University of Hawaii

Measuring Our Progress Report 2004 Update

This version of the U H Measuring Our Progress Report is designed to promote accessibility for people with disabilities in compliance with Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. To ensure proper functioning of assistive technology tools such as screen readers, Hawaiian diacriticals were not included and spaces between selected acronyms were added (e.g., U H). We apologize for any inconvenience.

The President’s Message

The University of Hawaii is proud to share this report, University of Hawaii: Measuring Our Progress, 2004 Update, with the Hawaii State Legislature, the people of Hawaii, and our alumni and friends. This document provides measures of performance, benchmarks, and other indicators of our efforts to meet the goals we set forth in the University of Hawaii Strategic Plan: Entering the University’s Second Century, 2002–2010.

In 2002, the University of Hawaii community—faculty, staff, students, alumni, regents, and friends—came together and crafted a strategic plan that sets the course for the University’s second century. Firmly grounded in Native Hawaiian values, including the notion of ahupuaa—from the mountains to the sea, sharing our finite resources for the benefit of all—this plan envisions a University that is locally responsive and globally significant, serving Hawaii and the world, through excellence in teaching, research, and service. Further, we affirm our commitment to be a Pacific-Asian university, bridging East and West as we articulate the values of sharing, community, and respect that island societies have to offer in an increasingly interdependent world.

Within this unique context, our strategic plan advances five goals that commit the University to an agenda of measurable improvements in all aspects of its operations:

The multiple measures presented here review the performance, effectiveness, and many achievements of our faculty, students, and administrators. We have begun to execute the compelling strategic plan we have in place. Measuring Our Progress honors our commitment to be accountable to the people of Hawaii. With the leadership of the Board of Regents, and together with members of the Executive Branch, the Legislature and our alumni and friends, we will continue to move the University forward on a voyage of discovery, transforming our students’ lives and giving them the ingredients for success, and in the process transforming Hawaii’s society, and changing the world we live in for the better.

David McClain
Interim President
University of Hawaii

Table of Contents

Skip Table of Contents

Return to Measuring Our Progress main report page

President’s Message

Contents

Introduction

University of Hawaii Campuses

Goal 1: Educational Effectiveness and Student Success

Goal 2: A Learning, Research, and Service Network

Goal 3: A Model Local, Regional, and Global University

Goal 4: Investment in Faculty, Staff, Students, and Their Environment

Goal 5: Resources and Stewardship

Distinctions and Achievements

Introduction

The University of Hawaii Measuring Our Progress, 2004 Update, updates the Institutional Effectiveness Report, 2002 Update. The title of this report has been changed to reflect the importance the University places on measuring its progress on the goals of the recently adopted University of Hawaii System Strategic Plan: Entering the University’s Second Century, 2002–2010. This report is responsive to Board of Regents’ policy that requires regular and systematic assessment of programs, services, campuses, and the University system as a whole. As required by Act 161 of the 1995 legislative session, the Board of Regents acted in an earlier year to adopt benchmark/performance indicators that continue to form the basis for this biennium report.

As the University moves forward to celebrate its centennial in the year 2007, it honors the efforts of all of those who have contributed to the history and growth of the University. Founded in 1907, under the auspices of the Morrill Act, the University of Hawaii is a land-grant, sea-grant, and space-grant institution. As Hawaii’s sole state public university system, it is governed by a single Board of Regents and is composed of graduate/research, baccalaureate, and community college campuses. In addition, the University of Hawaii operates an Employment Training Center, three University Centers, multiple learning centers, and extension, research, and service programs at more than 70 sites in the state of Hawaii. The University is also engaged in instructional, research, and service activities at hundreds of Hawaii schools, hospitals, and community sites, and carries out these activities across the Pacific islands and in foreign countries. The University of Hawaii system’s special distinction is found in its Hawaiian, Pacific, and Asian orientation and its position as one of the world’s foremost multicultural centers for global and indigenous studies.

Vision

The University of Hawaii system embraces a vision grounded in the ahupuaa practice of sharing diverse but finite resources for the benefit of all. Working together for the betterment of all the diverse ethnic populations that are part of this state, the University of Hawaii system will ensure the survival and prosperity of Hawaii’s people and these beautiful islands for generations to come.

Commitments and Core Values

Overarching commitments reflect the core values that bind University of Hawaii faculty, staff, and students together and contribute to the realization of the University’s vision and mission. These include aloha; collaboration and respect; academic freedom and intellectual rigor; institutional integrity and service; access, affordability, and excellence; active learning and discovery; diversity, fairness, and equity; Hawaiian and Pacific-Asian commitment; innovation and empowerment; accountability and fiscal integrity; and malama aina sustainability.

Functioning as a System

The common purpose of the University of Hawaii system is to serve the public by creating, preserving, and transmitting knowledge in a multicultural environment that takes advantage of Hawaii’s unique attributes. As a system, the University provides all qualified people in Hawaii equal opportunity through a variety of entry points and the flexibility to move among parts of the system to achieve educational goals. Accredited as autonomous units, the ten campuses serve multiple missions and pursue distinct pathways in response to state needs. They are bound, nonetheless, by their commitment to functioning as a system in service to the state.

> Return to Table of Contents

University of Hawaii Campuses

U H MANOA is a research university of international standing, offering bachelor’s degrees in 87 fields of study, master’s degrees in 86 fields of study, doctorates in 53 fields of study, first professional degrees in architecture, law, and medicine, and a number of certificates. It has widely recognized strengths in tropical agriculture, tropical medicine, oceanography, astronomy, electrical engineering, volcanology, evolutionary biology, comparative philosophy, comparative religion, Hawaiian studies, Pacific Islands studies, Asian studies, and Pacific and Asian regional public health. U H Manoa offers instruction in more languages than any U S institution outside the Department of State.

U H HILO is a comprehensive institution offering baccalaureate liberal arts and professional and selected graduate degrees. It offers master’s programs in education, Hawaiian language, tropical conservation biology and environmental science, and China-U S Relations. A master of arts in counseling psychology will soon be offered. Baccalaureate degrees are offered in various fields of the humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, and in agriculture, nursing, business, and computer science. Programs emphasize student-faculty collaboration, fieldwork, internships, and hands-on learning. Drawing on the geological, biological, and cultural diversity of the island of Hawaii, many programs are organized around the theme of “the island as a learning laboratory.”

U H WEST OAHU is an upper division institution offering bachelor of arts degrees in business administration, humanities, public administration, and social sciences. U H West Oahu also offers certificate programs that address pressing social needs such as substance abuse and addiction studies, disaster preparedness and emergency management, and environmental studies. A commitment to student access is demonstrated by a schedule of day, evening, and weekend courses as well as distributed education options for students on all islands.

U H COMMUNITY COLLEGES are open-door, low-tuition institutions offering associate degrees and certificate programs in academic, technical, and occupational subjects.

HAWAII COMMUNITY COLLEGE offers a strong liberal arts program, including basic skills, and a comprehensive career technical program that includes business, nursing, trades technology, hospitality, and public service careers. A unique program to Hawaii Community College is Tropical Forest Ecosystem and Agroforestry Management or FOREST Team Program.

HONOLULU COMMUNITY COLLEGE offers a comprehensive liberal arts program and 22 technical-occupational programs, including programs that are not offered at any other campus, example given, marine technologies, cosmetology, refrigeration and air conditioning, aeronautic maintenance, commercial aviation pilot training, and occupational and environmental safety management.

KAPIOLANI COMMUNITY COLLEGE offers a comprehensive liberal arts program. This campus is a statewide leader in health services education with nine unique programs in allied health professions; it offers the state’s only legal assisting program and an extensive food service and hospitality education program. The college also offers degree programs in emerging technology fields, including new media arts and biotechnology, as well as programs for those seeking degrees as educational paraprofessionals and as fitness professionals in exercise and sport science.

KAUAI COMMUNITY COLLEGE offers both a comprehensive liberal arts program and career and technical education responsive to community workforce needs, including nursing, culinary arts, visitor industry, and information technology/electronics. As a University Center and distance learning leader, the college also provides access to baccalaureate and graduate level education for Kauai County. Non-credit, short-term courses are focused on skills for the workforce and community interests.

LEEWARD COMMUNITY COLLEGE offers an extensive liberal arts program, combined with selected career technical education offerings, and provides courses in 67 disciplines; unique programs include television production and information and computer sciences. Courses are also offered on-site in Waianae.

MAUI COMMUNITY COLLEGE offers a strong liberal arts program and a comprehensive career program that includes business, culinary arts, nursing, trade technology, and public service career fields. Courses offered over the statewide cable system and interactive television system provide instruction throughout the state.

WINDWARD COMMUNITY COLLEGE offers a strong comprehensive liberal arts program and selected career educational programs, including business education and agriculture. The Employment Training Center, located at Windward Community College, provides job training for "at risk" populations in high demand areas such as food service, auto repair, construction occupations, and office technology.

> Return to Table of Contents

Goal 1

Educational Effectiveness and Student Success

Enabling student success requires an academic culture that supports students and student learning. Measures of student access, engagement, performance, satisfaction, and diversity are presented to demonstrate the University’s efforts to establish an optimum culture for student entry, retention, and success.

Access

What is the status of access to the University of Hawaii?

Rapid enrollment growth beginning in the post-World War 2 era peaked in the early 1970s and was followed by an extended period of stable enrollment. Expanded access helped the U H system post modest overall gains from the early 1970s through the 1990s. Since fall 2000, enrollment has increased 12.9 percent and is projected to reach 56,000 by fall 2009.

Graph entitled “Historical and Projected Enrollment, by Unit.” Depicts enrollment by campus, fall semesters, from 1909 projected through 2009. Hardcopy and tabular data available by request from the Office of Planning and Policy.

ovppp@hawaii.edu

What is the going rate of recent Hawaii high school graduates who attend the U H?

After reaching a historical low of 31.7 percent in fall 2001, the going rate of recent Hawaii high school graduates into the University of Hawaii campuses increased to 32.8 percent in fall 2003. Going rates for Hawaii high school graduates reached an all-time high of 46.3 percent in fall 1972.

Graph entitled “Going Rates to U H, by Unit.” Depicts the going rates (in percent) into U H Manoa, U H Hilo, and U H Community Colleges from 1993 to 2003. Hardcopy and tabular data available by request from the Office of Planning and Policy.

ovppp@hawaii.edu

Note: The going rate is the percentage of Hawaii high school graduates entering the University of Hawaii without delay upon graduation from high school.

What opportunities are available for high school students to begin college work?

Running Start is a joint-credit collaboration between the Department of Education and University of Hawaii whereby students can work toward an associate degree and a high school diploma at the same time. All U H Community Colleges and U H Hilo participate in Running Start.

Table: Running Start Enrollments
Headcount
20022003
Enrolled195375
Completed182338

The Running Start retention rate was 93 percent in 2002 and 90 percent in 2003. Credits earned increased from 628 to 1,203 in the same period.

What are the chances of a Hawaii resident being admitted to the University of Hawaii system?

Acceptance rates demonstrate that there is a place within the U H system for students who prepare themselves for post-secondary education.

Table: U H Admission Activity by Residents,
By Level
Acceptance Rates
2-Year98%
4-Year80%
Grads67%
Other Grads94%
Note: Acceptance rate is the percent of total applicants accepted. “Other Grads” includes post-baccalaureate certificate and unclassified graduate applicants. These figures exclude applicants to U H Manoa Schools of Law and Medicine.

What is the status of off-campus access to U H credit programs?

In fall 2002, 793 classes were delivered off-campus to students in-state and out-of-state. These classes accounted for 8,299 registrations, a 13 percent increase over the prior year. Classes apply to certificate, associate, baccalaureate, and graduate degrees. Sixty-three percent of the registrations were in classes that use the Internet, interactive television, cable television, or mixed modes. Internet classes increased 44 percent. Off-site instruction (classes to the military installations or faculty traveling to another island) continues to be a major method of delivery.

Table: Number of Distance Education Classes
by Receive Sites, Fall 2002
(Student Registrations in Parentheses)
Tech-AssistedOn-Site
Oahu154 (2,079)50 (602)
Kauai54 (202)16 (152)
Maui96 (732)30 (230)
Molokai38 (160)35 (472)
Lanai13 (22)8 (56)
North Hawaii1 (1)4 (57)
West Hawaii47 (200)60 (898)
U H Hilo21 (130)0 (0)
Military0 (0)70 (1,261)
Out-of-State3 (15)18 (312)
Unspecified75 (718)0 (0)
Note: Fall 2003 data not available at time of printing.

Table: Receive Sites by County/Region
HONOLULUHAWAIIKAUAIMAUIU S & FOREIGN
Honolulu C C
Kapiolani C C
Leeward C C
U H Manoa
Waianae Education
 Center
Correctional
 Facilities
Hospitals
Military Bases
Schools
Individual Homes
Hawaii C C
U H Hilo
University Center,
 West Hawaii
Correctional
 Facilities
Hospitals
Schools
Individual Homes
Kauai C C
Hospitals
Schools
Individual Homes
Maui C C
University Center,
 Maui
Educational Centers,
 Hana, Lanai,
 Molokai
Hospitals
Schools
Individual Homes
Asia
Europe
Pacific Basin
U S Mainland

More than 50 credentials and degrees are offered to Hawaii residents via distance delivery. Programs address state workforce and professional development needs. U H also provides access to classes in education, nursing, and business to students in the Pacific and Asia.

Table: Distance Learning Credential Programs
GRADUATEBACHELOR’SASSOCIATE/CERTIFICATE
  • Accounting
  • Business Administration
  • Certificate in Telecom Information Resource Management
  • Certificate in Travel Industry Management
  • Educational Administration
  • Educational Counseling & Guidance, Vocational Rehabilitation
  • Educational Foundations, Interdisciplinary
  • Hawaiian Medium Teacher Education Certificate
  • Information & Computer Science
  • Kinesiology & Leisure Science
  • Library & Information Studies
  • Nursing
  • Nursing, Clinical Systems Management
  • Post-baccalaureate Secondary Education
  • Business Administration
  • Certificate in Substance Abuse Studies
  • Computer Science
  • Elementary/Special Education
  • English
  • Hawaiian Language
  • Hawaiian Studies
  • Information & Computer Science
  • Liberal Studies
  • Marine Sciences
  • Psychology
  • Social Sciences
  • Accounting
  • Administration of Justice
  • Agricultural Careers
  • Applied Trades
  • Associate of Arts
  • Building Maintenance
  • Business
  • Deaf Studies
  • E-commerce
  • Early Childhood Education
  • Electronic Computer Engineering
  • Emergency Medical Technician
  • Fire & Environmental Emergency Response
  • Food Science
  • Food Service and Hospitality
  • Hawaiian Lifestyles
  • Hotel Operations
  • Human Services
  • Liberal Arts
  • Medical Assisting
  • Nursing
  • Office Administration & Technology
  • Opticianry
  • Practical Nursing
  • Pre-Engineering
  • Pre-Nursing
  • Welding

What are the opportunities for non-credit continuing education across the U H system?

Annually, there are over 90,000 registrations in University of Hawaii non-credit continuing education programs.

Graph entitled “Continuing Education Registrations.” Depicts enrollment in non-credit continuing education programs from calendar year 1993 through 2003. Hardcopy and tabular data available by request from the Office of Planning and Policy.

ovppp@hawaii.edu

Note: While there has been some decline in continuing education enrollment over the period shown, differences in data quality and changes in reporting procedures allow for only a general comparison over time.

How do U H Manoa and U H Hilo perform on freshmen selectivity measures?

Scholastic Assessment Test (S A T) math and verbal scores for entering freshmen at U H Manoa are consistently above the U S and Hawaii norms.

U H Hilo entering freshmen verbal scores are comparable to Hawaii norms but math scores are slightly below.

Table: Average S A T-1 Verbal
U H Manoa and U H Hilo
U H ManoaU H HiloHawaiiU S
Fall 1997520483483505
Fall 1998527491483505
Fall 1999525482482505
Fall 2000526482488505
Fall 2001525488486506
Fall 2002523496488504
Fall 2003528489486507

Table: Average S A T-1 Math
U H Manoa and U H Hilo
U H ManoaU H HiloHawaiiU S
Fall 1997565494512511
Fall 1998570498513512
Fall 1999570494513511
Fall 2000566492519514
Fall 2001563505515514
Fall 2002563515520516
Fall 2003564497516519
Note: U H M = First-time freshmen entering fall semester;
U H H = First-time freshmen entering fall semester;
Hawaii = Hawaii test takers;
U S = U S test takers
Note: All scores are recentered scores. As an upper division institution, U H West Oahu is not included.

In fall 2003, 47 percent of U H Manoa and 35 percent of U H Hilo first-time freshmen were in the top 20 percent of their high school class.

Table: Matriculation Rate by High School Rank
Fall 2003
U H ManoaU H Hilo
1st high school quintile47%35%
2nd high school quintile34%36%
3rd high school quintile14%20%
4th high school quintile4%7%
5th high school quintile1%2%
Note: Percentages are based on students for whom high school rankings are available. As an upper division institution, U H West Oahu is not included.

> Return to Table of Contents

Student Engagement

How engaged are University of Hawaii students in their educational experience at upper division/four-year campuses?

Research on college student development shows that the time and energy students devote to educationally purposeful activities is the single best predictor of their learning and personal development. Two national surveys, the National Survey of Student Engagement (N S S E) and the Community College Survey of Student Engagement (C C S S E), focus on student engagement—student behaviors and institutional practices that are highly correlated with student learning and retention.

On the N S S E survey, five benchmarks of effective educational practice encompass multiple indicators. As benchmarks, these results provide comparisons with peer institutions and serve as baseline indicators against which future progress can be measured.

Benchmark #1 Level of Academic Challenge
Academic Challenge represents the nature and amount of assigned academic work, the complexity of the cognitive tasks required of students, and the standards faculty members use to evaluate student performance.

U H Manoa seniors report a slightly greater level of academic challenge than seniors from the comparison group. Although other U H groups report lower levels of academic challenge than their peer counterparts, academic challenge is perceived to increase by the time students reach their senior year.

Table: Level of Academic Challenge
Benchmark Score
U H ManoaU H HiloU H West Oahu
First-YearSeniorFirst-YearSeniorSenior
U H Mean4856495556
Comparison Group Mean5255586161

Benchmark #2 Active and Collaborative Learning
Active and Collaborative Learning represents the extent to which students are actively involved in their learning through discussions, presentations, group projects, and community projects.

Students, both first-year and senior, report lower levels of active and collaborative learning than their peer counterparts.

Table: Active and Collaborative Learning
Benchmark Score
U H ManoaU H HiloU H West Oahu
First-YearSeniorFirst-YearSeniorSenior
U H Mean3645385044
Comparison Group Mean3846445252

Benchmark #3 Student-Faculty Interaction
Student-Faculty Interaction captures the personal interaction between students and their instructors as evidenced by discussions about grades and assignments, projects outside the classroom, and talks about career plans.

By the time students are seniors at U H Manoa, they report a level of student-faculty interaction on par with their peers. All other groups report less interaction than their peers report.

Table: Student-Faculty Interaction
Benchmark Score
U H ManoaU H HiloU H West Oahu
First-YearSeniorFirst-YearSeniorSenior
U H Mean3138334740
Comparison Group Mean3339425252
Source: National Survey of Student Engagement (U H M 2002; U H H and U H W O 2003)

Benchmark #4 Enriching Educational Experiences
Enriching Educational Experiences are those activities that complement the academic program such as student government, community service, capstone experiences, and interacting with a diverse group of students.

U H Manoa students report an enriching educational experience comparable to their peers. U H Hilo and U H West Oahu students report fewer activities that complement their academic progress than their peers.

Table: Enriching Educational Experiences
Benchmark Score
U H ManoaU H HiloU H West Oahu
First-YearSeniorFirst-YearSeniorSenior
U H Mean5548595346
Comparison Group Mean5646665757

Benchmark #5 Supportive Campus Environment
Supportive Campus Environment provides support for student success, help students cope with non-academic issues, and offer quality relations among students, faculty, and staff.

All seniors report a level of support on their campuses that nearly equals or exceeds their peers.

Table: Supportive Campus Environment
Benchmark Score
U H ManoaU H HiloU H West Oahu
First-YearSeniorFirst-YearSeniorSenior
U H Mean5052586266
Comparison Group Mean5752666363
Source: National Survey of Student Engagement (U H M 2002; U H H and U H W O 2003)

How engaged are University of Hawaii students in their educational experience at lower division campuses?

The Community College Survey of Student Engagement (C C S S E) focuses on five benchmarks of student engagement—institutional practices and student behaviors that are highly correlated with student learning and retention.

The percentiles in the following charts indicate the performance of each U H community college relative to its comparably-sized peers. These results serve as baseline data against which future progress can be measured.

Benchmark #1 Active and Collaborative Learning
Through collaboration with others to solve problems or master challenging content, students develop valuable skills that prepare them to deal with the kinds of situations and problems they will encounter in the workplace, community, and their personal lives.

Relative to comparably-sized peers, six out of seven U H community colleges are at or above the 70th percentile in the area of active and collaborative learning experienced by students.

Table: Active and Collaborative Learning
Percentile
Hawaii versus Small Colleges100
Honolulu versus Medium Colleges50
Kapiolani versus Medium Colleges80
Kauai versus Small Colleges80
Leeward versus Medium Colleges70
Maui versus Small Colleges90
Windward versus Small Colleges100
Source: Community College Survey of Student Engagement 2002

Benchmark #2 Student Effort
“Time on task” is a key variable in success, and there are a variety of settings and means through which students may apply themselves to the learning process.

When compared to like colleges, student effort at the U H Community Colleges ranged from a low in the 40th percentile to the maximum 100th percentile at Windward Community College.

Table: Student Effort
Percentile
Hawaii versus Small Colleges50
Honolulu versus Medium Colleges40
Kapiolani versus Medium Colleges50
Kauai versus Small Colleges50
Leeward versus Medium Colleges60
Maui versus Small Colleges90
Windward versus Small Colleges100

Benchmark #3 Academic Challenge
Academic Challenge represents the nature and amount of assigned academic work, the complexity of cognitive tasks presented to students, and the standards faculty members use to evaluate student performance.

Students found the academic challenge of the U H Community Colleges at or above the 80th percentile for five out of seven campuses when compared to similar-sized colleges.

Table: Academic Challenge
Percentile
Hawaii versus Small Colleges100
Honolulu versus Medium Colleges60
Kapiolani versus Medium Colleges80
Kauai versus Small Colleges40
Leeward versus Medium Colleges80
Maui versus Small Colleges90
Windward versus Small Colleges100

Benchmark #4 Student-Faculty Interaction
Personal interaction with faculty members strengthens students’ connections to the college and helps them focus on their academic progress.

Survey results found the largest variation in student-faculty interaction relative to peers with a low in the 20th percentile to the maximum 100th percentile at Maui Community College.

Table: Student-Faculty Interaction
Percentile
Hawaii versus Small Colleges50
Honolulu versus Medium Colleges80
Kapiolani versus Medium Colleges60
Kauai versus Small Colleges20
Leeward versus Medium Colleges60
Maui versus Small Colleges100
Windward versus Small Colleges90

Benchmark #5 Support for Learners
Community college students benefit from services targeted to assist them with academic and career planning, academic skill development, and other issues that may affect both learning and retention.

In campus support for learners, five of the colleges are at the 60th percentile or higher relative to comparable-sized colleges.

Table: Support for Learners
Percentile
Hawaii versus Small Colleges70
Honolulu versus Medium Colleges70
Kapiolani versus Medium Colleges40
Kauai versus Small Colleges50
Leeward versus Medium Colleges60
Maui versus Small Colleges90
Windward versus Small Colleges60
Source: Community College Survey of Student Engagement 2002

How does U H student participation in community-based projects compare to national levels?

The number of opportunities for experiential learning include—but are not limited to—internships, cooperative education placements, volunteer positions, fellowships, and practica. Service learning opportunities involve instructional strategies that link community service and academic study so that one strengthens the other.

The N S S E and C C S S E surveys include a question on how frequently students participate in community-based projects as part of a class requirement. U H and national comparison group responses fell somewhere between Sometimes and Never.

Although U H students appear to have slightly more exposure to community-based activities than their national counterparts, there do not appear to be many opportunities for either group.

Table: How Often Have You Participated in a Community-Based Project as a Part of a Regular Course (e.g., Service Learning)?
U H MeanComparison
Group Mean
U H Manoa1.551.49
U H Hilo1.831.65
U H West Oahu1.541.65
Hawaii C C1.731.36
Honolulu C C1.351.33
Kapiolani C C1.471.34
Kauai C C1.511.39
Leeward C C1.351.33
Maui C C1.611.38
Windward C C1.421.38
Note: Based on a 4.0 scale. Never=1; Sometimes=2; Often=3; Very Often=4.

U H M, U H H, and U H W O reflect senior student responses. First-year student responses for U H M and U H H are not included.

Source: National Survey of Student Engagement (U H M 2002; U H H and U H W O 2003)
Community College Survey of Student Engagement 2002

What is the usual U H undergraduate student experience in terms of class size and faculty type?

The U H system lower division average class size remained stable at 24, with slight increases at four-year campuses.

Table: Lower Division
Average Class Size—University of Hawaii
Number of Students
Fall 1999Fall 2003
U H System2424
U H Manoa Arts & Sciences2932
U H Manoa Other3435
U H Hilo2425
U H Community College General2424
U H Community College Career Technology1817

Generally, U H system upper division average class size has increased since fall 1999 and is now at 20; campus averages range between 18 and 23.

Table: Upper Division
Average Class Size—University of Hawaii
Number of Students
Fall 1999Fall 2003
U H System1820
U H Manoa Arts & Sciences1821
U H Manoa Other1719
U H Hilo1618
U H West Oahu2323

Approximately 80 percent of all U H undergraduate and lower division classes enroll 30 or fewer students.

Table: Fall 2003 Classes by Range of Enrollment
University of Hawaii
1–1011–3031–5051–100101+
Lower Division Classes11.5%68.4%15.6%3.3%1.2%
Undergraduate Classes16.0%64.7%15.2%3.1%1.0%
Note: Ranges for U H C C differ from four-year campuses, but were grouped as closely as possible.

At the undergraduate level, 68 percent or more than two-thirds of student semester hours were taught by regular faculty in fall 2002, down from nearly 74 percent in fall 1998.

Table: S S H Taught, by Faculty Type
Undergraduate Level—U H System
Regular FacultyLecturerOther Faculty
Fall 199873.7%19.0%7.3%
Fall 200268.0%23.6%8.4%

> Return to Table of Contents

Student Performance

What are the U H graduation and retention outcomes for entering students?

Graduation rate is the percentage of full-time, first-time, degree/certificate-seeking undergraduates that graduated six years after entry at U H Manoa and U H Hilo and three years after entry at the U H Community Colleges. Retention rate is the percentage still enrolled at the same institution. The graduation and retention rates have remained relatively stable over time. For U H Manoa, the average range over five years has been 64–65 percent and for U H Hilo and the U H Community Colleges, 34–36 percent. At U H West Oahu, the graduation rate for the fall 1998 cohort is 62 percent after four years; an additional 10 percent are still enrolled.

Table: Average Graduation and Retention Rates
U H Campuses
6 years after entry
1991–1997 cohorts
4 years after entry
1998 cohort
3 years after entry
1994–2000 cohorts
U H
Manoa
U H
Hilo
U H
West Oahu
U H C C
Average
Hawaii
C C
Honolulu
C C
Kapiolani
C C
Kauai
C C
Leeward
C C
Maui
C C
Windward
C C
Graduated54%30%62%15%22%15%10%20%12%17%12%
Still Enrolled11%6%10%20%14%17%26%17%24%16%18%
Note: U H Manoa, U H Hilo, and U H Community Colleges calculations are based on first-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen, fall cohorts. As an upper division campus, U H West Oahu calculates graduation and retention rates based on new, first-time transfers to U H West Oahu.

U H Manoa’s six-year graduation and retention rate for first-time students is slightly lower than the average rates for peer and benchmark groups. U H Hilo’s six-year graduation and retention rate for first-time students is lower than the average rate for its benchmark group but only slightly lower than the average rate for its peer group.

Table: Average 6-Year Graduation and Retention Rates
U H Manoa (1990–1996)
BenchmarkPeerU H Manoa
Graduated69%66%53%
Still Enrolled3%3%11%
Total72%69%64%
Note:First-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen
U H M=Fall 1990–1996 cohorts as of 2002

Table: Average 6-Year Graduation and Retention Rates
U H Hilo (1994–1996)
BenchmarkPeerU H Hilo
Graduated46%31%31%
Still Enrolled4%7%5%
Total50%38%36%
Note:First-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen
U H H=Fall 1994–1996 cohorts as of 2002

Source: Consortium for Student Retention Data Exchange 2002–2003 Survey

The one-year retention rate for first-time students at U H Manoa and U H Hilo is lower than the average rates for peer and benchmark groups. The one-year retention rate for U H Manoa has decreased from a high of 82.7 percent in 1990 to 78.0 percent in 2002. The U H Hilo retention rate has fluctuated between 1994 and 2001, dipping from a high of 63.5 percent in 1994 to a low of 56.7 percent in 1998 before reaching 65.5 percent in 2002.

Table: Average 1-Year Retention Rates
U H Manoa (1990–2002)
BenchmarkPeerU H Manoa
Still Enrolled88%85%80%
Note:First-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen
U H M=Fall 1990–2002 cohorts as of 2003

Table: Average 1-Year Retention Rates
U H Hilo (1994–2002)
BenchmarkPeerU H Hilo
Still Enrolled75%69%61%
Note:First-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen
U H H=Fall 1994–2002 cohorts as of 2003

Source: Consortium for Student Retention Data Exchange 2003–2004 Survey

What are the graduation and retention outcomes for ethnic groups?

The graduation and retention rate for Asian/Pacific Islanders at U H Manoa is slightly lower than the rates for peer and benchmark groups. Within U H Manoa’s Asian/Pacific Islander category, Chinese and Japanese students show comparable graduation and retention rates to peer and benchmark groups, while the rates for Filipino, Hawaiian, and the other Asian categories are lower.

The graduation and retention rate for Caucasians at U H Manoa is considerably lower than the rates for peer and benchmark groups.

Table: 6-Year Graduation and Retention Rates by Ethnicity
U H Manoa (1990–1996)
BenchmarkPeerU H Manoa
Graduated74%72%56%
Still Enrolled3%3%12%
Total77%75%68%
Note: First-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen, Fall 1990–1996 cohorts as of 2002

Table: 6-Year Graduation and Retention Rates by Ethnicity
U H Manoa (1990–1996)
Caucasian
BenchmarkPeerU H Manoa
Graduated70%66%41%
Still Enrolled3%3%5%
Total73%69%46%
Note: First-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen, Fall 1990–1996 cohorts as of 2002

Table: 6-Year Graduation and Retention Rates by Ethnicity
U H Manoa (1990–1996)
Mixed
U H Manoa
Graduated47%
Still Enrolled11%
Total58%
Note: First-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen, Fall 1990–1996 cohorts as of 2002

Table: 6-Year Graduation and Retention Rates by Ethnicity
U H Manoa (1990–1996)
Asian or Pacific Islander
Detailed Breakdown
ChineseFilipinoHawaiianJapaneseOther Asian
Graduated72%51%41%64%53%
Still Enrolled9%11%10%13%12%
Total81%62%51%77%65%
Note: First-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen, Fall 1990–1996 cohorts as of 2002

Other institutions do not have a Mixed ethnic category and U H M enrollments for other ethnic groups such as Hispanics and African Americans are too small for comparison.

Though U S Office of Management and Budget (O M B) federal reporting standards on race and ethnicity have changed recently, they previously defined the Asian or Pacific Islander category to include Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders. Available data can only be aggregated as shown here.

Source: Consortium for Student Retention Data Exchange 2002–2003 Survey

The graduation and retention rate for Asian/Pacific Islanders at U H Hilo is lower than the rate for the benchmark group and slightly lower than that for the peer group. Within U H Hilo’s Asian/Pacific Islander category, Chinese, Filipino, and Japanese graduation rates are higher than or comparable to the peer group, while the rates for Hawaiian and the other Asian categories are lower.

The graduation and retention rate for Caucasians at U H Hilo is lower than those for both the peer and benchmark groups.

Table: 6-Year Graduation and Retention Rates by Ethnicity
U H Hilo (1994–1996)
BenchmarkPeerU H Hilo
Graduated51%34%32%
Still Enrolled3%6%5%
Total54%40%37%
Note: First-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen, Fall 1994–1996 cohorts as of 2002

Table: 6-Year Graduation and Retention Rates by Ethnicity
U H Hilo (1994–1996)
Caucasian
BenchmarkPeerU H Hilo
Graduated54%38%33%
Still Enrolled2%6%3%
Total56%44%36%
Note: First-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen, Fall 1994–1996 cohorts as of 2002

Table: 6-Year Graduation and Retention Rates by Ethnicity
U H Hilo (1994–1996)
Mixed
U H Hilo
Graduated24%
Still Enrolled7%
Total31%
Note: First-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen, Fall 1994–1996 cohorts as of 2002

Table: 6-Year Graduation and Retention Rates by Ethnicity
U H Hilo (1994–1996)
Asian or Pacific Islander
Detailed Breakdown
ChineseFilipinoHawaiianJapaneseOther Asian
Graduated56%41%27%33%28%
Still Enrolled0%5%5%8%6%
Total56%46%32%41%34%
Note: First-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen, Fall 1994–1996 cohorts as of 2002

Other institutions do not have a Mixed ethnic category and U H H enrollments for other ethnic groups such as Hispanics and African Americans are too small for comparison.

Though U S Office of Management and Budget (O M B) federal reporting standards on race and ethnicity have changed recently, they previously defined the Asian or Pacific Islander category to include Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders. Available data can only be aggregated as shown here.

Source: Consortium for Student Retention Data Exchange 2002–2003 Survey

What is the volume of credentials awarded annually by U H?

On the average, over 7,000 degrees and certificates are awarded annually by U H.

Table: U H Degrees and Certificates Awarded, by Level
2-year4-YearPost-baccalaureate
Advanced Degrees
F Y 1992–19932,4692,9971,644
F Y 1993–19942,3813,0091,683
F Y 1994–19952,6423,1561,731
F Y 1995–19962,6433,3951,708
F Y 1996–19972,6973,2791,660
F Y 1997–19982,7223,0861,332
F Y 1998–19992,6153,0891,413
F Y 1999–20002,6503,1151,469
F Y 2000–20012,5342,9511,325
F Y 2001–20022,5532,9101,177
F Y 2002–20032,7113,0101,355
Note: U H Community College certificates refer to Certificates of Achievement only.

What share of eligible students pass external exams in their field of study?

University of Hawaii students and graduates are scoring well on national and state exams in their fields of study.

Community College Programs. In 2002–2003, 100 percent of the U H Community College graduates who sat for the following national licensing examinations passed on their first attempt.

Table: Licensing Examination Passed
Health-RelatedOther Technologies
Certified Nurses Aide (Hawaii C C)Commercial Pilot (Honolulu C C)
Medical Laboratory Technician (Kapiolani C C)Esthetician (Honolulu C C)
Occupational Therapy Assistant (Kapiolani C C)F A A Airframe & Power Plant (Honolulu C C)
Physical Therapist Assistant (Kapiolani C C)Flight Instructor (Honolulu C C)
Radiologic Technician (Kapiolani C C)Private Pilot (Honolulu C C)
VISIONS Certification (Hawaii C C)

Dental Hygiene. All of the U H Manoa Dental Hygiene students taking the national licensing exam for the past five years passed.

Education. In 2002–2003, over 90 percent of U H Manoa College of Education and U H Hilo education graduates passed the professional knowledge exam portion of the Praxis Teacher Certification Exam. Pass rates for the various Praxis assessment areas for U H Manoa and U H Hilo graduates and for the state of Hawaii (which includes U H graduates) are provided below.

Table: Praxis Teacher Certification Exam
Assessment AreaU H Manoa C O E
Pass Rate
U H Hilo Education
Pass Rate
Hawaii
Pass Rate
PRINCIPLES OF LEARNING & TEACHING
 K–1692%92%93%
 7–1294%92%94%
ELEMENTARY
 Curriculum, Instruction, &  Assessment87%91%85%
 Content Area Exercise99%100%99%
ENGLISH
 Language, Literature, &  Composition Content89%not applicable88%
 Language, Literature, &  Composition Pedagogy69%not applicable66%
SOCIAL STUDIES
 Content Knowledge95%not applicable93%
 Pedagogy89%not applicable92%
TEACHING SPECIAL POPULATIONS
 Knowledge-Based Core Principles96%not applicable96%
 Application of Core Principles81%not applicable84%

E T S. At U H Hilo, the Educational Testing Service (E T S) Major Field Achievement Test provides national comparisons and serves as a vehicle for program improvement. U H Hilo students usually perform at or above the national mean.

Table: U H Hilo E T S Major Field Achievement Test Scores
2000200120022003
U H HiloNationalU H HiloNationalU H HiloNationalU H HiloNational
Accounting5049504854484744
Computer Science153147156147159147157147
Economics4841424046404643
Management5953545261536357
Quantitative Business  Analysis4949504962495655
Finance4139423846383836
Marketing5447544750475146
Legal/Social Environment4442384147415248
International Issues5545504445445544

Law. Graduates of the U H Manoa William S. Richardson School of Law are consistently outperforming Hawaii bar exam test takers from other law schools. In 2003, 96 percent of U H Manoa Law School graduates passed the Hawaii state bar exam on their first attempt and the overall pass rate (86%) was higher than the state rate (75%).

Table: Hawaii State Bar Exam Pass Rate (Percent)
19992000200120022003
U H First-Time Takers82%85%86%89%96%
Overall U H79%85%78%80%86%
Overall State67%72%72%67%75%

Medical Technology. From 2001 to 2004, all U H Manoa Medical Technology students passed the national certification exams on their first attempt and scores were consistently above the national average.

Medicine. Medical students need to pass two exams prior to the completion of one year of residency. Students at the U H Manoa John A. Burns School of Medicine (J A B S O M) consistently attain pass rates on the United States Medical Licensing Exam (U S M L E) Step 1 Examination that are comparable to the national average. Those taking this exam in the 2003–2004 academic year achieved an average total score that was slightly below the national average. Students scored above the national average in 16 of 20 disciplines measured.

Table: U S M L E Step 1 Percentages
2003–20042002–20032001–20022000–2001
U H Medical School90%91%82%95%
National92%91%90%92%

J A B S O M medical students performed very well on the U S M L E Step 2 Exam, consistently achieving pass rates that equal or exceed the national average.

Table: U S M L E Step 2 Percentages
2002–20032001–20022000–20011999–2000
U H Medical School98%98%95%100%
National96%96%95%95%

Nursing. National Council for Licensing Examinations (N C L E X) results have fluctuated for the past several years; however, more than two-thirds of U H graduates pass the examination on a regular basis.

Table: National Council for Licensing Examinations
(N C L E X)
Pass Rate
2000–20012001–20022002–2003
U H Manoa99%92%88%
U H Hilo93%71%91%
Hawaii C C73%73%78%
Kapiolani C C93%84%93%
Kauai C C67%83%77%
Maui C C89%76%80%

Orthopaedics. Residents in the Orthopaedic Residency Program of the John A. Burns School of Medicine consistently score well on the Orthopaedic In-Training Exam, which is administered to orthopaedic residents across the country to promote study and discussion and to help them prepare for their board exams. The program’s percentile rank was 87 in 2002 and 77 in 2003. For the past four years, all graduates have passed Part I of the National Licensing Examination on their first attempt.

Surgical Care. Over the past three years (2001–2003), 67 percent of residents in the Surgical Residency Program have passed the American Board of Surgery (A B S) qualifying exam on their first attempt. During the same time period, 100 percent of residents have passed the A B S certifying exam on their first attempt.

For the past three years (2001–2003), all fellows in the Surgical Critical Care Fellowship Program have passed the American Board of Surgery certifying exam for Surgical Critical Care on their first attempt.

> Return to Table of Contents

Student Satisfaction

How satisfied are students with their educational experience?

The N S S E and C C S S E student surveys include one direct measure of student satisfaction: “How would you evaluate your entire educational experience at this institution?” In response to this question, the responses of students enrolled at the ten U H campuses ranged from 2.87 at U H Manoa to 3.51 at U H West Oahu (on a scale of 1 to 4, with 1=Poor and 4=Excellent). The range of responses from comparable institutions is 3.08 to 3.43.

Table: How Would You Evaluate Your Entire Educational Experience?
U H MeanComparison
Group Mean
U H Manoa2.873.16
U H Hilo3.183.43
U H West Oahu3.513.43
Hawaii C C3.113.13
Honolulu C C3.043.08
Kapiolani C C3.023.08
Kauai C C3.063.13
Leeward C C3.063.08
Maui C C3.183.12
Windward C C3.283.12
Note: Based on a 4.0 scale. Poor=1; Fair=2; Good=3; Excellent=4.

The N S S E survey includes a second question that measures satisfaction: “If you could start over again, would you go to the same institution you are now attending?” The range of responses (from 2.94 at U H Manoa to 3.60 at U H West Oahu) indicates that students attending the three upper division campuses would Probably or Definitely attend the same institution if they could start over again. The range of responses from comparable institutions is 3.14 to 3.26.

Table: If You Could Start Over Again, Would You Go to the Same Institution You Are Now Attending?
U H MeanComparison
Group Mean
U H Manoa2.943.14
U H Hilo3.253.26
U H West Oahu3.603.25
Note: Based on a 4.0 scale. Definitely No=1; Probably No=2; Probably Yes=3; Definitely Yes=4.

Similarly, U H Community College students were asked by C C S S E if they would recommend their college to a friend or family member. Between 92 and 97 percent responded positively.

How prepared do U H students and alumni believe they are for employment?

Enrolled Students
When asked on the N S S E and C C S S E surveys to what extent their undergraduate experience has contributed to their ability to acquire job or work-related knowledge and skills, U H student responses ranged from Some to Quite a Bit.

Table: To What Extent Has Your U H Experience Contributed to Acquiring Job or Work-Related Knowledge and Skills?
U H MeanComparison
Group Mean
U H Manoa2.882.94
U H Hilo3.022.85
U H West Oahu3.012.85
Hawaii C C2.792.67
Honolulu C C2.792.60
Kapiolani C C2.572.61
Kauai C C2.692.67
Leeward C C2.542.62
Maui C C2.772.67
Windward C C2.332.68
Note: Based on a 4.0 scale. Very Little=1; Some=2; Quite a Bit=3; Very Much=4.

U H M, U H H, and U H W O reflect senior student responses. First-year student responses for U H M and U H H are not included.

Source: National Survey of Student Engagement (U H M 2002; U H H and U H W O 2003)
Community College Survey of Student Engagement 2002

Alumni
In 2003, 93 percent of U H Manoa alumni respondents indicated they were Adequately to Very Well Prepared for their current primary job.

Table: U H Manoa Alumni
Job Preparation for Current Primary Job
% of Responses
200320001997
Very Well Prepared21.2%16.4%11.9%
Moderately Well Prepared39.9%39.5%33.1%
Adequately Prepared31.8%35.9%43.1%
Poorly Prepared7.1%8.2%11.9%
Note: U H M alumni are surveyed five years after graduation.

Source: 2003 U H M Alumni Outcomes Survey

In 2003, 95 percent of U H Community College graduates and leavers indicated they were Adequately to Very Well Prepared for their current primary job.

Table: U H Community Colleges Graduates and Leavers
Job Preparation for Current Primary Job
% of Responses
200320022001
Very Well Prepared36.6%46.0%38.3%
Well Prepared38.4%40.8%52.2%
Adequately Prepared20.1%12.5%6.3%
Poorly Prepared4.9%0.8%3.3%
Source: Community Colleges Graduate and Leavers Survey

> Return to Table of Contents

Diversity

What are the demographic trends in the composition of the U H student body?

University of Hawaii attendees are members of student populations in which no one ethnic group constitutes a majority, and the educational experience is enriched by the diversity of their classmates.

Age
The mean age for the U H system has held steady since fall 1996 at or near 26 years of age.

Table: Mean Age of U H Students
Fall Semester
19931994199519961997199819992000200120022003
Mean Age26.526.626.426.125.926.026.226.226.226.226.0

Gender
The percentage of women continues to increase, accounting for nearly 58 percent of enrolled students in fall 2003.

Table: U H Enrollment by Gender
Fall Semester (Percent)
19931994199519961997199819992000200120022003
Women56.4%56.6%56.5%56.1%55.8%55.9%56.1%56.3%56.7%57.3%57.9%
Men43.6%43.4%43.5%43.9%44.2%44.1%43.9%43.7%43.3%42.5%41.7%
No Data0.2%0.4%

Full-Time Status
Since fall 1996 more than 55 percent of U H students have been enrolled full-time.

Table: U H Full-Time Enrollment
Fall Semester
19931994199519961997199819992000200120022003
Percent of Students53.4%53.7%54.5%55.1%56.3%56.5%55.8%56.6%56.1%56.4%55.1%

Ethnicity
The U H is one of the most ethnically diverse institutions of higher learning in the nation–21.1 percent of the students are Caucasian, 16.6 percent are Japanese, 13.6 percent are Hawaiian or part-Hawaiian, 12.8 percent are Filipino, 5.8 percent are Chinese, and 11.9 percent report Mixed ethnicity.

The percentages of Hawaiian, Pacific Islander, and Mixed ethnic students have increased in the last ten years, while the percentages of Japanese, Chinese, Filipino, and Caucasian students have decreased.

Table: U H Enrollment by Ethnicity
HawaiianFilipinoChineseJapaneseCaucasianPacific
Islander
MixedAll Other
Fall 199311.6%14.1%7.9%20.6%22.5%1.8%9.2%12.3%
Fall 200313.6%12.8%5.8%16.6%21.1%2.6%11.9%15.6%

There have been increases in the share of degrees conferred to students of Hawaiian/part-Hawaiian, Filipino, and Mixed ancestry, and decreases in the share of degrees awarded to students of Caucasian and Japanese ancestry.

Table: U H Degrees Earned by Race/Ethnicity
HawaiianFilipinoChineseJapaneseCaucasianPacific
Islander
MixedAll Other
F Y 1992–19937.8%10.2%10.1%23.6%24.5%1.3%6.4%16.1%
F Y 2002–200312.6%12.5%8.3%20.9%20.6%2.3%10.2%12.7%

Table: How do U H students relate to issues of diversity?

Hawaii’s unique demographic makeup and U H’s commitment to improving the entry, retention, and graduation of diverse student populations offer students opportunities to interact with others from different backgrounds.

N S S E and C C S S E survey results indicate U H students have a greater understanding of and more frequent interaction with others from different backgrounds than their national comparison group counterparts.

Table: How Often Have You Had Serious Conversations with Students of a Different Race or Ethnicity Than Your Own?
U H MeanComparison
Group Mean
U H Manoa2.922.63
U H Hilo3.162.70
U H West Oahu2.972.70
Hawaii C C2.752.33
Honolulu C C2.522.35
Kapiolani C C2.552.35
Kauai C C2.502.34
Leeward C C2.652.34
Maui C C2.652.33
Windward C C2.912.33
Note: Based on a 4.0 scale. Never=1; Sometimes=2; Often=3; Very Often=4.

Table: How Often Have You Had Serious Conversations with Students Who Differ from You in Terms of Their Religious Beliefs, Political Opinions, or Personal Values?
U H MeanComparison
Group Mean
U H Manoa2.682.67
U H Hilo2.932.90
U H West Oahu2.782.90
Hawaii C C2.602.41
Honolulu C C2.342.40
Kapiolani C C2.442.40
Kauai C C2.372.42
Leeward C C2.532.39
Maui C C2.352.42
Windward C C2.762.41
Note: Based on a 4.0 scale. Never=1; Sometimes=2; Often=3; Very Often=4.

Table: To What Extent Has Your U H Experience Contributed to Understanding People of Other Racial and Ethnic Backgrounds?
U H MeanComparison
Group Mean
U H Manoa2.882.64
U H Hilo3.052.60
U H West Oahu2.972.60
Hawaii C C2.802.31
Honolulu C C2.502.28
Kapiolani C C2.532.28
Kauai C C2.612.33
Leeward C C2.682.27
Maui C C2.862.31
Windward C C2.682.33
Note: Based on a 4.0 scale. Very Little=1; Some=2; Quite a Bit=3; Very Much=4.

Table: To What Extent Does U H Encourage Contact Among Students from Different Backgrounds?
U H MeanComparison
Group Mean
U H Manoa2.532.28
U H Hilo2.872.50
U H West Oahu2.762.50
Hawaii C C2.902.41
Honolulu C C2.522.41
Kapiolani C C2.632.40
Kauai C C2.552.43
Leeward C C2.702.40
Maui C C2.782.42
Windward C C2.642.42
Note: Based on a 4.0 scale. Very Little=1; Some=2; Quite a Bit=3; Very Much=4.

U H M, U H H, and U H W O reflect senior student responses. First-year student responses for U H M and U H H are not included.

Source: National Survey of Student Engagement (U H M 2002; U H H and U H W O 2003)
Community College Survey of Student Engagement 2002

> Return to Table of Contents

Goal 2

A Learning, Research, and Service Network

Serving the state of Hawaii demands that the University system engage its diverse resources to contribute to the state’s economy, workforce and training needs, and the creation and application of knowledge. Measures of affordability, economic impact, information and technology resources, research and scholarly productivity, the educational pipeline, and workforce development are presented to demonstrate the University’s progress in fostering the intellectual capital of the state of Hawaii.

Affordability

How affordable is higher education in Hawaii for students and their families?

In almost all states, higher education has become less rather than more affordable when the costs of attending college are considered in relation to family income.

Results from Measuring Up 2004 indicate that no state received a grade of A in affordability. Three states received a B or C, 22 percent received a D, and 72 percent of states received an F. Hawaii scored a D on the affordability of its public (U H) and private institutions. U H awards approximately $18.5 million in tuition waivers which are not included in the Measuring Up 2004 analysis.

In Hawaii, the percent of income (average of all income groups) needed to pay for college expenses has been declining since 2000, but Hawaii rates are still not comparable to those of the best performing states a decade ago.

Table: Percent of Income Needed to Pay for College Expenses
Minus Financial Aid
19942000200220041994
Top States
U H Community Colleges17%22%19%18%15%
U H 4-Year20%28%24%23%16%
Note: Comparisons with top-performing states are based on performance a decade ago because nearly all states have recently declined in affordability.

Source: The National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education
Measuring Up 2000/2002/2004 2000/2002/2004

What is the distribution of financial aid at U H campuses?

The share of first-time freshmen receiving aid in Annual Year 2002–2003 ranged from 55 percent (Hawaii C C) to 23 percent (Leeward C C). On average, financial aid recipients received between $1,700 and $2,900.

Table: Financial Aid to U H First-Time Undergraduates
Percent Receiving Aid
U H Manoa45%
U H Hilo51%
Hawaii C C55%
Honolulu C C29%
Kapiolani C C26%
Kauai C C26%
Leeward C C23%
Maui C C38%
Windward C C41%

Table: Financial Aid to U H First-Time Undergraduates
Average Aid Amount Received
U H Manoa$2,863
U H Hilo$2,616
Hawaii C C$2,501
Honolulu C C$1,729
Kapiolani C C$2,482
Kauai C C$1,930
Leeward C C$1,909
Maui C C$2,086
Windward C C$2,305
Note: Includes fall 2002 cohort of full-time, first-time degree/certificate-seeking undergraduate students. As an upper division institution, U H West Oahu is not included.

How do U H tuitions compare with like institutions elsewhere?

Almost all U H tuition rates are below W I C H E (institutions from 15 states that are members of the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education) averages. All but two of the U H resident tuition rates are below W I C H E averages: U H Manoa John A. Burns School of Medicine rates are at the W I C H E average, and U H Hilo’s graduate rate is 6 percent above the average. All but one of the U H non-resident rates are below the W I C H E average. The U H Community College rate is 7 percent above the average.

Table: 2003–2004 U H Tuition and Required Fees
as a Percentage of 2003–2004 W I C H E Averages
ResidentNon-Resident
U H Manoa Undergraduate80% 66%
U H Manoa Graduate85%72%
U H Manoa Medicine100% 87%
U H Hilo Undergraduate82% 74%
U H Hilo Graduate106% 82%
U H West Oahu71% 67%
U H Community Colleges61% 107%
Note: W I C H E = Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education
Effective 2000–2001, W I C H E no longer has law tuition comparisons.

How affordable is U H Community College tuition for low income families?

The U H Community Colleges have continued to be very affordable. In 2004, the share of income Hawaii’s poorest families paid for tuition was 9 percent, about as low as that of the best-performing states a decade ago (7%).

Source: The National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education
Measuring Up 2004 2004

> Return to Table of Contents

Economic Impact on Hawaii

What is the overall economic impact of the U H system on Hawaii?

The University of Hawaii is a $1.4 billion enterprise and represents a major economic force in Hawaii.

The following is based on “The Contribution of the University of Hawaii to Hawaii’s Economy in 2003,” prepared by the U H Economic Research Organization (U H E R O), March 2004.

U H stimulates the business community

U H leverages taxpayer dollars

U H generates a return on government investment

U H expands the state economy

Foreign investment in U H
The external non-U S economic investment in the U H continues to be substantial. For the past seven years, the average number of awards from foreign sources was 43 and the average amount awarded was $7.1 million.

Table: Awards from Foreign Sources
Fiscal
Year
Number of
Projects
Amount Awarded
(in millions)
1996–199745$7.6 M
1997–199836$7.3 M
1998–199936$4.1 M
1999–200049$11.2 M
2000–200139$6.6 M
2001–200244$3.8 M
2002–200352$9.2 M

The larger awards for F Y 2003 were $3.4 million from the Japan Marine Science and Technology Center and $0.7 million from the National Space Development Agency of Japan. In F Y 2002, the largest award was $0.7 million from the Government of American Samoa.

The state of Hawaii and the U H benefit from the large foreign investments in astronomy facilities and operations on Mauna Kea and Haleakala, even though these are not direct investments in the U H astronomy programs. Highlights include:

The U H has bilateral scientific cooperation agreements with each of the foreign observatory organizations. In return for providing the site and for managing the physical and operational infrastructure of the observatory complexes, the U H receives a guaranteed share of the observing time (typically 10–15%).

Technology Transfer
The Office of Technology Transfer and Economic Development (O T T E D) serves as a gateway for access to the University’s rich educational, scientific, and technical resources by actively promoting new University inventions and discoveries to industry and by working with business and government leaders throughout the state to encourage economic development.

A reorganization of O T T E D’s priorities, with a renewed focus on licensing new University technologies to industry partners, has begun to pay dividends with a significant increase in the number of licenses executed, including licenses to several new Hawaii companies built upon U H technologies.

The number of invention disclosures climbed slightly in F Y 2003, while licensing revenues and the number of licenses and options executed during the year rose significantly. Cumulatively, O T T E D received more than 130 issued patents and realized licensing revenues of slightly more than $3.3 million.

Table: Invention Disclosures
By Fiscal Year
199519961997199819992000200120022003
Number of Disclosures211114184520453134

Economic Development Highlights

> Return to Table of Contents

Information and Technology Resources

Library

How does U H’s major library compare on a national basis?

Among the 114 university libraries that are members of the Association of Research Libraries (A R L), U H Manoa ranks 64th—a significant improvement from 77th six years ago.
Source: 2002–2003 A R L Membership Index and Statistics

The indexed ranking is based on the number of volumes held, number of volumes added in the last fiscal year, number of current serials, size of permanent staff, and total operating expenditures.

In the past four years, the library has made strides to regain its standing in terms of annual book/journal (materials) expenditures. The University has made a strong commitment to restoring book funds to the library.

Implementation of a new online library system in 2001, as well as completion of the Hamilton Library Addition and renovation of the existing building, adds greatly to the library’s ability to serve students and faculty with their scholarly, research, and information needs.

Current improvements are in line with the library’s strategic goal to be back in the A R L top 40.

Table: U H Manoa Library Rankings
(Out of the 114 A R L Member Libraries)
U H M Ranking
1999–20002000–20012001–20022002–2003
Overall A R L Criteria Index60676464
Materials Expenditures93979082
Volumes Added—Gross52756066
Volumes in the Library45454747
Current Serials50576150
Professional Staff82888689
Support Staff97979492
Total Library Expenditures84929079

How is U H capitalizing on technological change?

Information Technology
The primary activities of U H, like any university, involve the creation, sharing, and storage of knowledge. In the increasingly digital age of the 21st century, these activities are influenced by the capability of modern information technologies. In 2004, U H Manoa was recognized in two national rankings: 44th in Princeton Review’s “Most Connected Campuses” and 37th in Intel’s “Most Unwired College Campuses” (for wireless access).

Communication
Other than in-person, e-mail is now the primary form of communication for members of the University community. E-mail usage continues to grow steadily with an average of over 300,000 messages and 10 gigabytes of e-mail processed daily.

Table: Average Daily Volume of E-mail
Pieces Sent
Quarter 1Quarter 2Quarter 3Quarter 4
20002,344
20012,8422,9613,4154,034
20023,8835,6304,4305,720
20037,0907,2797,9689,240
200410,418

Travel has become more expensive and time-consuming, especially in the post-9/11 era. U H has implemented a system-wide videoconferencing system now available at all campuses and education centers.

Student Information System
U H completed the on-time and on-budget implementation of a new system-wide student information system serving all ten campuses. While there is much more work to be done, for the first time:

Business Processes
U H has implemented the most advanced public sector electronic purchasing environment in Hawaii. Purchasers can solicit quotations online, thereby increasing openness and competitiveness, which provides lower prices. Winning quotes can be selected online and purchases made either paperlessly through the University’s Purchasing Card (P-Card) program or through automatic transfer to the web-based purchasing system for generation of a purchase order. This system saves time, reduces costs, and improves transparency.

Table: Online Quotations Awarded in 2003
Total Number of Buyers833
Total Number of Vendors1,389
Total Number of Awards995
Total Award Amounts$3,888,507
Average $ Per Request$3,908
Average Number of Quotes Received4.2
Average Number of Open Days6.3
Spread (Average Price — Winning Bid)12%
Average Savings over Non-Dynamic Pricing4%–16%

To what extent do U H students use electronic media in their coursework and to communicate with instructors?

Web C T
Web C T is the web-based, online course management tool institutionally supported by Information Technology Services (I T S). The numbers represent courses that use Web C T to deliver fully online courses and those that use it as a resource to support traditional face-to-face courses. Many courses now use a hybrid approach to teaching and learning that incorporates both face-to-face and online methodology.

I T V (Interactive/Instructional Television)
I T V represents 2-way video and 2-way audio courses that are offered from one campus to another campus (often referred to as H I T S: Hawaii Interactive Television System).

Public Access Cable
I T S supports delivery of U H courses on public access cable channel 55. Most of these courses support the U H Community Colleges’ delivery of an associate of arts degree. During Academic Year 2003–2004 I T S worked with each county cable access entity so that all U H programming is on public access channel 55 throughout the state.

Table: Use of Electronic Media in Coursework
Fall 2003Spring 2004
Web C TClasses773948
Student accounts*18,55224,648
I T VClasses5988
Students*1,4541,436
Public Access CableClasses3636
Students*1,3041,299
*duplicated headcount

E-mail and Other Electronic Media
The following three graphs demonstrate that, based on results of the N S S E / C C S S E surveys, U H students’ use of electronic media in classrooms and to communicate with their instructors approximates the level of use at peer and national campuses.

Table: How Often Have You Used an Electronic Medium
(List-Serve, Chat Group, Internet, etc.) to Discuss or Complete an Assignment?
U H MeanComparison
Group Mean
U H Manoa2.822.82
U H Hilo2.802.72
U H West Oahu2.912.72
Hawaii C C2.072.16
Honolulu C C2.152.17
Kapiolani C C2.172.16
Kauai C C2.272.15
Leeward C C2.082.17
Maui C C2.262.15
Windward C C2.202.15
Note: Based on a 4.0 scale. Never=1; Sometimes=2; Often=3; Very Often=4.

Table: How Often Have You Used E-mail to
Communicate with an Instructor?
U H MeanComparison
Group Mean
U H Manoa3.023.21
U H Hilo3.103.39
U H West Oahu2.993.39
Hawaii C C1.801.94
Honolulu C C2.132.11
Kapiolani C C2.282.10
Kauai C C1.871.94
Leeward C C2.112.11
Maui C C2.401.92
Windward C C2.071.93
Note: Based on a 4.0 scale. Never=1; Sometimes=2; Often=3; Very Often=4.

Table: To What Extent Has Your U H Experience Contributed to Your Use of Computing and Information Technology?
U H MeanComparison
Group Mean
U H Manoa3.013.04
U H Hilo3.063.02
U H West Oahu3.143.02
Hawaii C C2.652.66
Honolulu C C2.692.65
Kapiolani C C2.562.66
Kauai C C2.632.66
Leeward C C2.622.65
Maui C C2.782.65
Windward C C2.412.66
Notes: Based on a 4.0 scale. Very Little=1; Some=2; Quite a Bit=3; Very Much=4.

U H M, U H H, and U H W O reflect senior student responses. First-year student responses for U H M and U H H are not included.

Source: National Survey of Student Engagement (U H M 2002; U H H and U H W O 2003)
Community College Survey of Student Engagement 2002

> Return to Table of Contents

Research and Scholarly Productivity

How have U H research and training activities fared in recent years?

For the sixth year in a row, the University of Hawaii received record support for research and training. Extramural funds—grants and contracts from federal, state, private, and foreign sources—reached $330 million for F Y 2004, a 2 percent increase over the previous fiscal year and an increase of 2.3 times the support received ten years ago.

Table: Office of Research Services
Extramural Fund Support
Past and Projected (in millions)
ResearchTraining
Actual
F Y 1975$23.7 M$11.9 M
F Y 1976$16.3 M$8.7 M
F Y 1977$21.6 M$7.8 M
F Y 1978$21.4 M$11.0 M
F Y 1979$27.0 M$15.1 M
F Y 1980$25.7 M$15.3 M
F Y 1981$27.1 M$19.1 M
F Y 1982$26.5 M$10.8 M
F Y 1983$33.8 M$11.9 M
F Y 1984$30.2 M$17.7 M
F Y 1985$36.7 M$16.6 M
F Y 1986$35.8 M$18.2 M
F Y 1987$35.8 M$16.7 M
F Y 1988$39.4 M$22.1 M
F Y 1989$47.0 M$24.9 M
F Y 1990$49.4 M$34.3 M
F Y 1991$58.1 M$48.0 M
F Y 1992$65.8 M$59.1 M
F Y 1993$61.1 M$70.0 M
F Y 1994$77.8 M$64.8 M
F Y 1995$70.2 M$69.0 M
F Y 1996$76.7 M$57.8 M
F Y 1997$89.1 M$71.7 M
F Y 1998$91.7 M$68.2 M
F Y 1999$92.7 M$71.4 M
F Y 2000$102.8 M$77.8 M
F Y 2001$132.8 M$83.4 M
F Y 2002$141.8 M$110.3 M
F Y 2003$190.6 M$134.1 M
F Y 2004$200.9 M$129.1 M
Projected
F Y 2005$193.0 M$135.4 M
F Y 2006$207.2 M$144.7 M
F Y 2007$221.5 M$154.0 M
F Y 2008$235.7 M$163.3 M
F Y 2009$249.9 M$172.6 M
F Y 2010$264.1 M$181.9 M
F Y 2011$278.3 M$191.2 M
F Y 2012$292.6 M$200.4 M

The largest gain was in research funding, where the level of support in F Y 2004 rose to $200.9 million, a nearly 6 percent increase over the previous fiscal year. This was the ninth year in a row that extramural support for research increased.

U H operates the Maui High Performance Computing Center (M H P C C) for the Air Force Research Lab under the largest single contract yet awarded to the University. U H is not only meeting the needs of the Department of Defense for advanced computational services, but through an educational partnership agreement U H faculty and students now have access to these resources when they are not in use. Expenditures in the first two years have been $27.8 million.

Research Breakthroughs in Last Two Years
Fertilizing waters of Antarctica with iron shows the importance of the element in determining the abundance of phytoplankton.

Discovery of a spectacular circumstellar dust disk with indirect evidence for newly formed planets around the star A U Microscopium (A U Mic), only 33 light years from earth.

First observational evidence that a ten-year-old supernova came from a double star system of stars orbiting around each other and the discovery of a massive star that is believed to be a companion to the supernova progenitor.

Discovery of a new and unusual elementary particle, which may be the first example of a new type of sub-atomic particle. If so, this may be the first glimpse of a new realm of sub-atomic physics.

A set of genes called Hox genes found to be utilized in squid in different ways than in other animals, giving researchers a key to understanding how an animal’s body plan is shaped by evolution.

Oceanic salinity found to be important in attempts to model the carbon cycle.

Star clusters of up to a million stars found compacted into dense sphere-shaped groupings in what was thought to be empty space.

Studies of obesity in cloned mice indicate that epigenetic modification rather than genetic change may be the reason for the low success rate of cloning and for producing aberrant phenotypes.

Bacteria and archaea found in fluids of deep ocean crust along the flanks of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The fluids were sampled from a 990-foot borehole drilled through sediments overlying the crust.

Dendrobium orchids bioengineered to over-express a gene for flower color, resulting in deeper and unique colors.

Plant cells genetically engineered to produce jellyfish fluorescent protein, which in turn serves as a marker or biosensor for other selected gene products.

Discovery of two oxygen-laden proteins in microbes that are the earliest known ancestors to hemoglobin, bringing scientists closer to identifying the earliest life forms to use oxygen and aiding them in the search for blood substitutes.

> Return to Table of Contents

Educational Pipeline

What is the role of the University in facilitating a seamless educational pipeline in Hawaii?

The University of Hawaii is one of three core partners, along with the Hawaii Department of Education and the Good Beginnings Alliance, at the heart of Hawaii’s P-20 Initiative. A P-20 approach to education is grounded in the vision of educated, caring, self-sufficient lifelong learners who contribute to their families, to the economy, and to the common good. To this end, P-20 identifies the unique roles played by parents, by educators, by employers, and by the community as a whole—as well as by the learners themselves—and seeks to assure that the connections among all these players are as seamless as possible and that all elements are working together to achieve this shared vision.

Key accomplishments of the P-20 effort to date include:

What is the status of articulation within the U H system?

Articulation refers to the alignment of courses among campuses such that students are able to transfer credits earned at one campus to meet specific requirements on another campus.

In July 2000, the Board of Regents (B O R) approved new general education requirements at U H Hilo and U H Manoa. The implementation of these requirements in fall 2000 at U H Hilo and in fall 2001 at U H Manoa has greatly increased opportunities for students to transfer courses among campuses of the University.

Following the B O R approval of the new requirements, the University Council for Articulation completed a categorization of nearly 1,800 courses that were applicable to meeting the new requirements on all campuses.

As of spring 2004, students from other U H campuses transferring to U H Manoa had approximately 3,000 classes that they could apply to meeting U H Manoa’s general education and graduation requirements.

What is the number of U H Community College students who transfer to U H upper division/four-year campuses?

On average, about 1,000 students transfer from the U H Community Colleges to the U H upper division/four-year campuses in any given fall semester.

Table: Transfers from the U H Community Colleges
into the U H Upper Division/Four-Year Campuses
U H ManoaU H HiloU H West OahuTotal
Fall 19938582111081,177
Fall 19947311951311,057
Fall 19957932581661,217
Fall 1996649220119988
Fall 19977201881511,059
Fall 1998695176125996
Fall 19997211722151,108
Fall 2000632169133934
Fall 20017011781651,044
Fall 2002631182159972
Fall 200360272156830

What proportion of transfer students to U H Manoa receive a baccalaureate degree?

U H Community College transfers to U H Manoa graduate at higher rates than their non-U H Community College transfer counterparts.

Table: Average Graduation Rates of Full-Time
U H Community College Transfers to U H Manoa
U H Community College transfers
to U H Manoa
Non-U H Ccommunity College transfers
to U H Manoa
1 year after entry1%<1%
2 years after entry20%9%
3 years after entry43%29%
4 years after entry57%46%
5 years after entry68%56%
6 years after entry71%59%

What proportion of U H students who earn bachelor degrees pursue graduate work?

Enrolled Students
More than half (58%) of U H Hilo graduating students said they planned to attend graduate or professional school and over one-fourth (26%) had already applied and been accepted to graduate or professional school.
Source: 2002–2003 U H H Graduating Student Survey

Alumni
More than half (53%) of U H Manoa alumni pursued some form of higher education after receiving their baccalaureate degree, including those taking coursework only (i.e., not enrolled in a graduate program). Sixty percent of those who completed coursework also received an advanced degree. Similarly, 66 percent who were pursuing further studies were working toward an advanced degree.
Note: U H M alumni are surveyed five years after graduation.
Source: 2003 U H M Alumni Outcomes Survey

Over half (58%) of recent graduates at U H West Oahu are planning to pursue a graduate degree. One-fifth (19%) indicated they were enrolled in a graduate program.
Source: Spring 2001 U H W O Survey of Recent Graduates

> Return to Table of Contents

Workforce Development

What is the University’s response to jobs in demand in Hawaii?

Workforce development is a priority for the University and a key objective in system and community college strategic plans. System representatives participate in the State Workforce Development Council, as do campus representatives on county workforce development councils and local workforce investment boards. Shortages in the following employment areas and U H’s efforts to meet these job demands are outlined below.

Teachers. Annually, approximately 410 teacher education degrees are issued by the U H Manoa College of Education and U H Hilo. However, the Department of Education estimates that there are approximately 1,300 teacher openings annually due to growth and separations, and hundreds of teacher assistants who need certification by 2006.

The University has made a special effort to increase numbers of teachers in critical areas, such as special education—in Annual Year 2002–2003 there were 80 graduates, up from 60 the year before. Distance-delivered dual programs in elementary education and special education on Kauai and Maui contributed to the effort. U H Hilo annually prepares between 30 and 40 post-baccalaureate students for teacher certification.

In 2003, Kapiolani Community College and Leeward Community College expanded teacher assistant certificate and associate degree programs in an effort to meet No Child Left Behind requirements.

U H Hilo’s third master of education (M Ed) cohort is working on their degrees and a fourth cohort will begin in fall 2004. The M Ed program is designed to enable classroom teachers to complete graduate work while continuing to work full-time on the island of Hawaii.

Nurses. Each year the U H campuses graduate approximately 180 nursing and dental hygiene certificate and degree students to fill the 630 openings reported by the state Department of Labor and Industrial Relations. The campuses are working closely with the medical profession and agencies to expand the numbers of students admitted into the programs. System-wide, the campuses offer an A S / R N to B S N to M S in Nursing degree program utilizing technology-assisted instructional modes of delivery to expand opportunities to the advanced levels of nursing.

Information Technology Specialists. The Hawaii Center for Advanced Communications and the Pacific Center for Advanced Technology Training, with programs such as the C I S C O Academy Training Center and the Oracle Workforce Development Program, are examples of progressive initiatives that advance training and education for I T specialists. There is an annual demand of 420 openings for information technologists, including network and computer systems analysts, and computer applications and software engineers. The U H Manoa and U H Hilo degree programs have had impressive increases in enrollments and graduate over 100 students annually. The U H Community Colleges graduate an additional 50–60 students.

Tourism, Hospitality, and Leisure. In the area of food preparation and services alone, there are 3,650 annual job openings, approximately 470 of which require postsecondary training or long-term on-the-job training. Several campuses, including Kapiolani Community College, Maui Community College, and U H Manoa offer certificates and degrees in culinary arts, hospitality, and travel industry management to meet the 160 positions available each year in hotel operations. Students fill many of the industry jobs in public relations, marketing, and accounting.

Construction. In 2003, Hawaii secured major contracts for construction projects that will require skilled workers for the foreseeable future. The U H Community Colleges have held summits with industry stakeholders to strategically plan expanded training opportunities.
Source: Average Annual and Total Job Openings, 2000 and 2010
State of Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations;
U H Degrees and Certificates earned, F Y 2002–2003

What is the likelihood of a U H Community College career technical student getting a job in Hawaii?

U H career technical graduates have a very good chance of getting a job in Hawaii. For those seeking employment, between 82 and 100 percent indicated they were successful.

Table: Employment of Career Technical Graduates
2000–20012001–20022002–2003
Hawaii C C88%93%100%
Honolulu C C91%93%82%
Kapiolani C C85%87%88%
Kauai C C93%97%87%
Leeward C C94%97%92%
Maui C C91%94%89%
Windward C C93%88%93%
Note: Career Technical was formerly known as Vocational-Technical.
Source: Community Colleges Graduate and Leavers Survey

> Return to Table of Contents

Goal 3

A Model Local, Regional, and Global University

Establishing the University as a distinguished resource in Hawaiian and Pacific-Asia affairs depends on strengthening the commitment to perpetuating Hawaiian culture and language and focusing the international dimension of the University on the Pacific-Asia region. Measures of student participation in Hawaiian language and cultural studies, the Pacific-Asia focus of international activity on campuses, and the efforts to internationalize the campus experience demonstrate the University’s progress in positioning itself as one of the world’s foremost multicultural centers for global and indigenous studies.

Hawaiian Language and Cultural Studies

How well is the University doing in its commitment to preserve and disseminate Hawaiian history, language, and culture?

At U H Manoa, registration in Hawaiian studies courses is currently at its highest ever, nearly doubling from 2002 to 2003. Registration in Hawaiian language courses has decreased since peaking in 1997.

As a U H Manoa General Education graduation requirement, students must take an approved course focused on Hawaiian, Pacific, and Asian issues.

Registrations in Hawaiian language and Hawaiian studies courses at U H Hilo have steadily increased in recent years, and are both at their highest ever.

The Ka Haka Ula O Keelikolani College of Hawaiian Language has offered introductory Hawaiian language courses online and asynchronously to students across the state and on the mainland. In spring 2002, U H Hilo graduated its first master of arts (M A) students in Hawaiian Language and Literature.

At U H Community Colleges, student registrations in Hawaiian studies courses continue their upward trend with a 39 percent increase between 2002 and 2003.

Table: Registration in Hawaiian Language and Hawaiian Studies Courses
U H Manoa
Fall Semester
19931994199519961997199819992000200120022003
Hawaiian Language6867719601,0291,0651,000877733754742692
Hawaiian Studies2333784693033833234173995186161200

Table: Registration in Hawaiian Language and Hawaiian Studies Courses
U H Hilo
Fall Semester
19931994199519961997199819992000200120022003
Hawaiian Language266277255193210241212198225250300
Hawaiian Studies291331250234275230217217218265350

Table: Registration in Hawaiian Language and Hawaiian Studies Courses
U H Community Colleges
Fall Semester
19931994199519961997199819992000200120022003
Hawaiian Language731910930920996957888750706712726
Hawaiian Studies2664213553345706827697177679111266

> Return to Table of Contents

Pacific-Asia Focus

How is U H strengthening its Pacific-Asia focus?

International Student Enrollment
In fall 2003, 2,562 international students from 94 countries enrolled in the U H system. More than 85 percent were from the Pacific-Asia region.

Table: Enrollment of Degree-Seeking International Students
U H System
200120022003
Asia1,7211,8671,970
Pacific/Oceania179341226
Europe193208190
Americas123154135
Africa/Middle East202422
Note: No data for 19 students, fall 2003

International Partnerships
Of the University’s 171 formal partnerships with institutions overseas, 85 percent are with institutions in the Pacific-Asia/Oceania region. These linkages provide opportunities for faculty and student exchange, short-term training, library exchanges, collaborative research, and the development of international programs that benefit the University.

Table: International Partnerships
Distributed by Region
200120022003
East Asia91103111
Southeast Asia182222
Central &
South Asia
332
Pacific/Oceania121110
Europe151822
Americas434

> Return to Table of Contents

Internationalizing the Campus Experience

How is the University ensuring an international dimension to students’ education?

The University of Hawaii supports international education through the on-campus presence of international students, trainees, faculty, and scholars; foreign language offerings; internationally focused courses and certificate programs; international exchange; and study abroad opportunities.

HIGHLIGHTS

Overseas Study/Research Programs
Of the 560 students who participated in the international study/research progams, 268 (48%) went to the Pacific-Asia region. Of these participants, 402 students (72%) were enrolled at the U H Manoa campus.

In Annual Year 2002–2003, the participation of U H students studying abroad decreased by 7 percent compared to 2001–2002. This reduction is possibly due to the outbreak of S A R S and war in the Middle East. As a result, studying abroad in the Pacific-Asia region decreased by more than half while the number of students studying in the Pacific/Oceania (which more than tripled over the previous two years) nearly doubled.

Table: Student Participation in Education Abroad
U H System, Annual Year 2002–2003
AsiaEuropePacific/
Oceania
AmericasAfricaOtherTotal
Percent30% 39% 18% 4%<1%9%
Number Enrolled168 219 100 20152560
Note: The “Other” category accounts for students who were reported as studying abroad but information on their destinations was either not provided by their home campus or their studies covered multiple destinations.

In F Y 2002–2003, 424 international faculty and visiting scholars taught, conducted research, and participated in international exchange activities under U H and Fulbright sponsorship. This represents a 13 percent decrease from the previous year. The outbreak of S A R S likely contributed to the 11 percent decrease in visiting scholars from Asia. More than 48 percent came from Asia, 35 percent from Europe, and the remainder from countries in the Americas, the Pacific/Oceania, Africa, and the Middle East. The largest number was from Japan, followed by China, Germany, Canada, and South Korea.

Table: Visiting Scholars and International Faculty
Distributed by Region
F Y 2000–2001F Y 2001–2002F Y 2002–2003
Asia192231202
Europe134148149
Americas314147
Pacific/Oceania111819
Africa554
Middle East333

Language Study
U H students can earn a certificate with an international component in nearly 40 fields. Students have the opportunity to participate in international exchange, study abroad, and specially designed campus-based overseas programs. U H offers over 31 languages other than English.

Over the past nine years, registrations in foreign languages increased 9 percent overall.

Table: Registration in Languages
U H System
Fall Semester
19931994199519961997199819992000200120022003
East Asian Language3,2223,3983,4743,5663,1693,4343,1543,1553,0913,2343,390
European Language3,0003,0293,0882,9312,7142,9102,8692,8502,7342,9303,354
Hawaiian/Indo-Pacific Language2,3942,7002,9172,8692,7403,0462,7562,4262,4332,4542,632

International Non-Credit Enrollment at U H C Cs
The U H Community Colleges served 1,085 non-credit international students during the Annual Year 2002–2003, with 49 percent attending the Kapiolani campus.

Table: International Non-Credit Students
U H Community Colleges, Annual Year 2002–2003
KapiolaniKauaiLeewardMauiWindwardHawaiiHonoluluTotal
Percent49%3%8%10% 2%7%22%
Number Enrolled529 3383 11021722371085

The international non-credit student programs generated revenues totalling approximately $974,000. Thirty-six percent of this revenue came from Kapiolani Community College. Another 15 percent came from Hawaii Community College, which had the highest average contribution per student ($1,965).

> Return to Table of Contents

Goal 4

Investment in Faculty, Staff, Students, and Their Environment

Creating a university culture of excellence requires attention to the value and development of human resources and the work environments that sustain them. Measures of the University’s investment in faculty and staff and investment in the physical plant are presented to demonstrate the University’s progress in recognizing and renewing its most important assets.

Investment in Faculty and Staff

How are campuses investing in their faculty and staff?

U H System
Information Technology Services (I T S)

Sabbatical and Professional Leave
The University invests in faculty and staff by providing funding for six-month and year-long leaves to pursue scholarly activities and academic renewal.

Table: U H Sabbatical/Professional Improvement Leave 2003
Employee TypeNumberTotal Salary
Administrative/Professional/Technical3$99,198
Executive/Managerial4$354,674
Faculty158$5,908,259
Total165$6,362,131
Note: Cost based on monthly rate multiplied by 6 months for those on Sabbatical/Professional
Improvement Leave or Study Leave for I2 faculty; multiplied by 3 months Study Leave for Junior Specialist.

U H Manoa
The U H Manoa’s Office of Faculty Development and Academic Support (O F D A S) provides a range of faculty professional development and academic support services through its Center for Teaching Excellence and Center for Instructional Support. Through the following programs and services, O F D A S attempts to address the many pedagogical and professional issues that relate directly to teaching and learning and to ethical and professional development: lecture series on university teaching; mid-semester diagnosis of teaching effectiveness; course and faculty evaluation (C A F E); discussion groups on issues in higher education; grant writing series; teaching assistant training and future professoriate series; new faculty orientation program; departmental leadership workshops; media and graphic services.

U H Hilo
The U H Hilo Faculty Research Council awards intramural grants for conference travel, seed money grants, and some grants for scholarly activity in academic fields that usually have little chance for extramural funding. Grants are awarded for scholarly and/or creative activities, as well as training grants to enhance instructional capabilities.

In 2002–2004, U H Hilo brought four national experts on student learning, mentoring, and advising to campus to give workshops to faculty and student affairs staff. Through a five-year National Science Foundation science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (S T E M) grant, science and math faculty are learning different approaches to studying the natural world and adapting to different student learning styles.

A new faculty committee on professional development and teaching is coordinating workshops on instructional technology and efforts to refocus faculty on excellence in teaching and advising.

U H West Oahu
U H West Oahu offers professional development activities, including professional development day for the faculty at the beginning of each semester and workshops and seminars throughout the year for staff and civil service personnel. Funds are allocated for in-state and mainland travel when budgets permit.

A collaborative assessment project pairs faculty with liaisons from the Faculty Assessment Committee to improve skills in assessing student learning outcomes.

U H Community Colleges
The U H Community Colleges support professional development efforts through system and campus planning and resource allocations. New and continuing initiatives are funded by chancellors, fundraisers, and external grants. Kauai Community College employs a full-time professional development coordinator who implements a campus-wide professional development plan. At Honolulu Community College, training and education are facilitated by faculty and staff committees. Workshops on assessing student learning outcomes and support for faculty travel are among the types of professional development opportunities offered. Similar activities are ongoing at each of the community colleges to keep faculty and staff well prepared and up-to-date in their areas of specialization.

How do U H faculty salaries compare with national averages?

U H Community College faculty salaries continue to compare favorably in relation to their national public institution counterparts, but U H Manoa, U H Hilo, and U H West Oahu show signs of lagging behind.

U H Manoa’s average Rank 2 salary was the only salary rank that surpassed those of other public doctoral level institutions. Faculty salaries for Ranks 2 and 4 at U H Hilo and for Rank 2 at U H West Oahu outpaced those of their national baccalaureate counterparts.

Table: Comparison of Average Faculty Salaries with Other Public Institutions for 2003–2004
(U H Manoa, U H Hilo, U H West Oahu)
Rank 5Rank 4Rank 3Rank 2
U H
Manoa
U H
Hilo
U H
West Oahu
U H
Manoa
U H
Hilo
U H
West Oahu
U H
Manoa
U H
Hilo
U H
West Oahu
U H
Manoa
U H
Hilo
U H
West Oahu
U H Average$94,606$68,996$68,996$66,275$55,887$55,887$56,277$46,387$46,387$37,972$37,516$37,516
National
Average
$86,516$68,727$60,981$64,908$56,947$51,401$55,465$46,341$45,420$41,985$37,735$39,192
Note: The national averages are the averages of all public institutions surveyed that are in the same category as the U H campus.
Source: Academe Mar/Apr 2004 Bulletin of the American Association of University Professors (A A U P)

Salaries at Ranks 2, 3, and 4 at the U H Community Colleges exceeded the national averages in comparison with other public two-year institutions with academic ranks. However, at the Rank 5 level, only Kapiolani Community College matched the national faculty salary average.

Table: Comparison of Average Faculty Salaries
with Other Public Institutions for 2003–2004
(U H Community Colleges)
HawaiiHonoluluKapiolaniKauaiLeewardMauiWindwardNational
Averages
Rank 5$61,851$62,891$64,591$63,838$63,281$60,619$62,205$64,439
Rank 4$54,192$56,037$55,168$57,201$53,999$55,742$53,487$51,859
Rank 3$48,156$53,271$48,578$51,716$47,321$49,474$47,764$45,239
Rank 2$41,102$41,205$42,051$44,391$42,563$43,925$41,078$39,062
Note: The national averages are the averages of all public institutions surveyed that are in the same category as the U H campus.
Source: Academe Mar/Apr 2004 Bulletin of the American Association of University Professors (A A U P)

What share of their time do U H faculty spend on instruction and research?

Equivalent semester hours per regular faculty remained about the same at U H Manoa from fall 1998 to fall 2002, but increased slightly at U H West Oahu and decreased slightly at U H Hilo and the U H Community Colleges. U H regular faculty teach from two to four courses a semester. For comparative purposes, equivalent semester hours per regular faculty at the U H Community Colleges include general academic instruction only.

Table: University of Hawaii
Equivalent Semester Hours/Regular Faculty
Fall 2002Fall 1998
U H Manoa8.18.0
U H Hilo9.09.6
U H West Oahu10.28.9
U H Community Colleges11.412.7
Note: Equivalent semester hours consist of fixed semester hours plus defined equivalencies for directed reading, thesis or dissertation classes, and other variable credit classes.

What is the turnover rate for faculty?

Faculty turnover rates have steadily decreased over the past three years after peaking in F Y 2000–2001.

Top five reasons faculty left U H (ranked from high to low):

Table: U H Faculty Resignations (Turnover Rate)
F Y 1998–1999F Y 1999–2000F Y 2000–2001F Y 2001–2002F Y 2002–2003F Y 2003–2004
Number of Resignations Processed7995145128109102
Percent2.5%3.1%4.6%4.0%3.3%3.0%
Note: Does not include retirements.
Source: Personnel Exit Questionnaire, U H Office of Human Resources

What are the demographic trends in the composition of U H employees?

Employment by ethnicity has remained stable since 1999 among all U H employees. There have been slight increases in the percentages of faculty members among Hawaiian/part-Hawaiian, Filipino, and other Asian/Pacific Islander groups.

Table: All Employees by Ethnicity
Fall 1999Fall 2003
Caucasian40%40%
Filipino5%5%
Hawaiian/Part-Hawaiian7%8%
Chinese10%9%
Japanese29%28%
Other5%5%
Other Asian/Pacific Islanders4%5%

Table: Faculty by Ethnicity
Fall 1999Fall 2003
Caucasian59%57%
Filipino2%3%
Hawaiian/Part-Hawaiian4%5%
Chinese8%8%
Japanese19%18%
Other4%4%
Other Asian/Pacific Islanders4%5%

The proportion of women in the U H workforce increased steadily from 1996. Currently, the gender balance for all employees is close to even. The percentage of women on the faculty increased slightly by 2.5 percent between 1999 and 2003.

Percent of U H Women Employees
Fall 1999Fall 2003
All Employees49.1%50.6%
Faculty40.5%43.0%

> Return to Table of Contents

Investment in the Physical Plant

What is the level of C I P appropriations/authorizations received by U H from the state executive budget?

State C I P appropriations have fluctuated annually from a high of $214 million in 2002 to a low of $28 million in 2000.

Table: Capital Improvements Program
Appropriations/Authorizations ($ Thousand)
Act/Session Laws of Hawaii
MEANS OF FINANCE91/1999281/2000259/2001177/2002200/200341/2004
 Special Funds5000750000
 General Obligation Bond Fund62,36427,70069,51584,04422,80488,561
 Revenue Bonds6,7500094,32000
 Federal Funds1,80062522,5801,00010,00018,405
 Private Contributions73004,38235,0000200
 County Funds40000000
 Revolving Funds65009,834000
TOTAL73,19428,325107,061214,36432,804107,166

What is the level of investment for maintaining the U H physical plant?

The repairs and maintenance (R&M) allocation per gross square foot (G S F) between fiscal years 1999 and 2005 has increased substantially due to funding support from the capital improvements program (C I P) budget.

Table: U H Manoa
Budget Allocation Compared with Gross Square Feet
F Y 2001F Y 2002F Y 2003F Y 2004F Y 2005¹
R&M Allocation$13,520,481$17,898,650$21,472,307$4,696,943$18,633,943
Gross Square Feet ²4,746,9284,746,9284,751,4324,751,4324,751,432
Ratio ($/GSF)$2.85$3.77$4.52$0.99$3.92
Note: ¹ Projected
² Does not include off-campus facilities and on-campus facilities that are self-supporting.

Table: U H Hilo
Budget Allocation Compared with Gross Square Feet
F Y 2001F Y 2002F Y 2003F Y 2004F Y 2005¹
R&M Allocation$3,216,275$4,147,046$5,326,273$940,686$4,588,686
Gross Square Feet867,000983,508983,508983,508983,508
Ratio ($/GSF)$3.71$4.22$5.42$0.96$4.67
Note: ¹ Projected

Table: U H West Oahu
Budget Allocation Compared with Gross Square Feet
F Y 2001F Y 2002F Y 2003F Y 2004F Y 2005¹
R&M Allocation$67,691$72,624$97,432$32,000$92,000
Gross Square Feet39,73639,73639,73639,73639,736
Ratio ($/GSF)$1.70$1.83$2.45$0.81$2.32
Note: ¹ Projected

Table: U H Community Colleges
Budget Allocation Compared with Gross Square Feet
F Y 2001F Y 2002F Y 2003F Y 2004F Y 2005¹
R&M Allocation$6,459,292$8,689,085$11,042,085$2,217,085$9,572,085
Gross Square Feet2,375,8282,519,5052,575,8372,613,4072,613,407
Ratio ($/GSF)$2.72$3.45$4.29$0.85$3.66
Note: ¹ Projected

Table: U H System
Budget Allocation Compared with Gross Square Feet
F Y 2001F Y 2002F Y 2003F Y 2004F Y 2005¹
R&M Allocation$23,263,739$30,807,405$37,938,097$7,886,714$32,886,714
Gross Square Feet8,029,4928,289,6778,350,5138,388,0838,388,083
Ratio ($/GSF)$2.90$3.72$4.54$0.94$3.92
Note: ¹ Projected

The percentage of the general operating budget (general fund appropriations and tuition revenues) dedicated to R&M needs to be increased by 1.5–3 percent of its replacement value to ensure proper facilities maintenance and renewal.

Table: Systemwide Repairs and Maintenance Operating Allocations Compared
with Total Operating Allocations
F Y 2001F Y 2002F Y 2003F Y 2004F Y 2005¹
R&M Allocation$3,263,739$3,807,405$2,938,097$2,886,714$2,886,714
Total Operating$326,936,579$342,088,466$334,439,926368,479,768$371,869,768
Ratio (R&M$/OPER$)1.00%1.11%0.88%0.78%0.78%
Note: ¹ Projected.

In F Y 2004–2005 an additional $30 million was allocated for R&M through C I P appropriations which helped to alleviate a portion of the deferred R&M, but the backlog of R&M remains one of the most serious problems facing the University.

Table: Total Deferred Repairs and Maintenance
CampusF Y 1996F Y 2000F 2003F Y 2004
U H Manoa$36,770,000$88,793,000$52,635,390$82,902,000
U H Hilo$8,079,600$30,929,250$22,664,453$30,090,000
U H Community Colleges$22,882,600$47,015,945$29,622,549$48,053,876
Total Unfunded Deferred R&M$67,732,200$166,738,195$104,922,392$161,045,876

> Return to Table of Contents

Goal 5

Resources and Stewardship

Achieving the goals of the University’s strategic plan depends on the University to acquire, allocate, and manage public and private revenue streams and exercise exemplary stewardship over these assets. Measures of investment from the state and investment from private sources and measures of accountability in the management of these resources are presented to demonstrate the University’s commitment to manage its resources in service to the state and its citizens.

Investment from the State

What proportion of U H’s revenues come from the state?

In F Y 2003, about half of the University’s funds came from the state general fund appropriations.

Table: U H Funding Sources, F Y 2003
State51%
Federal27%
Tuition & Fees12%
Sales/Services, Endowments and Other7%
Private and Local3%

How does U H expend the resources to support instruction, research, and other activities?

The primary use of funds is to support instruction and research.

Table: U H Funding Uses, F Y 2003
Student Services, Scholarships and Fellowships8%
Public Service5%
Academic and Institutional Support17%
Auxiliary, Independent and Operation & Maintenance11%
Research26%
Instruction33%

What is the relationship between U H’s share of the state budget and U H enrollment?

U H’s share of state general funds has gone from 8.8 percent in F Y 1997–1998 to 8.4 percent in F Y 2003–2004—a 5 percent decline. U H enrollment has increased by 10.5 percent during the same period.

Table: U H Enrollment and Share of State General Funds
1997–19981998–19991999–20002000–20012001–20022002–20032003–2004
Percent Share of General Funds8.8%8.7%9.2%9.2%8.4%8.1%8.4%
Enrollment45,55145,33746,47944,57945,99448,17350,317

> Return to Table of Contents

Investment from Private Sources

What are the trends in private giving through the U H Foundation?

Private giving to the University through the foundation remains strong. During the last comprehensive campaign, which kicked off on July 1, 1997 and ended June 30, 2001, over $116 million was raised in support of faculty and programs at all ten campuses of the U H system. In F Y 2001–2002, the post-campaign year, $18 million was raised.

The U H Foundation embarked on another comprehensive campaign—the Centennial Campaign for the University of Hawaii—on July 1, 2002. During the first year of the campaign, $22 million was raised. In F Y 2003–2004, another $25.9 million was raised for a total of $48 million.

Approximately $8.2 million was spent over the last two years to raise the $48 million, or 17 cents per dollar. This is in line with the national cost-per-dollar average for fund-raising activities.

Table: University of Hawaii Foundation
Funds Raised by Campaign Year (in millions)
Year 1Year 2Year 3Year 4Year 5
Centennial CampaignF Y 2003 $22.0 MF Y 2004 $25.9 M F Y 2005* $40.0 MF Y 2006* $43.0 MF Y 2007* $46.0 M
Campaign for HawaiiF Y 1998 $19.3 MF Y 1999 $23.1 MF Y 2000 $33.0 MF Y 2001 $41.0 Mnot applicable
* F Y 2005–2007 reflect campaign goals.
Source: U H Foundation

Private gifts come from a wide variety of sources. In F Y 2003–2004, $9.9 million—nearly 40 percent—came from alumni and friends of the University, which include faculty, staff, parents, and other individuals. Another $8.6 million came from private foundations and trusts.

Table: University of Hawaii Foundation
F Y 2003–04 Gifts by Source (in millions)
Foundations & TrustsFriendsOrganizationsAlumniCorporationsTotal Gifts
Gifts$8.6 M$6.8 M$3.4 M$3.1 M$4.0 M$25.9 M
Percent33%26%13%12%15%

What is the status of the University’s endowment?

The endowment reached an all-time high of $115.8 million in 2003–2004 after weathering the market downturn of 2000 through 2002. This high is ahead of its benchmark (17.7% versus 15.7%).

Over the last four years, approximately 27 percent of funds raised were designated for the endowment. Increasing this rate to 40 percent will be a priority over the next three years.

Table: University of Hawaii Foundation
F Y 1995–F Y 2004 Investment Portfolio (in millions)
1994–19951995–19961996–19971997–19981998–19991999–20002000–20012001–20022002–20032003–2004
Market Value$45.4 M$58.6 M$68.9 M$86.5 M$94.4 M$112.2 M$106.9 M$94.7 M$96.5 M$115.8 M

> Return to Table of Contents

Accountability

How does the University demonstrate its accountability to the public?

Accountability
This document, Measuring Our Progress, responds to Act 151 of the 1995 Legislature to provide benchmarks and performance indicators that reflect the systematic assessment of U H programs and services. This 2004 Update is intended to demonstrate to the public the University’s progress in meeting the goals set forth in the University of Hawaii System Strategic Plan: Entering the University’s Second Century 2002–2010. In addition, each campus demonstrates its accountability through accreditation, program review, and institutional assessment activities.

Accreditation
Regional Accreditation
All ten campuses of the University system are separately and regionally accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (W A S C). Regional accreditation means that, as the result of an external review process, the University is judged to be fulfilling its stated purposes and can be expected to continue to do so. Students and the public can be assured that University of Hawaii campuses have met standards of quality across the entire range of institutional activities.

Table: University of Hawaii Status of Accreditation
CampusAccediting BodyStatus
U H ManoaW A S C -Senior CommissionSpecial visit completed, March 2003. Accreditation reaffirmed until spring 2010. Special visit, November 2005. Proposal for the two-stage preparatory review and educational effectiveness review due October 2006. Preparatory review, spring 2009. Educational effectiveness review, spring 2010.
U H HiloW A S C -Senior CommissionAccreditation reaffirmed, summer 2004 for 10 years. Preparatory visit completed, March 2003. Educational effectiveness visit completed, March 2004.
U H West OahuW A S C -Senior CommissionRenewal of full accreditation, June 1998; preparatory review, March 2003. Special visit, December 2003. Educational effectiveness review, October 2004.
U H C C
 HawaiiW A S C - A C C J C CommissionEach campus is separately accredited. Accreditation reaffirmed for all campuses, fall 2000 for six years—the maximum allowed by A C C J C policy. Reaccreditation process, fall 2006.
 HonoluluW A S C - A C C J C Commission
 KapiolaniW A S C - A C C J C Commission
 KauaiW A S C - A C C J C Commission
 LeewardW A S C - A C C J C Commission
 MauiW A S C - A C C J C Commission
 WindwardW A S C - A C C J C Commission
 Employment
 Training
 Center
W A S C Commission for Regional Occupational CentersAccreditation reaffirmed, June 1999. Next reaccreditation visit, spring 2005.

Professional Accreditation
In addition, nearly 50 University of Hawaii academic programs hold separate professional accreditation. These programs have been subjected to rigorous external reviews that ensure high standards of professional practice. As a result, the U H credentials conferred convey a special merit of quality within these specialized fields of study.

U H Manoa. At U H Manoa, 53 degree programs are accredited by 24 external professional accrediting organizations that examine the various programs every five to ten years. Among the accredited programs are law, medicine, nursing, architecture, accounting, business, travel industry management, social work, engineering, biosystems engineering, ocean engineering, journalism, chemistry, dental hygiene, dietetics, library and information studies, clinical psychology, audiology, speech-language pathology, education, counselor education, special education, rehabilitation counseling, medical technology, music, public health and epidemiology, and urban and regional planning. In addition, the Counseling and Student Development Center, the U H Manoa Children’s Center, and U H Manoa’s University Health Services are professionally accredited.

U H Hilo. The nursing and education programs at U H Hilo are separately accredited. The business program is undergoing review for accreditation in fall 2004.

U H Community Colleges. Twenty community college programs hold separate accreditation, including nursing and a variety of food service programs at multiple campuses, aeronautics maintenance, automotive maintenance, cosmetology, fire science, motorcycle safety, legal assistant, medical assistant, medical lab technician, occupational therapy, physical therapy, radiologic technology, and respiratory care.

Program Review
Program review is a continuing activity within the University of Hawaii. Campuses routinely review established academic programs, as well as assess the need for new programs, make major modifications of curriculum, and update the names of departments and degrees. Activities for the past two years are summarized below.

During 2002–2003, the Board of Regents approved nine new academic programs and moved six programs from provisional to established status. The administration approved 11 certificate credentials and one minor degree, suspended admission to two established certificate programs, resumed previously suspended admissions to two programs, approved planning for 13 new degrees and certificates, and approved name changes for five departments and degrees. In all, 121 academic programs underwent review in this academic year.

During 2003–2004, the Board of Regents approved eight new academic programs, granted established status to eight provisional academic programs, and terminated one provisional graduate certificate. The administration approved six new certificates and one minor degree, suspended admission to one provisional certificate and two established degrees, removed suspended admission to one provisional program, approved planning for seven new degrees, terminated three established certificates, and approved name changes for five departments and degrees. In all, 129 academic programs underwent review in this academic year.

In accordance with B O R Policy, instruction and research centers/institutes/academies and public services centers that serve external communities are reported annually. During the 2002–2003 academic year, University administration approved nine new centers, closed two centers, and reviewed two centers that were continued. As of April 2003, the University of Hawaii housed 103 centers.

Institutional Assessment and Research
U H Manoa. U H Manoa’s assessment of student learning outcomes is consistent with its mission as a research university. Assessment is conducted by academic leaders in individual programs; it is a scholarly endeavor informed by data; it includes peer review; it recognizes the evolutionary nature of learning and discovery. All U H Manoa departments are engaged in the regular assessment of their programs. Capstones, internships, theses, design projects, and other culminating course-based experiences are commonly used to assess student performance and learning. Assessment of U H Manoa’s general education program is led by U H Manoa’s General Education Committee. Assessment efforts are posted on U H Manoa’s assessment website.

U H Hilo. The U H Hilo Institutional Research Office manages the biennial National Survey of Student Engagement (N S S E) and annual Incoming Student and Graduating Student Surveys, assists academic and support programs in ongoing assessment, and manages special projects such as a spring 2004 retention study and a survey of Big Island residents spring/fall 2004. The office maintains a data-rich website. The faculty congress assessment committee monitors the program review process and assists academic programs in completing reviews aimed at continuous program improvement. The assessment and general education committees are working with faculty to develop measurable learning goals for all programs and more informative and student-friendly course syllabi.

U H West Oahu. In the past year, the Institutional Research Office was staffed to maintain institutional data and conduct surveys, course evaluations, pre- and post-testing, longitudinal tracking, and periodic reports for accreditation/program review and planning. A college-wide faculty Assessment Committee formulates policy on assessment and guides the assessment of learning outcomes at the level of the specialization, division, and institution. Student learning is assessed in capstones and practica requirements of all graduates.

U H Community Colleges. Leadership for assessment in support of institutional effectiveness comes from the Council of Community College Chancellors (C C C C), with appropriate staff support provided by the community college support offices.

Programs and activities that provide data to support assessment for institutional effectiveness include the community colleges’ annual Program Health Indicator (P H I) reports and U H Community Colleges Fact Book, participation in the national Community College Survey of Student Engagement (C C S S E), and the analysis of the current course placement process and placement testing procedures.

A workshop attended by approximately 140 U H Community College faculty, staff, and administrators in early 2004 initiated a system-wide dialog designed to develop a better understanding of the new Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges (A C C J C) standards, assess existing policies and practices, and develop an action plan to meet the new A C C J C standards. From that workshop, a number of actions were initiated including:

> Return to Table of Contents

Distinction and Achievements

The U H Manoa William S. Richardson School of Law’s National and International Environmental Law moot court teams have continued to receive high honors. In the last 13 years, National Environmental Law moot court teams have advanced to the quarterfinal or semifinal rounds nine times. International Environmental Law moot court teams have finished in the top four for the third consecutive year.
Source: U H Manoa

A professor of geology co-authored a book on volcanic study recognized as Best Geography and Earth Science Book of 2002 by the Professional/Scholarly Publishing (P S P) Division of the Association of American Publishers.
Source: U H Manoa

The National Research Council ranks U H Manoa doctoral programs in astrophysics and astronomy, geography, geosciences, linguistics, and oceanography in the top 30 nationally in their field.
Source: National Research Council

Boeing donated $110,000 of equipment to Kauai Community College to establish a photonics laboratory.
Source: Kauai Community College

Between 1992 and 2001 the share of U H Manoa students receiving Pell grants increased by 10.2 percent, the highest among state flagship universities in the nation.
Source: Postsecondary Education Opportunity, February 2004

A 2003 graduate was selected as one of 15 international candidates to the renowned Directors Guild of America Assistant Directors Training.
Source: Leeward Community College

U H Hilo’s athletic program received the U S A Today national academic award in fall 2002 for excellent graduation rates of student athletes.
Source: U H Hilo

In terms of citations of scientific papers in astronomy, the U H Manoa Institute for Astronomy (I f A) is ranked second among the top 20 astronomy departments in the U.S. Four of the I f A researchers are listed among 249 of the world’s most cited and influential researchers in the space sciences.
Source: U H Manoa

In F Y 2003, U H Manoa’s School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (S O E S T) ranked sixth in terms of National Science Foundation funding for ocean sciences at U S universities.
Source: U H Manoa

The Hawaii International Film Festival recognized a U H Manoa Center for Pacific Islands Studies professor for The Land has Eyes, a film that he wrote and directed. The Land Has Eyes is the first feature film by an indigenous filmmaker from Fiji and made its world premiere at the prestigious Sundance Film Festival.
Source: U H Manoa

U H Hilo is ranked sixth among national liberal arts colleges in campus diversity in the 2004 edition of the “America’s Best Colleges” guidebook.
Source: U S News and World Report

A U H Manoa assistant professor of ocean engineering was one of 26 scientists selected nationally by the Office of Naval Research as a 2003 Young Investigator. The prestigious Young Investigator awards recognize research achievements, potential for continued outstanding research, and strong university support.
Source: U H Manoa

Commands with Kapiolani Community College trained military personnel received N E Y culinary awards for excellence in Navy and Marine Corps food service programs.
Source: Kapiolani Community College

Maui Community College was one of four institutions to receive the MetLife Foundation Best-Practice College Awards for exemplary performance in student retention.
Source: Maui Community College

U H Manoa’s education, business, law, and social work graduate programs are cited among the top 100 in the country in the 2005 edition of America’s Best Graduate Schools.
Source: U S News and World Report, March 2004

A Windward Upward Bound Thinkquest Team received the Best of Contest Award in Web Design and the Gold Medal Site from New Project awards sponsored by the U S Department of Education, Office of T R I O Programs.
Source: Windward Community College

A Kapiolani Community College culinary arts team won the gold medal at the 2003 Western Regional American Culinary Federation Conference.
Source: Kapiolani Community College

U H Hilo was named one of Outside Magazine’s top 40 colleges. The national lifestyle publication also ranked U H Hilo Number 19 among “the coolest places to work, play, study, party, and live.”
Source: Outside Magazine, September 2003

A Maui Community College culinary arts team received a silver medal at the 2004 National American Culinary Federation Junior Competition.
Source: Maui Community College

Four plant science researchers, three with ties to the U H, received the prestigious 2002 Alexander Humboldt Foundation Award for Agriculture for developing the ringspot virus-resistant papaya that saved the Hawaiian papaya industry.
Source: U H Manoa

A Honolulu Community College student was one of 27 community college students nationwide to be awarded a Jack Kent Cooke scholarship.
Source: Honolulu Community College

For two consecutive years, U H Manoa professors of physics have been selected as Outstanding Junior Investigator by the U S Department of Energy Division of High Energy Physics. Besides U H Manoa, only Princeton and U C Berkeley have had back-to-back recipients of the prestigious award.
Source: U H Manoa

Regal Travel opened a full-service on-campus travel agency, providing hospitality and tourism students with hands-on experience and the U H community with convenient travel assistance.
Source: Kapiolani Community College

An architecture graduate placed second at the 2002 Imagi-Nations Design Competition, a design competition by Walt Disney Imagineering to promote diversity. U H Manoa individuals/teams have placed in the finals nine of the ten years they have participated.
Source: U H Manoa

A distinguished ocean science researcher received the prestigious Henry Bryant Bigelow Award in Oceanography for his contributions to the field of microbiology and the ecological role of microorganisms in the sea.
Source: U H Manoa

Honolulu Community College’s faculty development website received an innovation award from the 2003 National Council for Staff, Professional, and Organization Development.
Source: Honolulu Community College

A 2004 graduate was named one of four Best College Jazz Soloists by DownBeat magazine and the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (A S C A P) West Coast Student Classical Composer of the Year.
Source: U H Manoa

A U H Hilo professor of Japanese and chair of the Languages Department was awarded the 2004 Japan-U S Friendship Commission Prize for his translation of an anthology of short stories by Japanese writers.
Source: U H Hilo

A Maui Community College fashion technology graduate’s contemporary Hawaiian quilts were highlighted at the National Quilting Trade Show. Her quilt kits were featured in the nationally distributed magazine, Keepsake Quilting, spring 2003.
Source: Maui Community College

A U H alumnus was appointed World Health Organization Director General.
Source: U H Manoa

A U H West Oahu professor was reappointed for a three-year term as an Associate in Science by the Bishop Museum.
Source: U H West Oahu

The U H Manoa School of Social Work was awarded the Employer of the Year award by the Hawaii Division of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. The award recognizes employers who have made significant contributions toward the hiring and retention of workers with multiple sclerosis and other disabilities.
Source: National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Hawaii Division, November 2003

> Return to Table of Contents

Acknowledgements

The University of Hawaii Council of Chief Academic Officers (C C A O) provided overall direction for this project. The 2004–2005 Chief Academic Officers are:

Neal Smatresk, U H Manoa
Chris Lu, U H Hilo
flo wiger, U H West Oahu
Doug Dykstra, Hawaii Community College
Sharon Ota, Honolulu Community College
Leon Richards, Kapiolani Community College
Helen Sina, Kauai Community College
Peter Quigley, Leeward Community College
Suzette Robinson, Maui Community College
Linka Mullikin, Windward Community College
David McClain, U H System

This report was prepared under the guidance of the Interim Associate Vice President for Planning and Policy. Sandra Furuto of the Institutional Assessment and Policy Office and members of her staff—Stephan Doi, Chatney Graham, and Ashley Kitabayashi—took lead responsibility for the document preparation. Sharyn Nakamoto and the Institutional Research staff provided management data and analyses. The following campus/system representatives provided data and analyses and worked collaboratively with us in shaping this report: Helene Sokugawa, U H Manoa; April Komenaka and Lynne Stamoulis, U H Hilo; Lynn Inoshita, U H West Oahu; Cheryl Chappell-Long and Sam Prather, U H System (Academic Affairs for Community Colleges). Numerous other individuals from campus and system offices also provided data and assistance. The Office of Creative Services provided cover graphic and campus photos. The report was printed by Glenn Matsumoto and Honolulu Community College's Print Shop.

We extend our appreciation to all contributors and advisers.

Linda K. Johnsrud
Interim Associate Vice President for Planning and Policy

>End of Document Return to Table of Contents