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Professor Emeritus / Recently Retired

Hudson

Thom Hudson
Emeritus Professor

PhD, University of California Los Angeles

tdhat symbolhawaii.edu
http://thomhudsonblog.wordpress.com/

Thom Hudson is Professor Emeritus of Second Language Studies at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, and co-editor of the electronic journal Reading in a Foreign Language.  Dr. Hudson received his B.S. degree in sociology at the University of California at Berkeley, MA degree in TESOL and Ph.D. in Applied Linguistics at the University of California at Los Angeles. He has lived and taught in the U.S., Egypt, Mexico, and Japan.

Dr. Hudson’s research has concentrated on second language testing, reading, language for specific purposes, and curriculum and program development, with a long-term interest in criterion-referenced testing.

Robert Bley-Vroman

Emeritus Professor

PhD, University of Washington

vromanat symbolhawaii.edu

Robert Bley-Vroman received his MA in Germanics and his MA and PhD in linguistics from the University of Washington. He concluded his employment at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa as chancellor before briefly returning to the faculty in fall 2017.

Dr. Bley-Vroman’s research has concentrated on applied linguistics, syntax, and second language acquisition theory. His most influential papers are “The logical problem of foreign language learning” and “The comparative fallacy in interlanguage studies.” His latest research interest concerns the relationship between pitch in linguistics and perfect pitch in music.

Recently Retired

Brown

JD Brown

Professor

PhD, University of California Los Angeles

brownjat symbolhawaii.edu
https://sites.google.com/site/jdbrownshome/home

JD has spoken and taught courses in more than forty countries ranging from Brazil to Yugoslavia. He has also authored or co-authored a number of books and published numerous journal articles and book chapters (on wide-ranging topics including language curriculum development, language testing, language testing in Japan, testing L2 pragmatics, performance testing, criterion-referenced language testing, ideas for classroom assessment, using surveys in language programs, doing quantitative and qualitative research, connected speech, quantitative research methods, mixed methods research, and heritage language curriculum).

Areas of Expertise:

  • Language Testing
  • Language Curriculum Development
  • Language Program Evaluation
  • Quantitative Research Methods
  • Mixed-Methods Research
  • Connected Speech

Selected Publications:

Brown, J. D. (2017). Developing and using rubrics in language classroom assessment. Proceedings of the 2017 PKETA International Conference: Future perspectives on English language education. Pan-Korea English Teachers Association and Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, Korea.

Brown, J. D. (2017). Forty years of doing second language testing, curriculum, and research: So what? Language Teaching, 50(2), pp. 276–289.

Brown, J. D. (2017). Test review of the Comprehensive Receptive and Expressive Vocabulary Test (3rd ed.) [CREVT-3]. In J. F. Carlson, K. F. Geisinger, & J. L. Jonson (Eds.), The Twentieth Mental Measurements Yearbook (pp. 219–221). The Buros Institute of Mental Measurements, Lincoln, Nebraska: University of Nebraska Press.

Brown, J. D. (2017). Test review of the International Teaching Assistant Speaking Assessment [ITASA]. In J. F. Carlson, K. F. Geisinger, & J. L. Jonson (Eds.), The Twentieth Mental Measurements Yearbook (pp. 413–415). The Buros Institute of Mental Measurements, Lincoln, Nebraska: University of Nebraska Press.

Brown, J. D., & Trace, J. (2017). Classroom assessment. In E. Hinkel (Ed.), Handbook of research in second language teaching and learning: Volume III (pp. 490–505). New York: Routledge.

Trace, J., Brown, J. D., Janssen, G., & Kozhevnikova, L. (2017). Determining cloze item difficulty from item and passage characteristics across learner backgrounds. Language Testing, 33(1), 151–174.

Kathryn A. Davis
Professor

PhD, Stanford University
Kathryn A. Davis’ research interests have included exploration of language and identity, transnational linguistic flows, new literacies/multi-media technology, and community, school, and university collaborations.