Spring 2014

(Schedule updated November 22, 2013; subject to change)

302 (1) Second Language Learning MWF

 9:30-10:20

staff KUY 304
302 (2) Second Language Learning TR

10:30-11:45

staff M 109
302 (3) Second Language Learning MWF

  8:30-9:20

staff M 207
303 (1) Second Language Teaching MWF

  8:30-9:20

staff M 120
303 (2) Second Language Teaching TR

 9:00-10:15

staff M 207
303 (3) Second Language Teaching MWF

11:30-12:20

staff WAT 113
312 (1) Techniques in SL Teaching: Reading & Writing MWF

10:30-11:20

Gilliland M 202
380 (1) Bilingual Education MWF

 9:30-10:20

staff KUY 303
418 (1) Instructional Media TR

1:30-2:45

Zheng M 107
430 (1) Pidgin and Creole English in Hawai‘i MWF

11:30-12:20

Sakoda KUY 304
441 (1) Language Concepts for SL Learning & Teaching TR

9:00-10:15

staff M 105
441 (2) Language Concepts for SL Learning & Teaching MW

 9:30-10:45

Schwartz M 107
460 (1) English Phonology MWF

11:30-12:20

staff KUY 308
480N (1) Topics in SL Analysis: TBA MWF

10:30-11:20

staff SAK C301
480P (1) Topics in SL Pedagogy: TBA TR

10:30-11:45

staff SAK C301
480U (1) Topics in SL Use: Communicative & Interactional Competence MWF

1:30-2:20

Burch M 227
485 (1) Professionalism in SLS TR

  1:30-2:45

Harsch M 228
490 (1) SL Testing MWF

  8:30-9:20

staff M 112
612 (1) Alternative Approaches to SL Teaching W

3:00-5:50

Day M 102
613 (1) SL Listening & Speaking TR

  1:30-2:45

Brown M 120
620 (1) SL Reading MW

1:30-2:45

Hudson M 102
630 (1) Language Program Development TR

3:00-4:15

Brown M 107
650 (1) SL Acquisition MW

1:30-2:45

Ziegler SAK B103
660 (1) Sociolinguistics & SL TR

1:30-2:45

Higgins M 227
670 (1) SL Quantitative Research MW

9:30-10:45

Hudson M 102
680N (1) SL Analysis: Generative Approaches to L2 (Morpho)syntax W

3:00-5:50

Schwartz M 111
680P (1) SL Pedagogy: SL Program Administration W

3:00-5:50

Crookes M 109
680P (2) SL Pedagogy: Tasks, Activities, & Learning Environments T

 3:00-5:50

Zheng M 102
680P (3) SL Pedagogy: Pedagogical Grammar MW

11:00-12:15

Ziegler M 107
730 (1) Seminar in SL Education: SL Teacher Education & Development F

9:30-12:20

Day M 107
730 (2) Seminar in SL Education: Adolescent & Adult SL Academic Literacy in U.S. Contexts M

3:00-5:50

Gilliland M 105
750 (1) Seminar in SL Acquisition: Eyetracking Methods in Language Research F

9:30-12:20

Grüter M 206
750 (2) Seminar in SL Acquisition: Conversation Analysis & SLA T

3:00-5:50

Kasper M 117

Course Descriptions

SLS312 (1). Techniques in Second Language Teaching: Reading & Writing. Gilliland
This course is an overview of the theoretical and practical issues involved in the teaching of second or foreign language (L2) reading and writing. The theoretical aspects of the course are integrated with empirical research findings as well as practical concerns and experiences including observation, classroom techniques, and material design. The goals of the course include providing students with opportunities to evaluate materials; to prepare lesson plans and activities; and to observe L2 reading and writing lessons in L2 classrooms.

SLS 418 (1). Instructional Media. Zheng
A wide range of emerging technologies for learning will be explored in this course. The premises of hands-on labs and understanding the affordances of different technologies for learning and language use have to be grounded with solid pedagogies, theories of second language development and acquisition, as well as human learning and development theories. Therefore, online and face-to-face discussions and hands-on experiential learning are integrated with learner’s needs, current best practices, and theoretical foundations. Students are expected to co-build the class blog site [http://sls.hawaii.edu/~zhengd/blog/] with useful resources. The blog site will also a serve as a community portal for prolonged participation.
After completion of the course, students are expected to:
1. Be aware of emergent technologies available for educational purposes.
2. Make use of technologies for their daily learning, teaching, and research activities.
3. Understand the rationale of each technology use.
4. Understand the relationship between technology use and L2 literacy development.
5. Critically evaluate emerging technologies for language use.
6. Evaluate learning outcomes with technologies.

SLS 430 (1). Pidgin and Creole English in Hawai‘i. Sakoda
This course provides a general understanding of the sociohistorical background and linguistic structure of both Hawai‘i Pidgin English (HPE) and Hawai‘i Creole English (HCE). The main concepts covered include the major historical, descriptive, and pedagogical aspects of English in Hawai‘i; pidgin and creole languages; linguistic change; and language variation. The course also addresses the question of language attitudes, language education, and literary heritage. Present-day attitudes in the school system and community toward HCE receive particular attention. Students will work with actual language data, and laboratory work is required.
Prerequisite: SLS 302, Ling 102, or graduate standing

SLS 441 (2). Language Concepts for Second Language Learning and Teaching. Schwartz
This course is an introduction to the study of language, with particular attention to the structure of English. It will examine the component parts of language; namely, phonetics and phonology (the sound system), morphology (the internal structure of words), syntax (the structure of phrases and sentences), and semantics and pragmatics (meaning), as well as touch on other linguistic topics (e.g., language typology, first language acquisition, etc.). While emphasis will be given to the structure of English, especially its morphosyntax, data from other languages will also be examined. The overall goals are: (a) to become familiar with the key concepts and terminology needed to describe and analyze language; (b) to gain a basic understanding of the way language works; (c) to appreciate how languages differ (and how they’re the same); and (d) to help in the reading of the primary (second language acquisition) literature.
The course will be a combination of assigned readings, lectures, exercises, group discussions, and small group projects. No prior knowledge of linguistics or language description is assumed.

SLS 480U (1). Communicative and Interactional Competence. Burch
This course explores the competencies (knowledge and abilities) first and second language users need in order to interact and communicate. Topics include grammatical, strategic, pragmatic, nonverbal, and technological competencies, among others.
Regular assignments include reading articles and discussing their implications, and students will be required to lead discussions twice during the semester. Students will also submit weekly reading reflections and teaching ideas. The midterm consists of transcription and analysis of natural interaction. For the final, students can choose between (1) a 10-page research paper; or (2) a portfolio including 5 lesson plans designed as a unit, including all materials, an assessment measure, and rationales based upon the course readings.
No textbook. Selected readings provided on Laulima.
Prerequisites: SLS 302 and SLS 303. SLS 313, SLS 380, SLS 441 and/or SLS 460 are not prerequisites, but are strongly encouraged.

SLS 485 (1). Professionalism in Second Language Studies. Harsch
Through this capstone course for the SLS bachelor’s degree, students reflect upon their learning and accomplishments throughout the pursuit of their degrees, become acquainted with diverse concepts of and approaches to professionalism in the field, and formally compile a professional portfolio. Evidence of learning and accomplishments will include academic writing; presentations; artifacts and reflections on teaching, service, and research experiences; and professional development experiences. Expanding from these initial items, students create important elements of their portfolios—including curricula vitae, statements of professional philosophy (often, but not limited to, philosophy of teaching), cover letters, instructional materials, research papers/presentations, websites, and so on—and conduct information searches in fields and locations for future employment or graduate study. All portfolios will be formally presented to the Department of SLS, as well as within the class.
Requisite: Spring or Summer 2014 graduation and BA in SLS major; or consent, if space is available

SLS 612 (1). Alternative Approaches to Second Language Teaching. Day
This course aims to develop a theoretical understanding of and practical experience with a variety of approaches to learning and teaching a second or foreign language. Depending on class interest, there could be sessions on such approaches as Cooperative Language Learning, the Lexical Approach, Neurolinguistic Programming, Comprehension Approach, Total Physical Response, Critical Pedagogy, CALL and technology, drama and music, content-based education, literature, and Natural Approach.
Using a workshop format, students will examine the approaches from both an instructor’s and a learner’s viewpoint, which allows participants to critique the approaches and to assess their applicability to L2 instruction at various levels and contexts.
Students who complete this course will be able to:
• Discuss a number of different approaches to learning and teaching an L2.
• Evaluate the strengths and weakness of the different approaches.
• Design, conduct, and evaluate a workshop on an approach.

SLS 613 (1). Second Language Listening and Speaking. Brown
This course will examine the procedures used in designing, implementing, and assessing the instruction of listening and speaking skills in EFL. Based on a comprehensive overview of the practical aspects of organizing and conducting a listening/speaking course, it will also provide a bridge from research and theory to classroom practice in spoken discourse, pronunciation, and listening comprehension. To those ends, the course will cover: the many forms of spoken discourse in English and how these contrast with forms of written discourse; existing methods and materials for teaching speaking and listening skills, including pronunciation, suprasegmentals, and paralinguistic features; techniques for planning lessons, designing curriculum, and selecting materials for the teaching of speaking and listening skills; techniques for creating original curriculum and materials for listening and speaking; techniques for presenting demonstrations and giving feedback on methods and materials for listening and speaking; and techniques for testing the speaking and listening skills.
No textbook. Selected readings to be assigned throughout course.

SLS 620 (1). Second Language Reading. Hudson
SLS 620 is a survey of research in second language reading processes and of methodologies in its teaching. The theoretical aspects of the course will be integrated with practical concerns of classroom techniques, materials development, and evaluation. The course is organized around lectures, group discussions, practical activities, and student presentations.
Students will:
• Obtain a detailed knowledge of the theoretical issues involved in the reading process and the teaching of reading in S/FL settings.
• Have opportunities to develop and evaluate reading materials.
• Experience conducting reading research.
Required text: Hudson, T. (2007). Teaching Second Language Reading. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Additional readings assigned throughout the course.
*Please order textbook through addall.com, Amazon.com, or other online source.
Prerequisite: SLS 600 or consent

SLS 630 (1). Language Program Development. Brown
An examination of procedures used in designing, implementing, and evaluating language programs, this course will survey key issues in language curriculum development, introduce students to a systems-based approach to program and curriculum development, and provide opportunities for practical experience in developing language curriculum. To those ends, we will cover: (a) the history of curriculum design in language programs; (b) the systems approach to language curriculum design, implementation, and maintenance; (c) language needs analysis, (d) goals and objectives for language programs; (e) language testing for norm-referenced and criterion-referenced purposes; (f) choosing, adapting, and creating language materials for a specific program; (g) teaching in a systems approach language curriculum; and (h) evaluation at the program level for improvement and maintenance of curriculum.
Required text: Brown, J.D. (1995). The elements of language curriculum: A systematic approach to program development. Boston: Heinle & Heinle.
Selected recent readings to supplement the textbook.

SLS 650 (1). Second Language Acquisition. Ziegler
This course is designed to provide a review of current theory and research in child and adult second language acquisition. In addition, it will review relevant research in first language acquisition and explore relationships between theory and practice in the second and foreign language learning classroom. Various theoretical perspectives and issues are addressed, including cognitive-interactionist, emergentist, social, and psycholinguistic approaches, and principal areas of research such as age effects, cognition, development of learner language, and individual differences will be discussed. We will also examine the available quantitative and qualitative research methods and how they might be used in second language (L2) research.
Suggested reading: Ortega, L. (2009). Understanding second language acquisition. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

SLS 660 (1). Sociolinguistics and Second Languages. Higgins
This course introduces basic concepts, findings, issues and research methods in sociolinguistics as they relate to using, learning and teaching additional languages. The first part of the course focuses on macrosociolinguistics and includes the topics of language variation, language policy and planning, bilingual education, and language rights. The second part of the course focuses on microsociolinguistics, which involves the use of empirical data to analyze multilingual learners and users.  The topics addressed for the second part of the course include social identities, language socialization, and questions of culture. Students will learn about some key methods in sociolinguistics, including linguistic landscape analysis, interactional sociolinguistics, and narrative analysis.  The course will require extensive reading and discussions, class presentations, and a final course paper.
Required text: Course packet available on Laulima
Recommended text: Hornberger, N. & McKay, S. (eds.). 2010. Sociolinguistics and language education. Bristol: Multilingual Matters.

SLS 670 (1). Second Language Quantitative Research. Hudson
SLS 670 introduces basic design, analysis, and inference procedures in second language quantitative research. The course addresses a range of topics critical to the accurate and ethical use of quantitative methods in L2 studies: (a) the purposes and roles of research; (b) the generation of research questions; (c) study design strategies for gathering, organizing, and analyzing quantitative data; (d) critical reading of research reports; and (e) current concerns with the use of statistical significance testing, the role to be played by power analysis, effect sizes, and confidence intervals.
Students will:
• Understand purposes and types of second language quantitative research.
• Learn components of research design and study reporting.
• Understand statistical inference.
• Recognize threats to validity of interpretation of statistical studies.
Required text: Selected readings.
Prerequisites: SLS 490 and graduate standing; or consent

SLS 680N (1). Generative Approaches to L2 (Morpho)syntax. Schwartz
A growing body of research ties together current linguistic theory and nonnative language (L2) acquisition. The overall goal of this type of research (in which the focus on syntax far surpasses all other domains) is to create a conceptually and empirically well-grounded theory of L2 acquisition of grammar. The aims of this course are to become familiar with some current work on theoretical approaches to L2 acquisition whose underpinnings stem from (generative) linguistic theory. We will closely examine conceptual and empirical research that speaks to issues relevant to such approaches. In general, although we will concentrate on L2 acquisition (with comparisons to native language acquisition) from within one particular theory of syntax, namely, the Principles and Parameters (P&P) framework of Universal Grammar, it is also expected that other topics on L2 acquisition of interest to the class will be touched on.
The course will be a combination of lectures and student presentations of readings. While familiarity with introductory syntax is highly desirable, time will be taken in class to ensure understanding of the necessary linguistic background. A data-based term paper will be required.
Required texts: White, Lydia. 2003. Second Language Acquisition and Universal Grammar. New York: Cambridge University Press.
Selected readings to be provided.

SLS 680P (1). Second Language Program Administration. Crookes
This course provides an introduction to second and foreign language program administration theory and practice. Upon completion of this course, participants will have developed or updated their knowledge of the formal literature of program administration and improved their command of the skills and practices involved in developing and running a second or foreign language program.
Topics include the following:
1. Organizational theory
2. Leadership theories
3. Program development: planning, evaluation, and innovation
4. Financial administration (budgets)
5. Human resource development/personnel: recruitment, supervision, assessment, and community building
6. Other administrative responsibilities (student services, marketing, communication, conflict resolution)
No required text. Online course packet to be used.

SLS 680P (2). Tasks, Activities, and Learning Environments. Zheng
This course addresses new understandings of learning as they apply to second language instruction and instruction in general; namely, embodied learning, joint coordinated action, and dialogical approaches to instruction. One part of the course will focus on current literature in New (Media) Literacies, Computer-Supported Learning Environments, Ecological Linguistics, Activity Theory, and Distributed Cognition; the other will focus on literature and class projects related to designing second language learning or general learning tasks, activities, and learning environments. Students will be equipped with cutting-edge understandings of theory and practice and apply them to the design and implementation of practical class activities and learning tasks suitable for in-person and on-line learning environments.
Organized in the format of a seminar, course participants will read 10–15 critical articles that can shape their new understandings of the distributed, dialogical, and ecological approaches to language. Participants are encouraged to bring in their own readings and experiences to make meanings of these new approaches and to create new concepts and designs for second language learning, and learning in general.
The goal of the final project is to contextualize our understanding of the new approaches to cognition and language, which will provide an opportunity to critically evaluate what is important for learning, teaching, design, and humanity, in addition to traditional constructs. It can be in one of the following formats:
1. A curricular unit for classroom and/or computer-assisted learning settings
2. A concept paper

SLS 680P (3). Pedagogical Grammar. Ziegler
This course will introduce participants to issues at the core of describing, learning, and teaching second language grammars. The aims of the course are to: (a) examine particular grammatical features in terms of their forms, meanings, and use; (b) explore potential difficulties involved in learning L2 grammars; and (c) consider the different ways in which teachers may help develop their learners’ ability to use L2 grammatical features. The course will be informed by insights from linguistic theory and description, SLA research, L2 pedagogy, and participants’ own experience of learning and teaching grammar.
Suggested readings: Biber, D., Conrad, S., & Leech, G. (2002). Longman student grammar of spoken and written English. Harlow: Pearson Education Limited.
Celce-Murcia, M., & Larsen-Freeman, D. (1999). The grammar book: An ESL/EFL teachers’ course (2nd ed.). Boston: Heinle & Heinle.

SLS 730 (1). Seminar in SL Education: Second Language Teacher Education and Development. Day
This seminar deals with critical issues and approaches in second language teacher education and development. The goals are to familiarize students with the critical issues and to fulfill their expectations. By the end of the seminar, students will be able to critique and discuss the major issues in L2 teacher education and development and to research and present a topic on L2 teacher education and development.
A needs analysis will be conducted after the initial registration period for Spring 2014. Based on the results, additional learning outcomes will be developed, as well as a first draft of possible topics and requirements. The final determination of outcomes, topics, and requirements will be negotiated during the first week of the semester.

SLS 730 (2). Seminar in SL Education: Adolescent and Adult Second Language Academic Literacy in U.S. Contexts. Gilliland
In this class, we will examine theories and definitions of academic language and literacies (broadly construed) for the schooling of adolescent and adult second language learners. Readings cover studies of language socialization and classroom language use as they relate to the acquisition and use of the language of schooling. We will examine educational policies that shape these students’ academic trajectories and discuss pedagogical implications for teachers of adolescent and adult learners in ESL and mainstream classrooms. We will also engage in qualitative research methods (participant observation, discourse analysis, and document analysis) to collect and analyze classroom language and literacy data and to analyze learners’ experiences and contextual issues. While the assigned readings primarily focus on English as the medium of instruction in U.S. schools, this course is intended for students interested in adolescent and adult academic second language development in many different contexts.
Required text: Dyson, A. H., & Genishi, C. (2005). On the case: Approaches to language and literacy research. New York: Teachers College Press.
Suggested readings: Additional readings will be provided on Laulima.
Prerequisite: SLS 600

SLS 750 (1). Seminar in SL Acquisition: Eyetracking Methods in Language Research. Grüter
Cross-listed with Ling 750Y. Psycholinguistics Seminar: Eyetracking Methods in Language Research. Schafer
This seminar will examine the use of freehead eyetracking in language research and provide an introduction to eyetracking research methods. Our focus will be on the visual world paradigm, with briefer coverage of “do-it-yourself (DIY)” eyetracking and eyetracking while reading. Most readings and discussions will be oriented to psycholinguistic research (including native and nonnative, child and adult processing at the sentence and discourse levels), but students may also explore applications of eyetracking to other areas of linguistic and second language research. Some background in psycholinguistics will be assumed. The seminar will include hands-on work with an SMI 250 eyetracking system as well as discussion of eyetracking research presented in articles that we will read.
Readings: A collection of journal articles and chapters.
Prerequisite: SLS 673, Ling 640Y, or consent of the instructor

SLS 750 (2). Seminar in SL Acquisition: Conversation Analysis and Second Language Acquisition. Kasper
The seminar will examine recent advancements in the application of conversation analysis (CA) to second language learning and development. Starting with a capsule review of CA’s conceptual premises, the structure of interaction, CA’s perspective on psychological and social context, and CA’s analytical principles and practices, the seminar will address the following themes: (1) young children’s interaction and development of interactional competencies in their first language; (2) learning as a social practice in adult L2 speakers’ activities inside and outside of classrooms; (3) the development of interactional competencies over time, with attention to changes in practices and use of resources in the short term and over extended periods of observation; (4) methodological issues of comparison and comparability among cases in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies; (5) classic SLA topics such as planning, motivation, avoidance, attitudes, noticing, focus on form, and the ZPD as participant concerns.
Coursework will include reviews of research reports and data sessions. For their final projects, students may choose between leading a seminar session and a standard research report of a study on the seminar topic. Students are encouraged to work on projects that are under way or develop a new study.
No textbook. All course materials will be available on Laulima.

 

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