IN THIS ISSUE (No.9)


PUBLISHED REPORTS

 

Melody Actouka & Morris Lai. 1989. Project Holopono, Evaluation report, 1987-1988. Honolulu: Curriculum Research and Development Group, College of Education, University of Hawai‘i.

Project Holopono [‘success’] was carried out in Hawai‘i from 1984 to 1988. It involved approximately 300 students of limited English proficiency in grades 4 to 6 in 8 schools, half of them speakers of Hawai‘i Creole English (HCE). The program consisted of 150 hours per week of instruction time, including some awareness activities, such as contrasting features of HCE and standard English and emphasizing appropriate contexts for each. An evaluation of the final year of the project showed an increase in oral English proficiency among 84% of the students, but no significant gains in reading proficiency (despite teachers’ claims to the contrary).

Lorna B. Afaga and Morris K. Lai. 1994. Project Akamai, Evaluation report, 1992-93, Year Four. Honolulu: Curriculum Research and Development Group, College of Education, University of Hawai‘i.

Also in Hawai‘i, Project Akamai [‘smart’] ran from 1989 to 1993. This program was aimed at more than 600 HCE speakers in grades 9 and 10 in 11 schools. It involved some contrastive awareness activities as well as the use of local literature containing HCE. An evaluation of the final year of the project showed increases of between 35% and 40% on tests of standard English use and oral language skills.

Northern Territory Department of Education. 1997. Annual Reports from specialist staff in bilingual programs in Northern Territory schools, 1995. Darwin: Northern Territory Department of Education.

A report on the Kriol/English bilingual program at the Barunga Community Educa-tion Centre appears on pp.16-18. It includes sections on curriculum development, teaching of literacy, staff and school development, and literature (and video) production.

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