University of Hawaii

Measuring Our Progress Report 2006

This version of the U H Measuring Our Progress Report is designed to promote accessibility for people with disabilities in compliance with Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. To ensure proper functioning of assistive technology tools such as screen readers, Hawaiian diacriticals were not included and spaces between selected acronyms were added (e.g., U H). We apologize for any inconvenience.

The President’s Message

Each biennium the University of Hawaii produces a report to document our progress in meeting our goals in service to the state of Hawaii. I am proud to share with the Governor, the Hawaii State Legislature, the people of Hawaii, our alumni and friends, this 2006 edition of Measuring Our Progress.

As 2006 comes to a close, we are cognizant of the leadership transition under way in Congress. Leaders of both parties value the role of higher education in the lives of U.S. citizens and the nation, but the nature of their support may differ. Nonetheless, it is likely that the tenets of the action plan announced by Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings, “to improve accessibility, affordability, and accountability,” will be sustained. These goals mirror the commitment of the University of Hawaii to support “access with success” for the citizens of Hawaii, to maintain affordability, and to provide measures of our effectiveness to the public.

I am pleased to report that since I became the chief executive of the University of Hawaii System in 2004, we have been able to attract significant additional resources to our enterprise: over $50 million in additional operating funds and nearly $200 million in new capital improvement funds from state appropriations; a $100 million increase in the volume of research and training grants to over $430 million; and—led by entrepreneur Jay Shidler’s $25 million investment in U H Manoa’s business school—over $100 million in private gifts to the U H Foundation.

The University of Hawaii seeks to be held accountable for performance and results achieved with these resources entrusted to us. The executive and legislative branches and Hawaii’s people deserve to have their University judged by the quality and success of its programs, services, students, and graduates. This document provides measures of performance, benchmarks, and other indicators of our progress in meeting the goals we set forth in the University of Hawaii Strategic Plan: Entering the University’s Second Century, 2002–2010. Our strategic plan advances five goals that commit the University to an agenda of measurable improvements in all aspects of its operations:

The measures presented here reveal progress over time, at intervals, and as available, against benchmark standards relative to the strategic goals we have in place. Measuring Our Progress demonstrates our commitment to excellence and accountability. With the guidance of the Board of Regents, and the support of the Executive Branch, the Legislature, and our alumni and friends, we continue the voyage begun in 1907, a journey of transformation of your university, of the state of Hawaii, and of the lives of those we serve.

David McClain
President
University of Hawaii

Table of Contents

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President’s Message

Contents

Introduction

University of Hawaii Campuses

Goal 1: Educational Effectiveness and Student Success

Goal 2: A Learning, Research, and Service Network

Goal 3: A Model Local, Regional, and Global University

Goal 4: Investment in Faculty, Staff, Students, and Their Environment

Goal 5: Resources and Stewardship

Distinctions and Achievements

Introduction

The University of Hawaii Measuring Our Progress, 2006, updates the 2004 report, and demonstrates the importance the University places on measuring the University’s progress on the goals of the University of Hawaii System Strategic Plan: Entering the University’s Second Century, 2002–2010. This report is responsive to Board of Regents’ policy that requires regular and systematic assessment of programs, services, campuses, and the University system as a whole. As required by Act 161 of the 1995 legislative session, the Board of Regents acted to adopt benchmark/performance indicators that continue to form the basis for this biennium report.

As the University moves forward to celebrate its centennial in the year 2007, it honors the efforts of all of those who have contributed to the history and growth of the University. Founded in 1907 under the auspices of the Morrill Act, the University of Hawaii is a land-grant, sea-grant, and space-grant institution. As Hawaii’s sole state public university system, it is governed by a single Board of Regents and is composed of graduate/research, baccalaureate, and community college campuses. In addition, the University of Hawaii operates three University Centers, multiple learning centers, and extension, research, and service programs at more than 70 sites in the state of Hawaii. The University of Hawaii system’s special distinction is found in its Hawaiian, Asian, and Pacific orientation and its position as one of the world’s foremost multicultural centers for global and indigenous studies.

Second Decade Project, 2010–2020

To ensure that the University’s strategic direction remains current, President McClain charged the Office of Academic Planning and Policy to analyze the demographic data and information relevant to the higher education needs of the state in the decade following the University’s strategic plan. As a result of the analysis, a public agenda for higher education in Hawaii has been advanced to inform U H planning and priorities for 2006 and the future. The agenda underscores the need to:

Functioning as a System

The common purpose of the University of Hawaii system is to address the public agenda and prepare the liberally educated and highly skilled workforce essential for the future economic success, health, and well being of this island state as it participates in a global society. As a system, the University provides all qualified people in Hawaii equal opportunity through a variety of entry points and the flexibility to move among parts of the system to achieve educational goals. Accredited as autonomous units, the ten campuses serve multiple missions and pursue distinct pathways in response to state needs. They are bound, nonetheless, by their commitment to functioning as a system in service to the state.

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University of Hawaii Campuses

U H MANOA is a research university of international standing, offering bachelor’s degrees in 87 fields of study, master’s degrees in 87 fields of study, doctorates in 53 fields of study, first professional degrees in architecture, law, and medicine, and a number of certificates. It has widely recognized strengths in tropical agriculture, tropical medicine, oceanography, astronomy, electrical engineering, volcanology, evolutionary biology, comparative philosophy, comparative religion, Hawaiian studies, Pacific Islands studies, Asian studies, and Pacific and Asian regional public health. U H Manoa offers instruction in more languages than any U.S. institution outside the Department of State.

U H HILO is a comprehensive institution offering baccalaureate liberal arts and professional and selected master’s programs. It also offers a PhD in Hawaiian and Indigenous Language and Culture Revitalization and a doctorate in Pharmacy. Baccalaureate degrees are offered in various fields of the humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, and in agriculture, nursing, business, and computer science. Programs emphasize student-faculty collaboration, fieldwork, internships, and hands-on learning. Drawing on the geological, biological, and cultural diversity of the island of Hawaii, many programs are organized around the theme of “the island as a learning laboratory.”

U H WEST OAHU is a four-year, comprehensive university with an emphasis on baccalaureate education founded in the liberal arts, serving professional, career-related, and applied fields, based on state and regional needs. U H West Oahu is committed to providing access to residents throughout the state of Hawaii through its partnerships with the U H community colleges and its delivery of distance education programs. A commitment to student access is demonstrated by a schedule of day, evening, and weekend courses as well as distributed education options for students on all islands.

U H COMMUNITY COLLEGES are open-door, low-tuition institutions offering associate degrees and certificate programs in academic, technical, and occupational subjects.

HAWAII COMMUNITY COLLEGE offers a strong liberal arts program, including basic skills, and a comprehensive career technical program that includes business, nursing, trades technology, hospitality, and public service careers. Unique programs at Hawaii Community College include a Hawaiian Lifestyles Program and Tropical Forest Ecosystem and Agroforestry Management or FOREST Team Program.

HONOLULU COMMUNITY COLLEGE offers a comprehensive liberal arts program and 23 technical-occupational programs, including programs that are not offered at any other campus, for example, marine technologies, cosmetology, refrigeration and air conditioning, aeronautic maintenance, commercial aviation pilot training, and occupational and environmental safety management. The college has created an innovative construction academy with 14 Oahu high schools, and is home to the Pacific Center for Advanced Technology Training (P C A T T) serving Hawaii’s telecommunications and I T community.

KAPIOLANI COMMUNITY COLLEGE offers a comprehensive liberal arts program. This campus is a statewide leader in health services education with nine unique programs in allied health professions; it offers the state’s only legal assisting program and an extensive food service and hospitality education program. The college also offers degree programs in emerging technology fields, including new media arts and biotechnology, as well as programs for those seeking degrees as educational paraprofessionals and as fitness professionals in exercise and sport science.

KAUAI COMMUNITY COLLEGE offers both a comprehensive liberal arts program and career and technical education responsive to community workforce needs, including nursing, culinary arts, visitor industry, accounting and business technology, transportation technology, building trades, and information technology/electronics. As a University Center and distance learning leader, the college also provides access to baccalaureate and graduate level education for Kauai County. Non-credit, short-term courses are focused on skills for the workforce and community interests.

LEEWARD COMMUNITY COLLEGE offers an extensive liberal arts program, combined with selected career technical education offerings, and provides courses in 67 disciplines; unique programs include television production and information and computer sciences. Courses are also offered on-site at the educational center in Waianae which houses the Waianae Health Academy, Ka Lama Education Academy, and the Waianae Maritime Academy.

MAUI COMMUNITY COLLEGE offers a strong liberal arts program and a comprehensive career program that includes business, culinary arts, nursing, trade technology, and public service career fields. Courses are offered through various modalities including face-to-face, Web C T internet-based, and statewide cable and interactive television systems. The first baccalureate degree in Applied Business and Information Technology (A B I T) has received candidacy status. Through its University Center, the college provides access to baccalaureate and graduate level programs to Maui County residents.

WINDWARD COMMUNITY COLLEGE offers a strong comprehensive liberal arts program and selected career educational programs, including business education and agriculture. The Employment Training Center, located at Windward Community College, provides job training for “at risk” populations in high demand areas such as food service, auto repair, construction occupations, and office technology.

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Goal 1

Educational Effectiveness and Student Success

Enabling student success requires an academic culture that supports students and student learning. Measures of student access, engagement, performance, satisfaction, and diversity are presented to demonstrate the University’s progress in establishing an optimum culture for student success.

Access

What is the status of access to the University of Hawaii?

Rapid enrollment growth in the post-war era was followed by an extended period of more stable enrollment. Expanded access helped the U H system post modest overall gains from the early 1970s through the 1990s. From fall 2000 to fall 2005, enrollment increased 12.5 percent. Enrollment is anticipated to remain stable at approximately 50,000.

Graph entitled “Historical and Projected Enrollment, by Unit.” Depicts enrollment by campus, fall semesters, from 1907 projected through 2012. Hard copy and tabular data available by request from the Office of Academic Planning and Policy.

app@hawaii.edu

What are the chances of a Hawaii resident being admitted to the University of Hawaii and how many actually enroll?

Acceptance rates demonstrate that there is a place within the U H System for students who prepare themselves for postsecondary education. Yield rates indicate how many eventually enrolled. In fall 2005, approximately two-thirds of resident undergraduates accepted at a U H campus enrolled. A larger portion of admitted graduate students enrolled.

Table: U H Admission Activity by Residents, by Level
Fall 2005
Acceptance
Rates
Yield Rates
2-Year98%63%
4-Year83%66%
Grads68%80%

Note: Acceptance rate is the total accepted divided by the total applied. Yield rate is the total enrolled divided by the total accepted. “Grads” exclude applicants to U H Manoa Schools of Law and Medicine and post-baccalaureate certificate programs, and to students applying as unclassified graduates.

What is the going rate of recent Hawaii high school graduates who attend the U H?

After reaching a historical low of approximately 32 percent in fall 2001, the going rate of recent Hawaii high school graduates into the University of Hawaii campuses increased to 33 percent in fall 2005. One of the University’s priorities is to address its declining going rate through various statewide partnerships (for more detail, refer to the Educational Pipeline section). National and state going rates have averaged in the mid- to upper 50 percent ranges.

Graph entitled “Going Rates of Public and Private High Schools, U H System, State pf Hawaii, and the Nation.” Depicts the going rates (in percent) into U H Manoa, U H Hilo, and U H Community Colleges from 1970 to 2005. Hard copy and tabular data available by request from the Office of Academic Planning and Policy.

app@hawaii.edu

What opportunities are available for high school students to begin college work?

Running Start is a joint-credit collaboration between the Department of Education and University of Hawaii whereby students can work toward a college degree and a high school diploma at the same time. All seven U H Community Colleges as well as U H Hilo participate in Running Start. Since the program’s inception in 2002, enrollments in Running Start courses have more than tripled. The completion rates of high school students taking Running Start courses have remained consistently high, ranging from 90–97 percent.

Table: Running Start Course Enrollments
Headcount
2002 2003 2004 2005
Enrolled195375553648
Completed182 (93%)338 (90%)539 (97%)621 (96%)

What is the status of off-campus access to U H credit programs?

“Off-campus, face-to-face” and “online” methods of delivery comprised 83 percent of distance/distributed learning classes offered in fall 2006. “Off-campus, face-to-face” refers to instructors travelling to off-campus locations to teach students. Less than half of the distance/distributed learning classes are now taught through traditional face-to-face interaction.

Table: Distance/Distributed Learning Classes by Delivery Mode
Fall 2006
Percent
Off-Campus, Face-To-Face46%
Online37%
Interactive TV12%
Cable TV5%
Note: Online refers to “online via the Internet” and “online and on/off-campus site.”
Cable TV refers to “public access cable TV.”
Interactive TV refers to “interactive TV (including HITS)” and “interactive TV and on/off-campus site.”

In fall 2006, 438 technology-assisted (excludes off-campus face-to-face) classes were delivered off-campus to students in-state and out-of-state. These classes accounted for 9,209 registrations. Among them, four were podcasting courses taken by 57 students. Classes apply to certification, associate, baccalaureate, and graduate degrees.

Table: Technology-Assisted Distance/Distributed Learning Classes
By Offering Campus, Fall 2006
Number of
Classes
Number of Registrations
U H Manoa961,415
U H Hilo8275
U H West Oahu30744
Hawaii CC591,160
Honolulu CC29812
Kapiolani CC1022,073
Kauai CC577
Leeward CC631,364
Maui CC401,129
Windward CC6160

More than 40 credentials and degrees, in whole or in part, are offered to Hawaii residents using distance delivery. Courses offered may range from island-specific to worldwide. For example, U H provides access to classes in education, nursing, and business internationally while the A A S in Applied Trades is offered only on Oahu at off-site locations. Many of the programs address state workforce and professional development needs.

Table: Distance/Distributed Learning Credential Programs
GRADUATE DEGREESBACHELOR’S DEGREESASSOCIATE/CERTIFICATES
  • Accounting (MAcc)
  • Business Administration (MBA)
  • Curriculum Studies, Middle Level Emphasis (M L M E D)
  • Early Childhood Education (M E d)
  • Educational Administration (K–12) (M E d)
  • Educational Foundations (M E d)
  • Educational Technology (M E d)
  • Human Resources Management (MHRM)
  • Information & Computer Science (MS)
  • Library & Information Studies (M L I S c)
  • Music Education (M A)
  • Nursing (MS and PhD)
  • Rehabilitation Counseling (M E d)
  • Social Work (MSW)
  • Business Administration (B A)
  • Early Childhood Education (B A)
  • Elementary Education (B E d)
  • Interdisciplinary Studies, Human Relations in Organizations (B A)
  • Interdisciplinary Studies, Information Resource Management (B A)
  • Nursing (RN to BSN)
  • Psychology (B A)
  • Social Sciences (B A)
  • Administration of Justice
  • Agricultural Careers
  • Applied Trades
  • Associate of Arts
  • Business Careers
  • Business Technology
  • Deaf Studies, Educational Assistant
  • Deaf Studies, Educational Paraprofessionals
  • Early Childhood Education
  • Electronic Computer Engineering
  • Fire & Environmental Emergency Response
  • Food Science
  • Food Service and Hotel Operations
  • Forestry
  • Hawaiian Lifestyles
  • Hotel Operations
  • Human Services
  • Medical Assisting
  • Nurse Aide
  • Personal Care Attendant
  • Practical Nursing
  • Substance Abuse Counseling

What are the opportunities for non-credit continuing education across the U H system?

Registrations for University of Hawaii non-credit continuing education programs have declined over the past decade. In 2005, there were roughly 76,000 registrations compared to 102,000 registrations in 1995. Registrations reached a high in 1997 at approximately 128,000.

Graph entitled “Continuing Education Registrations.” Depicts enrollment in non-credit continuing education programs from calendar year 1995 through 2005. Hard copy and tabular data available by request from the Office of Academic Planning and Policy.

app@hawaii.edu

How do U H Manoa and U H Hilo perform on freshmen selectivity measures?

Scholastic Assessment Test (S A T) math and verbal scores for entering freshmen at U H Manoa are consistently above the U.S. and Hawaii norms.

U H Hilo entering freshmen verbal scores are comparable to Hawaii norms but math scores are slightly lower.

Table: Average S A T–1 Verbal
U H Manoa and U H Hilo
U H ManoaU H HiloHawaiiU S
Fall 1997520479483505
Fall 1998527487483505
Fall 1999525494482505
Fall 2000526482488505
Fall 2001525485486506
Fall 2002523496488504
Fall 2003527489486507
Fall 2004537486487508
Fall 2005534499490508

Table: Average S A T–1 Math
U H Manoa and U H Hilo
U H ManoaU H HiloHawaiiU S
Fall 1997565486512511
Fall 1998570495513512
Fall 1999570503513511
Fall 2000566494519514
Fall 2001563493515514
Fall 2002563515520516
Fall 2003564497516519
Fall 2004568497514518
Fall 2005570507516520
Note: All scores are recentered scores. As an upper division institution, U H West Oahu is not included; it will admit its first freshman class in fall 2007.

Approximately one-half of U H Manoa and one-third of U H Hilo first-time freshmen graduate in the top 20 percent of their high school class.

Table: Matriculation by High School Rank
U H Manoa
Fall 2001Fall 2003Fall 2005
1st High School Quintile48%47%50%
2nd High School Quintile33%34%31%
3rd High School Quintile14%14%15%
4th High School Quintile4%4%4%
5th High School Quintile1%1%<1%

Matriculation by High School Rank
U H Hilo
Fall 2001Fall 2003Fall 2005
1st High School Quintile32%35%33%
2nd High School Quintile38%36%40%
3rd High School Quintile19%20%19%
4th High School Quintile8%7%5%
5th High School Quintile2%2%3%

Note: Percentages are based on students for whom high school rankings are available. As an upper division institution, U H West Oahu is not included.

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Student Engagement

Research on college student development shows that the time and energy students devote to educationally purposeful activities is the single best predictor of their learning and personal development. Two national surveys, the National Survey of Student Engagement (N S S E) and the Community College Survey of Student Engagement (C C S S E), focus on student engagement—student behaviors and institutional practices that are highly correlated with student learning and retention.

How engaged are University of Hawaii students in their educational experience at upper division/four-year campuses?

On the N S S E survey, five benchmarks of effective educational practice encompass multiple indicators. As benchmarks, these results provide comparisons with peer institutions and serve as baseline indicators against which future progress can be measured. U H Manoa, U H Hilo, and U H West Oahu campuses participate in N S S E. Results from the 2005 survey are illustrated below.

Benchmark #1 Level of Academic Challenge
Academic Challenge represents the nature and amount of assigned academic work, the complexity of the cognitive tasks required of students, and the standards faculty members use to evaluate student performance.

U H Manoa seniors report a slightly greater level of academic challenge than seniors from their comparison group. Other U H groups report lower levels of academic challenge than their peer counterparts; however, academic challenge is perceived to increase by the time students reach their senior year.

Table: Level of Academic Challenge
U H ManoaU H HiloU H West Oahu
First-YearSeniorFirst-YearSeniorSenior
U H Mean4856475356
Comparison Group Mean5155576161

Benchmark #2 Active and Collaborative Learning
Active and Collaborative Learning represents the extent to which students are actively involved in their learning through discussions, presentations, group projects, and community projects.

U H Manoa students report a similar level of active and collaborative learning as their peer counterparts. All other groups report lower levels relative to their peers.

Table: Active and Collaborative Learning
Benchmark Score
U H ManoaU H HiloU H West Oahu
First-YearSeniorFirst-YearSeniorSenior
U H Mean3848415044
Comparison Group Mean3948445454

Benchmark #3 Student-Faculty Interaction
Student-Faculty Interaction captures the personal interaction between students and their instructors as evidenced by discussions about grades and assignments, projects outside the classroom, and talks about career plans.

U H students, both first-year and seniors, report lower levels of student-faculty interaction compared to their national counterparts. U H Manoa senior scores were closest to their peers; U H West Oahu senior scores varied the most from their peers.

Table: Student-Faculty Interaction
U H ManoaU H HiloU H West Oahu
First-YearSeniorFirst-YearSeniorSenior
U H Mean2840324337
Comparison Group Mean3141375152
Note: N S S E survey results are based on U H West Oahu’s former standing as an upper division institution.
Source: National Survey of Student Engagement 2005

Benchmark #4 Enriching Educational Experiences
Enriching Educational Experiences are those activities that complement the academic program such as student government, community service, capstone experiences, and interacting with a diverse group of students.

U H Manoa first-year students report having an enriching educational experience that slightly exceeds their peers. Other U H groups report fewer activities that complement their academic progress compared to their national counterparts.

Table: Enriching Educational Experiences
U H ManoaU H HiloU H West Oahu
First-YearSeniorFirst-YearSeniorSenior
U H Mean2940284132
Comparison Group Mean2841315152

Benchmark #5 Supportive Campus Environment
Supportive Campus Environment provides support for student success, helps students cope with non-academic issues, and promotes quality relations among students, faculty, and staff.

In contrast to the previous benchmark, U H West Oahu seniors report a level of support on their campus that exceeds their peers. All other U H groups report less of a supportive campus environment than what their peers report.

Table: Supportive Campus Environment
U H ManoaU H HiloU H West Oahu
First-YearSeniorFirst-YearSeniorSenior
U H Mean5052595666
Comparison Group Mean5753656261
Note: N S S E survey results are based on U H West Oahu’s former standing as an upper division institution.
Source: National Survey of Student Engagement 2005

How engaged are University of Hawaii students in their educational experience at lower division campuses?

The Community College Survey of Student Engagement (C C S S E) focuses on five benchmarks of student engagement—institutional practices and student behaviors that are highly correlated with student learning and retention.

The following percentiles from the 2006 C C S S E survey demonstrate the performance of each U H community college relative to its comparably-sized peers. These results serve as baseline data against which future progress can be measured.

Benchmark #1 Active and Collaborative Learning
Through collaboration with others to solve problems or master challenging content, students develop valuable skills that prepare them to deal with the kinds of situations and problems they will encounter in the workplace, community, and their personal lives.

Relative to comparably-sized peers, two out of seven U H community colleges are at or above the 80th percentile in the area of active and collaborative learning, four are at or above the 50th percentile, and one is below.

Table: Active and Collaborative Learning
Percentile
Hawaii versus Small Colleges90
Honolulu versus Small Colleges50
Kapiolani versus Medium Colleges60
Kauai versus Small Colleges50
Leeward versus Medium Colleges50
Maui versus Small Colleges80
Windward versus Small Colleges40

Benchmark #2 Student Effort
“Time on task” is a key variable in success, and there are a variety of settings and means through which students may apply themselves to the learning process.

Of the five benchmark categories, the U H Community Colleges scored least favorably in the area of student effort. When compared to like institutions, two campuses scored above the 50th percentile. Two campuses scored at the 20th percentile.

Table: Student Effort
Percentile
Hawaii versus Small Colleges80
Honolulu versus Small Colleges20
Kapiolani versus Medium Colleges20
Kauai versus Small Colleges40
Leeward versus Medium Colleges40
Maui versus Small Colleges70
Windward versus Small Colleges40

Benchmark #3 Academic Challenge
Academic Challenge represents the nature and amount of assigned academic work, the complexity of cognitive tasks presented to students, and the standards faculty members use to evaluate student performance.

Students found the academic challenge of the U H Community Colleges at or above the 60th percentile at four out of seven campuses when compared to similar-sized colleges. Students at the remaining three campuses report a lower level of academic challenge, suggesting they can be challenged further than they have been.

Table: Academic Challenge
Percentile
Hawaii versus Small Colleges90
Honolulu versus Small Colleges40
Kapiolani versus Medium Colleges40
Kauai versus Small Colleges40
Leeward versus Medium Colleges60
Maui versus Small Colleges80
Windward versus Small Colleges70

Benchmark #4 Student-Faculty Interaction
Personal interaction with faculty members strengthens students’ connections to the college and helps them focus on their academic progress.

The U H Community Colleges scores relative to their peers ranged from a low in the 30th percentile to a high in the 90th percentile.

Table: Student-Faculty Interaction
Percentile
Hawaii versus Small Colleges80
Honolulu versus Small Colleges40
Kapiolani versus Medium Colleges90
Kauai versus Small Colleges50
Leeward versus Medium Colleges50
Maui versus Small Colleges70
Windward versus Small Colleges30

Benchmark #5 Support for Learners
Community college students benefit from services targeted to assist them with academic and career planning, academic skill development, and other issues that may affect both learning and retention.

On this indicator, five of the colleges are at the 60th percentile or higher relative to comparable-sized colleges.

Table: Support for Learners
Percentile
Hawaii versus Small Colleges40
Honolulu versus Small Colleges60
Kapiolani versus Medium Colleges60
Kauai versus Small Colleges60
Leeward versus Medium Colleges70
Maui versus Small Colleges80
Windward versus Small Colleges40
Note: Prior to C C S S E 2006, Honolulu C C was a Medium College.
Source: Community College Survey of Student Engagement 2006

How does U H student participation in community-based projects compare to national levels?

Opportunities for experiential learning include—but are not limited to—internships, cooperative education placements, volunteer positions, fellowships, and practica. Service learning opportunities involve instructional strategies that link community service and academic study so that one strengthens the other.

The N S S E and C C S S E surveys include a question on how frequently students participate in community-based projects as part of a class requirement.

U H students participate in community-based activities more often than their national counterparts, though as a whole, participation is low for all groups. U H and national comparison group responses fell somewhere between Sometimes (2.0) and Never (1.0).

Table: How Often Have You Participated in a Community-Based Project as a Part of a Regular Course (e.g., Service Learning)?
U H MeanComparison
Group Mean
U H Manoa1.581.45
U H Hilo1.871.75
U H West Oahu1.611.75
Hawaii CC1.611.29
Honolulu CC1.431.30
Kapiolani CC1.441.27
Kauai CC1.441.27
Leeward CC1.231.33
Maui CC1.481.29
Windward CC1.331.30
Note: Based on a 4.0 scale. Never=1; Sometimes=2; Often=3; Very Often=4.
U H M, U H H, and U H W O reflect senior student responses.

Source: National Survey of Student Engagement 2005 & Community College Survey of Student Engagement 2006

What is the usual U H undergraduate student experience in terms of class size and faculty type?

The U H System lower division average class size was 24. U H Manoa and U H Community Colleges Career and Technical Education experienced slight increases from five years ago.

Table: U H Average Class Size
Lower Division
Fall 2001Fall 2005
U H System2324
U H Manoa Arts & Sciences3032
U H Manoa Other3436
U H Hilo2524
U H Community College General2323
U H Community College Career
and Technological Education
1718

The U H System upper division average class size increased to 20 in fall 2005; campus averages range between 18 and 24.

Table: U H Average Class Size
Upper Division
Fall 2001Fall 2005
U H System1820
U H Manoa Arts & Sciences1822
U H Manoa Other1719
U H Hilo1618
U H West Oahu2124

Approximately 80 percent of all U H lower division and undergraduate classes enroll less than 30 students.

Table: Classes by Range of Enrollment, Fall 2005
U H System
1–910–2930–4950–99100+
Lower Division Classes9.3%71.0%16.5%1.9%1.3%
Undergraduate Classes13.2%67.7%15.8%2.1%1.2%

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Student Performance

What are the U H graduation and retention outcomes for entering students?

U H graduation and retention rates have remained relatively stable over time with a few campuses experiencing slight declines in the past year. U H Manoa’s rates have ranged from 63–65 percent over five years; U H Hilo’s rates have ranged from 35–41 percent; and the U H Community Colleges’ rates have ranged from 29–39 percent. U H West Oahu’s rates have ranged from 59–72 percent over two years.

Table: U H Average Graduation and Retention Rates by Campus
6 years after entry
1991–1999 cohorts
4 years after entry
1998–1999 cohorts
3 years after entry
1994–2002 cohorts
U H
Manoa
U H
Hilo
U H
West Oahu
U H CC
Average
Hawaii
C C
Honolulu
CC
Kapiolani
CC
Kauai
CC
Leeward
CC
Maui
CC
Windward
CC
Graduated54%30%55%15%21%14%11%20%13%17%11%
Still Enrolled10%6%10%20%14%18%26%17%24%16%18%
Note: Graduation rate is the percentage of full-time, first-time, degree/certificate-seeking undergraduates that graduated six years after entry at U H M and U H H and three years after entry at the U H C C. U H W O’s graduation rate is based on new, first-time transfers who graduated four years after entry. Retention rate is the percentage still enrolled at the same institution.

While the previous graph reflects a combination of graduation and retention data, the following illustrates U H graduation rates by cohort year. U H Manoa’s graduation rate has been in the low to mid-50 range, with its 1999 cohort reaching a low of 51 percent. U H Hilo rates have fluctuated around the 30 percent range. The U H Community Colleges have remained in the low to mid-teens after experiencing a high of 17 percent with their 1994 cohort.

U H Graduation Rates by Cohort
Fall 1Fall 2Fall 3Fall 4Fall 5Fall 6Fall 7Fall 8Fall 9
U H Manoa54.954.454.053.652.452.954.055.951.1
U H Hilo24.829.727.730.830.431.533.729.930.6
U H C C17.214.513.615.214.313.215.014.113.5
Note: For U H M and U H H, Fall 1=1991 cohort, Fall 9=1999 cohort.
For U H C C, Fall 1=1994 cohort, Fall 9=2002 cohort.
U H M and U H H graduation rates based on completion within six years. U H C C graduate rate based on completion within three years. U H W O data are excluded due to limited cohort years.

U H Manoa’s six-year graduation and retention rate for first-time students is lower than the average rates for peer and benchmark groups. UH Hilo’s six-year graduation and retention rate for first-time students is lower than the average rate for its benchmark group and slightly lower than the average rate for its peer group.

Table: Average Six-Year Graduation and Retention Rates
U H Manoa (1990–1998) Cohorts
BenchmarkPeerU H Manoa
Graduated69%66%53%
Still Enrolled3%3%10%
Total72%69%65%
Note: First-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen.
U H M=Fall 1990–1998 cohorts as of 2004.
Percentages may be slightly higher or lower due to rounding.

Source: Consortium for Student Retention Data Exchange Surveys

Table: Average Six-Year Retention Rates
U H Hilo (1994–1998) Cohorts
BenchmarkPeerU H Hilo
Graduated46%34%31%
Still Enrolled4%6%6%
Total50%40%37%
Note: First-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen.
U H H=Fall 1994–1998 cohorts as of 2004.
Percentages may be slightly higher or lower due to rounding.

Consortium for Student Retention Data Exchange Survey

The average one-year retention rate for first-time students at U H Manoa and U H Hilo is lower than the average rates for peer and benchmark groups.

Table: Average One-Year Retention Rates
U H Manoa (1990–2003) Cohorts
BenchmarkPeerU H Manoa
Still Enrolled88%85%79%
Note: First-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen.
U H M=Fall 1990–2003 cohorts as of 2004.

Source: Consortium for Student Retention Data Exchange Surveys

Table: Average One-Year Retention Rates
U H Hilo (1994–2003) Cohorts
BenchmarkPeerU H Hilo
Still Enrolled75%68%62%
Note:First-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen.
U H H=Fall 1994–2003 cohorts as of 2004.

Source: Consortium for Student Retention Data Exchange Surveys

What are the graduation and retention outcomes for ethnic groups?

The graduation and retention rate for Asian/Pacific Islanders at U H Manoa is lower than the rates for peer and benchmark groups. Within U H Manoa’s Asian/Pacific Islander category, Chinese and Japanese graduation rates are higher than or comparable to peer and benchmark groups, while the rates for Filipino, Hawaiian, and the other Asian categories are lower.

The graduation and retention rate for Caucasians at U H Manoa is considerably lower than the rates for peer and benchmark groups.

Table: Average Six-Year Graduation and Retention Rates by Ethnicity
U H Manoa (1990–1998)
Asian or Pacific Islander
BenchmarkPeerU H Manoa
Graduated76%73%57%
Still Enrolled2%3%11%
Total78%76%68%
Note: First-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen, fall 1990–1998 cohorts as of 2004.
Percentages may be slightly higher or lower due to rounding.

Table: 6-Year Graduation and Retention Rates by Ethnicity
U H Manoa (1990–1998)
Caucasian
BenchmarkPeerU H Manoa
Graduated71%67%42%
Still Enrolled2%3%5%
Total73%70%47%
Note: First-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen, fall 1990–1998 cohorts as of 2004.
Percentages may be slightly higher or lower due to rounding.

Table: 6-Year Graduation and Retention Rates by Ethnicity
U H Manoa (1990–1998)
Mixed
U H Manoa
Graduated48%
Still Enrolled10%
Total58%
Note: First-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen, fall 1990–1998 cohorts as of 2004.
Percentages may be slightly higher or lower due to rounding.

Table: 6-Year Graduation and Retention Rates by Ethnicity
U H Manoa (1990–1998)
Asian or Pacific Islander
Detailed Breakdown
ChineseFilipinoHawaiianJapaneseOther Asian
Graduated71%51%42%64%47%
Still Enrolled9%11%10%13%12%
Total80%62%52%77%59%
Note: First-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen, fall 1990–1998 cohorts as of 2004.
Other institutions do not have a Mixed ethnic category and U H M enrollments for other ethnic groups such as Hispanics and African Americans are too small for comparison.
Though U.S. Office of Management and Budget (O M B) federal reporting standards on race and ethnicity have changed recently, they previously defined the Asian or Pacific Islander category to include Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders. Available data can only be aggregated as shown here.
Percentages may be slightly higher or lower due to rounding.

Source: Consortium for Student Retention Data Exchange Surverys

In a national study focusing on the success of African-American, Latino, and Native-American students at flagship universities, U H Manoa earned a grade of A. Success is defined as receiving a bachelor’s degree within six years of entry.

Source: The Education Trust & Engines of Inequality: Diminishing Equity in the Nation’s Premier Public Universities, 2006

The graduation and retention rate for Asian/Pacific Islanders at U H Hilo is lower than the rates for the benchmark and peer groups. Within U H Hilo’s Asian/Pacific Islander category, Chinese and Filipino students show comparable graduation and retention rates to the peer group, while the rates for Hawaiian, Japanese, and the Other Asian categories are lower.

The graduation and retention rate for Caucasians at U H Hilo is lower than those for both peer and benchmark groups.

Table: 6-Year Graduation and Retention Rates by Ethnicity
U H Hilo (1994–1998)
Asian or Pacific Islander
BenchmarkPeerU H Hilo
Graduated48%37%30%
Still Enrolled3%7%7%
Total51%44%37%
Note: First-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen, fall 1994–1998 cohorts as of 2004.
Percentages may be slightly higher or lower due to rounding.

Table: 6-Year Graduation and Retention Rates by Ethnicity
U H Hilo (1994–1998)
Caucasian
BenchmarkPeerU H Hilo
Graduated54%39%35%
Still Enrolled3%5%4%
Total57%44%39%
Note: First-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen, fall 1994–1998 cohorts as of 2004.
Percentages may be slightly higher or lower due to rounding.

Table: 6-Year Graduation and Retention Rates by Ethnicity
U H Hilo (1994–1998)
Mixed
U H Hilo
Graduated29%
Still Enrolled7%
Total36%
Note: First-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen, fall 1994–1998 cohorts as of 2004.
Percentages may be slightly higher or lower due to rounding.

Table: 6-Year Graduation and Retention Rates by Ethnicity
U H Hilo (1994–1998)
Asian or Pacific Islander
Detailed Breakdown
ChineseFilipinoHawaiianJapaneseOther Asian
Graduated42%38%27%31%29%
Still Enrolled0%6%6%6%6%
Total42%44%33%37%35%
Note: First-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen, fall 1994–1998 cohorts as of 2004.
Other institutions do not have a Mixed ethnic category and U H H enrollments for other ethnic groups such as Hispanics and African Americans are too small for comparison.
Though U S Office of Management and Budget (O M B) federal reporting standards on race and ethnicity have changed recently, they previously defined the Asian or Pacific Islander category to include Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders. Available data can only be aggregated as shown here.
Percentages may be slightly higher or lower due to rounding.

Source: Consortium for Student Retention Data Exchange Surveys

What is the volume of credentials awarded annually by U H?

On the average, over 7,000 degrees and certificates are awarded annually by U H.

Table: U H Degrees and Certificates Awarded, by Level
2-Year4-YearPost-baccalaureate/
Advanced Degrees
F Y 1995–19962,6433,3951,708
F Y 1996–19972,6973,2791,660
F Y 1997–19982,7223,0861,332
F Y 1998–19992,6153,0891,413
F Y 1999–20002,6503,1151,469
F Y 2000–20012,5342,9511,325
F Y 2001–20022,5532,9101,177
F Y 2002–20032,7113,0101,355
F Y 2003–20042,5963,2731,377
F Y 2004–20052,6713,2941,572
F Y 2005–20062,6373,6391,641
Note: U H Community College certificates refer to Certificates of Achievement only.

What share of eligible students pass external exams in their field of study?

University of Hawaii students and graduates are scoring well on national and state exams in their fields of study.

Community College Programs. In 2003–2005, over 90 percent of the U H Community College graduates who sat for the following national licensing examinations passed on their first attempt.

Table: Licensing Examination Passed
Health Care-RelatedOther Technologies
Emergency Medical Technician (Kapiolani CC)Autobody Repair & Painting (Honolulu CC)
Medical Labratory Technician (Kapiolani CC)Automotive Technology (Honolulu CC)
Occupational Therapy Assistant (Kapiolani CC)Commercial Pilot (Honolulu CC)
Physical Therapist Assistant (Kapiolani CC)Cosmetology (Honolulu CC)
Practical Nursing (Hawaii CC, Kapiolani CC, Maui CC)Esthetician (Honolulu CC)
Radiologic Technician (Kapiolani CC)F A A Airframe & Powerplant (Honolulu CC)
Respiratory Care (Kapiolani CC)Flight Instructor (Honolulu CC)
Substance Abuse Counseling (Leeward CC)Private Pilot (Honolulu CC)

Dental Hygiene. Over 90 percent of U H Manoa Dental Hygiene students taking the national licensing exam passed on their first attempt for the past three years (100% in 2004; 94% in 2005 and 2006).

Education. In A Y 2004–05, over 80 percent of U H Manoa College of Education and U H Hilo education graduates passed the professional knowledge portion of the Praxis Teacher Certification Exam. Pass rates for the various Praxis assessment areas for U H Manoa and U H Hilo graduates and for the state of Hawaii (which includes U H graduates) are provided below.

Table: Praxis Teacher Certification Exam, A Y 2004–05
Assessment AreaU H Manoa C O E
Pass Rate
U H Hilo Education
Pass Rate
Hawaii
Pass Rate
PRINCIPLES OF LEARNING & TEACHING
 K–1693%83%88%
 7–1296%100%97%
ELEMENTARY
 Curriculum, Instruction, &  Assessment84%86%83%
 Content Area Exercise100%100%100%
ENGLISH
 Language, Literature, &  Composition Content96%not applicable96%
 Language, Literature, &  Composition Pedagogy92%not applicable93%
MATHEMATICS
 Content Knowledge100%not applicable100%
 Pedagogy91%not applicable91%
SOCIAL STUDIES
 Content Knowledge95%not applicable94%
 Pedagogy90%not applicable92%
TEACHING SPECIAL POPULATIONS
 Knowledge-Based Core Principles97%not applicable99%
 Application of Core Principles100%not applicable93%

E T S. At U H Hilo, the Educational Testing Service (E T S) Major Field Achievement Test provides national comparisons and serves as a vehicle for program improvement. U H Hilo students usually perform at or above the national mean.

Table: U H Hilo E T S Major Field Achievement Test Scores
2002200320042005
U H HiloNationalU H HiloNationalU H HiloNationalU H HiloNational
Accounting5448474444454345
Computer Science159147157147161149172149
Economics4640464347434843
Management6153635757576357
Quantitative Business Analysis6249565559566056
Finance4638383638363836
Marketing5047514648475447
Legal/Social Environment4741524846505250
International Issues4544554449445244

Law. Graduates of the U H Manoa William S. Richardson School of Law are consistently outperforming Hawaii bar exam test takers from other law schools. In 2005, 89 percent of U H Manoa Law School graduates passed the Hawaii state bar exam on their first attempt and the overall pass rate (81%) was higher than the state rate (64%).

Table: Hawaii State Bar Exam Pass Rate
20012002200320042005
U H First-Time Takers86%89%96%73%89%
Overall U H78%80%86%68%81%
Overall State72%67%75%62%64%

Medical Technology. From 2001 to 2006, all U H Manoa Medical Technology students passed the national certification exams on their first attempt and scores were consistently above the national average.

Medicine. Medical students need to pass two exams prior to the completion of one year of residency. Students at the U H Manoa John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) attained pass rates on the United States Medical Licensing Exam (U S M L E) Step 1 Examination that are generally close or comparable to the national average. Those taking the exam in A Y 2004–2005 achieved an average total score above the national average.

Table: U S M L E Step 1 Pass Rate
2000–20012001–20022002–20032003–20042004–2005
U H Medical School95%89%90%91%82%
National93%92%92%91%90%

JABSOM medical students performed very well on the U S M L E Step 2 Exam, consistently achieving pass rates that equaled or exceeded the national average.

Table: U S M L E Step 2 Pass Rate
2000–20012001–20022002–20032003–20042004–2005
U H Medical School98%96%98%98%95%
National94%94%96%96%95%

Nursing. Graduates of RN nursing programs must pass the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX RN) before they may practice nursing. The purpose of this exam is to ensure the public’s protection. The exam measures the competencies needed to safely and effectively perform as a newly licensed, entry-level registered nurse.

Table: National Council for Licensing Examinations
(NCLEX)
Pass Rate
200320042005
U.S.87%85%87%
U H Manoa88%92%93%
U H Hilo43%75%55%
Hawaii CC90%61%95%
Kapiolani CC81%82%93%
Kauai CC92%88%83%
Maui CC77%85%94%
Note: First-time test takers; registered nurses (RN) only.

Surgical Care. Over the past three years (2004–2006), 100 percent of residents in the Surgical Residency Program have passed the American Board of Surgery (A B S) qualifying exam on their first attempt.

For the past six years (2001–2006), all fellows in the Surgical Critical Care Fellowship Program have passed the American Board of Surgery certifying exam for Surgical Critical Care on their first attempt.

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Student Satisfaction

How satisfied are students with their educational experience?

The 2005 N S S E and 2006 C C S S E student surveys include one direct measure of student satisfaction: “How would you evaluate your entire educational experience at this institution?” In response to this question, the responses of students enrolled at the ten U H campuses ranged from 2.83 at U H Manoa to 3.48 at U H West Oahu (on a scale of 1 to 4, with 1=Poor and 4=Excellent). The range of responses from comparable institutions is 3.15 to 3.47.

Table: How Would You Evaluate Your Entire Educational Experience?
U H MeanComparison
Group Mean
U H Manoa2.833.17
U H Hilo3.193.47
U H West Oahu3.483.46
Hawaii CC3.103.17
Honolulu CC3.193.17
Kapiolani CC3.123.15
Kauai CC3.103.17
Leeward CC3.073.15
Maui CC3.143.17
Windward CC3.273.16
Note: Based on a 4.0 scale. Poor=1; Fair=2; Good=3; Excellent=4.
Sources: National Survey of Student Engagement 2005 & Community College Survey of Student Engagement 2006

The N S S E survey includes a second question that measures satisfaction: “If you could start over again, would you go to the same institution you are now attending?” The range of responses (from 2.96 at U H Manoa to 3.52 at U H West Oahu) indicates that students attending the three upper division campuses would Probably attend the same institution if they could start over again. The range of responses from comparable institutions is 3.19 to 3.29. U H Hilo and U H West Oahu’s seniors indicated a level of satisfaction that exceeded their comparison groups.

Table: If You Could Start Over Again, Would You Go to the Same Institution You Are Now Attending?
U H MeanComparison
Group Mean
U H Manoa2.963.19
U H Hilo3.313.29
U H West Oahu3.523.28
Note: Based on a 4.0 scale. Definitely No=1; Probably No=2; Probably Yes=3; Definitely Yes=4.
U H M, U H H, and U H W O reflect senior student responses.

Source: National Survey of Student Engagement 2005

Similarly, U H Community College students were asked by C C S S E if they would recommend their college to a friend or family member. Between 91 and 98 percent responded positively.
Source: Community College Survey of Student Engagement 2006

GRADUATES
Nearly 80 percent of U H Manoa’s spring 2005 graduating seniors rated the overall quality of their academic experience as either Good or Excellent. Comparisons with past survey results should be made with caution as respondents and data distribution vary; however, there does appear to be a general increase in the share of students rating their academic experience at U H Manoa as Excellent.

Table: U H Manoa Graduating Seniors
Overall Quality of Total Undergraduate Experience
19931996199920022005
Excellent7.9%9.2%12.6%11.4%17.4%
Good63.3%58.0%61.2%64.7%61.8%
Fair27.3%29.6%23.4%22.0%17.8%
Poor1.5%3.1%2.9%1.9%3.0%
Note: Past survey results are included only as a point of reference to the current year. Any comparisons should be interpreted with caution as respondents and data distribution vary by study.
Source: U H M SURVEY of graduating seniors

How prepared do U H students and alumni believe they are for employment?

Enrolled Students
When asked on the N S S E and C C S S E surveys to what extent their undergraduate experience has contributed to their ability to acquire job or work-related knowledge and skills, U H student responses ranged between Some and Quite a Bit.

Table: To What Extent Has Your U H Experience Contributed to Acquiring Job or Work-Related Knowledge and Skills?
U H MeanComparison
Group Mean
U H Manoa2.842.94
U H Hilo2.892.84
U H West Oahu3.052.84
Hawaii CC2.752.64
Honolulu CC2.782.64
Kapiolani CC2.402.59
Kauai CC2.632.65
Leeward CC2.392.53
Maui CC2.652.65
Windward CC2.372.65
Note: Based on a 4.0 scale. Very Little=1; Some=2; Quite a Bit=3; Very Much=4.
U H M, U H H, and U H W O reflect senior student responses.
Sources: National Survey of Student Engagement 2005 & Community College Survey of Student Engagement 2006

Graduates
In 2005, 95 percent of U H Community College graduates and leavers indicated they were Adequately to Very Well Prepared for their current primary job.

Table: U H Community Colleges Graduates and Leavers
Job Preparation for Current Primary Job
200520042003
Very Well Prepared32.8%40.9%36.6%
Well Prepared36.2%34.0%38.4%
Adequately Prepared26.1%20.4%20.1%
Poorly Prepared4.9%4.7%4.9%
Note: Results for 2003 and 2004 are included only as a point of reference to the current year. Any comparisons should be interpreted with caution as respondents and data distribution vary by study.
Source: Community Colleges Graduate and Leavers Survey

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Diversity

What are the demographic trends in the composition of the U H student body?

University of Hawaii attendees are members of student populations in which no one ethnic group constitutes a majority, and the educational experience is enriched by the diversity of their classmates.

Ethnicity
U H is one of the most ethnically diverse institutions of higher learning in the nation—21.7 percent of the students are Caucasian, 15.7 percent are Japanese, 13.8 percent are Hawaiian or Part-Hawaiian, 12.7 percent are Filipino, 5.4 percent are Chinese, and 11.5 percent report Mixed ethnicity.

The percentages of Hawaiian, Caucasian, Pacific Islander, and Mixed ethnic students have increased in the last ten years, while the percentages of Japanese, Chinese, and Filipino students have decreased.

Table: U H Enrollment by Ethnicity
HawaiianFilipinoChineseJapaneseCaucasianPacific
Islander
MixedAll Other
Fall 199512.7%14.9%7.9%19.6%20.5%2.1%9.7%12.6%
Fall 200513.8%12.7%5.4%15.7%21.7%3.3%11.5%15.9%

There have been increases in the share of degrees conferred to students of Hawaiian/part-Hawaiian, Pacific Islander, and Mixed ancestry, and decreases in the share of degrees awarded to students of Japanese, Chinese, and Filipino ancestry. The share of degrees conferred to students of Caucasian ancestry has remained relatively constant.

Table: U H Degrees Earned by Race/Ethnicity
HawaiianFilipino ChineseJapanese CaucasianPacific
Islander
MixedAll Other
F Y 1995–199610.7%11.5%10.7%21.0%23.4%1.6%7.7%13.4%
F Y 2005–200612.3%10.4%6.5%18.3%23.8%2.5%11.2%15.1%

Age
The mean age for the U H system has declined somewhat since the mid-1990s and now measures 25.5 years of age.

Table: Mean Age of U H Students
Fall Semester
19951996199719981999200020012002200320042005
Mean Age26.426.125.926.026.226.226.226.226.025.725.5

Gender
The percentage of total male students enrolled at U H has slightly declined, from 44 percent in the mid-1990s to 42 percent in fall 2005. This gender disparity is consistent with a national trend in which the educational progress of males in higher education over several decades has been on a slow decline. According to an August 2003 Postsecondary Education OPPORTUNITY article “Fact Sheet: What’s Wrong with the Guys?,” the share of male undergraduates declined from 58 percent in 1969 to 44 percent in 2000. A July 2006 follow up article, “For Every 100 Girls& ,” from the same publisher reports that in 2004, 77 men were enrolled for every 100 women (i.e., 44% men, 56% women).

Table: U H Enrollment by Gender
Fall Semester
19951996199719981999200020012002200320042005
Women56.5%56.1%55.8%55.9%56.1%56.3%56.7%57.3%57.9%58.2%57.8%
Men43.5%43.9%44.2%44.1%43.9%43.7%43.3%42.5%41.7%41.4%41.9%

Full-Time Status
Since fall 1996 more than 55 percent of U H students have been enrolled full-time.

Table: U H Full-Time Enrollment
Fall Semester
19951996199719981999200020012002200320042005
Percent of Students54.5%55.1%56.3%56.5%55.8%56.6%56.1%56.4%55.7%55.9%55.9%
Note: Demographic data on ethnicity, age, gender, and full-time status includes undergraduate and graduate level students.

Table: How do U H students relate to issues of diversity?

Hawaii’s unique demographic makeup and U H’s commitment to improving the entry, retention, and graduation of diverse student populations offer students opportunities to interact with others from different backgrounds.

The 2005 N S S E and 2006 C C S S E survey results indicate U H students dialog with students from different ethnic backgrounds more frequently than do their national counterparts. They tend to be on par nationally when the conversations involve differing beliefs, opinions, and personal values.

Table: How Often Have You Had Serious Conversations with Students of a Race or Ethnicity Different Than Your Own?
U H MeanComparison
Group Mean
U H Manoa2.952.70
U H Hilo2.972.78
U H West Oahu2.842.78
Hawaii CC2.632.28
Honolulu CC2.482.28
Kapiolani CC2.532.32
Kauai CC2.562.28
Leeward CC2.532.33
Maui CC2.602.28
Windward CC2.792.28
Note: Based on a 4.0 scale. Never=1; Sometimes=2; Often=3; Very Often=4.

Table: How Often Have You Had Serious Conversations with Students Who Differ from You in Terms of Their Religious Beliefs, Political Opinions, or Personal Values?
U H MeanComparison
Group Mean
U H Manoa2.752.77
U H Hilo2.782.96
U H West Oahu2.672.96
Hawaii CC2.442.29
Honolulu CC2.272.29
Kapiolani CC2.322.31
Kauai CC2.312.29
Leeward CC2.322.31
Maui CC2.442.29
Windward CC2.612.29
Note: Based on a 4.0 scale. Never=1; Sometimes=2; Often=3; Very Often=4.

Survey results suggest U H students have a greater understanding of and more frequent interaction with others from different backgrounds than their national comparison group counterparts.

Table: To What Extent Has Your U H Experience Contributed to Understanding People of Other Racial and Ethnic Backgrounds?
U H MeanComparison
Group Mean
U H Manoa2.842.55
U H Hilo3.042.63
U H West Oahu3.062.63
Hawaii CC2.642.31
Honolulu CC2.662.31
Kapiolani CC2.622.27
Kauai CC2.662.31
Leeward CC2.592.27
Maui CC2.642.31
Windward CC2.562.31
Note: Based on a 4.0 scale. Very Little=1; Some=2; Quite a Bit=3; Very Much=4.

Table: To What Extent Does U H Encourage Contact Among Students from Different Backgrounds?
U H MeanComparison
Group Mean
U H Manoa2.422.32
U H Hilo2.652.47
U H West Oahu2.752.47
Hawaii CC2.682.40
Honolulu CC2.652.40
Kapiolani CC2.622.40
Kauai CC2.572.40
Leeward CC2.622.40
Maui CC2.702.40
Windward CC2.632.40
Note: Based on a 4.0 scale. Very Little=1; Some=2; Quite a Bit=3; Very Much=4.
U H M, U H H, and U H W O reflect senior student responses.

Sources: National Survey of Student Engagement 2005 & Community College Survey of Student Engagement 2006

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Goal 2

A Learning, Research, and Service Network

Serving the state of Hawaii demands that the University of Hawaii engage its diverse resources to contribute to the state’s economy, workforce and training needs, and the creation and application of knowledge. Measures of affordability, the educational pipeline, workforce development, information and technology resources, research and scholarly productivity, and economic impact are presented to demonstrate the University’s progress in fostering the intellectual capital of the state of Hawaii, and preparing citizens educated for participation in democracy.

Affordability

How affordable is higher education in Hawaii for students and their families?

Higher education in the United States as a whole has become increasingly less affordable when the costs of attending college are considered in relation to family income.

Results from the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education’s Measuring Up 2006 indicate that no state received a higher grade than C– in affordability. Since Measuring Up 2004, the number of states receiving an F increased from 36 to 43. Two states received a C. Hawaii was one of the remaining five states that scored a D on the affordability of its public (U H) and private institutions. U H awards approximately $20 million in tuition waivers which are not included in the Measuring Up 2006 analysis.

In Hawaii, the percent of income (average of all income groups) needed to pay for college expenses has been declining steadily since 2000, but Hawaii rates are still not comparable to those of the best performing states a decade ago.

Table: Percent of Income Needed to Pay for College Expenses
Minus Financial Aid
19942000200220042006Top States
(Early 90s)
U H Community Colleges17%22%19%18%17%15%
U H 4-Year20%28%24%23%21%16%
Note: Comparisons are against best state performances in the early 1990s. Since then, college affordability in the U.S. has been on the decline.
Better performance is indicated by lower figures.
Source: The National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education
Measuring Up 2000/2002/2004/2006 2000/2002/2004/2006

What is the distribution of financial aid at U H campuses?

The share of first-time freshmen receiving aid in A Y 2004–2005 ranged from 65 percent (U H Hilo) to 29 percent (Kapiolani CC). Average financial aid ranged from $3,387 (U H Manoa) to $1,907 (Kauai CC).

Table: Financial Aid to
U H First-Time Undergraduates
Percent Receiving Aid, A Y 2004–2005
U H Manoa53%
U H Hilo65%
Hawaii CC53%
Honolulu CC35%
Kapiolani CC29%
Kauai CC31%
Leeward CC34%
Maui CC47%
Windward CC41%

Table: Financial Aid to U H First-Time Undergraduates
Average Aid Amount Received, A Y 2004–2005
U H Manoa$3,387
U H Hilo$2,799
Hawaii CC$2,690
Honolulu CC$1,962
Kapiolani CC$2,466
Kauai CC$1,907
Leeward CC$2,213
Maui CC$2,667
Windward CC$2,442
Note: Includes fall 2004 cohort of full-time, first-time, degree/certificate-seeking undergraduate students. As an upper division institution, U H West Oahu is not included; it will admit its first freshman class in fall 2007.
Financial aid includes federal, state, and institutional grants (no pay back required) and student loans (pay back required).

How many students received Pell awards and what was the total value disbursed?

The number of federal Pell recipients and the total value disbursed by U H decreased from F Y 2004 to F Y 2006. Slight decreases in enrollment, particularly at the U H Community Colleges, accounted for some of the differences. A larger issue was related to a U.S. Department of Education change in the Expected Family Contribution (E F C) formula in F Y 2006. A reduction in the percentage of estimated state tax for most states resulted in families paying less in taxes, but more in expected college contributions. Approximately 80,000 students nationwide were no longer eligible for Pell grants while others qualified for reduced amounts.

Table: U H Disbursement of Pell Grants
F Y 2003–2004F Y 2004–2005F Y 2005–2006
Total Pell Disbursed
 (in millions)
$22.8 M$22.4 M$19.9 M
Number of Pell Recipients9,3689,1338,288
Note: Average amount awarded: F Y 2003–2004, $2,436; F Y 2004–2005, $2,451; F Y 2005–2006, $2,405.

What is the breakdown of tuition assistance awarded by U H?

The number of recipients increased by nearly 22 percent over a recent three-year period while the total value of tuition waivers awarded increased by 16 percent.

The amount of need-based aid fluctuated slightly while all other categories, including merit-based and athletic waivers, steadily increased. Graduate assistants receive tuition waivers as a result of their employment with the University.

Table: Tuition Assistance by Type
(in millions)
F Y 2002–2003F Y 2003–2004F Y 2004–2005
Need-Based$5.0 M$4.8 M$5.3 M
Merit$2.1 M$2.4 M$2.7 M
Athletic$2.1 M$2.3 M$2.4 M
Graduate Assitants$5.0 M$5.4 M$6.1 M
Other$3.3 M$3.6 M$3.9 M
Total Assistance$17.5 M$18.5 M$20.4 M
Total Recipients7,2578,4268,840
Note: “Other” includes Regents, Presidential, and Pacific Asian scholarships, band, institutional agreements, employee, summer session, extension, and undergraduate nursing clinical categories.

How do U H tuitions compare with like institutions elsewhere?

U H resident tuition rates are below W I C H E (institutions from 15 states that are members of the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education) averages except for U H Hilo’s graduate rate which is slightly above the average. All U H non-resident rates are below the W I C H E average, with the U H Community Colleges rate nearing the average.

Table: 2005–2006 U H Tuition and Required Fees
as a Percentage of 2005–2006 W I C H E Averages
ResidentNon-Resident
U H Manoa Undergraduate71% 56%
U H Manoa Graduate74%63%
U H Manoa Medicine83% 78%
U H Hilo Undergraduate85% 72%
U H Hilo Graduate102% 77%
U H West Oahu74% 66%
U H Community Colleges56% 95%
Note: W I C H E law tuition comparisons discontinued.

How affordable is U H for low income students?

In a national study focusing on low income access for students at flagship universities, U H Manoa earned a grade of A. Low income access is defined as eligibility for a Pell grant.
Source: The Education Trust, Engines of Inequality: Diminishing Equity in the Nation’s Premier Public Universities, 2006

The U H Community Colleges have continued to be very affordable. In 2006, the share of income Hawaii’s poorest families paid for tuition was nine percent, about as low as that of the best-performing states in the early 1990s (7%).
Source: The National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education, Measuring Up 2006 2006

How much in private aid has been raised for U H students?

The amount of scholarship funds raised through the U H Foundation’s ongoing Centennial Campaign has steadily increased since it began in F Y 2002–2003. Private support was provided by individuals, corporations, and foundations.

The total market value of endowed funds for student assistance as of June 30, 2006 was $51.5 million. The total expendable funds available for A Y 2006–2007 for student assistance is $8.5 million.

Table: U H Foundation
Student Scholarship Funds Raised by Fiscal Year
(in millions)
F Y 2002–2003F Y 2003–2004F Y 2004–2005F Y 2005–2006
Expendable$1.6 M$4.9 M$6.7 M$5.9 M
Endowed$2.8 M$2.6 M$2.3 M$4.2 M
Total$4.4 M$7.5 M$9.0 M$10.1 M

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Educational Pipeline

What is the role of the University in facilitating a seamless educational pipeline in Hawaii?

According to data assembled by the National Center for Higher Education Systems (N C H E M S) in 2006, the outcomes of the Hawaii pipeline are below the national average and considerably below that of the best performing state in each transition area.

Table: Success Rate Per 100 Ninth Graders at Each Transition Point, 2004
U.S. and Hawaii
Best Performing StateU.S. AverageHawaii
Graduate from High School91% 70%65%
Enter College57%39%33%
Enroll Sophomore Year42% 27%21%
Graduate On Time28% 18%13%
Notes: Data from 2004. “Graduate on time” is defined as within three years for an associate degree and six years for a baccalaureate degree. For more detailed information, see www.higheredinfo.org.
Source: The N C H E M S Information Center for State Higher Education Policymaking and Analysis, 2006

The role of the University in improving these pipeline statistics is multifaceted. Through its P–20 partnership with the Hawaii Department of Education and the Good Beginnings Alliance, U H’s efforts include:

Measures related to the achievement of these goals are specified in the P–20 Strategic Plan. Several specific initiatives and partnerships currently addressing these goals involve:

American Diploma Project Network. Hawaii has joined the American Diploma Project Network, a coalition of 26 states dedicated to aligning K–12 curriculum, standards, assessments, and accountability policies with the demands of college and work. Within the state, commitment to this effort has come jointly from the University, Hawaii Business Roundtable, State of Hawaii Department of Education (D O E), and Office of the Governor. (www.achieve.org)

GEAR UP Program. Thanks to the efforts of the U H Manoa Shidler College of Business, the University has brought $15.3 million into the state through the federal GEAR UP (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs) Program. GEAR UP Hawaii’s six-year grant, awarded in 2005 by the U.S. Department of Education, has been matched by $15.3 million in commitments from Hawaii partners, including the D O E. The program’s mission is to increase the number of students, particularly those from low income communities, to enter and succeed in postsecondary education. GEAR UP services are designed to increase the flow of students throughout the educational pipeline (kindergarten to higher education), and to improve educational system linkages by addressing infrastructure, transition, and systemic issues. Project activities aim to increase access to higher education for Hawaii students by providing information and encouragement for students and families, supporting students’ academic preparation, and increasing students’ access to financial aid. 7,500 students from low income communities statewide participate in the GEAR UP Scholars Program. Among its first class of GEAR UP Scholars, 90 percent graduated high school on time (vs. 80 percent statewide) and 45 percent earned honors diplomas (vs. 32 percent statewide). (www.gearup.hawaii.edu)

Running Start Program. Running Start, a joint effort of the University with the D O E, serves hundreds of students each year in concurrent enrollment programs, allowing many students to finish high school with a semester or more of college credits already earned. See Running Start data on page 2. (www.hawaii.edu/runningstart/)

The P–20 Strategic Plan and additional information about ongoing University partnerships within the P–20 context can be found at www.p20hawaii.org.

What is the status of articulation within the U H system?

Articulation is the acceptance of courses from one campus to another which enables students to transfer. The University has taken great measures to make transfer within the system simpler and more predictable. Completion of an Associate of Arts degree with a G P A of 2.0 or higher from a U H community college fulfills admission and lower division general education (G E) core requirements at all U H baccalaureate degree-granting institutions. All courses that are 100 level and higher transfer across U H campuses. Their applicability or how the credits apply toward graduation is determined by the requirements of a specific degree.

Articulation agreements have been developed to provide for a smooth transfer to specific programs. These agreements describe the courses that transfer and the requirement they fulfill. Current articulation agreements are available at http://www.hawaii.edu/vpaa/system_aa/articulation/articulation.html.

Hallmarks
Prior to 2001, for a course to meet a G E requirement at U H Manoa, it required a specific course equivalent. With the adoption of the current G E requirements based on “hallmarks” or specific characteristics rather than specific courses, the number of courses that transferred into U H Manoa and met a specific G E requirement increased sixfold (from 300 to 1,800+). In addition, courses not offered at U H Manoa have the potential to meet a U H Manoa G E requirement.

Oahu U H campuses (Honolulu CC, Kapiolani CC, Leeward CC, Windward CC, and U H West Oahu), have adopted the same hallmarks for their general education requirements. This will increase the number of transfer courses that meet G E requirements among U H campuses and add to the ease and predictability of transfer for students.

U H Manoa. The majority of past articulation issues have centered on transfers to U H Manoa. With the adoption of the hallmarks approach to G E, a number of issues have been resolved. A list of courses that transfer from other U H campuses that meet U H Manoa G E requirements is available online (www.hawaii.edu/ovcaa/academics/articulation_courses.htm).

The cumbersome and time-consuming course articulation process of the past has been replaced with a more streamlined process in which U H Manoa directly reviews courses for articulation and transfer. It is now possible to have courses approved within a few weeks. In addition, multicampus boards have been established which allows other U H campuses to approve their own courses to meet specific G E requirements at U H Manoa. The Foundations Multicampus Board is in place and a similar board on the Hawaiian, Asian, and Pacific (H A P) G E requirement is establishing a multicampus H A P agreement.

U H Manoa continues to approve large numbers of transfer courses from other campuses to meet U H Manoa’s G E and degree requirements. In addition, equivalence and G E designations of transfer courses have become more transparent with the availability of online information and the STAR degree audit system. Transfer students have expressed their approval of the flexibility of the latest revision of U H Manoa G E requirements.

U H Hilo. The campus has updated its transfer evaluation policy to maximize the applicability of transfer credits to G E and graduation requirements. It has also initiated articulation agreements between campuses and programs to provide clear and efficient curricular pathways and dual-campus advising for students in two-year programs who wish to attain baccalaureate degrees at U H Hilo.

U H West Oahu. U H West Oahu, an upper division campus until 2006, has always focused transfer students. Recently, the B O R approved a revised mission statement which states in part, “U H West Oahu is committed to providing access to residents throughout the state of Hawaii through its partnerships with the U H community colleges and its delivery of distance education programs.” New programs include a Bachelor of Applied Science which is designed to meet the academic and professional needs of community college graduates who earned an Associate of Science or Associate of Applied Science degree and the Bachelor of Arts in Social Sciences with a concentration in Early Childhood Education, which builds upon the A S in Early Childhood Education offered at four U H community colleges.

Technological Enhancements
The Transfer to a U H Campus (www.hawaii.edu/academics/admissions/transfers.html) webpage has been updated and contains links to various websites regarding articulation and transfer within U H system.

The U H Master Course List (https://myuh.hawaii.edu/uhdad/bwckctlg.p_disp_dyn_ctlg) lists all active courses offered throughout the ten campuses of the U H System and is a helpful resource to avoid course duplications, identify gaps, prevent course numbering conflicts, etc.

The U H System Course Transfer Database (www.hawaii.edu/transferdatabase) provides a systemwide articulation database that provides students with information on how specific courses transfer across the U H campuses.

What is the number of U H Community College students who transfer to U H upper division/four-year campuses?

On average, about 1,000 students transfer from the U H Community Colleges to the U H upper division/four-year campuses in any given fall semester.

Table: Transfers from the U H Community Colleges
into the U H Upper Division/Four-Year Campuses
U H ManoaU H HiloU H West OahuTotal
Fall 19957912581661,215
Fall 1996648220119987
Fall 19977191881511,058
Fall 1998695176125996
Fall 19997211722151,108
Fall 2000632169133934
Fall 20017011781651,044
Fall 2002631182159972
Fall 200360272156830
Fall 20047459755897
Fall 2005859185671,111

What proportion of transfer students to U H Manoa receive a baccalaureate degree?

U H Community College transfers to U H Manoa graduate at higher rates than their non-U H Community College transfer counterparts.

Table: Average Graduation Rates of Full-Time
U H Community College Transfers to U H Manoa
U H Community College transfers
to U H Manoa
Non-U H Community College transfers
to U H Manoa
1 year after entry1%<1%
2 years after entry20%9%
3 years after entry43%29%
4 years after entry58%46%
5 years after entry68%55%
6 years after entry72%58%
Note: U H M=Fall 90–Fall 03 cohorts as of 2004.

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Workforce Development

What is the University’s response to jobs in demand in Hawaii?

Workforce development is a priority for the University and a key objective in system and community college strategic plans. System representatives participate in the State Workforce Development Council, as do campus representatives on county workforce development councils and local workforce investment boards. Shortages in the following employment areas and U H’s efforts to meet these job demands are outlined below.

Teachers. Annually, approximately 400 individuals from University of Hawaii programs are recommended for teacher licensure in Hawaii. However, the Hawaii Department of Education (D O E) needs more than 1,300 new teachers each year.

The University has made a special effort to increase numbers of teachers in critical areas. A large federal grant to the U H Manoa College of Education (C O E) provides scholarships and other assistance to individuals preparing to teach mathematics or science in Hawaii schools. An arrangement with the Hawaii D O E provides assistance to individuals preparing to teach special education.

All U H Manoa C O E teacher preparation programs are available through statewide delivery to people on all of the neighbor islands. At this time over 250 individuals are enrolled in statewide programs. In addition, the college provides programs on-site on the leeward coast, an area with high teacher turnover.

The U H Manoa C O E continues to provide a wide variety of routes to teaching in order to attract and accommodate as many potential teachers as possible. The college offers initial teacher preparation programs at the baccalaureate, post-baccalaureate, and master’s degree levels. The Master’s of Education in Teaching (M E d T) program offers three strands leading to licensure: traditional, Native Hawaiian focus, and a partnership with Teach for America.

U H Hilo’s education department offers a Teacher Education Program (T E P) which leads to licensure in the state. From F Y 2004–2006, an average of 40 students completed the Elementary or Secondary Teaching program each year.

U H West Oahu has developed a baccalaureate degree program in early childhood education in cooperation with Hawaii, Kapiolani, Kauai, and Maui Community Colleges. Enrollments in this program began fall 2006.

Leeward Community College created an Associate of Arts in Teaching (A A T) degree program in September 2005 which is designed to attract students to teaching and prepare them for entry to a licensure program at a four-year degree program. U H Manoa C O E is currently working with Leeward Community College to create a seamless pathway from the A A T degree to a bachelor of education (B E d) degree that prepares teachers for state licensure. A goal of this program is to attract more first-generation and minority students into teaching.

Kapiolani and Leeward CC expanded teacher assistant certificate and associate degree programs in an effort to prepare more teaching assistants, attract more people into teaching, and meet the requirements of the federal law, No Child Left Behind.

Nurses. The six U H nursing programs, through coordinated leadership known as the U H Statewide Nursing Consortium, are developing a statewide baccalaureate nursing curriculum with multiple exit points designed to meet the current and future health needs of the people of Hawaii by responding to the nursing shortage and providing for a more educated workforce. The campuses are concurrently working with healthcare agencies, the community, and the state legislature to expand the numbers of students admitted into nursing programs. Since 2004, the nursing program at U H Manoa increased admissions by 50 percent and increased graduations from the baccalaureate program by 15 percent. U H Manoa graduates approximately 20 students from the graduate nursing program annually. Maui CC has admitted students for the first time in the spring semester, increasing their enrollment 33 percent for A Y 2006–2007.

Innovative programs such as the accelerated baccalaureate nursing option, the online PhD in nursing, and the graduate program with various specialties utilize technology-assisted instructional delivery to increase access to nursing education and assist in meeting the critical shortfall of nurses and nursing faculty.

The Hawaii State Center for Nursing, established at the U H Manoa School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene, is taking the lead in compiling supply and demand data for the state’s nursing workforce. The following table on admissions and enrollments of nursing students in U H programs during A Y 2004–2005 reports that the LPN, BSN, and PhD programs are being filled to capacity and more. Difficulty filling admission slots for the remaining ladder, A D N, and MSN programs may be related to a combination of factors, including program-related reasons (e.g., lack of availability of faculty, facilities, clinical placement sites) and personal reasons (e.g., lack of qualified students, affordability, enrollment into another program).

Table: Capacity of U H Nursing Education Programs and Enrollment
A Y 2004–2005
Programs
LPNLadderA D NBSNMSNPhD
Number of
admission slots
6011410073409
Newly enrolled
students
63799098279
Number of
unfilled slots
035100130
Source: Hawaii State Center For Nursing, Survey of Nursing Education Programs, 2004–2005

Information Technology Specialists. The Department of Information and Computer Sciences (I C S) at U H Manoa offers six degree programs that provide students the means to support Hawaii’s high tech information infrastructure. These degrees consist of a bachelor of arts, a bachelor of science, a master of science, a master of library and information science, a PhD in computer science, and a certificate program that focuses on technology. Two of the four programs participate in an interdisciplinary PhD in Communications and Information Sciences offered by the I C S department. Through these degree offerings, the department provides higher education to over 780 students. In A Y 2005–2006, the department had over 115 graduates in the areas of Computer Science, Communication and Information Science, Information and Computer Sciences, and Library and Information Science. Students from the program are recruited by organizations both in private industry and government, and are involved in fields such as aerospace, intelligence, software development, and networking.

U H Hilo computer science majors ranked in the 95th percentile among 177 institutions in the Computer Science Major Field Achievement Test in 2005.

Tourism and Hospitality. The U H Hospitality and Tourism Consortium, established in 2005 and represented by seven U H campuses, is responsible for examining areas such as overall workforce development coordination and strategy for the state of Hawaii, research and development, delivery of professional programs, distance education, articulation between campuses, and joint recruitment promotion of programs within the hospitality and tourism disciplines. This collaborative effort offers U H students the opportunity to participate in a unique four-island experience by working and learning in a wide range of facilities and venues. Career pathways are started using traditional instruction, distance learning, and internships from executive-level degrees to hands-on technical training.

To meet the management demands of the state’s leading industry, U H Manoa offers certificate, bachelor’s degree, and master’s degree programs in travel industry management. Undergraduate enrollment, currently at 439, has increased 30 percent from 2003. Ninety percent of graduates gain entry-level management or higher positions.

Graduates from the U H Community Colleges hotel operations programs fill entry level positions in Hawaii’s tourism industry. The community college programs also attract industry workers who wish to upgrade their skills. These graduates then qualify for supervisory positions.

Construction. Through the Construction Academy, U H provides equipment and instruction at the high school level in skilled trades. The Academy began as a pilot project at the Honolulu Community College in A Y 2005–2006. As a $1.4 million grant, the U.S. Department of Labor provided service to eight Hawaii Department of Education (D O E) high schools on Oahu. More recently, the Academy was awarded a $5.5 million budget from the state legislature and now services 24 D O E high schools nearly statewide (14 on Oahu, 7 on Maui, and 3 on the Big Island). The number of participating schools are expected to increase next year, and include those on the island of Kauai. Approximately 700 high school students statewide participate in the program.

Students benefit by entering college better prepared and with a greater skill set. The Academy’s goals are to help produce qualified workers for an industry that is experiencing tremendous growth, standardize a building and construction curriculum with the D O E, create teacher mentorship and internship opportunities with businesses, and establish a statewide industry advisory council.

What is the likelihood of a U H Community College career technical student getting a job in Hawaii?

U H career and technical education graduates have a very good chance of getting a job in Hawaii. For those seeking employment in 2004–2005, between 80 and 100 percent indicated they were successful.

Table: Employment of Career Technical Education Graduates
2002–20032003–20042004–2005
Hawaii CC100%93%88%
Honolulu CC82%93%100%
Kapiolani CC88%96%94%
Kauai CC87%92%80%
Leeward CC92%98%96%
Maui CC89%100%100%
Windward CC93%100%86%
Note: Career and Technical Education was formerly known as Vocational–Technical Education.
Past survey results are included only as a point of reference to the current year. Any comparisons should be interpreted with caution as respondents and data distribution vary by study.
Source: Community Colleges Graduate and Leavers Survey

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Information and Technology Resources

Library

How does U H’s major library compare on a national basis?

U H Manoa ranks 68th among the 113 ranked university libraries that are members of the Association of Research Libraries (A R L).
Source: 2003–2004 A R L Membership and Statistics

The indexed ranking is based on the number of volumes held, number of volumes added in the last fiscal year, number of current serials, number of permanent staff, and total operating expenditures.

The library aspires to regain its previous higher standing which was significantly impacted by budget cuts in the mid- to late 1990s, and from which the library has been slowly recovering.

In October 2004, the University suffered another major setback when more than $37 million in library materials and equipment were lost and the entire ground floor of Hamilton Library was destroyed in a devastating flood. More than 50 library staff have been relocated to temporary areas while the ground floor is being reconstructed. It is estimated that reconstruction will be completed by January 2009.

Increased subscriptions to electronic journals and databases, and expedited interlibrary loan services have greatly added to the library’s ability to serve students and faculty with their scholarly research and information on campus and at a distance. The Asia and Pacific special collections make U H Manoa’s Hamilton Library a premier resource for research and scholarship in the region.

Table: U H Manoa Library Rankings
Among Ranked A R L Member Libraries
Rank
F Y 1993–199448
F Y 1994–199547
F Y 1995–199678
F Y 1996–199777
F Y 1997–199862
F Y 1998–199964
F Y 1999–200060
F Y 2000–200167
F Y 2001–200264
F Y 2002–200364
F Y 2003–200468
Note: The number of university libraries that are A R L members occasionally change from year to year.

How is U H capitalizing on technological change?

Information Technology Resources
The primary activities of U H, like any university, involve the creation, sharing, and storing of knowledge. In the increasingly digital 21st century, these activities are enabled by the capability of modern information technologies. U H operates one of the most efficient information technology organizations in the country, providing the key systems services available at most universities with far fewer resources than its peers.

Electronic Communication
After 9/11 made travel difficult and expensive, U H implemented an Internet-based videoconferencing capability. This has grown from some 15 locations to more than 30 videoconferencing sites on six islands and is regularly booked for a wide range of intercampus interisland meetings. The Internet enables completely ad-hoc videoconferences that require no central coordination. However, over 200 multisite events are now facilitated each semester through the U H systemwide videoconference scheduling service. In addition, this videoconferencing service is routinely extended for national and international events via the Internet and Internet2 in support of U H faculty, students, and staff. Videoconferencing saves valuable time and money while improving communications within Hawaii and beyond.

Business Processes

Internet Access
One of Hawaii’s greatest challenges is its isolation from the mainland. Because of its island location, providing the type of high-speed Internet connectivity sufficient for a research university’s needs is more expensive than in any other state except Alasska. U H has leveraged international, federal, state, and university resources, along with private partnerships, to establish new 10 Gbps (ten billion bits per second) connections to the U S-based Internet2 and National LambdaRail research & education networks as well as to the Australian Academic and Research Network and the Global Lambda Integrated Facility (G L I F). Links of this speed are now being established by major universities throughout the world to support the next generation of advanced research based on what the National Science Foundation refers to as “CyberInfrastructure.” U H is now extending this capacity to the international astronomy community on the Big Island. Market pricing for the capability currently in place and for what is being established would be well over $30 million.

To what extent do U H students use electronic media in their coursework and to communicate with instructors?

WebCT
WebCT is the web-based, online course management tool institutionally supported by Information Technology Services (I T S). The numbers in the table below represent courses that use WebCT to deliver fully online courses and those that use it as a resource to support traditional face-to-face courses. Many courses now use a hybrid approach to teaching and learning that incorporates both face-to-face and online methodology.

I T V (Interactive/Instructional Television)
I T V represents 2-way video and 2-way audio courses that are offered from one campus to another campus (often referred to as HITS, or Hawaii Interactive Television System).

Public Access Cable
I T S supports delivery of U H courses on public access cable channel 55. Most of these courses support the U H Community Colleges’ delivery of an associate of arts degree. During A Y 2003–2004, I T S worked with each county cable access entity so that all U H programming is on public access channel 55 statewide.

Table: Use of Electronic Media in Coursework
Fall 2004Spring 2005Fall 2005Spring 2006
WebCTClasses1,2721,3061,6161,543
Student accounts*30,85032,35241,98440,864
I T VClasses66726665
Students*1,4541,5591,3001,239
Public Access CableClasses32363328
Students*7321,1041,015683
*duplicated headcount

E-mail and Other Electronic Media
According to the results of the N S S E/C C S S E surveys, U H students often employ the use of electronic media for coursework. Their level of use approximates or slightly exceeds that of their peer and national counterparts.

Table: How Often Have You Used an Electronic Medium
(List-Serve, Chat Group, Internet, etc.) to Discuss or Complete an Assignment?
U H MeanComparison
Group Mean
U H Manoa2.802.83
U H Hilo2.742.73
U H West Oahu2.842.73
Hawaii CC2.892.74
Honolulu CC2.702.74
Kapiolani CC2.942.75
Kauai CC2.862.74
Leeward CC2.792.75
Maui CC2.932.74
Windward CC2.762.74
Note: Based on a 4.0 scale. Never=1; Sometimes=2; Often=3; Very Often=4.

U H students at the four-year/upper division campuses use e-mail to communicate with their instructors more often than U H students at the two-year campuses. Four-year/upper division students use e-mail slightly less than their peer and national counterparts while U H community college students tend to use e-mail as frequently or more frequently than their peer and national counterparts.

Table: How Often Have You Used E-mail to
Communicate with an Instructor?
U H MeanComparison
Group Mean
U H Manoa3.233.32
U H Hilo3.113.50
U H West Oahu3.223.50
Hawaii CC2.472.26
Honolulu CC2.232.26
Kapiolani CC2.792.32
Kauai CC2.312.26
Leeward CC2.502.33
Maui CC2.652.26
Windward CC2.402.26
Note: Based on a 4.0 scale. Never=1; Sometimes=2; Often=3; Very Often=4.
U H M, U H H, and U H W O reflect senior student responses.
Sources: National Survey of Student Engagement 2005 & Community College Survey of Student Engagement 2006

U H students feel that their campus experience contributed Quite a Bit to their use of computing and information technology. Their responses are similar to national norms.

Table: To What Extent Has Your U H Experience Contributed to Your Use of Computing and Information Technology?
U H MeanComparison
Group Mean
U H Manoa3.023.20
U H Hilo3.103.04
U H West Oahu3.203.04
Hawaii CC2.762.74
Honolulu CC2.732.74
Kapiolani CC2.692.66
Kauai CC2.762.74
Leeward CC2.762.66
Maui CC2.912.74
Windward CC2.672.74
Note: Based on a 4.0 scale. Very Little=1; Some=2; Quite a Bit=3; Very Much=4.
U H M, U H H, and U H W O reflect senior student responses.
Sources: National Survey of Student Engagement 2005 & Community College Survey of Student Engagement 2006

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Research and Scholarly Productivity

How have U H research and training activities fared in recent years?

For the eighth year in a row, the University of Hawaii received record support for research and training. Extramural funds—grants and contracts from federal, state, private, and foreign sources—reached an all-time high of $433.4 million in F Y 2006, a 22 percent increase over the previous fiscal year and an increase of more than three times the support received a decade ago.

U H’s research funding reached a record $236.7 million in F Y 2006. Extramural support for training also achieved a record year at $196.7 million. Combined together, they comprise U H’s extramural fund support.

U H Manoa ranked 25th in the nation among public universities for federal expenditures on research in F Y 2004 according to a 2006 National Science Foundation (NSF) report. Several of the larger research organizations at U H Manoa include:

The Institute for Astronomy’s (I f A). Development of ground-breaking astronomical instruments and expanding partnerships with the Mauna Kea and Haleakala observatories brought in over $22 million a year in extramural funds alone.

The John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM). The National Institutes of Health (N I H) reported in 2006 that J A B S O M received $20 million in N I H awards through 35 different projects in F Y 2005. JABSOM’s national rankings in research awards have steadily improved.

The School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (S O E S T). S O E S T received a record $73.6 million in extramural support in F Y 2006, including $43 million from the N S F and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (N O A A).

Table: U H Office of Research Services
Extramural Fund Support
(in millions)
ResearchTrainingTotal
F Y 1995–1996$76.7 M$57.8 M$134.5 M
F Y 1996–1997$89.1 M$71.7 M$160.8 M
F Y 1997–1998$91.7 M$68.2 M$159.9 M
F Y 1998–1999$92.7 M$71.4 M$164.1 M
F Y 1999–2000$102.8 M$77.8 M$180.6 M
F Y 2000–2001$132.8 M$83.4 M$216.2 M
F Y 2001–2002$141.9 M$110.5 M$252.4 M
F Y 2002–2003$190.4 M$133.5 M$323.9 M
F Y 2003–2004$199.9 M$129.0 M$328.9 M
F Y 2004–2005$209.2 M$144.9 M$354.1 M
F Y 2005–2006$236.7 M$196.7 M$433.4 M

Research Breakthroughs in the Last Two Years

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Economic Impact on Hawaii

What is the economic impact of U H on Hawaii?

Statewide. The University of Hawaii is a major economic force in Hawaii. In 2006, total UH revenues were $1.2 billion.

The following is based on “The Contribution of the University of Hawaii to Hawaii’s Economy in 2003” by the U H Economic Research Organization (U H E R O), March 2004.

Big Island. The following is from the report: “The Annual Economic Impact of the University of Hawaii at Hilo on the Local Economy, 2006 Update” by David Hammes, PhD, U H Hilo Economics Department, September 2006.

Foreign investment in U H
The external non-U.S. economic investment in the U H continues to be substantial. For the past nine years, the average number of awards from foreign sources was 43 and the average amount awarded was $7.6 million.

The largest awards for the last two fiscal years were from the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science & Technology Center (J A M S T E C) in the amounts of $3.2 and $2.9 million, respectively. The recipient, the U H International Pacific Research Center (I P R C), is a unique, international collaborative climate research program established in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology. Since the project’s inception in 1997, the I P R C has received over $22.5 million in funding from J A M S T E C.

Table: Awards from Foreign Sources
Fiscal
Year
Number of
Projects
Amount Awarded
(in millions)
1996–199745$7.6 M
1997–199836$7.3 M
1998–199936$4.1 M
1999–200049$11.2 M
2000–200139$6.6 M
2001–200244$3.8 M
2002–200352$9.2 M
2003–200447$10.4 M
2004–200543$7.9 M

Technology Transfer
The Office of Technology Transfer and Economic Development (O T T E D) serves as a gateway for access to the University’s rich educational, scientific, and technical resources by actively promoting new University inventions and discoveries to industry and by working with business and government leaders throughout the state to encourage economic development.

While the overall number of active licenses has continued to climb, the licenses to local companies that are making a direct contribution to Hawaii’s economy are most exciting. In 2004, O T T E D participated in the U H Business Plan competition by offering up to $20,000 in additional prize money to winning teams whose business plans were based on licensable U H technologies. For three consectuive years, the top placing team in the competition has based their plan on a U H technology. There are now two new companies operating in Honolulu based on those technologies, with a third in the start up phase. One in particular, Pipeline Communications and Technology, Inc., is a prime example of the kind of activity O T T E D is trying to promote. Pipeline has licensed three U H technologies, sponsored research at U H, employed ten full-time staff (including U H graduates), hired U H students as paid interns, and provided mentoring to other business plan teams.

Table: U H Invention Disclosures
By Fiscal Year
19961997199819992000200120022003200420052006
Number of Disclosures1114184520453134564861

The University’s licensing revenues increased for four years before decreasing in F Y 2005–2006. Total revenues, as a whole, tend to fluctuate significantly from year to year because of the varying durations of licenses.

Table: U H Licensing Revenues
(in thousands)
F Y 2000–2001F Y 2001–2002F Y 2002–2003F Y 2003–2004F Y 2004–2005F Y 2005–2006
Amount$268 K$381 K$530 K$809 K$1,036 K$899 K

The number of licenses and options signed by the University also have a tendency to fluctuate annually. The cumulative number of active licenses and options is currently 74. Ten are locally-based licensees.

Table: Annual U H Licenses/Options Signed
Fiscal YearAmount
2000–20017
2001–20023
2002–200318
2003–200415
2004–200517
2005–200611

Economic Development Highlights

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Goal 3

A Model Local, Regional, and Global University

Establishing the University as a distinguished resource in Hawaiian and Pacific-Asia affairs depends on a strong commitment to perpetuating Hawaiian culture and language and on focusing the international dimension of the University on the Pacific-Asia region. Measures of student participation in Hawaiian language and cultural studies, the Pacific-Asia focus of international activity on campuses, and the efforts to internationalize the campus experience demonstrate the University’s progress in positioning itself as one of the world’s foremost multicultural centers for global and indigenous studies.

Hawaiian Language and Cultural Studies

How well is the University doing in its commitment to preserve and disseminate Hawaiian history, language, and culture?

Hawaiian studies courses offered at U H Manoa, U H Hilo, and the U H Community Colleges continue to grow in popularity.

At U H Manoa, registration in Hawaiian studies courses continues to increase after nearly doubling from 2002 to 2003. Registration in Hawaiian language courses has decreased since peaking in 1997. Students must take an approved course focused on Hawaiian, Pacific, and Asian issues as a U H Manoa General Education graduation requirement.

U H Manoa offers two M A degree programs, one in Hawaiian Studies and one in Hawaiian Language, and has increased its undergraduate and graduate course offerings. Improved funding of Hawaiian programs between 2001 and 2005 and strong faculty leadership have provided consistent governance to help coordinate this growth.

Table: Registration in Hawaiian Language and Hawaiian Studies Courses
U H Manoa
Fall Semester
19951996199719981999200020012002200320042005
Hawaiian Language9601,0291,0651,000877733754742692707755
Hawaiian Studies4693033833234173995186161,2001,4171,275

At U H Hilo, registrations in Hawaiian language decreased slightly the past two years while registrations in Hawaiian studies courses have increased and are at their highest ever.

The Ka Haka Ula O Keelikolani College of Hawaiian Language has offered introductory Hawaiian language courses online and asynchronously to students across the state, on the mainland, and internationally.

Table: Registration in Hawaiian Language and Hawaiian Studies Courses
U H Hilo
Fall Semester
19951996199719981999200020012002200320042005
Hawaiian Language255193210241212198225250300279257
Hawaiian Studies250234275230217217218265350311358

At the UH Community Colleges, student registrations in Hawaiian studies courses continue their upward trend and are currently at their peak.

Table: Registration in Hawaiian Language and Hawaiian Studies Courses
U H Community Colleges
Fall Semester
19951996199719981999200020012002200320042005
Hawaiian Language930920996957888750706712726679623
Hawaiian Studies3553345706827697177679111,2661,4411,684

The U H Manoa William S. Richardson School of Law received a federal grant of nearly $600,000 to establish a Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian Law. The Center focuses primarily on education, research, and the preservation of invaluable historical, legal, traditional, and customary materials.

U H Manoa’s School of Social Work was awarded a federal grant to establish Ha Kupuna, a national resource center for Native Hawaiian elders. It is one of only three federally funded centers in the nation.

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Pacific-Asia Focus

How is U H strengthening its Pacific-Asia focus?

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Internationalizing the Campus Experience

How is the University ensuring an international dimension to students’ education?

Overseas Study/Research Programs
Of the 886 students who participated in an international program of study, research, internship, or service learning in calendar year 2005, approximately one-third went to Asia, one-third to Europe, and the remainder went to the Pacific/Oceania region, the Americas, and the Caribbean. Students from U H Manoa comprised 79 percent of the participants.

Table: Student Participation in Education Abroad, C Y 2005
U H System
AsiaEuropePacific/
Oceania
Americas & the CaribbeanAfricaTotal
Percent35% 33% 22% 10%<1%
Number Enrolled315 289 196 851886
Note: In 2005, the reporting period changed from academic to calendar year.

Faculty/Staff Activities
A total of 188 faculty and administrators systemwide reported going overseas to participate in teaching and research, present at international conferences, recruit international students, escort student groups on service learning projects, and engage in field schools. More than half of the participants went to Asia.

Five U H faculty members, four from Manoa and one from Honolulu Community College, were awarded Fulbright Scholar grants. Four lectured and or conducted research in Asia and one in Scandinavia.

Visiting Scholars and International Faculty
In calendar year 2005, 565 international faculty/staff and visiting scholars taught, conducted research, worked in academic/institutional support positions, or participated in international exchange activities under U H sponsorship. More than 45 percent came from Asia, 33 percent from Europe, and the remainder from Canada, Latin America, Oceania, the Middle East and Africa. The largest number was from China, followed by Japan, Canada, Germany, and South Korea. An additional 45 individuals came to U H campuses as lecturers, Fulbright scholars, or seminar/conference participants.

Table: Visiting Scholars and International Faculty
Calendar YearAmount
1999339
2000376
2001446
2002420
2003457
2004532
2005565

International Partnerships
As of calendar year 2005, the University of Hawaii has 175 formal international agreements with partner institutions. These linkages provide opportunities for faculty and student exchange, short-term training, library exchanges, collaborative research, and the development of international programs that are mutually beneficial.

Table: International Partnerships
Calendar YearAmount
1995110
1996114
1997122
1998117
1999107
2000132
2001132
2002144
2003148
2004145
2005175

International Student Enrollment
In fall 2006, 2,870 international degree-seeking students, representing 119 places of origin, were enrolled at a U H campus. Eighty percent of the international student population came from one of 28 Asian nations. Japan sends the largest number of students, comprising 41 percent of the total U H system international student enrollment.

Table: Enrollment of Degree-Seeking International Students
U H System
199819992000200120022003200420052006
Asia1,5491,5111,5991,7211,8671,9701,7482,2782,286
Pacific/Oceania70161373179341226226374207
Other257291318336386366582371377
Total1,8761,9632,2902,2362,5942,5622,5563,0232,870
Note: Students who did not specify place of origin are included in the “Other” category.

Language Study
U H students can earn a certificate with an international component in nearly 40 fields. Students have the opportunity to participate in international exchange, study abroad, and specially designed campus-based overseas programs. U H offers 30 languages other than English.

Over the past decade, registrations in foreign languages increased 9 percent overall.

Table: Registration in Languages
U H System
Fall Semester
19951996199719981999200020012002200320042005
East Asian Language3,4743,5663,1693,4343,1543,1553,0913,2343,3903,4903,403
European Language3,0882,9312,7142,9102,8692,8502,7342,9303,3543,5383,528
Hawaiian/Indo-Pacific Language2,9172,8692,7403,0462,7562,4262,4332,4542,6322,6452,561

International Non-Credit Enrollment
A total of 6,605 international students participated in short-term non-credit training across U H in 2005, generating revenues of approximately $2.5 million. U H completed 74 customized contract training programs. Sixty-seven percent of the reported revenues were generated by English language training at U H Manoa. The U H Community Colleges served international participants in fields including: English language training, Hawaiian history and culture, culinary arts, early childhood education, emergency medical training, hospitality and tourism, flight attendant training, and cosmetology.

Table: International Non-Credit Students, 2005
U H System
U H Manoa
N I C E¹
U H Manoa
H E L P²
KapiolaniKauaiLeewardMauiWindwardHawaiiHonoluluTotal
Percent59%6%12%2%2%2%10% 2%5%
Number Enrolled4,431466886122 143155 7631563697,491
Note: ¹ New Intensive Courses in English (U H M Outreach College) English as a Second Language
² Hawaii English Language Program (U H M) Intensive English as a Second Language

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Goal 4

Investment in Faculty, Staff, Students, and Their Environment

Creating a university culture of excellence requires attention to the value and development of human resources and the work environments that sustain them. Measures of the University’s investment in faculty and staff and investment in the physical plant are presented to demonstrate the University’s progress in recognizing and renewing its most important assets.

Investment in Faculty and Staff

How are campuses investing in their faculty and staff?

U H System
Information Technology Services (I T S)

Table: Participation in I T S Training and Informational Sessions
A Y 2004–2005A Y 2005–2006
Number of
Participants
Number of
Sessions
Number of
Participants
Number of
Sessions
TALENT101220917
Brown Bags15772777
Training Courses1973215917

Sabbatical and Professional Leave
The University invests in faculty and staff by providing funding for leaves of six months at full pay or twelve months at half pay to pursue scholarly activities and academic renewal. In 2005, the University supported 166 employees on sabbatical and professional leaves.

Table: U H Sabbatical/Professional Improvement Leave 2005
Employee TypeNumber
Staff5
Faculty161
Total166

U H Manoa
The U H Manoa’s Office of Faculty Development and Academic Support (O F D A S) provides a range of faculty professional development and academic support services through its Center for Teaching Excellence, Center for Instructional Support, and Faculty Mentoring Program. Through the following programs and services, O F D A S attempts to address pedagogical and professional issues that relate directly to teaching and learning and to ethical and professional development: lecture series on professional development; mid-semester diagnosis of teaching effectiveness; course and faculty evaluation (C A F ); discussion groups on issues in higher education; grant writing series; teaching assistant training and future professoriate series; new faculty orientation program; departmental leadership workshops; media and graphic services; library of dossiers; and faculty mentoring.

U H Hilo
The U H Hilo Faculty Research Council awards intramural grants for conference travel, and start-up projects, as well as grants for scholarly activity in academic fields that have relatively little opportunity for external funding. Grants are awarded for scholarly and/or creative activities, as well as training grants to enhance instructional capabilities.

Through a five-year Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) grant, science and math faculty are learning different approaches to studying the natural world and adapting to different student learning styles. The University’s National Science Foundation Keaholoa–STEM program sponsored a three-day OnCourse I workshop on enhancing student learning in which U H Hilo and U H Community Colleges faculty participated. U H Hilo faculty have participated in several series of on-campus workshops on instructional technology and online instruction, including podcasting and production of multimedia materials for online delivery.

U H West Oahu
U H West Oahu offers professional development activities, including a professional development day for the faculty prior to the start of each semester, as well as workshops and seminars throughout the year for faculty and staff. Intramural funds are provided for seed money research grants and for funding faculty travel to conferences. U H West Oahu funded 100 percent of faculty travel requests in A Y 2005–2006.

In spring 2005, the Director of Assessment began a series of workshops to assist faculty in developing measurable learning outcomes and assessment tools. This Collaborative Assessment Project (C A P) continued in fall 2006 with a new cohort of faculty.

U H Community colleges
The U H Community Colleges support professional development efforts through system and campus planning and resource allocation. New and continuing initiatives are funded by chancellors, fundraisers, and external grants. Workshops on assessing student learning outcomes and support for faculty travel are among the types of professional development activities offered. All colleges have staff and faculty development committees and have continued the annual practice of a college-wide, non-instructional professional development and enrichment day.

The Wo Learning Champions and the Tsunoda Community College Leadership Champions (C C L C) programs are examples of major investments in faculty and staff development by the community colleges.

Funded by an endowment from the Wo Family Foundations, the Wo Learning Champions initiative focuses on professional development for faculty and staff. With a focus on learning, the Wo Learning Champions program invests in junior members of the academic community, renews its senior members, and promotes the enrichment of all. Among the accomplishments in the last two years are the successful coordination of a systemwide professional development day; the Wo Innovations in Learning Day; the selection of an Innovation of the Year Award recipient; the coordination of a successful Distinguished Lecturer series; a speakers’ bureau; an exchange grant program; and cosponsorship of a number of systemwide workshops and conferences. A fifth generation of Wo Learning Champions representatives from the community colleges and Employment Training Center will assume responsibilities in January 2007.

The mission of the C C L C program is to identify, encourage, develop, and support the next generation of community college leadership. The group, made up of representatives from each campus, was formed in response to a desire to grow its leaders from within and to acknowledge that effective leadership must come from all levels. Leadership Champions have the opportunity to attend the Community College Leadership Development Institute at the University of California, San Diego. Each campus supports the travel expenses of their Champion to attend monthly meetings on each campus, which are intended to develop a better understanding of the challenges and opportunities facing the system and to pursue a leadership project chosen by the group.

How do U H faculty salaries compare with national averages?

U H Manoa, U H Hilo, and U H West Oahu salaries continue to lag behind national averages for higher ranked faculty (Ranks 4 and 5) while salaries for lower ranked faculty (Ranks 2 and 3) are more on par with their national counterparts from public doctoral level and baccalaureate institutions.

Table: Comparison of Average Faculty Salaries
with Other Public Institutions, 2005–2006
U H Manoa, U H Hilo, U H West Oahu
Rank 5Rank 4Rank 3Rank 2
U H
Manoa
U H
Hilo
U H
West Oahu
U H
Manoa
U H
Hilo
U H
West Oahu
U H
Manoa
U H
Hilo
U H
West Oahu
U H
Manoa
U H
Hilo
U H
West Oahu
U H Average$92,875$71,700$65,821$68,652$59,206$55,581$59,846$50,534$51,300$45,217$39,511$38,892
National
Average
$101,620$73,406$73,406$70,952$59,913$59,913$60,440$49,546$49,546$40,670$39,925$39,925

U H Community College faculty salaries continue to reflect favorably in relation to their national public institution counterparts. Salaries at Ranks 2, 3, and 4 continue to exceed the national averages in comparison to other public two-year institutions with academic ranks. At the Rank 5 level, Kapiolani and Kauai Community Colleges exceeded the national average.

Table: Comparison of Average Faculty Salaries
with Other Public Institutions, 2005–2006
U H Community Colleges
HawaiiHonoluluKapiolaniKauaiLeewardMauiWindwardNational
Averages
Rank 5$65,332$64,722$67,104$66,370$65,979$65,544$65,204$66,011
Rank 4$57,688$58,963$59,164$58,290$55,709$58,330$55,786$53,405
Rank 3$49,236$55,219$50,655$54,462$49,899$52,644$51,368$47,116
Rank 2$44,099$41,634$44,120$48,527$44,167$45,716$42,630$40,266
Note: The national averages are the averages of all public institutions surveyed that are in the same category as the U H campus.
Source: Academe Mar/Apr 2006 Bulletin of the American Association of University Professors (A A U P)

What share of their time do U H faculty spend on instruction and research and how does this compare with counterparts elsewhere?

Instructional workload increased slightly at U H Manoa and U H Hilo but decreased slightly at U H West Oahu and the U H Community Colleges from fall 2000 to fall 2004. U H regular faculty teach from two to four courses a semester and some teach five. For comparative purposes, equivalent semester hours per regular faculty at the U H Community Colleges include general academic instruction only.

Table: U H Equivalent Semester Hours/Regular Faculty
Fall 2004Fall 2000
U H Manoa8.17.9
U H Hilo9.39.1
U H West Oahu10.010.8
U H Community Colleges11.712.0
Note: Equivalent semester hours consist of fixed semester hours plus defined equivalencies for directed reading, thesis or dissertation classes, and other variable credit classes.

U H Manoa instructional faculty estimate they spend more time teaching than their counterparts nationwide while U H Hilo, U H West Oahu, and U H Community Colleges faculty estimate they spend less time. The share of U H faculty time spent on research in comparison with their national counterparts varies for each unit. The share of time U H faculty at all four units spend on administrative, professional growth, service, and other non-teaching activities exceeds that of their peers.

Table: Percentage of Time Instructional Faculty
Spent on Various Activities, by Institutional Type¹
TeachingResearchOther³
U H Manoa²49%24%27%
U.S. Research44%33%23%
U H Hilo56%19%25%
U H West Oahu58%15%27%
U.S. Comprehensive65%15%20%
U H Community Colleges66%5%29%
Two-Year72%8%20%
Note: ¹ Based on 684 responses by U H faculty classified as instructional (excluding lecturers), spring 2006. U.S. data includes full-time faculty and instructional staff members with instructional responsibilities, fall 2003.
² Adding U H M faculty classified as “research” to the U H M profile would result in a percentage closer to the national average.
³ “Other” includes administration, professional growth, service, and other non-teaching activities.
Sources: U H Quality of Faculty Worklife Survey, Spring 2006 & National Center For Education Statistics, 2004 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty

What is the overall state of faculty morale at U H?

On a scale of 1 to 10, U H faculty morale in spring 2006 stands slightly above the mid-point at 5.93, with the lowest at U H Manoa (5.77) and the highest at U H West Oahu (6.81). Note that comparisons between survey years should be approached with caution as respondents and data distributions vary with each administration. With that caveat in mind, it does appear that overall faculty morale at U H has moved in a generally positive direction.

Table: U H Faculty Morale by Campus
200620021998
U H Overall5.935.405.16
U H Manoa5.775.174.63
U H Hilo5.836.046.26
U H West Oahu6.815.205.80
Hawaii CC6.144.565.08
Honolulu CC6.196.116.19
Kapiolani CC6.555.676.07
Kauai CC5.795.135.94
Leeward CC6.226.215.82
Maui CC5.825.666.09
Windward CC6.196.386.46
Employment
Training Center
5.896.716.47
Note: Scale range is 1–10. 1=low morale; 10=high morale (midpoint 5.5)

U H faculty members perceive the greatest need for improvement is in areas related to personal factors (such as salary and housing) and advocacy for faculty, and the least need is in areas related to collegial relations and students.

Table: U H Quality of Worklife Areas
200620021998
Collegial Relations3.873.773.80
Students3.433.433.33
Professional Worklife3.153.093.07
Reward/Evaluation System3.153.043.04
Confidence in the Leadership3.093.052.87
Faculty Governance3.032.922.81
Support Services3.012.932.84
Advocacy for the Faculty2.972.882.75
Personal Factors2.962.913.13
Note: Scale range is 1–5. 1=most negative; 5=most positive (midpoint 3)
Mean results for 1998 and 2002 are included only as a point of reference to the current year. Any comparison should be interpreted with caution as respondents and data distribution vary by study.
Reflects all members of the U H faculty (i.e., instructors, researchers, specialists, agents, and librarians).
Source: U H Quality of Faculty Worklife Survey, Spring 2006

What is the turnover rate for faculty?

Faculty turnover rates reached a high in F Y 2000–2001 before decreasing and stabilizing for the last three years. The reasons for leaving tend to be fairly consistent from year to year. In F Y 2005–2006, the top five reasons faculty left U H (ranked from high to low) were:

Table: U H Faculty Resignations (Turnover Rate)
F Y 1995–1996F Y 1996–1997F Y 1997–1998F Y 1998–1999F Y 1999–2000F Y 2000–2001F Y 2001–2002F Y 2002–2003F Y 2003–2004F Y 2004–2005F Y 2005–2006
Number of Resignations Processed961101097995145128109103103103
Percent3.1%3.5%3.5%2.5%3.1%4.6%4.0%3.3%3.1%3.0%3.0%
Note: Does not include retirements.
Source: Personnel Exit Questionnaire, U H Office of Human Resources

What are the demographic trends in the composition of U H employees?

Ethnicity
Employment by ethnicity has remained stable since 2001 among all U H employees except for a slight decrease in the percentage of employees and faculty of Japanese ancestry.

Table: All Employees by Ethnicity
Fall 2001Fall 2005
Caucasian39%40%
Filipino5%5%
Hawaiian/Part-Hawaiian8%8%
Chinese9%9%
Japanese29%27%
Other6%6%
Other Asian/Pacific Islanders4%5%

Table: Faculty by Ethnicity
Fall 2001Fall 2005
Caucasian57%57%
Filipino3%3%
Hawaiian/Part-Hawaiian5%6%
Chinese8%8%
Japanese19%17%
Other4%5%
Other Asian/Pacific Islanders4%4%

Gender
The share of women in the U H workforce increased from a decade ago, by almost three percent for all employees and over five percent for faculty. According to the 2005 Report of the American Association of Medical Colleges, the John A. Burns School of Medicine has the highest percentage of women serving as department chairs of all 125 U.S. medical schools. Seven of its 15 chairs are filled by women (four times the national average).

Percent of U H Women Employees
Fall 1995Fall 2005
All Employees48.1%51.0%
Faculty38.9%44.2%

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Investment in the Physical Plant

What is the level of C I P appropriations/authorizations received by U H from the state?

State capital improvements program (C I P) appropriations totaled $234 million in fiscal years 2006 and 2007.

Table: Capital Improvements Program
Appropriation of State Funds ($ Thousand)
MEANS OF FINANCEAct 281/
F Y 2001
Act 259/
F Y 2002
Act 177/
F Y 2003
Act 200/
F Y 2004
Act 41/
F Y 2005
Act 178/
F Y 2006
Act 160/
F Y 2007
 General Funds00000042,500
 General Obligation Bond Fund27,70069,51584,04422,80488,561128,78362,988
TOTAL27,70069,51584,04422,80488,561128,783105,488

What is the level of investment for maintaining the U H physical plant?

The repairs and maintenance (R&M) allocation per gross square foot (G S F) between fiscal years 2001 and 2006 has increased substantially due to funding support from the C I P budget.

Table: U H System
Budget Allocation Compared with Gross Square Feet
F Y 2001F Y 2002F Y 2003F Y 2004F Y 2005F Y 2006
R&M Allocation¹$23,263,739$30,807,405$37,938,097$7,886,594$32,920,234$38,058,571
Gross Square Feet8,029,4928,289,6778,350,5138,388,0838,388,0832,613,407
Ratio ($/GSF)²$2.90$3.72$4.54$0.94$3.92$4.53
Note: ¹ Does not include a F Y 2006 system allocation of $0.5 million for a facilities audit/assessment.
² Figures may vary slightly due to rounding.

Table: U H Manoa
Budget Allocation Compared with Gross Square Feet
F Y 2001F Y 2002F Y 2003F Y 2004F Y 2005F Y 2006
R&M Allocation$13,520,481$17,898,650$21,472,307$4,696,943$18,633,943$33,786,943
Gross Square Feet³4,746,9284,746,9284,751,4324,751,4324,751,4324,751,432
Ratio ($/GSF)²$2.85$3.77$4.52$0.99$3.92$7.11
Note: ² Figures may vary slightly due to rounding.
³ Does not include off-campus facilities and on-campus facilities that are self-supporting.

Table: U H Hilo
Budget Allocation Compared with Gross Square Feet
F Y 2001F Y 2002F Y 2003F Y 2004F Y 2005F Y 2006
R&M Allocation$3,216,275$4,147,046$5,326,273$943,566$4,624,856$1,363,498
Gross Square Feet867,000983,508983,508983,508983,508992,161
Ratio ($/GSF)²$3.71$4.22$5.42$0.96$4.70$1.37
Note: ² Figures may vary slightly due to rounding.

Table: U H West Oahu
Budget Allocation Compared with Gross Square Feet
F Y 2001F Y 2002F Y 2003F Y 2004F Y 2005F Y 2006
R&M Allocation$67,691$72,624$97,432$32,000$89,350$35,045
Gross Square Feet39,73639,73639,73639,73639,73639,736
Ratio ($/GSF)²$1.70$1.83$2.45$0.81$2.25$0.88
Note: ² Figures may vary slightly due to rounding.

Table: U H Community Colleges
Budget Allocation Compared with Gross Square Feet
F Y 2001F Y 2002F Y 2003F Y 2004F Y 2005F Y 2006
R&M Allocation$6,459,292$8,689,085$11,042,085$2,217,085$9,572,085$2,373,085
Gross Square Feet2,375,8282,519,5052,575,8372,613,4072,613,4072,613,407
Ratio ($/GSF)²$2.72$3.45$4.29$0.85$3.66$0.91
Note: ² Figures may vary slightly due to rounding.

Of the total budget allocation for R&M in F Y 2006, $28.4 million was allocated to the University of Hawaii at Manoa to address flood related repairs and improvements from the October 2004 Manoa flood. The backlog of R&M remains one of the most critical problems facing the University.

Table: Total Deferred Repairs and Maintenance
CampusF Y 2003F Y 2004F Y 2005F Y 2006
U H Manoa$52,635,390$82,902,000$99,105,500$100,588,000
U H Hilo$22,664,453$30,090,000$36,209,500$23,236,000
U H Community Colleges$29,622,549$48,053,876$39,981,890$40,830,671
Total Unfunded Deferred R&M$104,922,392$161,045,876$175,296,890$164,654,671

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Goal 5

Resources and Stewardship

Achieving the goals of the University’s strategic plan depends on the University to acquire, allocate, and manage public and private revenue streams and exercise exemplary stewardship over these assets. Measures of investment from the state, Investment from private sources, environmental initiatives, and measures of accountability in the management of these resources are presented to demonstrate the University’s commitment to manage its resources in service to the state and its citizens.

Investment from the State

What proportion of U H’s revenues come from the state?

About half of the University’s funding comes from state general fund appropriations. The University’s share of federal funds has increased from five years ago, due in large part, to the outstanding performances of its research communities.

Table: U H Funding Sources
F Y 2001F Y 2005
State50%49%
Federal20%28%
Tuition & Fees15%12%
Sales/Services, Endowments, and Other11%8%
Private and Local4%3%

How does U H expend the resources to support instruction, research, and other activities?

The primary use of funds continues to be in support of instruction and research. The increased share in research use is consistent with the increase in external funding received by the University.

Table: U H Funding Uses
F Y 2001F Y 2005
Student Services, Scholarships, and Fellowships8%7%
Public Service6%5%
Academic and Institutional Support18%19%
Auxiliary, Independent, and Operation & Maintenance15%13%
Research21%26%
Instruction32%30%

What is the relationship between U H’s share of the state budget and U H enrollment?

U H enrollment increased from a low of 44,579 in F Y 2000–2001 to a high of 50,569 in F Y 2004–2005. U H’s share of the State general funds declined from 9.2 percent to 8.1 percent over the same period. Enrollment is forecast to remain flat at approximately 50,000. U H’s 8.1 percent share of the State general funds in F Y 2006–2007 remains at a historical low.

Table: U H Enrollment and Share of State General Funds
By Fiscal Year
1997–19981998–19991999–20002000–20012001–20022002–20032003–20042004–20052005–20062006–2007
Percent Share of General Funds8.8%8.7%9.2%9.2%8.4%8.1%8.4%8.1%8.5%8.1%
Enrollment45,55145,33746,47944,57945,99448,17350,31750,56950,15749,990

How efficient is the University in maximizing its current financial resources?

A study conducted by the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (N C H E M S) and funded by The Pew Charitable Trusts measured the performance of state higher education systems and their institutions relative to their levels of funding. Performance was measured using a variety of metrics for participation and completion rates, degree productivity, and research and development (where applicable). Funding comprised of state and local appropriations and tuition and fees (the two largest sources of unrestricted funds for higher education institutions) per full-time equivalent (F T E) student.

When averaging the ratios of performance to funding across all measures, Hawaii ranked 27th out of 50 states for state systems of higher education. However, the University scored at about the 80th percentile in its performance relative to funding on the number of credentials awarded in 2002–2003 per 100 full-time undergraduates. A number of states expended more in funding but experienced comparable or lesser credential and degree productivity.

The University fared better on its ability to attract competitive research and development grants from external sources relative to funding, scoring above the 80th percentile. Likewise, the U H Manoa campus performed well among public research institutions on the amount of research expenditures per full-time faculty.

Source: National Center For Higher Education Management Systems, A New Look at the Institutional Component of Higher Education Finance: A Guide For Evaluating Performance Relative to Financial Resources, Revised February 2006

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Investment from Private Sources

What are the trends in private giving through the U H Foundation?

Private giving to the University through the Foundation remains strong. The University and Foundation are in the middle of a comprehensive campaign—the Centennial Campaign for the University of Hawaii—which began on July 1, 2002. Earlier this year, the University’s Board of Regents and the Foundation’s Board of Trustees agreed to extend the campaign through June 30, 2009 and increase the goal to $250 million.

Each year of the campaign has seen an increase from the prior year. With the naming of a permanent president for the University of Hawaii, the Foundation is poised to significantly increase the fundraising results going forward.

Table: University of Hawaii Foundation
Funds Raised by Campaign Year (in millions)
F Y 2002–2003F Y 2003–2004F Y 2004–2005F Y 2005–2006F Y 2006–2007
Funds$22.0 M$25.9 M$34.6 M$35.1 M$50.0 M
(Projected)

Private gifts come from a wide variety of sources. In F Y 2005–2006, $15.3 million, or 44 percent of the total, came from alumni and friends of the University.

Table: University of Hawaii Foundation
Gifts by Source, F Y 2005–2006 (in millions)
Foundations & TrustsFriendsOrganizationsAlumniCorporationsTotal Gifts
Gifts$10.5 M$9.5 M$4.0 M$5.8 M$5.3 M$35.1 M
Percent30%27%11%17%15%

Private support helps the University in a variety of ways. In F Y 2005–2006, $10.1 million was raised to provide support for students. Click here for more detail on student scholarships raised.

Table: University of Hawaii Foundation
Gifts by Purpose, F Y 2005–2006 (in millions)
Academic SupportStudent AidSpecial ProgramsResearchOtherTotal Gifts
Gifts$11.8 M$10.1 M$5.0 M$5.0 M$3.2 M$35.1 M
Percent34%29%14%14%9%

What is the status of the University’s endowment?

The endowment continues to grow as a result of positive investment performance and funds raised. Approximately 24 percent of funds raised annually by the U H Foundation are for the U H Foundation endowment. The goal is to increase this to 30 percent.

Table: University of Hawaii Foundation
Investment Portfolio (in millions)
By Fiscal Year
1995–19961996–19971997–19981998–19991999–20002000–20012001–20022002–20032003–20042004–20052005–2006
Market Value$58.6 M$68.9 M$86.5 M$94.4 M$112.2 M$106.9 M$94.7 M$96.5 M$115.8 M$128.2 M$142.9 M

The University holds a second endowment from private and institutional donors which, invested separately, has a market value of $64.4 million in F Y 2005–2006.

Table: University of Hawaii
Net Assets/Endowment Fund Balance (in millions)
By Fiscal Year
1995–19961996–19971997–19981998–19991999–20002000–20012001–20022002–20032003–20042004–20052005–2006
Market Value$41.4 M$49.7 M$62.0 M$68.3 M$75.8 M$65.5 M$57.7 M$55.8 M$61.1 M$61.3 M$64.4 M

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Environmental Initiatives

What measures has the University taken in the area of environmental stewardship?

As one of the state’s largest consumers of energy and water, a significant contributor to its traffic load and waste stream, and an active guardian of its cultural history and customs, the University of Hawaii has a major role in safeguarding Hawaii’s precious natural and social legacies.

In 2002, the University of Hawaii adopted sustainability—defined as living in ways that meet our present needs without limiting the potential of future generations to meet their needs—as a guiding principle and began instituting sustainability policies and practices throughout the U H System. The U H Office of Sustainability was established to further the goal of creating a vibrant, healthful, resource-efficient, and culturally sensitive university. A long-term goal of U H is to serve as a working model of sustainability for the state and beyond. Recent and ongoing projects and events coordinated by the U H Office of Sustainability, U H campuses, and other U H organizations are described below.

Ongoing and Completed Projects
The new U H Manoa John A. Burns School of Medicine was designed to incorporate energy efficiency and state-of-the-art innovations in both its laboratories and office facilities. Technological innovations include a flywheel system, use of cold seawater in the cooling system, and light shelves. The flywheel system keeps power flowing to critical systems during brief electrical interruptions, assuring that medical experiments can continue. The Central Chiller Plant replaces the use of standard cooling towers and will save roughly 30 million gallons of potable water and reduce electrical consumption. The system is the first of its kind in Hawaii and was designed and built by the Honolulu Board of Water Supply. Interior lighting featuring “light shelves” on many windows reduces the need for artificial lighting by reflecting daylight into the room.

Maui Community College’s Sustainable Living Institute of Maui (S L I M) offers sustainable agriculture and sustainable technology internships for both high school and Maui Community College students. S L I M was established by Maui Community College, Maui Land & Pineapple Company, Inc., E A R T H University of Costa Rica, and the Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden to foster sustainable and innovative methods of community development and management.

U H Manoa has installed and is now evaluating interval meters in campus buildings to create a campus-wide energy-efficient plan and prioritize future energy-saving measures.

U H Manoa’s School of Architecture developed new methods to assess the solar power potential of U H Manoa rooftops.

U H’s Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (H N E I) developed and is testing a renewable energy technology that converts biomass (“green waste” such as campus tree trimmings and similar materials) into charcoal.

U H is aggressively moving from paper-based reporting to online retrieval systems. Regular central printing has been cut in half over the past several years and continues to decrease.

As the demand for higher education services continues to exceed the growth in resources, U H is one of a small number of institutions working to redesign courses to reduce delivery costs through technology while simultaneously improving student learning outcomes. Two initial projects have shown promising preliminary results, and U H is now one of the founding members of the Redesign Alliance, a consortium of colleges and universities who will share approaches and experiences to achieve greater success together.

U H led Hawaii’s first free statewide electronic waste recycling program, which resulted in the environmentally responsible disposal of more than 33 containers of “e-Waste” from U H campuses and Hawaii’s schools. An additional seven containers were collected from the public.

Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (L E E D) awards certification for newly constructed buildings that meet certain energy and resource-saving requirements. L E E D ratings are ranked in the following order, starting at the lowest: bronze, silver, gold, and platinum. All new U H Manoa buildings will be of L E E D silver or better caliber. The JABSOM complex is applying for L E E D certification at the silver level.

Events
Energy experts from the University of Hawaii, University of California, Hawaiian Electric Company, and the private sector attended an October 2006 energy summit at U H Manoa to develop strategies to reduce the University of Hawaii’s growing energy bill. The U H System is the second largest consumer (behind the military services) of electricity on Oahu. A partnership between U H Manoa and Hawaiian Electric Company (H E C O) aims at monitoring and reducing energy consumption on campus through energy-efficient alternatives such as a reduction in fluorescent lighting, solar water heating, and wind powered generators.

Maui Community College hosted the 2006 International Small Islands Studies Association (I S I S A) Conference “Islands of the World IX,” where scholars and experts discussed sustainability efforts and strategies for sustainable development for small islands. I S I S A adopted The Maui Declaration which recognizes the important role of educational institutions in advancing the concept of public, private, and corporate co-responsibility in the sustainability of small islands.

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Accountability

How does the University demonstrate its accountability to the public?

Accountability
This document, Measuring Our Progress, responds to Act 161 of the 1995 Legislature to provide benchmarks and performance indicators that reflect the systematic assessment of U H programs and services. This 2006 update is intended to demonstrate to the public the University’s progress in meeting the goals set forth in the University of Hawaii System Strategic Plan: Entering the University’s Second Century 2002–2010. In addition, each campus demonstrates its accountability through accreditation, program review, and institutional assessment activities.

Accreditation
Regional Accreditation
All ten campuses of the University of Hawaii are separately and regionally accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (W A S C). Regional accreditation means that, as the result of an external review process, the University is judged to be fulfilling its stated purposes and can be expected to continue to do so. Students and the public can be assured that University of Hawaii campuses have met standards of quality across the entire range of institutional activities.

Table: University of Hawaii Status of Accreditation
CampusAccrediting BodyStatus
U H ManoaW A S C -Senior CommissionAccreditation reaffirmed until spring 2010. Institutional proposal approved, December 2006. Special visit, March 2007. Preparatory review expected, spring 2009. Educational effectiveness review date to be determined.
U H HiloW A S C -Senior CommissionAccreditation reaffirmed, summer 2004, for ten years. Interim site visit, spring 2008.
U H West OahuW A S C -Senior CommissionRenewal of full accreditation, June 1998; preparatory review, March 2003. Special visit, December 2003. Educational effectiveness review, October 2004.
 Hawaii CCW A S C - A C C J C CommissionEach college is separately accredited. Accreditation reaffirmed for all colleges, fall 2000 for six years—the maximum allowed by A C C J C policy. Reaccreditation visits to all seven campuses conducted fall 2006.
 Honolulu CCW A S C - A C C J C Commission
 Kapiolani CCW A S C - A C C J C Commission
 Kauai CCW A S C - A C C J C Commission
 Leeward CCW A S C - A C C J C Commission
 Maui CCW A S C - A C C J C Commission
 Windward CCW A S C - A C C J C Commission

Each U H Community College as well as the Office of the Vice President for Community Colleges prepared for the regular professional peer review that is part of the accreditation process for an institution. Campuses conducted rigorous self-appraisals in terms of the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges (A C C J C) Standards. Self-appraisal requires a conscious and self-reflective analysis of strengths and weaknesses and an examination of every aspect of institutional function against Commission Standards. The ultimate goal of accreditation is to help an institution improve attainment of its own mission—improving student learning and student achievement. The results of the appraisal, the institutional Self Study 2006, are posted on each college’s website.

Professional Accreditation
Nearly 50 University of Hawaii academic programs hold separate professional accreditation. These programs have been subjected to rigorous external reviews that ensure high standards of professional practice. As a result, the U H credentials conferred convey a special merit of quality within these specialized fields of study.

U H Manoa. At U H Manoa, 54 degree programs are accredited by 24 external professional accrediting organizations that examine the various programs every five to ten years. Among the accredited programs are law, medicine, nursing, architecture, accounting, business, travel industry management, social work, engineering, biosystems engineering, ocean engineering, journalism, chemistry, dental hygiene, dietetics, library and information studies, clinical psychology, audiology, speech-language pathology, education, counselor education, special education, rehabilitation counseling, medical technology, music, public health and epidemiology, and urban and regional planning. In addition, the Counseling and Student Development Center, the U H Manoa Children’s Center, and U H Manoa’s University Health Services are professionally accredited.

U H Hilo. The nursing and education programs at U H Hilo are accredited by National Professional Accrediting Organizations. The College of Business and Economics is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (A A C S B). The Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Eduation (A C P E) is currently reviewing the College of Pharmacy’s self-study report for pre-candidate status.

U H Community Colleges. More than twenty community college programs hold separate accreditation, including nursing, a variety of culinary programs at multiple campuses, aeronautics maintenance, automotive maintenance, cosmetology, dental assisting, fire science, motorcycle safety, legal assistant, medical assistant, medical lab technician, occupational therapy, physical therapy, radiologic technology, and respiratory care.

Academic Program Actions and U H Centers
The heart of the University is its instructional programs. Campuses routinely review established academic programs, as well as assess the need for new programs, make major modifications of curriculum, and update the names of departments and degrees.

During A Y 2005–2006, the Board of Regents

The U H administration

In all, 163 academic programs underwent review in this academic year.

In accordance with Board of Regents policy, instruction and research centers/institutes/academies and public services centers that serve external communities are reported on annually. During A Y 2004–2005, the University administration approved two new centers and closed one center. As of December 2005, the University of Hawaii housed 102 centers.

Institutional Assessment and Research
U H Manoa. U H Manoa’s assessment of student learning outcomes addresses W A S C accreditation standards and U H Manoa’s mission as a research university. Assessment is conducted by faculty and academic leaders in individual programs as a scholarly endeavor informed by data, comparative information with peer institutions, and other evidences of educational performance.

All U H Manoa departments are engaged in the regular assessment of their programs. Capstone, internships, theses, design projects, and other culminating course-based experiences are commonly used to assess student performance and learning. Assessment of U H Manoa’s general education program is led by U H Manoa’s General Education Committee and the Manoa Academic Assessment Council. Departmental assessment efforts are posted on U H Manoa’s assessment website. (www.hawaii.edu/assessment/uhm/)

U H Hilo. The U H Hilo Office of Institutional Research responds to priorities identified by the Faculty Congress General Education & Assessment Support Committees and routinely engages in institutional effectiveness and learning outcomes assessment efforts through: a) administering a robust schedule of semesterly, annual, biennial, quintennial, and ad hoc student, alumni, and community surveys; b) developing specialized studies and analyses–through use of system-generated archival reports and/or campus-level operational data–that serve as evidence for the evaluation and enhancement of academic programs, and student learning/developmental outcomes; and c) supporting campus strategic goal attainment through dissemination of results from these activities, and bringing discussion and analyses of findings to bear on campus academic and student affairs planning and policy discourses.

U H West Oahu. The Office of Assessment & Institutional Research maintains institutional data, tracks graduation/retention rates, conducts surveys, course evaluations, pre- and post-testing, and ad hoc reports for special projects.

Recent institutional research projects include: a survey of U H West Oahu alumni, course grade distribution analysis, and focus groups of graduating seniors in distance education programs. Ongoing data extraction projects meet campus needs such as program reviews, institutional planning, and accreditation.

The Writing Assessment Project (W A P) was initiated in spring 2006 to determine the effectiveness of the capstone experience (senior project/practicum) as a writing intensive course and to inform the efficacy of writing intensive courses in general.

In spring 2006, the U H West Oahu faculty senate renamed the Assessment Committee as the Educational Effectiveness Committee and broadened its scope to include accreditation and program review. This committee continues to formulate policy on the assessment of learning outcomes at the level of the concentration, division, and institution.

U H Community Colleges. Ongoing leadership and support of institutional effectiveness comes from the Office of the Vice President for Community Colleges and the Council of Community College Chancellors. Programs and activities that provide data to support assessment for institutional effectiveness include the community colleges’ Comprehensive Program Reviews, annual reviews of program data, annual Program Health Indicator reports and U H Community Colleges Fact Book, participation in the national Community College Survey of Student Engagement (C C S S E) as individual colleges and as a consortium, Strategic Planning Key Performance Indicators, and the analysis of the current course placement process and placement testing procedures.

The U H Community Colleges has conducted four workshops designed to help faculty, staff, and administrators develop a better understanding of the new A C C J C standards, assess existing policies and practices, and develop an action plan to meet the new A C C J C standards.

Individual colleges have been engaged in research and assessment at the institutional, program, and classroom level. The colleges support a wide range of faculty-led endeavors in classroom and student learning outcomes. Examples such as those at Kapiolani Community College can be found at http://quill.kcc.hawaii.edu/page/loa.html. Each college conducts a variety of college appropriate survey and assessment projects, comprehensive program reviews, and annual reviews of program data which are analyzed at the campus and system level.

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Distinctions and Achievements

The U H Manoa College of Business Administration received a generous $25 million gift from alumnus Jay H. Shidler, the largest single donation in U H’s history. The college has been renamed the Shidler College of Business in the donor’s honor.
Source: U H Manoa

U H Hilo ranked in the top five among liberal arts colleges for ethnic and racial diversity in the 2007 edition of America’s Best Colleges.
Source: U.S. News and World Report

A U H West Oahu alumnus (2002 Air Force R O T C and Anthropology) was granted the single slot open for the 2006 Air Force Forensic Science Advanced Degree Program at George Washington University’s Masters of Forensic Science Program. One of her recent cases for the Air Force Office of Special Investigations will appear this year on the popular television show, Forensic Files.
Source: U H West Oahu

Hawaii Community College sponsored the E Imi Pono (Best Practices) in Substance Abuse Treatment Conference in 2005 where internationally renowned experts in the addiction and criminal justice fields provided training for treatment providers and health professionals.
Source: Hawaii Community College

The School of Architecture has the first and only nationally accredited professional Architecture Doctorate degree in the country. The program was named one of the three most innovative in the U.S. by DesignIntelligence in 2004.
Source: U H Manoa

A student from Honolulu Community College is a 2006 recipient of the Jack Kent Cooke Scholarship, an award of up to $30,000 presented each year to only 25 community college students from around the country.
Source: Honolulu Community College

A Kapiolani Community College student was selected as one of 20 members of the U S A Today All-U S A Academic Team.
Source: Kapiolani Community College

The Environmental Law Program (E L P) at the William S. Richardson School of Law is the 2006 recipient of the prestigious American Bar Association Award for Distinguished Achievement in Environmental Law and Policy.
Source: U H Manoa

A 2006 U H Hilo history graduate won the Herbert F. Margulies Prize in American History for his paper “The Hessians in the American War of Independence.”
Source: U H Hilo

Kapiolani Community College was selected by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching as one of 14 colleges and universities nationally to assist in the development of a new elective classification of community engagement.
Source: Kapiolani Community College

The Kauai Community College chapter of the Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society for two-year colleges received a 2005 Pinnacle Silver Award for increasing chapter membership.
Source: Kauai Community College

U H Manoa’s School of Travel Industry Management is one of only two U.S. institutions out of 13 internationally-recognized tourism education schools included in the World’s Leading Tourist Programmes directory.
Source: U H Manoa

Leeward Community College’s student magazine, Harvest, won “First Place” award from the American Scholastic Association. This is the third time the publication has won a First Place award from a national association.
Source: Leeward Community College

A team of U H Hilo student delegates was honored at the 2006 National Model United Nations Conference in New York City. The team placed in the top ten percent among 289 schools.
Source: U H Hilo

The first four-year degree to be offered by a U H community college, the Bachelor of Applied Science in Applied Business and Information Technology at Maui Community College, was recognized as a candidate for accreditation by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges.
Source: Maui Community College

Two Leeward Community College students received the prestigious Monbugakusho Scholarship awarded to 22 students from the United States to study for three years in Japan.
Source: Leeward Community College

U H Hilo was selected to administer the Islands of Opportunity Alliance, a consortium of 19 public and private universities and colleges throughout the Pacific Island nations, that are committed to increasing the number of professional scientists among people from underrepresented minority groups.
Source: U H Hilo

U H Manoa’s law, education, international business, and library science graduate programs are recognized among the nation’s best in the 2007 edition of America’s Best Graduate Schools.
SourcE: U.S. News and World Report

A U H Manoa astronomer coordinated all Earth-based worldwide observations of NASA’s Deep Impact collision-with-a-comet program.
Source: U H Manoa

A Leeward Community College TV Production student won the National Television Academy of Arts and Sciences’s Shelly Fay Videography Scholarship. This is the eighth National Television Academy Scholarship that has been awarded to TV Production students since 1989.
Source: Leeward Ccommunity College

U H Manoa is one of the nation’s “best value” undergraduate institutions according to the 2006 edition of America’s Best Value Colleges.
Source: The Princeton Review

An engineering student won the 2005 Alton B. Zerby and Carl T. Koerner Outstanding Electrical and Computer Engineering Student Award. This award, given to the top engineering student in the nation, has been given to a U H Manoa student three out of the past five years.
Source: U H Manoa

Windward Community College’s newsletter, Malamalama o Koolau, has won the prestigious Paragon award from the National Council for Marketing and Public Relations, which recognizes excellence in communications among two-year colleges.
Source: Windward Community College

For the past two consecutive years, the Hawaii Tumor Registry at the Cancer Research Center of Hawaii was ranked first place and awarded the Data Quality Award from the National Cancer Institute. This award recognizes Hawaii’s tumor registry as the best in the country and, for all practical purposes, the best in the world.
Source: U H Manoa

A U H Hilo agriculture economics professor was selected from 200 applicants as one of 35 exhibitions for the 8th annual Food and Agricultural Science and Education Congressional Reception in Washington D C.
Source: U H Hilo

In terms of citations of scientific papers in astronomy, the Institute for Astronomy (I f A) is ranked second among the top 20 astronomy departments in the U.S. Four I f A researchers are listed among 249 of the world’s most cited and influential researchers in the space sciences.
Source: U H Manoa

According to Princeton Review’s 2006 Best Law School rankings, the William S. Richardson School of Law ranks second for Best Environment for Minority Students and fifth for Most Diverse Faculty.
Source: The Princeton Review

Local business leaders committed nearly $3 million to establish the Dan and Maggie Inouye Distinguished Chair in Democratic Ideals at U H Manoa. According to Walter A. Dods, Jr., Chairman of First Hawaiian Bank, “This distinguished chair will underscore the crucial elements of Senator Inouye’s unrivaled role in Hawaii and the nation.”
Source: U H Manoa

A Leeward Community College English instructor was recognized as a 2005 WebCT Exemplary Course Project recipient for her online Expository Writing course. This was one of six awards given internationally.
Source: Leeward Community College

In 2005, U H Manoa’s Air Force R O T C Detachment 175 won the High Flight Award for the Southwest Region. The U H unit beat out more than a dozen other medium-sized units in the region for the prestigious award that recognizes the unit with the highest level of excellence in a number of leadership categories.
Source: U H Manoa

An oceanographer and an astronomer from U H Manoa were elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2005 and 2006. Election to the Academy is considered one of the highest honors that can be accorded to a U.S. scientist or engineer.
Source: U H Manoa

The Honolulu Community College chapter of the Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society for two-year colleges, was named one of 25 “Distinguished Chapters” out of 1,200 chapters located at community and junior colleges across the United States, Canada, Germany, Micronesia, and Palau.
Source: Honolulu Community College

Three U H Manoa faculty members and an alumna have been named Living Treasures of Hawaii by the Honpa Hongwanji Mission of Hawaii for making a significant difference in improving the community.
Source: U H Manoa

Maui Community College received a $1 million gift from Dorvin and Betty Leis, the largest gift received by the campus to date, to advance sustainability initiatives.
Source: Maui Community College

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Acknowledgements

The University of Hawaii Council of Chief Academic Officers (C C A O) provided overall direction for this project. The 2006–2007 Chief Academic Officers are:

Neal Smatresk, U H Manoa
Stephen Hora, U H Hilo
Stephen Sylvester, U H West Oahu
Doug Dykstra, Hawaii Community College
Sharon Ota, Honolulu Community College
Louise Pagotto, Kapiolani Community College
Ramona Kincaid, Kauai Community College
James Goodman, Leeward Community College
Suzette Robinson, Maui Community College
Linka Corbin-Mullikin, Windward Community College

This report was prepared under the guidance of the Vice President for Academic Planning and Policy. Sandra Furuto of the Office of Academic Planning and Policy and members of her staff—Stephan Doi, Chatney Graham, and Ashley Kitabayashi—took lead responsibility for the document preparation. Sharyn Nakamoto and the Institutional Research staff provided management data and analyses. The following campus/system representatives provided data and analyses and worked collaboratively with us in shaping this report: Helene Sokugawa, U H Manoa; Brendan Hennessey, U H Hilo; Lynn Inoshita, U H West Oahu; Cheryl Chappell-Long and Sam Prather, U H Vice President for Community Colleges. Numerous other individuals from campus and system offices also provided data and assistance. The Office of Creative Services provided inside cover map graphic and campus photos. Cover photograph was provided by Monte Costa, courtesy of the Polynesian Voyaging Society. We extend our appreciation to all contributors and advisers.

Linda K. Johnsrud
Vice President for Academic Planning and Policy

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