oceania
Africa Americas Middle East Total
Scholars/Faculty
Percent59% 30% 3% 1%7%<1%
Number283 143 12 5 332478

In Annual Year 2000–01, there were 7,536 international participants in intensive English and other short-term training programs across the U H system. Of these, approximately 86 percent (or 6,438) were enrolled at U H M. Short-term programs and training grew by 35 percent over the previous year and generated $4.2 million in revenues.

Table: Short-term Programs/Training for International Students
U H System (Annual Year 2000–01)
U H Manoa U H Hilo Community
Colleges
Total
Students
Percent86% <1% 14%
Number of Students6,438 15 1,083 7,536

The world’s largest resource faculty for Asia-Pacific studies resides in U H M’s School of Hawaiian, Asian, and Pacific Studies. The school pioneered the study of Japan in America and is home to the oldest and largest Korean studies program outside Korea.
Source: U H M School of Hawaiian, Asian, and Pacific Studies

How is the University ensuring an international dimension to students’ education?

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION

U H students can earn a certificate with an international component in nearly 40 fields. Students have the opportunity to participate in international exchange, study abroad, and specially designed campus-based overseas programs. And the U H offers over 31 languages other than English.

Over the past ten years, registrations in Hawaiian/Indo-Pacific languages increased by over 50 percent, while those in East Asian and European languages decreased.

Table: Registration in Languages
U H System
Fall Semester
19911992199319941995199619971998199920002001
East Asian Lang3,7803,5683,2223,3983,4743,5663,1693,4343,1543,1553,091
European Lang2,9603,1043,0003,0293,0882,9312,7142,9102,8692,8502,734
Hawn/Indo Pac Lang1,6132,1312,3942,7002,9172,8692,7403,0462,7562,4262,433

How well is the University doing in its commitment to preserve and disseminate Hawaiian history, language, and culture?

HAWAIIAN LANGUAGE AND STUDIES

At U H Manoa, registration in Hawaiian studies courses is currently at its highest ever. Registrations in Hawaiian language courses also increased, although registrations in fall 2001 were somewhat lower than the peak in fall 1997.

Table: Registration in Hawaiian Language and Hawaiian Studies Courses
U H Manoa
Fall Semester
19911992199319941995199619971998199920002001
Hawaiian Language4576436867719601,0291,0651,000877733754
Hawaiian Studies177174233378469303383323417399518

Registrations in Hawaiian language and Hawaiian studies courses at U H Hilo have been relatively stable in recent years.

Table: Registration in Hawaiian Language and Hawaiian Studies Courses
U H Hilo
Fall Semester
19911992199319941995199619971998199920002001
Hawaiian Language195242266277255193210241212198225
Hawaiian Studies250275291331250234275230217217218

In 1996, U H Hilo became the first university in the nation to offer a graduate degree in an indigenous language—the master of arts in Hawaiian language and literature. In fall 1998, UHH became the first university in the nation to establish a college in an indigenous language. And, in spring 2002, UHH had its first graduate of the master’s program in Hawaiian language and literature.

U H West Oahu began offering a specialization in Hawaiian-Pacific Studies in fall term 1999.

At U H Community Colleges, student registrations in Hawaiian studies courses continue their upward trend.

Table: Registration in Hawaiian Language and Hawaiian Studies Courses
U H Community Colleges
Fall Semester
19911992199319941995199619971998199920002001
Hawaiian Language468701731910930920996957888750706
Hawaiian Studies298289266421355334570682769717767

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Economic Impact on Hawaii

What is the overall economic impact of the U H system on Hawaii?

As a billion dollar player in Hawaii’s economy, the University of Hawaii system and its participants represent a major economic force in Hawaii.

The following are based on the 2000 “Study of the Economic Impact of the University of Hawaii System” prepared by the Department of Economics at U H Manoa:

U H increases an individual’s earning potential

Table: Anticipated Increase in Lifetime Earnings and Cost by Educational Attainment Beyond High School, Hawaii*
Forgone earnings,
tuitions and fees
Increase in
Lifetime earnings
Bachelor’s Degree $68,190$1,045,456
Graduate Degree $122,902$2,016,668
*Note: The cost of obtaining a graduate degree includes the cost of obtaining a bachelor’s degree. Inflation adjusted.

U H stimulates the business community

U H leverages taxpayer dollars

U H generates a return on government investment

U H expands the state economy

U H develops human capital and knowledge

The most important economic impact of the University of Hawaii is the development of human capital and a knowledge infrastructure. The integration of Hawaii into global academic, business, and technology communities is not possible without the University. U H produces a broad range of positive economic results and is key to repositioning Hawaii’s economy by:

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Foreign Investment in U H

The external non-U.S. economic investment in the U H has been substantial. In fiscal years (FY) 2000, 2001, and 2002, over $25.7 million was invested by non-U.S. entities. Highlights of this support include:

Table: Awards from Foreign Sources
Fiscal
Year
Number of
Projects
Amount
Awarded
1996-9745$7.6M
1997-9836$7.3M
1998-9936$4.1M
1999-0049$11.2M
2000-0139$6.6M

National Resource Centers

In the 1990s, over $12 million in language-related contracts and grants were awarded to the U H to fund national centers for East Asian, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Island Studies; the National Foreign Language Resource Center; and a Center for International Business Education and Research. Additional private endowments totaling $10 million supported cultural studies of East Asia (China, Japan, and Korea).

Technology Transfer

The Office of Technology Transfer and Economic Development (OTTED) serves as a gateway for access to the University’s rich educational, scientific, and technical resources by actively promoting new University inventions and discoveries to industry and by working with business and government leaders throughout the state to encourage economic development. The technology transfer process begins with the disclosure of inventions and new technologies by University researchers. These discovery and invention disclosures have resulted in more than 265 patents or patent applications filed by the University, over 40 active license agreements or other commercialization agreement for future licenses, and over $2.0 million in gross licensing revenues (cumulative).

Table: Invention Disclosures
Fiscal Year
19951996199719981999200020012002
Number of Disclosures2111141845204531

Other Economic Development Highlights

Esteem

What is the University’s image overall?

Nearly 80 percent of Hawaii residents polled in 2001 had a favorable opinion of U H, but 61 percent stated the belief that the U H system is inadequately funded by the state. About three-fourths (74%) agree that, with enough support, U H can truly become a world class university in the next decade.
Source: 2001 Public Opinion Poll, Opinion Dynamics

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Standard 2

Achieving Educational Objectives Through Core Functions

The University of Hawaii system of campuses achieves institutional purposes and goals through teaching and learning, scholarship and creative activity, and support for student learning. Student and faculty performance, research achievements, student satisfaction, and workforce development demonstrate the effectiveness of core functions.

Teaching and Learning

How effectively is the University of Hawaii contributing to student learning?

U H Manoa, U H Hilo, and U H West Oahu scored well in a national survey intended to show how effectively colleges are contributing to learning in five areas: 1) level of academic challenge; 2) active and collaborative learning; 3) student-faculty interaction; 4) enriching educational experiences; and 5) supportive campus environment. All are doing better than predicted in levels of student engagement in the learning processes, and all are at levels higher than in previous administrations of this survey.

The biggest area noted where improvement is needed was the level of academic challenge experienced by freshmen. To address this, the core curriculum at U H Manoa has been modernized, and there has been an expansion of learning communities. At U H Hilo, faculty are looking at increasing the rigor of freshman courses.
Source: 2001 National Survey of Student Engagement

What is the volume of credentials awarded annually by U H?

On the average, nearly 7,000 degrees are awarded annually by U H.

Table: U H Degrees and Certificates Awarded, by Level
2-year 4-Year Post-baccalaureate
FY 1990-912,3302,7211,340
FY 1991-922,3782,7671,432
FY 1992-932,4692,9971,644
FY 1993-942,3813,0091,683
FY 1994-952,6423,1561,731
FY 1995-962,6433,3951,708
FY 1996-972,6973,2791,660
FY 1997-982,7223,0861,332
FY 1998-992,6153,0891,413
FY 1999-002,6503,1151,469
FY 2000-012,5342,9511,325

What percentage of degree/certificate programs have a required practicum, service learning, or other service learning component?

The service learning process involves instructional strategies which link community service and academic study so that one strengthens the other. It is an instructional method by which citizenship, academic subjects, skills, value, and the concept of giving back to the community are placed into the classroom and students participate in service learning activities with various agencies in the community.

About one-fourth of the degree/certificate programs at U H Manoa require some form of service learning component.

One program at U H West Oahu requires a practicum. Students in business administration and public administration can elect a practicum or a senior project.

Twenty-three percent of degree/certificate programs at U H Hilo have a practicum, hands-on training, or other service learning component.

A distinguishing aspect of the Manoa undergraduate experience is the number of opportunities for experiential learning, including—but not limited to—internships, cooperative education placements, volunteer positions, fellowships, and practica. These opportunities not only link theory to practice, but also the university to its community. In 2000–01, the Office of Career Services processed 208 experiential opportunities in business, computer science, engineering, life/physical science, social science, humanities, and teaching.

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Student Performance

What are the U H persistence and graduation outcomes for entering students?

The success rates (percentage of those who graduated or are still enrolled) as compared with the 2000 Benchmarks/Performance Indicators Report are:

Table: Success Rates
(As Measured by Average Graduation and Persistence Rates)
6 years after entry
1991-1995 cohorts
3 years after entry
1994-1998 cohorts
U H
Manoa
U H
Hilo
UHCC
Average
Hawaii
CC
Honolulu
CC
Kapiolani
CC
Kauai
CC
Leeward
CC
Maui
CC
Windward
CC
Graduated 54%29%15%23%16%9%22%12%18%12%
Still Enrolled 10%5%21%14%18%27%18%25%17%16%

U H Manoa’s 6-year success rate and 1-year retention rate for first-time students are slightly lower than the national average rates for peer and benchmark groups as derived from a national study. Students at U H M eventually graduate at rates comparable to those in the peer and benchmark groups; they just take longer to do so.

Table: Average Success Rates and Retention Rates
U H Manoa, Peer, and Benchmark Groups
6-Year Success (Graduation & Retention) Rate
BenchmarkPeerU H M
Graduated 68%65%54%
Still Enrolled 3%3%11%
Total 71%68%65%
Note: 6-year Graduation rate = F90–94 cohorts
Source: Consortium for Student Retention Data Exchange 2000–01 Survey

Table: Average Success Rates and Retention Rates
U H Manoa, Peer, and Benchmark Groups
1-Year Retention Rate
BenchmarkPeerU H M
Still Enrolled 88%85%80%
Note: 1-year Retention rate = F90–F99 cohorts
Source: Consortium for Student Retention Data Exchange 2000–01 Survey

Success Rates by Ethnicity

The success rate for Asian/Pacific Islanders at U H Manoa is slightly lower than the peer and benchmark groups. Within U H Manoa’s Asian/Pacific Islander category, Chinese and Japanese students show comparable success rates to peer and benchmark groups, while the rates for Filipino, Hawaiian, and the other Asian categories are lower.

The success rate for non-resident aliens at U H Manoa is slightly lower than the peer and benchmark groups but is considerably lower for Caucasians.

Table: Success Rates by Ethnicity
as Measured by 6-Year Graduation and Retention Rates
U H Manoa, Peer, and Benchmark Groups
ASIAN OR PACIFIC ISLANDER
BenchmarkPeerU H M
Graduated75%72%57%
Still Enrolled2%3%12%
Total77%75%69%
Source: Consortium for Student Retention Data Exchange 2000–01 Survey, F90–94 cohorts

Table: Success Rates by Ethnicity
as Measured by 6-Year Graduation and Retention Rates
U H Manoa, Peer, and Benchmark Groups
CAUCASIAN
BenchmarkPeerU H M
Graduated69%65%42%
Still Enrolled3%4%5%
Total72%69%47%
Source: Consortium for Student Retention Data Exchange 2000–01 Survey, F90–94 cohorts

Table: Success Rates by Ethnicity
as Measured by 6-Year Graduation and Retention Rates
U H Manoa, Peer, and Benchmark Groups
NON-RESIDENT ALIEN
BenchmarkPeerU H M
Graduated73%69%61%
Still Enrolled2%2%7%
Total75%71%68%
Source: Consortium for Student Retention Data Exchange 2000–01 Survey, F90–94 cohorts

Table: Success Rates by Ethnicity
as Measured by 6-Year Graduation and Retention Rates
U H Manoa, Peer, and Benchmark Groups
MIXED
U H M
Graduated49%
Still Enrolled10%
Total59%
Note: Other institutions do not have a Mixed ethnic category, and U H M enrollments for other ethnic groups such as Hispanics and African Americans are too small for comparison.
Source: Consortium for Student Retention Data Exchange 2000–01 Survey, F90–94 cohorts

Table: Success Rate by Ethnicity
Detailed Breakdown of U H Manoa Asian/Pacific Islander Category
(reference previous tables)
ChineseFilipinoHawaiianJapaneseOther Asian
Graduated73%52%41%64%47%
Still Enrolled9%10%11%14%12%
Total82%62%52%78%59%
Note: Though O M B federal reporting standards on race and ethnicity have changed recently, they previously defined the Asian or Pacific Islander category to include native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders. Available data can only be aggregated as shown here.
Source: Consortium for Student Retention Data Exchange 2000–01 Survey, F90–94 cohorts

What share of eligible students pass external exams in their field of study?

University of Hawaii students and graduates are scoring well on national and state exams.

Nursing. Of the 131 U H Community College Nursing Program graduates who took the licensing examination administered by the National Council for Licensing Examinations (NCLEX) in 2000–01, 85 percent passed. For U H M graduates the pass rate was 99 percent, and for UHH 82 percent received a passing score.

Table: Board of Nursing Exam (NCLEX)
Pass Rate
1998-991999-002000-01
U H M97%100%99%
UHH94%78%82%
UHCC94%91%85%

Medical Technology. In 1999–2000 and 2000–01, all U H M Medical Technology students passed the national certification examination on their first attempt, and scores are consistently above the national average.

Table: Medical Technology
National Certification Examination
Pass Rate of First-Time Takers
Academic Year
1996-971997-981998-991999-002000-01
Pass Rate85%87%92%100%100%
Note: Overall National Average = 84%

Dental Hygiene and Other Programs. For the past three years, all U H M Medical Dental Hygiene students taking the national licensing examination passed on their first attempt.

Community College Programs. In 1999–2000, graduates of the following Community College programs passed National licensing examinations on their first attempt: Radiologic Technologist, FAA Airframe and Power Plant Aviation Maintenance Technician, Cosmetology, FCC Electronic Certification, and Nursing Assistant Certification programs.

Emergency Medical. The Emergency Medical Service Program at Kapiolani Community College is one of only two programs nationwide with average scores in the 95th percentile for the National Registry Exam. In 2001, their Radiological Technologist Program had the highest overall test score in the nation and won the U.S. Department of Education Secretary’s Award for Outstanding Vocational Education Program. The program has a 100 percent pass rate on the licensing exam for the past seven years.

Education. On average, U H M College of Education graduates score equal to or higher than the national mean in almost every assessment area on the Praxis Teacher Certification Exam and meet or exceed Hawaii State Department of Education qualifying scores in all areas.

Table: Praxis Teacher Certification Examinations
(September 1, 2000 to August 31, 2001)
Assessment AreaU H
Median Score
National
Median Score
D O E Min.
Qual. Score
U H Pass
Rate
PRINC I PLES OF LEARNING & TEACHING
K-1617417416387%
7-1217317315794%
ELEMENTARY
Curriculum, Instruction & Assessment17917716484%
Content Area Exercise161157135100%
ENGLISH
Language & Literature Content16517416463%
Pedagogy15515515075%
MATHEMATICS
Content Knowledge142.514013673%
Pedagogy14514013593%
SOCIAL STUDIES
Content Knowledge15616615461%
Pedagogy178183144100%
BIOLOGY
Content Knowledge17016816184%
Pedagogy155155139100%
SPECIAL EDUCATION
Knowledge-based Core Principles16116213698%
Application-Core Principles Access15015314182%
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Content Knowledge16015416053%
Analysis & Design

Medicine. Residents in the Orthopaedic Residency Training program of the John A. Burns School of Medicine consistently score well on the In-training Exam, which is administered to orthopaedic residents across the country to promote study and discussion and to help them prepare for their board exam. A score in the 90th percentile is considered excellent. U H graduates scored 91 in 2001 and 99 in 1998–2000.

Ninety-five percent or more of the students at the John A. Burns School of Medicine pass Step 2 of the United States Medical Licensing Exam (U S M L E) and at a consistently higher rate than the national average for U.S. medical students taking the exam for the first time. On the last administration of Step 2 of the three-step process, 98 percent passed. On average, students score at the national passing percentage on Step 1.

Table: U S M L E Step 1 Percentages
6/20016/20006/19996/1998
U H Medical School84959198
National90929395

Table: U S M L E Step 2 Percentages
8/20018/20008/19998/1998
U H Medical School989510098
National95959595

Law. Graduates of the William S. Richardson School of Law are consistently outperforming Hawaii bar exam test takers from other law schools. On average, 85 percent of U H M Law School graduates pass the Hawaii state bar exam on their first attempt, and overall pass rates (81%) are consistently above the state average (72%).

Table: Hawaii State Bar Exam Pass Rate (Percent)
19971998199920002001
U H First-Time Takers83.6%89.1%81.7%85.0%86.0%
Overall U H80.0%82.3%79.0%85.0%78.0%
Overall State74.7%74.0%67.0%72.0%72.0%
Note: First-time Takers (average = 85.1);
Overall U H (average = 80.9);
Overall State (average = 71.9)

UHH. At UHH, the Educational Testing Service (E T S) Major Field Achievement Test provides national comparisons and serves as a vehicle for program improvement. UHH students usually perform at or above the national mean.

Table: U H Hilo E T S Major Field Achievement Test Scores
1998199920002001
UHHNationalUHHNationalUHHNationalUHHNational
Accounting39.448.947.948.950.348.949.748.1
Computer Science156.0148.0162.0147.0153.0147.0156.0147.0
Economics49.740.842.240.847.840.841.940.1
Management59.752.855.752.858.752.854.452.2
Quantitative Business Analysis50.749.349.449.349.449.350.048.8
Finance50.538.639.938.640.538.641.537.8
Marketing65.647.150.147.154.047.154.446.9
Legal/Social Environment55.341.743.041.744.341.738.041.1
International Issues50.645.149.145.155.145.150.144.3

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Student Satisfaction

What do U H students think of their educational experience?

Graduating seniors reported increased satisfaction with their educational experience at U H Manoa. More than three-fourths (76%) rated their overall undergraduate experience as either Good or Excellent.
Source: Spring 2002 U H M Graduating Senior Survey

Table: U H Manoa Graduating Seniors
Rating of Overall Academic Experience
% of Responses
200219991996
Excellent11.4%12.6%9.2%
Good64.7%61.2%58.0%
Fair22.0%23.4%29.6%
Poor1.9%2.9%3.1%

Over two-thirds (69%) of U H M classified undergraduates are satisfied with their experience at Manoa and most (72%) indicated that, if they could start over again, they would still choose U H M.
Source: 2002 U H M College Student Experiences Questionnaire

Most alumni continue to report increased satisfaction with their educational experience at U H Manoa. Over 80 percent of U H M alumni rated their overall undergraduate experience as either Good or Excellent.
Source: 2000 U H M Alumni Outcomes Survey

Table: U H Manoa Alumni
Rating of Overall Academic Experience
% of Responses
200019971994
Excellent14.2%11.2%11.5%
Good68.0%67.8%66.8%
Fair17.0%18.4%21.2%
Poor0.8%2.6%0.5%

Ninety-two percent of undergraduates and 93 percent of alumni at U H West Oahu rated their educational experience as either Good or Excellent. A similar percentage indicated that, if they could start over again, they would do so at U H W O.
Sources: 2001 National Survey of Student Engagement
2001 Survey of Recent Graduates
2000 College Student Experiences Questionnaire

Eighty-seven percent of graduating seniors and 91 percent of alumni at U H Hilo rated their overall undergraduate experience at UHH as either Good or Excellent.
Sources: Spring 2001 UHH Graduating Senior Survey
2001 UHH Alumni Outcomes Survey

Over 93 percent of U H Community College graduates and leavers are Satisfied or Very Satisfied with the quality of their community college experience.
Source: 2000–01 UHCC Graduate and Leaver Survey

The foregoing U H satisfaction results can be compared with those from the NCHEMS Comprehensive Alumni Survey. This survey, used by about 40 four-year institutions, asks an overall satisfaction question and a quality-related question about preparation for future study. About 82.6 percent of respondents rate their experience as Good or Excellent.
Source: National Center for Higher Education Management Systems

How satisfied are U H students with their general education core requirements and experience?

Table: U H Manoa
Overall Most Satisfied With:Overall Least Satisfied With:
  • Usefulness of courses
  • Knowledge gained
  • Availability of courses
  • Variety of courses
  • Number of courses required
  • Use of teaching assistants
  • Relevance of courses to life
  • Preparation for work in major
Source: Spring 2002 U H M Survey of Graduating Seniors

Table: U H Hilo
Overall Most Satisfied With:Overall Least Satisfied With:
  • Usefulness of courses
  • Availability of courses
  • Overall quality of instruction
  • Content of courses
  • Preparation for work in major
  • Relevance of courses to life
  • Preparation for upper-division courses
  • Variety of courses
Source: Spring 2002 UHH Graduating Senior Survey

Eighty-three percent of U H West Oahu undergraduates felt they gained Very Much or Quite a Bit in broadening their general education knowledge.
Source: Fall 2000 College Student Experiences Questionnaire

Similar general education core requirement satisfaction patterns were noted at U H Hilo.

New U H M core. In a process beginning in 1999, U H M has, for the first time in more than three decades, overhauled its general core curriculum requirements to offer more options and flexibility. The new core is less rigid and more student friendly, reduces the number of core credits from 40 to 31, and adds breadth to the number and types of courses students may take.

New UHH core. In 2000, the Board of Regents approved and U H Hilo implemented a new 40-credit general education core curriculum. The three colleges within UHH (Agriculture, Arts and Sciences, and Continuing Education and Community Service) adopted the new general education core with modifications appropriate to their respective missions. In addition to basic written communication, computational skills, and world culture requirements, the new core includes requirements in Humanities, Social Sciences, and Natural Sciences.

How satisfied are U H students with their preparation for employment?

When asked what they gained from their undergraduate experience, about two-thirds of UHH (64%) and U H M (61%) graduating seniors and 58 percent of recent U H W O graduates mentioned preparation for employment.
Sources: Spring 2002 U H M and UHH Graduating Senior Surveys
Fall 2001 U H W O Survey of Recent Graduates

Ninety-two percent of U H M alumni indicated they were Adequately to Well Prepared for their current primary job.
Source: 2000 U H M Alumni Outcomes Survey

Table: U H Manoa Alumni
Job Preparation for Current Primary Job
% of Responses
200019971994
Well Prepared16.6%11.9%14.9%
Moderately Well Prepared39.4%33.1%40.0%
Adequately Prepared35.9%43.1%35.7%
Poorly Prepared8.1%11.9%9.4%

U H Community College graduates and leavers continue to report increased satisfaction with their preparation for employment. Over 89 percent are Very Well Satisfied or Well Satisfied.
Source: 2000–01 UHCC Graduate and Leaver Survey

Table: U H Community Colleges
Preparation for Employment
1997-981998-992002-01
Very Well24.8%30.0%35.9%
Well56.3%54.1%53.2%
Poorly13.2%12.0%6.9%
Very Poorly5.8%3.9%3.9%

How satisfied are U H graduating students with program quality?

Over 86 percent of U H M graduating seniors felt that the quality of academic programs was About What They Expected or Better.
Source: Spring 2002 U H M Graduating Senior Survey

Table: U H Manoa Graduating Seniors
Quality of Academic Programs
% of Responses
200219991996
Better Than Expected16.3%13.2%13.7%
About What Expected70.1%73.0%69.7%
Worse Than Expected13.6%13.9%16.6%

A vast majority (94%) of UHH graduating seniors felt that the quality of academic programs at Hilo was About What They Expected or Better. The proportion of those that felt the quality of academic programs exceeded their expectations more than doubled since fall 1999.

Table: U H Hilo Graduating Seniors
Quality of Academic Programs
% of Responses
20021999
Better Than Expected49.3%24.3%
About What Expected45.0%67.6%
Worse Than Expected5.7%8.1%

How satisfied are alumni with their academic preparation?

Ninety-nine percent of recent U H W O graduates indicated the quality of academic programs at West Oahu was About What They Expected or Better.
Source: Fall 2001 Survey of Recent Graduates

Table: U H West Oahu Recent Graduates
Quality of Academic Programs
% of Responses
20021999
Better Than Expected66.0%65.0%
About What Expected33.0%32.0%
Worse Than Expected1.0%3.0%

A vast majority (91%) of U H M baccalaureate alumni were Satisfied or Very Satisfied with their academic preparation. U H M Alumni Outcomes Survey findings for 1989, 1991, 1994, and 1997 were similar.
Source: 2000 U H M Alumni Outcomes Survey

Table: U H Manoa Alumni
Satisfaction with Academic Preparation
Very SatisfiedSatisfiedDissatisfiedVery Dissatisfied
% of Responses16.9%74.0%8.0%1.1%

Similarly, the vast majority (94%) of UHCC graduates and leavers were Satisfied or Very Satisfied with academic programs at the U H Community Colleges.
Source: 2000–01 UHCC Graduate and Leaver Survey

Table: U H Community Colleges
Satisfaction with Academic Preparation
Very SatisfiedSatisfiedDissatisfiedVery Dissatisfied
% of Responses40.6%53.2%5.1%1.0%

A third of UHH alumni were Very Satisfied with their academic preparation, and nearly all of them (96%) were either Satisfied or Very Satisfied.
Source: Summer 2001 UHH Alumni Survey

Table: U H Hilo Alumni
Satisfaction with Academic Preparation
Very SatisfiedSatisfiedDissatisfiedVery Dissatisfied
% of Responses33.3%62.7%2.6%1.3%

How do graduating students and alumni view their degrees?

Over 91 percent of U H Manoa graduating seniors view their degree as Average or Above Average.
Source: Spring 2002 U H M Graduating Senior Survey

Table: U H Manoa Graduating Seniors
Perceived Quality of Baccalaureate Degree
% of Responses
200219991996
Above Average24.8%25.3%23.3%
Average66.4%67.5%68.5%
Below Average8.8%7.2%8.2%

The vast majority of U H Hilo graduating seniors (97%) and alumni (98%) perceive their baccalaureate degree as being of Average or Above Average quality.
Source: Spring 2002 UHH Graduating Senior and 2001 UHH Alumni Outcomes Survey

Table: U H Hilo Graduating Seniors/Alumni
Perceived Quality of Baccalaureate Degree
% of Responses
View of
Graduating Seniors
View of
Alumni
Above Average52.6%39.5%
Average44.4%58.6%
Below Average3.0%2.0%

Ninety-six percent of U H Manoa alumni perceive the quality of their undergraduate degree as Average or Above Average. Similar perceptions were reported in 1991, 1994, and 1997.
Source: 2000 U H M Alumni Outcomes Survey

Table: U H Manoa Alumni
Perceived Quality of Baccalaureate Degree
% of Responses
View of
Alumni
View of Others
(as perceived by alumni)
Above Average25.5%16.0%
Average70.5%73.1%
Below Average4.0%10.9%

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Workforce Development

What is the University’s response to jobs in demand in Hawaii?

Quote:
“The critical role of postsecondary and continuing education in the quality improvement of the workforce is long recognized. It is also key to increasing the knowledge-based skills mix to match the state’s economy to include a wider range of technology sectors. The major responsibility for this rests with the University of Hawaii system because a public state university must respond to the communities’ needs.”
Source: 2002 Report to the Governor
Policy Brief: Hawaii Workforce Initiatives for Economic Stimulus
Department of Labor and Industrial Relations

Teachers. Annually, approximately 350 teacher education degrees are issued by the U H M College of Education. However, this accounts for less than half of the teachers needed throughout the state. Budget cuts starting around 1997 have proven to be very serious for the College.

In response to the need for special education teachers, an additional 60 to 100 students per year from the University of Hawaii will be eligible for an initial teaching license in Special Education. Sixty-five completed the program in 2001 and an additional 60 are expected to graduate in 2002.

In addition to the elementary and secondary master’s degrees in special education, a post-baccalaureate certificate program was added to address the pressing need for special education teachers. A dual preparation program in general elementary and special education was also started on Maui in spring 2001.

Until the Master’s of Education in Secondary Education with Middle Level Emphasis began in 1996, there was no education program in the state that focused on early adolescents and their teachers, and this remains the only such program.

Nurses. U H Manoa’s School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene partners with healthcare agencies in the community to expand the number of students admitted into its baccalaureate nursing program. Faced with the problem of decreasing numbers of available nurses to fill vacant positions, administrators in local hospitals have provided funding to the school to hire the additional faculty needed to accommodate additional students.

Information Technology Specialists. The Hawaii Center for Advanced Communications, a research and education center in U H M’s College of Engineering that specializes in broadband and wireless communications, assists in providing a trained workforce for Hawaii’s rapidly growing high tech industry.

The Pacific Center for Advanced Technology Training (PCATT), a collaborative venture with the U H Community Colleges and Employment Training Center, enables the community colleges to design and deliver customized training for new high technology industries—from telecommunications and computer networking to biotechnology and digital media arts. With PCATT’s training capabilities, the state will be able to attract new businesses that require high-quality workforce training.

Tourism Workforce. Tourism will continue to have a strong presence in the state’s economy. In response, the Culinary Institute of the Pacific led by Kapiolani CC builds on the existing culinary arts programs to create high-end culinary arts and executive chef training.
Source: State of Hawaii Employment Outlook for Industries and Occupations (1998–2008),
Department of Labor and Industrial Relations

How satisfied are employers with U H graduates?

Key stakeholders (i.e., representatives of business and industry, education, labor, and community-based programs) were generally positive about the quality of technical training provided by Hawaii’s post-secondary institutions, including the University of Hawaii’s 4-year and 2-year campuses.
Source: 2000 Report to the Governor on Hawaii Workforce Development

In academic year 2000–01, sixty organizations (local and mainland) conducted student and alumni interviews at Manoa to fill current and future employment needs. Of those responding, almost 80 percent rated the academic preparation and training of U H M students as Good (above average) or Excellent. The most frequently offered advice/suggestion to better prepare students for employment is to improve their oral communication skills.
Source: 2001 Survey of Employer Perceptions of Graduates from U H M, U H M Career Services

Table: Employer Satisfaction with
U H M Academic Preparation/Training
ExcellentGoodAverageBelow AveragePoor
% of Responses17%61%22%0%0%

Of responses received from employers who rated U H M student on-the-job performance, 83 percent felt Manoa’s students met expectations.
Source: 2001 Survey of Employer Perceptions of Graduates from U H M
U H M Career Services

Table: Employer On-the-Job Satisfaction
with U H M Hires
Meet ExpectationsDo Not Meet Expectations
% of Responses83%17%

The vast majority of U H M College of Education graduates are meeting or exceeding the expectations of principals in the Department of Education.
Source: Fall 2000 Principals’ Assessment Survey of College of Education Graduates

What is the likelihood of a U H Community College vocational student getting a job in Hawaii?

U H Community College career and technical education graduates who seek employment are highly likely to get jobs in Hawaii. The percentage of those employed has remained around 75 percent over the past four years.
Source: Annual UHCC Graduate and Leaver Survey

Table: Employment of Vocational Education Graduates
% of Responses
2000-011999-001998-99
Employed Full-Time39.2%45.7%43.7%
Employed Part-Time34.8%29.7%29.9%
Homemaker3.3%2.8%4.4%
Unemployed, Seeking Work9.9%10.0%10.6%
Unemployed by Choice 12.7%11.8%11.4%

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Scholarship and Creative Activity

How have U H research and training activities fared in recent years?

In 2000, U H Manoa ranked 61st among the top 100 research universities in the nation in federal expenditures for research and development.
Source: Chronicle of Higher Education, March 2002

For the fourth year in a row, the University of Hawaii has received record support for research and training. Extramural funds—grants and contracts from federal, state, private, and foreign sources—reached $252 million for fiscal year 2002, a 17 percent increase over the previous fiscal year and a doubling of support over the last ten years.

The largest gain was in non-research funding, where the level of support rose to $110.3 million, a 32 percent increase over the previous fiscal year. U H received $141.7 million in research funding, a 7 percent increase over the amount received the previous fiscal year and the seventh year in a row that extramural support for research has increased.

Table: Office of Research Services
Extramural Fund Support
Past and Projected
ResearchTraining
Actual
FY1975$23.7M$11.9M
FY1976$16.3M$8.7M
FY1977$21.6M$7.8M
FY1978$21.4M$11.0M
FY1979$27.0M$15.1M
FY1980$25.7M$15.3M
FY1981$27.1M$19.1M
FY1982$26.5M$10.8M
FY1983$33.8M$11.9M
FY1984$30.2M$17.7M
FY1985$36.7M$16.6M
FY1986$35.8M$18.2M
FY1987$35.8M$16.7M
FY1988$39.4M$22.1M
FY1989$47.0M$24.9M
FY1990$49.4M$34.3M
FY1991$58.1M$48.0M
FY1992$65.8M$59.1M
FY1993$61.1M$70.0M
FY1994$77.8M$64.8M
FY1995$70.2M$69.0M
FY1996$76.7M$57.8M
FY1997$89.1M$71.7M
FY1998$91.7M$68.2M
FY1999$92.7M$71.4M
FY2000$102.8M$77.8M
FY2001$132.8M$83.4M
FY2002$141.8M$110.3M
Projected
FY2003$129.5M$100.4M
FY2004$135.7M$105.3M
FY2005$141.8M$110.1M
FY2006$148.0M$115.0M
FY2007$154.2M$119.8M
FY2008$160.4M$124.6M
FY2009$166.5M$129.5M
FY2010$172.7M$134.3M
FY2011$178.9M$139.1M
FY2012$185.1M$144.0M

In May 2001, the Air Force Research Laboratory awarded the University of Hawaii a four-year contract to operate the Maui High Performance Computing Center, home of one of the world’s most powerful supercomputing sites and the second most powerful supercomputing center in the Department of Defense. The contract may be extended up to 10 years with a potential value of $181 million. It is the largest single contract award in the history of the University of Hawaii.

Ranked Programs

Research Breakthroughs in Last Two Years

What is the status of U H undergraduate post-baccalaureate enrollment at U H Manoa?

Sixty-five percent of the spring 2002 U H M graduating seniors planned to attend graduate school. Of these, over half (55%) planned to attend graduate programs at Manoa.

Since 1999, the percentage of graduating seniors who planned to advance their higher education at Manoa has steadily increased, while those planning to do so on the mainland has decreased. Higher Quality Program Elsewhere (33%) was the most frequently cited reason for not attending U H Manoa.
Source: Spring 2002 U H M Graduating Senior Survey

Table: U H Manoa Graduating Seniors
Location of Planned Graduate Study
% of Responses
2002199919961993
U H Manoa55.4%50.4%47.5%59.0%
Mainland31.3%39.6%43.1%33.0%
Other13.3%10.0%9.4%8.0%

Sixty-four percent of the spring 2001 UHH graduating seniors planned to attend graduate school. Of these, over half (56%) planned to attend graduate programs at Manoa (35%) or Hilo (21%).

The percentage of UHH graduating seniors who planned to advance their higher education on the mainland decreased significantly in 2001.
Source: Spring 2001 UHH Graduating Senior Survey

Table: U H Hilo Graduating Seniors
Location of Planned Graduate Study
% of Responses
200120001999
U H Manoa34.7%23.1%27.3%
U H Hilo21.3%11.5%17.0%
Mainland36.0%45.2%42.0%
Private Hawaii University5.3%5.8%4.5%
Other2.7%14.4%9.1%

Five years after graduation, significant numbers (41%) of U H Manoa alumni have completed further higher education, and nearly 60 percent of those completing advanced studies did so at U H Manoa. Twenty-eight percent are still pursuing higher education and over 40 percent of these are studying at Manoa.
Source: 2000 U H M Alumni Outcomes Survey.
Note: U H M alumni are surveyed five years after graduation.

Of U H Hilo alumni who graduated before the 1999–2000 academic year, 41 percent have completed and nearly a third (31%) are still pursuing further higher education. Of these, about a quarter completed (21%) or are pursuing (25%) advanced studies at U H Manoa.
Source: Summer 2001 UHH Alumni Survey

Support for Student Learning and Diversity

What are the demographic trends in the composition of U H employees and the student body?

The mean student age for the U H system has held steady for the last three years at 26.2.

Table: Mean Age of Students
Fall Semester
19911992199319941995199619971998199920002001
Mean Age26.526.626.526.626.426.125.926.026.226.226.2

Women continue to account for over 56 percent of the students enrolled at U H.

Table: Enrollment of Women
Fall Semester
19911992199319941995199619971998199920002001
% of Enrolled55.8%56.4%56.4%56.6%56.5%56.1%55.8%55.9%56.1%56.3%56.7%

The percentage of Hawaiian, Pacific Islanders, and Mixed ethnic groups has increased in the last ten years, while the percentage of Japanese, Chinese, and Caucasian students has decreased.

Table: Enrollment by Ethnicity
Hawaiian/
Part-Hawaiian
FilipinoChineseJapaneseCaucasianPacific
Islander
MixedAll Other
Fall 199110.5%13.2%8.1%23.3%23.1%1.8%8.7%11.3%
Fall 200113.6%13.1%6.6%18.1%20.8%2.7%11.3%13.8%

The U H is one of the most ethnically diverse institutions of higher learning in the nation—20.8 percent of the students are Caucasian, 18.1 percent are Japanese, 13.6 percent are Hawaiian or part-Hawaiian, 13.1 percent are Filipino, 6.6 percent are Chinese, and 11.3 percent report Mixed ethnicity.

U H Hilo ranked ninth among national liberal arts colleges in campus diversity and was the only public institution making the national ranking in the campus diversity category.
Source: U.S. News & World Report, 2001

Since fall 1997 about 56 percent of U H students have been enrolled full-time.

Table: Full-time Enrollment
Fall Semester
19911992199319941995199619971998199920002001
% of U H Students54.0%52.4%53.4%53.7%54.5%55.0%56.3%56.5%55.8%56.6%56.1%

Minorities comprise smaller proportions among faculty members than among all U H employees. Over the past seven years, minorities have increased as a share of all employees.

Table: Employees by Ethnicity
Fall 2001
CaucasianHawaiian/
Part-Hawaiian
FilipinoChineseJapaneseOther Asian/
Pacific Islanders
Other
All Employees39%8%5%9%29%4%6%
Faculty Only58%5%3%8%18%4%4%

The proportion of women in the U H workforce has steadily increased over the past seven years. For all employees, the proportion of women is slightly higher than the proportion of men, while the ratio of women to men in faculty ranks is approximately 3 to 4.

Table: Percent of U H Women Employees
Fall 1996 and Fall 2001
19962001
All Employees48.6%50.6%
Faculty39.3%41.9%

What is the status of enrollment by geographic origin within Hawaii?

About 90 percent of the students enrolled at U H campuses list Hawaii as their home. Enrollment of students on or from the Neighbor Islands and mainland U.S. has increased since fall 1991.

Table: Permanent Home Address
HonoluluLeewardWindwardNeighbor IslandsOther U.S.Foreign Other
Fall 199134.8%25.8%10.5%20.8%4.5%3.6%
Fall 200131.0%25.9%9.6%22.5%7.5%3.5%

What share of students report a disability?

A smaller share (5–6%) of U H Manoa freshmen report a disability than do freshmen surveyed nationally (10%). It may be that fewer students with disabilities enroll at U H M or that U H M entering freshmen choose not to identify themselves as having a disability.
Sources: U H M Survey of First-Time Freshmen and Transfers;
UCLA Cooperative Institutional Research Program, Freshman Survey

Table: Self-Reported Disability
199819992000
U H M First-Time Freshmen5%5%6%
U H M Transfers9%9%9%
National Freshmen Survey10%10%10%

DIVERSITY INITIATIVES/HIGHLIGHTS

How do U H students relate to issues on diversity?

Almost two-thirds (63%) of Manoa undergraduates indicated they gained Quite a Bit or made Very Much progress in becoming aware of different philosophies, cultures, and ways of life—5 percent more than in 1999.
Source: 1996, 1999, 2002 U H M College Student Experiences Questionnaire

Table: Gains in Awareness of Different Philosophies, Cultures, and Ways of Life
% of Responses
200219991996
Very Much25%18%18%
Quite a Bit38%39%38%
Some30%34%34%
Very Little7%8%10%

Almost three-fourths (74%) of U H M undergraduates felt they gained Quite a Bit or made Very Much progress in developing the ability to understand and get along with different kinds of people.
Source: 1996, 1999, 2002 U H M College Student Experiences Questionnaire

Table: Gains in Ability to Get Along with Different Kinds of People
% of Responses
200219991996
Very Much33%32%24%
Quite a Bit41%41%42%
Some21%21%28%
Very Little5%7%6%

On a scale of 1 to 7, Manoa undergraduates rated the University 5.3 or above average in the development of student understanding and appreciation of human diversity.
Rating: 1 = weak emphasis; 7 = strong emphasis
Source: 2002 U H M College Student Experiences Questionnaire

Over three-fourths (76%) of U H W O undergraduates felt they gained Quite a Bit or made Very Much progress in becoming aware of different philosophies, cultures, and ways of life while attending West Oahu.
Source: 2000 U H W O College Student Experiences Questionnaire

In a recent national survey of freshmen and seniors, U H Hilo and U H West Oahu students were rated above average in their ability to understand and get along with different kinds of people.
Source: 2001 National Survey of Student Engagement

Table: Ability to Understand/Get Along with Different Kinds of People
U H HiloU H W ONational
Mean
Understood Students of Other Racial and Ethnic BackgroundsFreshmen2.852.58
Seniors3.193.232.63
Had Serious Conversations with Students of Different
Racial and Ethnic Backgrounds
Freshmen2.952.65
Seniors3.163.152.63
Had Serious Conversations with Students of Different
Religious Beliefs, Political Opinions, or Personal Values
Freshmen2.952.90
Seniors2.932.992.84
1 = never; 2 = sometimes; 3 = often; 4 = very often
Note: U H West Oahu is an upper division institution; only juniors and seniors.

U H Manoa attracts freshmen students who express tolerance of others on issues of sexual orientation and religion.
Source: 1998, 1999, and 2000 U H M Survey of First-Time Freshmen

Table: Entering U H M Students (First-Time Freshmen)
199819992000
Individuals have a right to live their lives as
others do regardless of their sexual orientation
72%71%77%
Tolerant of other religions69%66%70%

How selective are U H four-year institutions?

On average, Scholastic Assessment Test (S A T) math and verbal scores for entering freshmen at U H Manoa are consistently above the U.S. and Hawaii norms.

Verbal scores of U H Hilo entering freshmen are comparable to Hawaii norms but are slightly below in math.

Table: Average S A T-1 Verbal Score
U H Manoa and U H Hilo
U H MUHHHawaiiU.S.
Fall 1991519482499
Fall 1992519477500
Fall 1993519477500
Fall 1994515477499
Fall 1995524482504
Fall 1996522485505
Fall 1997520483483505
Fall 1998527491483505
Fall 1999525482482505
Fall 2000526482488505
Fall 2001525488486506
Note: U H M = First-time fresmen entering fall semester;
UHH = First-time fresmen entering fall semester;
Hawaii = Hawaii test takers;
U.S. = U.S. test takers

All scores are recentered scores. U H Hilo (UHH) scores not available prior to fall 1997.

Table: Average S A T-1 Math Score
U H Manoa and U H Hilo
U H MUHHHawaiiU.S.
Fall 1991553504500
Fall 1992557499501
Fall 1993556504503
Fall 1994557504504
Fall 1995557504506
Fall 1996565510508
Fall 1997565494512511
Fall 1998570498513512
Fall 1999570494513511
Fall 2000566492519514
Fall 2001563505515514
Note: U H M = First-time fresmen entering fall semester;
UHH = First-time fresmen entering fall semester;
Hawaii = Hawaii test takers;
U.S. = U.S. test takers

All scores are recentered scores. U H Hilo (UHH) scores not available prior to fall 1997.

In fall 2001, 48 percent of U H M and 32 percent of UHH matriculating (first-time) freshmen were in the top 20 percent of their high school class.

Table: Matriculation Rate by High School Rank
Fall 2001
U H ManoaU H Hilo
1st high school quintile48%32%
2nd high school quintile33%38%
3rd high school quintile14%19%
4th high school quintile4%8%
5th high school quintile1%2%
Note: Percentages are based on students for whom high school rankings are available.

> Return to Table of Contents

Transfer and Articulation

How successful are U H Community College students who transfer to U H four-year institutions?

UHCC transfers to U H M graduate at higher rates than their non-UHCC transfer counterparts.

Table: Average Graduation Rates of
Full-time UHCC Transfers to U H Manoa
UHCC transfers
to U H M
Non-UHCC transfers
to U H M
1 year after entry0.4%0.3%
2 years after entry19%9%
3 years after entry41%30%
4 years after entry56%47%
5 years after entry67%57%
6 years after entry71%60%

What is the status of articulation within the U H system?

Articulation refers to the alignment of courses among campuses such that students are able to transfer credit earned at one campus to meet specific requirements on another campus.

Since 1989, across the U H system, over 2,000 courses (excluding foreign language) have been submitted for articulation. These involved over 14,500 campus actions and approximately 93 percent have been approved.

In July 2000, the Board of Regents approved new general education requirements at U H Hilo and U H Manoa. The implementation of these requirements in fall 2000 at U H Hilo and in fall 2001 at U H Manoa has greatly increased opportunities for students to transfer courses among campuses of the University. As of summer 2002, students from other U H campuses had more than 500 additional course options which they could use to meet U H Manoa requirements and more than 600 additional course options to meet U H Hilo requirements.

The introduction of a new student information system for the entire University, beginning in summer 2002, is expected to further clarify the articulation of courses among campuses of the University.

A number of articulation agreements among campuses also serve to smooth the way for student transfer.
U H West Oahu has six agreements in place with community college vocational programs to allow transfer of credits toward a baccalaureate degree and continues to develop such agreements in new areas. Systemwide, computer science faculty have reached an agreement on the transferability of introductory courses among all campuses.

What is the status of student transfer rates within the U H system?

On average, over the last ten years, there have been about 55 percent more transfers from the UHCCs to the U H four-year campuses than from the U H four-year campuses to the UHCCs.

Table: Number of Transfers from
the U H Community Colleges
into the U H Four-Year Campuses
U H ManoaU H HiloU H West OahuTotal
Fall 1991853561021,011
Fall 1992886451181,049
Fall 19938582111081,177
Fall 19947311951311,057
Fall 19957932581661,217
Fall 1996649220119988
Fall 19977201881511,059
Fall 1998695176125996
Fall 19997211722151,108
Fall 2000632169133934
Fall 20017011781651,044

Since fall 1997, the number of transfers from U H four-year campuses to the UHCCs has increased gradually.

Table: Number of Transfers from
the U H Four-Year Campuses
into the U H Community Colleges
U H ManoaU H HiloU H West OahuTotal
Fall 19915607523658
Fall 199246625626748
Fall 199345212821601
Fall 199452413824686
Fall 19955329818648
Fall 19966589323774
Fall 19975536620639
Fall 19985658521671
Fall 199957710328708
Fall 20005739117681
Fall 200160810822738

What information is shared with the D O E relative to the success of D O E students at U H?

There has been general agreement between U H and the Department of Education about the importance of information exchange that focuses on the initial performance of D O E graduates attending U H.

U H Data to the D O E by High School on Recent Graduates Attending U H Campuses

Nearly 50 U H M faculty members serve as ambassadors, liaisons, and friends to every high school in Hawaii. These and similar efforts throughout the U H system help to build better bridges between Hawaii high schools and U H.

Standard 3

Developing and Applying Resources and Organizational Structures to Ensure Sustainability

The University of Hawaii strives to create a high quality environment for learning through its investment in human, physical, fiscal, and information resources.

Faculty Resources
Access to Faculty

What is the usual U H undergraduate student experience in terms of class size and faculty type?

Lower division average class size decreased slightly since fall 1997.

Table: Average Class Size
Lower Division—University of Hawaii
U H System U H M A&S U H M OtherU H HiloUHCC
General
UHCC
Vocational
Fall 1997 24 3134252418
Fall 2001 23 3034242316

Generally, upper division average class size has decreased since fall 1997.

Table: Average Class Size
Upper Division—University of Hawaii
U H System U H M A&S U H M OtherU H HiloU H W O
Fall 1997 19 19201622
Fall 2001 18 18181720

More than 80 percent of all U H undergraduate and lower division classes enroll 30 or fewer students.

Table: Fall 2001 Classes by Range
University of Hawaii
1-1011-3031-5051-100101+
Lower Division Classes13.0%69.8%13.3%2.7%1.3%
Undergraduate Classes17.4%66.1%12.9%2.5%1.0%
Note: Ranges for UHCC differ from four-year campuses, but were grouped as closely as possible.

At the undergraduate level, nearly 70% of student semester hours are taught by regular faculty.

Table: SSH Taught, by Faculty Type
Undergraduate Level—U H System
Regular FacultyLecturerOther Faculty
Fall 199776.4%16.8%6.9%
Fall 200168.5%21.3%10.2%

Faculty Salaries

How do U H faculty salaries compare with national averages?

The Community Colleges continue to reflect favorably in relation to their national public institution counterparts, but U H Manoa, U H Hilo, and U H West Oahu show signs of lagging behind their counterparts.

U H Manoa’s average salaries for only Rank 2 surpassed those of the other public doctoral-level institutions. Faculty salaries for Ranks 2 and 3 at U H Hilo and for Rank 2 at U H West Oahu outpaced other national general baccalaureate counterparts.

Table: U H Manoa
Comparison of Average Faculty Salaries
with Other Public Institutions for 2001–02
Rank 5Rank 4Rank 3Rank 2
U H Average$80,532$60,597$52,167$40,191
National Average$89,631$63,049$53,392$36,832
Note: The national averages are the averages of all public institutions surveyed which are in the same category as each campus.
Source: Academe March/April 2002, Bulletin of the American Association of University Professors

Table: U H Hilo
Comparison of Average Faculty Salaries
with Other Public Institutions for 2001–02
Rank 5Rank 4Rank 3Rank 2
U H Average$63,271$51,495$45,939$35,833
National Average$64,508$52,451$43,789$35,041
Note: The national averages are the averages of all public institutions surveyed which are in the same category as each campus.
Source: Academe March/April 2002, Bulletin of the American Association of University Professors

Table: U H West Oahu
Comparison of Average Faculty Salaries
with Other Public Institutions for 2001–02
Rank 5Rank 4Rank 3Rank 2
U H Average$57,432$40,973$38,728$36,514
National Average$64,508$52,451$43,789$35,041
Note: The national averages are the averages of all public institutions surveyed which are in the same category as each campus.
Source: Academe March/April 2002, Bulletin of the American Association of University Professors

Salaries at Ranks 2, 3, and 4 at the Community Colleges exceed the national averages in comparison with other public 2-year institutions with academic ranks. However, at Rank 5, average faculty salaries at only Kapiolani Community College reached the national average.

Table: Comparison of Average Faculty Salaries
with Other Public Institutions for 2001–02
(U H Community Colleges)
HawaiiHonoluluKapiolaniKauaiLeewardMauiWindwardNational
Averages
Rank 5$56,879$58,923$61,474$60,411$59,105$57,535$57,293$60,997
Rank 4$50,759$51,677$52,464$51,695$50,432$52,750$50,340$48,046
Rank 3$45,226$50,188$46,390$48,797$44,721$47,890$47,301$42,755
Rank 2$41,219$40,209$39,757$41,176$39,565$41,653$40,449$35,445
Note: The national averages are the averages of all public institutions surveyed which are in the same category as each campus.
Source: Academe March/April 2002, Bulletin of the American Association of University Professors

What share of their time do U H faculty spend on instruction and research and how does this compare with counterparts elsewhere?

Faculty Time

Instructional workload remained about the same for most U H faculty from fall 1997 to fall 2001, except at the UHCC where it decreased slightly. U H regular faculty teach from two to four courses a semester and some teach five. For comparative purposes, equivalent semester hours per regular faculty at the U H Community Colleges include general academic instruction only.

Table: University of Hawaii
Instructional Workload
(Equivalent Semester Hours/Regular Faculty)
U H MUHHU H W OUHCC
Fall 2001 7.88.910.011.9
Fall 1997 8.18.89.313.1

The share of time U H faculty spend on teaching and research is similar to that of their counterparts nationwide.

Overall, U H Manoa faculty spend slightly more time on teaching than their mainland counterparts, whereas faculty at Hilo, West Oahu, and the Community Colleges spend slightly less.

The most recent collective bargaining contract between the University and the U H Professional Assembly resulted in reduced teaching loads for the Community Colleges. During academic year 2001–02, teaching reductions totaling nearly 1,000 credits were awarded for curriculum development, professional development, and other non-instructional activities.

Table: Percentage of Time Instructional Faculty
Spent on Various Activities, by Institutional Type ¹
TeachingResearchOther ³
U H M ²49%22%29%
U.S. Research46%26%28%
UHH61%15%24%
U H W O58%11%31%
U.S. Comprehensive63%11%26%
UHCCs67%5%28%
Two-Year72%4%24%
Notes: ¹ University of Hawaii faculty (683) classified as instructional, Spring 2002. U.S. Public includes full-time faculty and instructional staff members with instructional responsibilities, Fall 1998.
² Adding U H M faculty classified as research to the U H M profile would produce a distribution of time across research and instruction similar to the national pattern.
³ “Other” includes administration, service, professional growth, and other non-teaching activities.

U H data based on Quality of Faculty Worklife Survey, 2002. U.S. data based on National Center for Education Statistics, 1999 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty, June 2001.

Faculty Morale

What is the overall state of faculty morale at U H?

On a scale of 1 to 10, U H faculty morale stands slightly below the mid-point at 5.39, with the lowest at Manoa (5.17) and the highest at the Employment Training Center (6.71).
Source: Spring 2002 U H Quality of Faculty Worklife Survey

Table: Overall Faculty Morale by Campus Units
U H MUHHU H W OUHCC
1998 4.636.265.805.96
2002 5.176.045.205.72
Note: Midpoint = 5.50
Range is from 1 = low morale to 10 = high morale.
UHCC includes Employment Training Center.

Although the morale reported by Manoa faculty is higher than reported in 1998, most do not perceive a change in their morale relative to past data.
Source: Spring 2002 U H Quality of Faculty Worklife Survey

Table: Overall Change in Manoa Faculty Morale
198719901992199419982002
Change in Morale 4.64.74.64.33.64.9
Note: 1.0 = declined morale
5.5 = midpoint or unchanged morale
10.0 = improved morale

Overall, faculty members perceive the greatest need is for improvement in advocacy for faculty, personal issues, and faculty governance, and the least need is for improvement in their students and collegial relations.
Source: Spring 2002 U H Quality of Faculty Worklife Survey

Table: U H Faculty Quality of Worklife
Advocacy for Faculty2.88
Personal Issues2.91
Faculty Governance2.92
Support Services2.93
Reward/Evaluation System3.04
Leadership3.05
Professional Worklife3.09
Students3.43
Collegial Relations3.76
Note: 1 = most negative response
5 = most positive response
midpoint = 3.0

Reflects all members of the U H faculty (i.e., instructors, researchers, specialists, agents, and librarians) affiliated with each of the three institutional types represented within the system (i.e., research university, baccalaureate granting, and community colleges).

Faculty Turnover

What is the rate of turnover for faculty?

After steady increases in fiscal years 2000 and 2001, the faculty turnover rate due to resignations decreased in 2002 and currently stands at 4.06 percent. Seeking greater opportunities for advancement, better pay, and lower cost of living/housing continue to be the most common reasons given for leaving the
U H.
Source: Exit Questionnaire, U H Office of Human Resources

Table: U H Faculty Resignations (Turnover Rate)
FY1998-99FY1999-00FY2000-01FY2001-02
Number of Resignations Processed7995145129
Percent2.54%3.06%4.63%4.06%
Note: Excludes graduate assistants and lecturers.
Source: Resignations of U H Employees, July 2001–June 2002, Office of Human Resources

> Return to Table of Contents

Fiscal and Physical Resources

What is the relationship between state general fund support and U H enrollment?

After several years of decline, both enrollment and current service funding have stabilized.

Over the past five years U H enrollment increased one percent, while current service funding is down five percent.

Table: Budget & Enrollment
1997-981998-991999-002000-012001-02
Current Service$267,337,395$243,536,966$257,233,817$258,217,284$253,658,138
Enrollment45,55145,33746,47944,57945,994
Note: Enrollment up 1%; Projected current service funding down 5.1%

How has U H fared relative to the rest of the state in its share of general fund support?

U H’s share of state general funds in the last ten years has gone from 13 to less than 9 percent—a 31 percent decline in support. Over the last seven years, it has remained relatively stable at 8 to 9 percent. U H student enrollment in the last decade has been between 45,000 and 52,000.

Table: Headcount Enrollments
1992-931993-941994-951995-961996-971997-981998-991999-002000-012001-02
Enrollment49,85150,64751,67750,24247,37945,55145,33746,47944,57945,994
Percent Share of
General Funds
11.9%11.5%11.5%9.3%9.2%8.8%8.7%9.2%9.2%8.4%

Compared to the national ten-year average (FY1992–2002), Hawaii ranks last in the nation in state appropriations for higher education.
Source: Grapevine, Center for Higher Education & Educational Finance
National Database of Tax Support for Higher Education

What is the University’s status on the source and application of current fund revenues?

In fiscal year 2000–01, half of the University’s funds came from state general fund appropriations.

Table: U H Funding Sources, FY2001
State50%
Federal20%
Tuition15%
Sales/Services, Endowments and Other11%
Private and Local4%

The primary use of funds is to support instruction and research.

Table: U H Funding Uses, FY2001
Student Services, Scholarships and Fellowships8%
Public Service6%
Academic and Institutional Support18%
Auxiliary, Independant and Operation & Maintenance15%
Research21%
Instruction32%

What is the level of investment for maintaining the U H physical plant?

The repairs and maintenance (R&M) allocation per gross square foot (GSF) between fiscal years 1999 and 2003 has increased substantially due to funding support from the capital improvement program (C I P) budget.

Table: U H Manoa
Budget Allocation Compared with Gross Square Feet
FY99FY00FY01FY02FY03 ¹
R&M Allocation$3,948,561$8,457,610$13,520,481$17,898,650$21,472,307
Gross Square Feet ²4,509,7084,609,5284,746,9284,746,9284,751,432
Ratio ($/GSF)$0.88$1.83$2.85$3.77$4.52
Note: ¹ Projected
² Does not include off-campus facilities and on-campus facilities that are self-supporting.

Table: U H Hilo
Budget Allocation Compared with Gross Square Feet
FY99FY00FY01FY02FY03 ¹
R&M Allocation$949,487$1,868,800$3,216,275$4,128,384$5,315,384
Gross Square Feet ²867,000867,000867,000983,508983,508
Ratio ($/GSF)$1.10$2.16$3.71$4.20$5.40
Note: ¹ Projected
² Does not include off-campus facilities and on-campus facilities that are self-supporting.

Table: U H West Oahu
Budget Allocation Compared with Gross Square Feet
FY99FY00FY01FY02FY03 ¹
R&M Allocation$0$100,000$67,691$73,833$100,000
Gross Square Feet ²39,73639,73639,73639,73639,736
Ratio ($/GSF)$0.00$2.52$1.70$1.86$2.52
Note: ¹ Projected
² Does not include off-campus facilities and on-campus facilities that are self-supporting.

Table: U H Community Colleges
Budget Allocation Compared with Gross Square Feet
FY99FY00FY01FY02FY03 ¹
R&M Allocation$2,812,085$3,513,085$6,459,292$8,689,085$11,042,085
Gross Square Feet ²2,372,5802,372,5802,375,8282,519,5052,613,407
Ratio ($/GSF)$1.19$1.48$2.72$3.45$4.23
Note: ¹ Projected
² Does not include off-campus facilities and on-campus facilities that are self-supporting.

Table: U H System
Budget Allocation Compared with Gross Square Feet
FY99FY00FY01FY02FY03 ¹
R&M Allocation$7,710,133$13,939,495$23,263,739$30,789,952$37,929,776
Gross Square Feet ²7,789,0247,888,8448,029,4928,289,6778,388,083
Ratio ($/GSF)$0.99$1.77$2.90$3.71$4.52
Note: ¹ Projected
² Does not include off-campus facilities and on-campus facilities that are self-supporting.

The percentage of the general operating budget (general fund appropriations and tuition revenues) dedicated to R&M needs to be increased to ensure that one of the University’s greatest assets—its facilities—is well maintained.

Table: Systemwide Repairs and Maintenance Operating Allocations Compared
with Total Operating Allocations
FY99FY00FY01FY02FY03
R&M Allocation$1,998,133$3,539.495$3,263,739$3,789,952$2,929,776
Total Operating ¹319,347,571320,030,381326,936,579342,088,466334,439,926
Ratio (R&M$/OPER$)0.63%1.11%1.00%1.11%0.88%
Note: ¹ General funds and tuition revenues

Although C I P appropriations have helped to alleviate a portion of the deferred R&M, the backlog of R&M remains one of the most serious problems currently facing the University.

Table: Total Deferred Repairs and Maintenance
FY 1996FY 2000FY 2003
U H Manoa$36,770,000$88,793,000$52,635,390
U H Hilo$8,079,600$30,929,250$22,664,453
U H Community Colleges$22,882,600$47,015,945$29,622,549
U H System$67,732,200$166,738,195$104,922,392

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Information and Technology Resources
Library

How does the U H’s major library compare on a national basis?

Among the 112 university libraries that are members of the Association of Research Libraries (A R L), U H ranks 60th—a significant improvement from 77th four years ago.
Source: 1999–00 A R L Membership Index and Statistics

The indexed ranking is based on the number of volumes held, number of volumes added in the last fiscal year, number of current serials, size of permanent staff, and total operating expenditures.

In the past four years, the library has made strides to regain its standing in terms of annual book/journal expenditures. The University has made a strong commitment to restoring book funds to the library.

Implementation of a new online library system in 2001, as well as construction of the Hamilton Library Addition and ongoing renovation of the existing building, adds greatly to the Library’s ability to serve students and faculty with their scholarly, research, and information needs.

Current improvements are in line with the library’s strategic goal to be back in the A R L top 40.

Table: U H Manoa Library Rankings
(Out of the 112 A R L Member Libraries)
U H M Ranking
1996-971997-981998-991999-00
Overall A R L Criteria Index77626460
Book/Journal Expenditures10710510193
Volumes Added (Gross)91565752
Volumes in the Library48484645
Current Serials39434550
Professional & Support Staff FTE91939497
Total Library Expenditures92978884

Information Technology

How is technology impacting U H?

Internet

U H has Internet capacity commensurate with most major research universities in the country and is the first in the world to purchase, rather than lease, its own capacity.

There has been continuing growth in the use of electronic mail (e-mail). Over the past 15 months, the number of messages sent increased by 14 percent, and the volume of information (Mbytes) sent via e-mail increased almost 40 percent.

Table: Average Daily Volume of E-mail
2001
Quarter 1
2001
Quarter 2
2001
Quarter 3
2001
Quarter 4
2002
Quarter 1
Pieces Sent 187,505176,479185,369212,457213,936

The U H has kept Hawaii at the forefront of Internet services. Among other things, U H operates the Hawaii Internet Exchange, a neutral exchange point for all the state’s Internet service providers and thus for nearly everyone who uses the Internet in Hawaii.

Supercomputer

U H won the competition for the $181 million 10-year contract to manage the Maui High Performance Computing Center, one of the five largest centers in the U.S. Department of Defense with over 2.36 teraflops of computational power.

E-commerce

In addition to providing free information to anyone anywhere in cyberspace, the University has a number of e-commerce applications that include the U H Press, which sells publications online, U H Manoa, which accepts electronic tuition and fee payment by credit card, and the U H Bookstore, which sells merchandise online and is beginning an e-commerce project for textbooks.

Student Information System

The seven community colleges of the U H system went “live” July 1, 2002, with a new U H system-wide Student Information System (SIS). The 4.5-month start-to-finish implementation represents one of the fastest-ever initial implementations of a major software package in higher education. The Banner Student System from SCT Corporation provides the University with web-based applications that run over the Internet. Manoa, Hilo, and West Oahu are expected to be fully integrated by fall 2003. With the consolidation (or centralization) of campus student information systems, students will be able to:

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Private Giving

What are the trends in private giving through the U H Foundation?

Private giving to the University through the Foundation remains strong. In FY2000–01, a record $41 million was given to the University. This represents a 24 percent increase over the previous year.

In FY2000–01, the Foundation completed the final year of a four-year plan to raise in excess of $100 million. Over $116 million was raised to support academic programs. Average giving over the campaign years was $29.1 million versus the average for the previous three-year period of $15.7 million.

Table: University of Hawaii Foundation
Comprehensive Campaign Gift History
3-year Average
pre-campaign
1997-981998-991999-002000-01
$15.7M$19.3M$23.1M$33.0M$41.0M

About $11 million was spent over the past four years to raise the $116 million, or about 9.6 cents per dollar, compared to the national average of about 10 cents per dollar for fund-raising activities.

Private gifts come from a wide variety of sources. Individuals (friends and alumni) account for 48 percent of the outright gifts received by the Foundation.

Table: University of Hawaii Foundation
FY2000–01 Gifts by Source
Foundations
& Trusts
FriendsOrganizationsAlumniCorporationsTotal
Gifts
Gifts$8.6M$16.1M$1.9M$3.8M$10.6M$41.0M
Percent21%39%5%9%26%

What is the status of the University’s endowment?

Due to significant market decline, the market value of the U H foundation’s investment portfolio decreased to $106.9 million in FY2000–01 even though endowment contributions remained steady.

Overall performance of financial markets during this period was -5.8 percent as compared to -3.6 percent for the Foundation’s portfolio.

Table: University of Hawaii Foundation
FY1995–FY2001 Investment Portfolio
1994-951995-961996-971997-981998-991999-002000-01
Market Value$45.4M$58.6M$68.9M$86.5M$94.4M$112.2M$106.9M

Standard 4

Creating an Organization Committed to Learning and Improvement

The University of Hawaii system of campuses pursues evidence-based and participatory discussions about how effectively it is accomplishing its purposes and achieving its educational objectives.

Program Review

What is the status of program review?

Program review is a continuing activity within the University of Hawaii. Campuses routinely review established academic programs, as well as assess the need for new programs, make major modifications of curriculum, and update the names of departments and degrees. Activities for the past two years are summarized below.

During 2000–2001, the Board of Regents approved six new academic programs, moved five programs from provisional to established status, approved the reorganization of one school and one college to house programs that had been administratively independent, terminated one provisional and three established academic programs, and approved revised general education plans for U H Manoa and U H Hilo. The administration approved four certificate credentials, suspended admissions to one degree program, resumed previously suspended admissions to a program, approved planning for eight new degrees and certificates, and approved name changes for eleven departments and degrees. In all, 126 academic programs underwent review in this academic year.

During 2001–2002, the Board of Regents approved 13 new academic programs, granted established status to 11 provisional academic programs, extended the provisional status of one program, terminated one provisional and one established academic program, and renamed two programs. The administration approved eight certificate credentials, terminated two certificate programs, stopped out admissions to four academic programs, approved planning for 15 new degree or certificate programs, and approved seven degree name changes or mergers of academic programs. In all, 162 academic programs underwent review in this academic year.

In July 2000, the Board of Regents established a new policy requiring annual reporting on and regular review of centers, institutes, and similar entities within the University that serve to focus research activities or training or service activities external to the University. The University administration reported approval of six new centers during 2000–2001 and two new centers during 2001–2002. During 2000–2001, one center was closed. In 2001–2002, one center was closed and 21 centers were reviewed and continued.

Management and Assessment Information

University Board of Regents and Executive policy establishes a commitment to accountability and educational assessment. The intent is to gather evidence about institutional effectiveness in meeting mission, goals, and objectives, and the importance of using this information to improve programs and services and to demonstrate public accountability.

Institutional Assessment and Research

The University’s assessment strategy focuses on program and institutional performance rather than individual evaluation, is decentralized, and encourages activities that are incorporated into existing program review, evaluation, accreditation, institutional planning, budgeting, and tuition-setting processes.

The University of Hawaii’s Institutional Effectiveness Report (previously known as the Benchmarks/Performance Indicators Report) has been called a sensible approach to the complex matter of accountability and performance reporting. It has served as a model for reports on policy indicators prepared by the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education.

In academic year 2001–02, 80 to 90 Management and Planning Support Reports (MAPS) were completed; these reports and those for earlier years are available on the Web at: www.hawaii.edu/iro/maps.htm. MAPS refers to a series of reports published on an ongoing basis by the U H Institutional Research Office to provide high quality data on various aspects of the University’s operations. The reports are public information and are widely distributed to the University community, including deans, directors, administrators, and departments. Areas covered include enrollment, courses, academic crossover, faculty/staff, planning information, curriculum, finance, students, and special reports. Reports focused on students include applications processed, degrees/certificates earned, distribution of grades, credits earned, course completion rates, graduation/retention rates, high school background, S A T scores, and transfer patterns. Special reports include price of attendance, current fund revenues/expenditures, and peer/benchmark group comparisons.

Recent survey efforts include:

Many of these surveys are available on the Web at: www.hawaii.edu/ovppp.

Outcomes are used to:

UHH. Important assessment activities at UHH include: establishment of an Institutional Research Office (2001); a new campus Academic Assessment Plan; revised program review guidelines that emphasize assessment of student learning; and campus assessment and general education committees.

U H W O. Important assessment activities at U H W O include establishment of an Assessment Office (1991) to maintain institutional data and conduct surveys, course evaluations, pre- and post-testing, longitudinal tracking, and periodic reports for accreditation/program review and planning. A collegewide Assessment Committee formulates policy on assessment concerns and specifies college and divisional learning and institutional objectives.

UHCC. The U H Community Colleges utilize Program Health Indicators (P H I) to assess all career and technical programs every year. Program faculty design and analysis indicators and results are used to support program planning and operations. The P H I program is being expanded to include liberal arts programs at all of the community colleges.

All seven CC campuses participated in the first nationwide Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE). This instrument assesses the learning-centered experiences of community college students. Successes, measured in six broad categories and defined as significantly outperforming like institutions nationwide, far outnumbered the challenges at all UHCC campuses. Campus assessment committees are incorporating CCSSE results in institutional action plans.

Distinctions and Achievements

U.S. News & World Report ranks U H graduate programs in the U H College of Business Administration, School of Law, and School of Social Work among the best in the nation.
Source: U.S. News & World Report, April 2002

The U H M School of Architecture was among the top three design schools in the nation recognized as those that “make a difference” in practice design.
Source: 2001 Leading School Survey, DesignIntelligence

Windward Community College was one of only five colleges nationwide to receive a competitive grant from NASA to establish an Aeronautics Education Laboratory that will benefit students in grades K–12 and serve as an outreach arm in science and technology education.
Source: Windward Community College

U.S. News & World Report ranked U H Hilo third among public liberal arts colleges in the West. It’s the only university in Hawaii classified as a national liberal arts college.
Source: U.S. News & World Report, 2000

A U H West Oahu graduate was one of four selected by the Society for American Archaeology to receive a grant from the National Science Foundation.
Source: U H West Oahu

The U H M College of Education met all twenty standards and was awarded five-year accreditation from the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education. The College meets the highest standard in the profession and is the only teacher education program in Hawaii to be nationally accredited.
Source: U H M College of Education

U.S. News & World Report ranks U H Manoa’s athletics among the nation’s top twenty programs. The inaugural sports honor roll recognizes schools with the best overall rankings across four major categories of achievement—gender equity, win-loss performance in all sports, number of sports offered, and graduation rates.
Source: U.S. News & World Report, March 2002

Kapiolani CC’s Radiological Technologist Program won the U.S. Department of Education Secretary’s Award for Outstanding Vocational Education Program.
Source: Kapiolani Community College

The Japanese American Saga co-produced by U H West Oahu and the U H M Center for Labor Education & Research won the 2001 “Cornerstone Prize” from the U.S.-Japan Foundation.
Source: U H West Oahu/CLEAR

Honolulu Community College is one of only twelve Microsoft Information Technology Academy Program Regional Centers in the U.S.
Source: Honolulu Community College

Leeward Community College responded to a need in the community by offering the nation’s first online opticianry courses for the National Federation of Opticianry Schools.
Source: Leeward Community College

A U H Hilo professor of management won the National Society for Human Resource Management Research Award for 2001.
Source: U H Hilo

In just two years, the U H Army Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) program skyrocketed from being ranked 194 out of 270 nationally to fourth in the country and first out of 77 schools in the West.
Source: U H ROTC

The U H Air Force ROTC program received the Air Force Southwest Region’s “High Flight Award,” ranking it among the top four programs nationally.
Source: U H ROTC

A U H scientist received the Microbeam Analysis Society’s 2002 Presidential Award for extraordinary contributions to the field of microanalysis.
Source: Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology

Kapiolani CC is one of sixteen colleges and universities nationally recognized by the Association of American Colleges and Universities for visionary campus-wide innovations in undergraduate education.
Source: Association of American Colleges and Universities

The U H international law team placed first overall in the 1999, 2000, and 2001 National Native American Moot Court Competition. The team has won regional competitions six times in the past nine years.
Source: U H M William S. Richardson School of Law

A U H Manoa dancer won the prestigious “Outstanding Performer” award at the Tenth National American College Dance Festival.
Source: U H M Department of Theatre and Dance

The Library and Information Science program in the U H M Computer & Information Science Department ranks first in per capita scholarly productivity among all accredited programs nationally.
Source: The Library Quarterly, April 2000

Kapiolani CC won national recognition by the American Council on Education as a Promising Practices college for its international efforts.
Source: Kapiolani Community College

Honolulu Community College was named the national winner of the 2001 Meritorious Service Award by the National Coalition of Advanced Technology Centers.
Source: Honolulu Community College

A U H associate professor was selected as the Hawaii Medical Association’s 2001 Physician of the Year and made national news when he became the first ophthalmologist to use the new area of telemedicine to guide another doctor in a surgical procedure.
Source: John A. Burns School of Medicine

Four plant researchers, three with ties to U H, will receive the prestigious 2002 Alexander von Humboldt Foundations Award for Agriculture for developing the ringspot virus-resistant papaya that saved Hawaii’s $45 million papaya industry.
Source: U H M College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources

Maui Community College’s culinary program placed third in the Culinary Federation Western Regional competition in March 2001.
Source: Maui Community College

A U H marine microbiologist is the 2001 winner of the A.G. Huntsman Award for Excellence in Marine Science, a prestigious international award bestowed by the Bedford Institute of Oceanography in Canada.
Source: Department of Oceanography, U H M School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology

A research team headed by a U H M postdoctoral fellow has discovered a brown dwarf near a star similar to the sun, a groundbreaking discovery that challenges modern theories about heavenly formations.
Source: Institute for Astronomy, 2002

A U H law professor was awarded the Gustavus Myers Outstanding Book Award for a top ten book in North America on human rights, social justice, and civil rights.
Source: U H M William S. Richardson School of Law, 2000

Windward Community College’s cutting-edge Imaginarium is the setting for journeys from the inside of a cell to the far reaches of the universe.
Source: Windward Community College

The University of Hawaii Board of Regents 2001–2002

Allan K. Ikawa, Chair, 2001–2002

Bert A. Kobayashi, Vice Chair, 2001–2002 and Chair, 2002–2003

Everett R. Dowling, Vice Chair, 2002–2003

Billy Bergin

Charles K. Kawakami

Duane K. Kurisu

Patricia Y. Lee

Ah Quon McElrath

Walter Nunokawa

Capsun M. Poe

Kathleen K.S.L. Thurston

Sharon R. Weiner

David Iha, Executive Administrator and Secretary of the Board of Regents

Evan S. Dobelle, President, University of Hawaii

Acknowledgments

The University of Hawaii System Academic Affairs Council (S A A C) provided overall direction for this project. The 2001–2002 Council members are:

Karl Kim, U H Manoa

Chris Lu, U H Hilo

William Pearman, U H West Oahu

Frank Perkins, U H Manoa

Michael T. Rota, U H Community Colleges

Barbara Polk, U H System, Planning and Policy, S A A C staff

Colleen O. Sathre, U H System, Planning and Policy, S A A C Chair

This report was prepared by the Office of the Vice President for Planning and Policy. Dennis Taga took lead responsibility for the document preparation; he was assisted by Sandra Yano, Stephan Doi, and Chatney Graham. Sharyn Nakamoto and the Institutional Research staff provided management data and analyses. Numerous individuals from U H campus and system offices provided data and assistance. Michael Tamaru, Office of University Relations, assisted with the design and production.

We extend our appreciation to all contributors and advisers.

Colleen O. Sathre,
Vice President for Planning and Policy

End of Document

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