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Class of 2011

Picture of CarolineCaroline Bark
Caroline's email

M.A. Thesis: A Commentary on the 1791 Journal of Manuel Quimper Benitez del Pino

For her Master's thesis, Caroline translated and commented on a 1791 Spanish visitor's account about Hawai‘i. She explored the ways in which Hawaiians and foreigners skillfully dealt with unfamiliar ideas and behaviors in order to obtain desired goods. Caroline plans to continue studying Hawaiian history and cross-cultural experiences, but through a more hands-on avenue. She aspires to use her Master's degree on the Polynesian Voyaging Society's World Wide Voyage (2013) to help facilitate respectful, knowledgeable, and lasting relationships with other people around the world. Caroline currently works at Ho'ala School in Wahiawa as a middle school Language Arts and Science teacher.

Picture of Maria Maria Gellatly
Maria's e-mail

M.A. Thesis: Beyond the Khalsa Panth: Recognizing Diversity in the Sikh Community

Maria studied Indian religions, specifically Sikhism and diversity in Sikh practices. Her M.A. thesis examined the construction of the academic presentation of the Sikh community and focused on the recognition of non-Khalsa groups within the Sikh Panth. She currently lives in Honolulu and is considering continuing her research through field work and Ph.D. studies.

Picture of LaraLara Magnabosco
Lara's e-mail

After spending two wonderful years at UHM exploring World Religions, Lara is now attending Indiana University School of Medicine. In Hawai‘i, her experiences, both in and out of the classroom, solidified her resolve to pursue geriatrics. She plans to combine her Master's studies and future medical school education to provide a culturally-collaborative approach to healthcare that supports seniors as they age so they can live their lives to the fullest.

Picture of Josh Joshua Urich
Josh's e-mail

M.A. Thesis: Understanding the American Buddhist

During his time at the University of Hawai‘i, Josh studied Buddhism in America. Specifically, he examined how Asian Buddhist teachers tailored their messages for American audiences. He plans to spend a year teaching and working on languages, after which he will enter a Ph.D. program.

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