Number XXX

SLS Letter

Volume XXX

Winter 1999-2000

NOTES FROM THE DEPARTMENT CHAIR

Fall 1999 has been a semester of transition and new beginnings for the Department of ESL. Ricky Jacobs, chair of the department since 1994, was appointed Interim Dean of the College of Languages, Linguistics and Literature in September. Robert Bley-Vroman is the new chair. We will miss Ricky’s vigorous leadership, but we are happy to have someone in the dean’s office who understands ESL from the inside out. As dean, Ricky has had to deal with the serious consequences of ongoing budget cuts at UH. The college struggles to stay afloat financially, even though our programs remain strong. Within ESL, the effects of the crisis have been felt primarily in the increasing difficulty of providing reliable support for graduate students. Too often, students are forced to wait until the last minute to discover whether one of the decreasing number of tuition waivers or GA-ships is available. These problems in support have been mitigated somewhat by your generous support to the Ruth Crymes Scholarship Fund (especially to the Rickard Fellowships). Our students have also been beneficiaries of the Charlene Sato Memorial Fund, to which many graduates have contributed.

Not only do we have a new chair and a new dean, we also expect soon to have a new name. In December, the department voted to change its name to the Department of Second Language Studies. This change will not affect the name of any of the degrees which we administer. The department will still grant an MA in English as a Second Language. This new department name will better reflect the range of interests and activities of our students and faculty, and keeping the degree names unchanged reflects our continuing commitment to graduate education in ESL and gives our graduates easily recognized and well-accepted degrees.

To add to this catalog of new developments, I’m happy to announce that the department has proposed a new graduate program. Starting in fall 2000, we hope to begin offering an advanced graduate certificate in second language studies. In order to apply for the certificate program, you must already have an MA or a Ph.D. in ESL, applied linguistics, or a related field or you must be working toward such a degree. The course of study will be fifteen units and typically last one year. We expect that the course will appeal to students who wish to update their knowledge–perhaps some of our own graduates–as well as experts in other areas who need the additional specialization or advanced training which our department can provide in the areas of second language research and practice.

This year, we enthusiastically welcome Catherine Doughty to our department. Dr. Doughty brings us important expertise in applied psycholinguistics and language teaching and technology.

The department was saddened by the death in late October of long-time ELI secretary Marilyn Mitobe. Marilyn had retired and was battling cancer, but as late as a few weeks before her death, she was in our office part-time, valiantly helping out. We will miss her energy, her skill, and her unceasing good humor.

As you know, our head secretary, Naomi Hirata, was seriously injured in an automobile accident last year. She continues to recuperate slowly at home. While she is looking much better, we expect it will be a long time before she returns; certainly we do not expect to see her back this academic year. With a newly constituted temporary secretarial staff and a new chair, there is a great deal of blind-leading-the-blind going on, but we muddle through with a lot of help from our friends.

The department remains strong. Applications to our programs are as numerous as ever; the students are great. The university noted in its June 1999 benchmark report that the Department of ESL was the leading program nationally and internationally in its field. It should have said as well that the department’s renown is to a very great extent a reflection of the accomplishments of our graduates. So, to you we send our gratitude and our best wishes for 2000.

Robert Bley-Vroman, Chair

May 1999 Graduates:

MA: Yasuhiro Akiyama, Scott Elwood Bingham, Mary Catherine Harrison, Eric Keith Hauser, Lori Saori Higashi, Maris Lynn Ho, Yoshimitsu Kudo, Xiaoxia Li, Noriko Maegawa, Kimberly Ann Neizgoda, Jim Kei Yoshioka

August 1999 Graduates:

MA: Asako Mezawa

December 1999 Graduates:

MA: Miran Ahn, Hae-Jin Min, Sun Lee, Yawen Chuang, Lisa Harada, Siwon Park

Ph.D.: Margaret Dufon

 

Graduate Programs

In last year’s comments, I referred to “heavy registration in our courses,” but little did I realize at the time what the facts were. As we prepared our summary statement for the program review that we presented to the Council on Program Reviews, a tabulation of enrollments in graduate programs across the campus proved surprising: whereas about two years ago, our graduate programs had been ranked in fourth place in student semester hours (behind psychology and political science, for example), we found that in the past two years we had risen much higher, while other programs experienced a major dive in enrollments. ESL has overtaken all of these, maintaining the highest graduate enrollments in Arts & Sciences for two years running, higher even than all the graduate enrollments in programs such as the School of Architecture, the School of Hawaiian, Asian, and Pacific Studies, the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, and about equal with all of the School of Ocean and Earth Sciences and Technology. At the same time, our graduate faculty FTE to student ratio was about double and even triple that of these other units.

With this wonderful news in hand, representing both productivity (income) and efficiency, we presented the case for our programs, especially for the permanent status of the Ph.D. in SLA program. However, although I stated last year that the “final meetings and expected approvals ” were scheduled for spring, they did not materialize. After an early meeting with the committee, nothing more happened, and we now find, a full year later, that the final step in approval may happen at last this spring. After 11 years in existence! Of course, if they needed a new football coach….

A speedier response has occurred with our proposal for an advanced graduate certificate in second language studies. The proposal was sent through in May, and the graduate council has already approved it. It now must pass through the faculty senate and the vice president’s office before final approvals. If all goes well, we could begin to admit students to this degree next academic year, perhaps by spring, 2001. The certificate will involve two semesters of study (15 credits), although prior or concurrent MA work at UH may double count for some of these. The intention is to provide advanced training in L2 research issues for holders of MA degrees, possibly PhDs, typically in other areas, but also possibly as an advanced degree beyond the MA in ESL or applied linguistics. A wide range of courses, as usual, is offered, along with supervision on a research paper similar to the MA scholarly paper. Spread the word, and write if you are interested.

MA program. Following a very active year and many graduations last spring and summer, a new group of 31 MA students entered this past fall, 1999. They are as usual a highly diverse group, with broad experience and background from everywhere (e.g. all over the U.S., Portugal, Italy, Thailand, China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Vietnam, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, and the Philippines). Several are already involved in teaching in the HELP program. It appears that the process of fall-only admissions is going to work very well.

The graduate faculty decided on one major change in the MA program last spring: to abolish the second language learning ‘seminar’ requirement. Over the years, this one-evening meeting had been problematic for some students, as it was confused with additional requirements for courses, and was only to be attended after the course requirement was completed. We have of course kept the requirement of a substantial L2 learning experience.

Ph.D. program. This past year has seen significant progress in the programs of several of our doctoral students. Peggy Dufon completed her analysis of pragmatic development in L2 Indonesian and has graduated this fall. Both Hae-Young Kim and Lourdes Ortega successfully defended their dissertations this fall, on L2 Korean development of article use and NP reference, and on L2 Spanish developmental measures, especially relative clauses. Finally, both John Norris, working on L2 German testing, and Yuichi Watanabe, working on tasks for the assessment of L2 writing, have passed their comprehensive exams and moved into the dissertation writing stage. We see in these recent groundbreaking studies the strong tendency of our program to expand into other L2 research than just ESL/EFL.

Among many other achievements of these outstanding graduates or soon-to-graduate, a forthcoming publication by Norris & Ortega deserves special mention. Their extensive meta-analysis of the effects of form-focused instruction on SLA has been accepted for publication in the fall, 2000, issue of Language Learning–it will surely take the record for the longest article ever to appear in the journal, besides gain notoriety for its findings, and its application of a well known methodology that has not appeared heretofore in applied linguistics.

Following several years of low numbers admitted to the Ph.D. program and the recent rash of Ph.D. completers, in an exceptional move this past fall we admitted four new students, and in spring, two additional ones. The new students from fall, all of whom have received teaching positions in either the ELI or HELP, are Eric Hauser, a summer graduate of our MA in ESL program who has worked on SLA and cognition; Dantao Su, an MA graduate of the Beijing Foreign Studies University whose work involves L2 reading, has received one of the select RCUH Scholarships to support her studies here; Steve Talmy, an MA graduate from the University of Washington who is interested in critical pedagogy; and Linda Woo, a graduate of Stanford and recent EFL teacher in Japan, whose thesis was on EFL in Japan. The new students who will start courses in the spring are also former MA in ESL students here: Siwon Park, whose thesis is on the ACTFL scales and testing of reading proficiency in Korean EFL students; and Ken Urano, who already had an MA from Shinshu University in Japan, and whose ESL MA is an experiment in lexical acquisition from reading. These two have been hired as research assistants on two NFLRC projects, respectively with Thom Hudson and JD Brown, and with Mike Long, Cathy Doughty and Craig Chaudron.

In the next year, be on the lookout for a revised post-graduation questionnaire that we hope to send out to everyone, in order to find out more about new employment and graduate training trends in the field. So keep us informed about your contact and address information.

Craig Chaudron
Graduate Chair

 

Harry Whitten Prize Awards

The Trustees of the Ruth Crymes Scholarship Fund announced in May that the Harry Whitten Prize for outstanding thesis, dissertation, or scholarly paper was awarded to the following four students for the period 1998-99: Eric Hauser (MA thesis: Explicit and incidental instruction and learner awareness), Kazuko Katsufuji (MA thesis: Discourse factors and markedness: Japanese learners’ acquisition of the dative alternation), Yasuhiro Akiyama (scholarly paper: “Japanese adult learners’ development of locality conditions on English reflexives”), and Jim Yoshioka (scholarly paper: “Convergent and divergent politeness strategies used in sanitarian-restaurant staff inspection interactions”).

 

Sato Awards

The Charlene Junko Sato Endowed Memorial Fund was established in honor of the late Dr. Charlene Sato, Associate Professor in the Department of ESL, who died in 1996. Dr. Sato (‘Charlie’) who was much-loved by many readers of ESLetter, was well-known internationally for her work in sociolinguistics, and pidgin and creole studies. She devoted her academic career to the study of Hawai‘i Creole English (HCE) and language policy in Hawai‘i, and her early death left a huge gap in the on-going struggle to have HCE accepted and legitimated as a valid language.

The Sato fund provides study awards to students of the University of Hawai‘i who are pursuing work involving or related to HCE. The inaugural award was made in fall 1998 to Nara Takakawa whose MA thesis research was a study of attitudes of Honolulu jurors to HCE. Ms. Takakawa’s matched-guise study found that both local and non-local jurors found witnesses to be more credible when speaking Standard English than when speaking HCE.

The second Sato award was made in fall 1999 to Terri Menacker, whose Ph.D. dissertation is a study of language development and language use of HCE and English speaking students at a rural Oahu elementary school.

For those who wish to contribute to the Sato fund, checks should be made payable to “UH Foundation” (mentioning the Charlene Junko Sato Memorial Fund) and sent to the University of Hawai‘i Foundation, PO Box 11270, Honolulu, HI 96828.

 

Marilyn Mitobe

Marilyn Mitobe, 55, of Mililani, died October 29, 1999. Born in Koloa, Kaua’i. Retired clerk stenographer for the University of Hawai‘i. Survived by husband, Denis; parents, Sadami and Fumiko Morisato; brother, Paul Morisato; sisters, Lianne Tong and Esther Auyong. Marilyn served for many years in the ESL Department office, and recently, she helped in the Linguistics Department office too. She was very dear to us.

 

ELI News

In 1999 the ELI’s enrollments have remained strong, suggesting that despite struggling Asian economies, international students are still interested in getting degrees from UH-Manoa. 1999 was also our first full year to have Steve Jacques as the ELI full-time instructor, and we’re elated to have him. In Fall 1999, we started revising the objectives for ELI courses, incorporating changes in technology and the student population. Looking to the new millennium, sometime in Spring 2000 we expect to complete the ELI website, which we hope will serve to better inform students about university and ELI policies, as well as encourage them to come to UH-Manoa. Look for a link to it from the ESL Department website.

Kenton Harsch
Assistant ELI Director

 

HELP News

The Hawai‘i English Language Program (HELP) ends the year with significant outcomes. At the Fall HELP graduation held last week at the Pacific Beach Hotel in Waikiki, thirteen HELP students were congratulated on being accepted into university degree programs. Eight were admitted to UH Manoa, with five others going on to local and mainland college campuses. In addition, three were admitted to professional training schools in travel industry management and tourism. HELP continues to attract and meet the language training needs of professional and academically bound international students.

HELP faculty and staff are the key players in ensuring that HELP continues to be a vital and rigorous center for language learning. Abby Brown, Jaynie Estermann, Pamela Minet-Lucid, and Gabriela Segade, HELP’s full-time instructors, have taken on new roles in curriculum development and coordination in the past year. In addition to teaching, they develop core and elective courses, and work closely with ESL graduate assistants at HELP. Susan Sakaue, HELP’s educational specialist, assists the program and individual students in countless ways, not the least of which involves keeping abreast of the ever daunting regulations that impact international students’ process of obtaining student visas to study intensive ESL. Both MA and Ph.D. students continue to hold GAships in the classroom, computer lab, as well as in program administration at HELP.

Materials development and ESL text writing projects are underway by at least two faculty members at HELP. Researchers Yoshinori Fukuya and Martyn Clark, both HELP GAs, received word that their paper, “Input enhancement of mitigators” will be published in Pragmatics and Language Learning. We are excited to see outcomes such as this publication, based on research conducted at HELP.

It has been a challenging and rewarding year at HELP. Keep abreast of HELP news at http://www.lll.hawaii.edu/programs/help

Mary Hammond
HELP Program Coordinator

Da Pidgin Coup

In fall 1998 Diana Eades began a lunchtime discussion group to talk about HCE/Pidgin, with its main focus being to stimulate and assist ESL students in their work on Pidgin. From the start we have been fortunate to have the regular participation of several experts, namely Kent Sakoda, native speaker of HCE, linguist, and instructor for ESL 430 (Pidgin & creole in Hawai‘i), Ermile Hargrove, native speaker of HCE and educational consultant who, like Kent, has worked for many years on HCE, and Professor Suzie Jacobs, English Department, who has also worked on HCE and English in Hawai‘i for many years. During his time as visiting professor in the department (in fall 98), Professor Jeff Siegel also participated, sharing his considerable background in the study of creoles, and his recent research on HCE specifically. We have had a number of student members each semester, and for the first 2 semesters our meetings were a relaxed and low-key environment in which we discussed a wide range of issues relating to research on Pidgin, focusing mostly on educational linguistic and other applied linguistic issues.

Early this semester our group was “inspired” by the chair of the BOE blaming Pidgin for the poor results of the children of Hawai‘i in national standardized writing tests. At the same time Bill Hoshijo, of the Hawai‘i Civil Rights Commission contacted Kathy Davis to ask about a response to the BOE chair, and Kathy and Bill, who had both worked on the language commission, joined our group.

For a few months the 13 active members of Da Pidgin Coup (pronounced as “coop”) have been working hard at writing and re-writing sections of drafts of a position paper, titled “Language and education.” Our document is intended initially to open up dialogue between our group and the DOE on the role of Pidgin in schools. We saw the chair of BOE’s statement as reflecting both widespread prejudice against Pidgin and its speakers, and a lack of understanding of a number of educational linguistic issues. Our paper, titled “Pidgin and Education” was completed at the end of November, and is available on the department’s website. A copy has gone to the Superintendent of DOE, Le Mahieu, who has accepted our invitation to meet with our group in early spring. We have also sent copies to Governor Cayetano (who recently had negative things to say about Pidgin in schools), as well as Lieutenant-Governor Hirono, members of the BOE, and a long list of other people. On January 22nd we are holding a meeting of ‘interested parties’, to which we are inviting community people whom we know to be supportive of Pidgin, including writers, legislators, and educators. At this meeting we want to make plans for public education and awareness.

Da Pidgin Coup has attracted media interest, being mentioned in several newspaper articles about Pidgin, and in particular being featured as front page story in the Honolulu Star-Bulletin on November 29th.

Diana Eades

 

National Foreign Language Resource Center

The University of Hawai‘i received news this past June that we were once again selected to serve as one of a small number of national language resource centers, established to improve the teaching of foreign languages throughout the United States. The university will receive a total of $923,924 to cover operations of the National Foreign Language Resource Center (NFLRC) here from October 1, 1999 to September 30, 2002. This brings the total amount awarded to the NFLRC to date to $4.5 million, with another $1.5 million brought in through other grants linked to NFLRC projects. Dick Schmidt is Director of the NFLRC, David Hiple is Associate Director, and Robert Bley-Vroman is Associate Director for Technology.

NFLRC projects are founded upon expertise at this university in both language teaching and applied linguistics and include faculty and students from most of the departments of the College of Languages, Linguistics, and Literature. The NFLRC focuses especially on the less commonly taught languages of Asia and the Pacific. While Japanese and (increasingly) Chinese are taught at many different universities, some languages taught at UH (e.g. Samoan, Khmer, Ilokano, Cantonese) are taught at only a few institutions in the US.

During the next three years, NFLRC resources will be focused on seven major projects:

· Development of computer-based tests for less commonly taught languages (Project Directors: J. D. Brown and Thom Hudson)

· Task-based language teaching in foreign language education (Project Directors: Michael H. Long, Catherine Doughty, and Craig Chaudron)

· Teaching pragmatics in the foreign language classroom (Project Director: Gabriele Kasper)

· Drawing on community language resources to improve K-12 foreign language education (Project Directors: Kathryn Davis and Diana Eades)

· Community-based service learning n heritage languages (Project Director: David Hiple)

· Disseminating technology-based models for distance education (Project Director: David Hiple)

· Continued sponsorship of the electronic journal Language Learning & Technology (Project Director: Richard Schmidt)

Ph.D. in SLA students Youngkyu Kim, Siwon Park, Terri Menacker, and Ken Urano are currently working on projects as NFLRC graduate research assistants, together with MA in ESL students Rachel Rivers and Hyeri Joo. Many DESL alumni have also maintained ties with the NFLRC. MA grad Jim Yoshioka recently joined the NFLRC as an educational specialist, replacing grad Heidi Wong, who returned to school to pursue an MSW. Bill Savage returned to Honolulu (from Thailand) this past summer to be a workshop facilitator for the NFLRC summer institute on self-directed learning. Stephen Fleming (UH MA’s in both ESL and Chinese) continues to work on NFLRC projects related to both Chinese and technology innovations in foreign language education. March Warschauer continues as co-editor of Language Learning & Technology, the journal that he founded as an intern with the NFLRC during his doctoral studies. Lourdes Ortega is directing a cross-language study to identify measures of syntactic development in oral discourse, working together with John Norris (ABD in the doctoral program), Sara Rabie (MA grad who recently relocated from Japan to Grenada), and former visiting colleague Noriko Iwashita of the Language Testing Research Centre at the University of Melbourne.

For more information on NFLRC projects, publications, and electronic resources, visit our website at http://www.LLL.hawaii.edu/nflrc

Dick Schmidt, NFLRC Director
Center for Second Language Research

The CSLR is currently supporting two projects: 1) a NFLRC-funded project designed to draw on community language resources to improve foreign language education (K-12) and 2) a community college-funded project for conducting a needs analysis for 1.5 generation immigrants entering college. We are applying for additional Federal funding to support curriculum/product development, implementation, and evaluation for each of these projects.

The CSLR will also continue to provide space and equipment support for a project directed by Jeff Siegal, University of New England, Australia. Jeff recently received a small grant to continue work begun last year on Hawai‘i Creole English (HCE). The aim of this project is to identify and describe external influences and internal variation in current Hawai‘i Creole English (HCE). Accounts of the evolution of creole languages in general, and HCE in particular, have featured prominently in current theories supporting an innate “instinct” for human language. Creole languages have also been central to theories that synchronic variation reflects diachronic change. The data gathered in the project will be used to reassess these theories and also to provide a grammatical description of current varieties of HCE that will be useful to educators and language planners.

Kathryn A. Davis
Director, CSLR

 

Alumni News

AUSTRALIA

Dr. Yoshinori Sasaki (y.sasaki@unsw.edu.au) passed through Hawai‘i during Thanksgiving, returning to the University of New South Wales, where he is Lecturer in Japanese Studies. He consulted with DESL affiliate faculty Dave Ashworth while he was here, and discussed the possibilities of implementing action research initiatives in Japanese teaching with Graham Crookes.

BRAZIL

Bill Bonk will be heading to Salvador da Bahia, Brazil at the end of January for 1-2 years on a grant as a USIA Teaching Fellow, consulting on a curriculum and assessment tool development project at a USA-Brazil binational center called ACBEU. Keep in touch using my trusty old e-mail address: bonk@hawaii.edu.

HAWAI‘I

Hawai‘i TESOL elected its officers for the 1999-00 year, including recent DESL graduate Donna Prather (Trans-Pacific Hawai‘i College), who was elected president of the organization.

INDONESIA

Phil Pinsent spent some time in the Cotswolds (UK) combing roadsides for firewood, followed by some time in Italy before returning to Jakarta, where he was offered a job helping Italians to build hospitals. He reports that there are no good EFL jobs in Indonesia right now, and it would be fair to say that those few genuine MAs still working there are not in their right minds. Actually, Phil and Meiri are fine, unaffected by politics and finding that most Indonesians are as polite and friendly as ever.

KOREA

Myong Hui Ko visited Hawai‘i this past summer on a family vacation. She teaches freshman English (composition, listening, basic conversation) at Kyung Hee University in Seoul.

JAPAN

UH/ESL faculty, current students, and alumni were much in evidence at the 12th World Congress of Applied Linguistics (AILA ’99) held at Waseda University in Tokyo. Among those attending (most presenting as well) were Jeff Blair, Lori DesRosiers, Cathy Doughty, Shunji Inagaki, Toshihiko Kobayashi, Mike Long, Eloise Pearson, Sara Rabie, Peter Robinson, Steve Ross, Bill Savage, Dick Schmidt, Toshihiro Shimizu, Ken Urano, Mark Warschauer, Yuichi Watanabe, Junko Yamaai, and Mawako Yanagisawa. J Toshihiro Shimizu has moved to Fukuoka and started to work for Kyushu University, one of the oldest and best in Japan. He can be reached at tshimizu@rc.kyushu-u.ac.jp J A baby boy was born on November 15, 1999 to the Japan cadet branch of the illustrious House of Steinberg. After consulting many learned books with hundreds of thousands of baby names and discussing the matter with experts in the field, the parents engaged in many hours of heated soul-searching on their own regarding the selection of a name. At length the parents took a creative step and chose the following names: WILL, which is derived from the name of Danny’s father, William, and DU, which is Wendy’s Chinese family name. Thus, the baby’s name will be: Will Du Steinberg. Will’s informal Chinese first name will be Wei-wei. Will’s grandparents will be horrified if his name is confused with any panda, but confusion with the name of Du Steinberg as being connected to the wealthy French aristocracy is encouraged. J Mark Stafford (marksteacher@hotmail.com) teaches in Matsuyama Ehime and celebrated the birth of another child (Colin Martin Stafford) in 1999. J J.D. Brown, in Japan on sabbatical, reports running into UH DESL graduates Jason-Britt Adachi and Tetsuko Adachi in Miyazaki. J Miki Yagi de Rodriguez, Jerrold Frank, and Mary Christianson attended the JALT national conference this year in Maebashi.

NICARAGUA

Greg Bowles finished his work in Bangladesh and recently took a job in rural Nicaragua as a development worker for the Friendship City Project of Boulder, CO. His email is gwb100@hotmail.com

PACIFIC ISLANDS

From Alan Taylor (alan.taylor@saipan.com ) on Saipan: “Dear friends, my wife, Dominique Buckley passed away on March 10, 1999. She suffered a relapse of leukemia approximately one month [earlier], and decided not to take chemotherapy again. She died at home, as she wished, peacefully and pain free, surrounded by her immediate family. She was passionate about life, her family, and her research on the Chamorro and Carolinian languages. She will be greatly missed and always remembered by myself and her beautiful daughter, Céline Lourdes Buckley-Taylor. Thank you all for the kind thoughts and words you have sent – they meant so much to her.” J Vince Riley is still at Northern Marianas College in Saipan, serving as assistant to the college’s Vice President for Instruction and as the accreditation coordinator for the college’s 2000 accreditation visit. Ivan Probst held both of those positions before retiring from the college in June 1997. Frank Sobolewsky is now in his fifth year as the only English instructor at the Rota branch of the college, where he is also academic coordinator and academic adviser for all students.

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

David Heuring (dheuring@emirates.net.ae) is still academic director of the Military Language Institute in Abu Dhabi, UAE. The Institute employs 60 highly-qualified ESL instructors to teach English to military personnel selected to study abroad or who need to use English in their jobs. Next June they are planning to set up a similar MLI-type program at the UAE’s Army College, with a major emphasis on a learner centered curriculum and CALL. David will be in the US in February and March interviewing prospective teachers for the 40 new teaching positions. UH alumni also at MLI include Vance Stevens (CALL coordinator), Peter Macfarquhar, and Zafar Syed, and David would love to have more top-notch professionals of the kind that UH produces join the staff.

US MAINLAND

Bill Johnston is leaving the University of Minnesota to return to Indiana University. J Alex Joshua Manheimer was born on Thursday 4 November 1999 in Oakland CA. Father Rob (manheimr@leland.stanford.edu) and mother Gloria are doing well. J Joel Wiskin, now in Fairfax Co., VA sent the following message: “In the last 15 years I have done a huge amount of different things in places all over the world: taught grad courses and British dip. courses in Australia, teacher training in Africa, and was even the plenary speaker at the first Annual TESOL-Peru Convention a few years ago. The background that I got at UH enabled me to have complete each of these “tasks” with a great feeling of confidence. I have come into contact with people with MA’s in ESL from all over the place and a great many know little more than how to correctly draw stick figures on the board. While in the program, I couldn’t wait to get out but I seriously understand now what an excellent foundation it has given me. My problem now is staying quiet when I hear people with MA’s speaking with a complete lack of any deep knowledge of lang. acquisition, etc. Please relate this to any of the teachers that I had in the program.” J Jodi Nishimura sends greetings from New York, where she is working for the New York Public Library center for reading and writing, doing adult literacy work.

 

Faculty & Staff News

J. D. Brown taught ESL 630 (Language Program Development) and ESL 671 (Issues in Language Testing) at UHM in spring 1999. He also chaired the MA Admissions Committee and edited the University of Hawai‘i Working Papers in ESL. In addition, JD served on numerous directed independent studies, masters thesis committees, doctoral dissertation committees, and scholarly papers at UHM and dissertation committees at Temple University Japan. He also served on the Japan-United States Fulbright Commission Selection Committee in Tokyo and the JALT Journal editorial board. JD was in Japan for eight months during the summer and for a sabbatical in Fall semester 1999. He delivered plenary addresses at the Fourth International ELT Conference in Ankara, Turkey; at the Korean Association of Teachers of English International Conference in Kwangju, Korea; at the Association of Foreign Language Educators in Seoul, Korea; and at Seventh Annual Rikkyo TEFL Seminar in Tokyo, Japan. He also presented or co-presented papers at the Fourth International ELT Conference in Ankara, Turkey; the Language Testing Research Colloquium in Tsukuba, Japan; and the JALT National Conference in Maebashi, Japan. JD was also invited to do lectures and workshops at Erciyes University in Kaiseri, Turkey; at both Istanbul Technical University and Marmara University, in Istanbul, Turkey; at the ELT MA Program at Bilkent University in Ankara, Turkey; at the Japan Association of Language Teachers monthly meeting in Tokushima, Japan; at Kansai University in Osaka, Japan; at Miyazaki International College, Miyazaki, Japan; at Kanazawa Institute of Technology, Ishikawa, Japan; for the National Federation of Prefectural English Teachers’ Organizations in Tokyo, Japan; and at the National Center for University Entrance Examinations in Tokyo, Japan. More importantly, during 1999, JD was seen rollerblading his heart out at various sites around the world.

Craig Chaudron taught applied psycholinguistics and SLA last spring, and second language quantitative research this past fall. This spring he’s slated for teaching second language writing, a course he has not taught since UCLA in 1982. Craig spent five days in May in Shanghai setting up and supervising an ESP program sponsored by the Shanghai Commission on Foreign Trade (SMERT), at the Chinese Textile University. He visited Spain (Madrid and Barcelona) in June-July, and gave lectures on classroom research at several teacher conferences and courses. In September, he gave a lecture on general research methods at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid. He will be presenting papers on elicited imitation and classroom interaction analysis at AAAL and TESOL in March.

Graham Crookes says that at this end of 1999 spring seems a blur, but he recalls attending the language teacher education conference at the University of Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he saw many old friends and noted that the published literature in this area and the conference itself seem to be in sync. During the summer Graham was heavily involved in the UH NFLRC’s Summer Institute workshop on self-directed learning, for which he was the evaluator, and with the associated symposium, in which he presented one paper and co-presented a second. Having stepped down from the advisory committee of Studies in Second Language Acquisition, Graham was pleased to be serve in a similar capacity in one of the field’s electronic journals, TESL-EJ, and has recently been asked to be on the editorial board of the ancient and honorable International Review of Applied Linguistics, which is undergoing a makeover. Graham continues to try out new remedies for back trouble that has kept him off planes most of the year; all suggestions welcomed.

During the fall semester, Kathy Davis taught the ESL 675 course on qualitative research methods and an ESL 680U course on the social context of second language learning and teaching. Members of these courses Steven Talmy and Jo Anne Kadooka, along with graduate assistant Terri Menacker, participated in a project concerning 1.5 generation immigrants attending community colleges and will continue work on this community college project (needs analysis and program evaluation) through her Spring ESL 730 course on bilingual education. This course will involve applying theoretical knowledge on bilingualism to research and curriculum development in actual second language teaching/learning situations. In addition to these educational applications, they hope to co-author technical reports and journal publications on course projects. In designing this and similar graduate seminars, Kathy hopes to facilitate student development of abilities to make connections between theory and practice. In addition to teaching and developing courses here at U.H., she traveled to Tokyo and Osaka, Japan in October for a Temple University Distinguished Lecture Series on bilingualism and bilingual education.

Richard Day attended the 1999 annual Hawai‘i TESOL Roundtable. He was a featured speaker at the 1999 JALT Annual Conference, where he had the pleasure of talking to many UH graduates. In the Fall 1999 semester, he taught ESL 613 L2 Listening and Speaking and ESL 620 L2 Reading. This semester, he is teaching a seminar on the use of literature in the L2 classroom and a L2 materials development/adaptation course. He plans to attend this year’s annual TESOL Conference in Vancouver, where he will present on extensive reading and materials development.

Diana Eades continued research in 3 main areas: In her primary area of language and power in the legal system, she continued her micro-analysis of Aboriginal English in Australian courts. In September, she presented a keynote paper on this topic at Edith Cowan University’s roundtable on language and literacy (Perth, Western Australia). Continuing her literature research on sociolinguistics issues in legal interpreting, she co-edited with Michael Cooke and Sandra Hale a special issue of the journal Forensic Linguistics on this topic. In her third research area, conceptualizations of language in legal contexts, Diana convened an invited colloquium (also presenting a paper) at the AAAL conference. Other conference presentations this year included the Society for Pidgin and Creole Linguistics, and a symposium on issues in non-standard dialect research at the Australian Linguistics Society conference. She also spoke at the University of Hawai‘i “Pidgin Conference” in April, in a session titled “Language discrimination: Creole English(es) and the Courts.” Locally, Diana was a committee member of the group that organized the annual meeting of the national Consortium of Task Forces and Commissions on Racial and Ethnic Bias in the Courts. She was also a panelist in a session on cultural barriers to court access. In July, she was appointed by Chief Justice Moon to the state Committee on Equality and Access to the Courts. She also continues as advisor to the Queensland Department of Justice on its innovative program to provide communication facilitator for speakers of Aboriginal English in courts.

Kenny Harsch spent 1999 launching new ELI projects, including an ELI website and a teacher-resource website on MAILE (together with Steve Jacques). These projects are still in progress, but should be completed during 2000. Kenny also worked on a subcommittee to develop guidelines for selection and support of instructors for the BA/ESL program, and to create clear sets of topics and goals for several of the courses. He has taken a short breather from the “professional development group”, but it will be back in Spring 2000 in a series of teacher portfolio workshops, which he will run together with Jim Yoshioka of the NFLRC. Kenny has also been working on a research project with alumna Lesley Riley (studying strategy awareness and use by Japanese learners in ESL and EFL situations) and a materials development project with Kate Wolfe-Quintero, and has been helping his daughter develop her ability in Japanese by agreeing to his wife’s request not to speak it at home.

Thom Hudson taught ESL 490 and ESL 730 (computer/web based testing and item response theory) in the fall semester of 1999. He is working with J. D. Brown on a NFLRC project that will produce a summer institute in June 2000 on computer based testing of less commonly taught languages. Five languages will be selected and three people from each language will form a team to develop tests for the world wide web. Siwon Park and Youngkyu Kim have also participated in that project. The previously mentioned ESL 730 seminar helped to identify some of the potential bugs in the computer and web based aspects of the project. (For a sample of what was produced in the seminar, see http://nts.LLL.hawaii.edu/web_testing) The project has caused him to spend great amounts of time looking (squinting) into the mysteries of html, JavaScript, Dreamweaver, and Perl. It also spurred him to set up his website at http://www.LLL.hawaii.edu/esl/hudson. He and J. D. have just about finished their book on criterion referenced testing, with only the revisions to go. Thom is also working on a test on second language reading.

Gabriele Kasper co-presented a paper at the 8th Symposium on Social Communication in Santiago de Cuba, gave a plenary at the 13th Annual International Conference on Pragmatics & Language Learning in Urbana-Champaign, IL, and organized a panel on the pragmatics of teaching-learning interaction at the Pragma99 conference in Tel-Aviv and Jerusalem. The pragmatically most challenging experience in these diverse locations was to refuse politely but effectively recurrent offers to purchase fake Cohibas in Cuba. (Ed. note: Cohibas are a particularly choice brand of puros.)

Mike Long spent Spring semester on leave at the National Foreign Language Center in Washington, D. C., where he completed several papers for a forthcoming book, Problems in SLA, to be published next year by Lawrence Erlbaum. He was half-time at the Center and what seemed like double-time helping take care of Jordi Nicholas Long, born on January 25. He weighed 7 lbs. 5 oz. then (Jordi, that is), and now (December) tips the scales at 21 lbs. 8ozs. March saw two trips. The first was to Stanford, CT. for the AAAL conference, where Mike presented a paper, ‘Methodological issues in learner needs analysis’, based on work supported both by the NFLC and UH’s own NFLRC, and for which he received valuable assistance from Paul Sevigny and Tony Donnes. The second was to Boston to conduct an interview with Noam Chomsky for the Anarcho-Syndicalist Review (see ASR # 25 & # 26 for the interview, and # 26 and # 27 for responses to it), and also to visit the alternative Sudbury Valley School in Framingham, MA. In August, Mike attended the AILA conference, held on the delightful Waseda University campus in Tokyo, where he presented a keynote address on ‘Theory change in SLA’, as well as papers on negative feedback, and implications of SLA research for language teaching. August also saw a five-day visit to Bogota to present a plenary on Task-Based Language Teaching to a British Council-sponsored conference on trends in language teaching. During fall semester, back at UH, he taught 650 (SLA) and the new 730 (Language teaching methodology), and he and Cathy moved house (taking Jordi along). With first-rate cooperation from HATESL, he organized a one-day book sale that raised $1,544.00 for the Charlie Sato Memorial Fund. The Fund now stands at over $30,000.00, and contributions continue to come in from around the world. Next semester, he will be teaching 650 again, plus his 730 seminar on Task-Based Language Teaching. He, Cathy Doughty and Craig Chaudron begin a two-year NFLRC-supported project on TBLT and focus on form at the same time, and that research will be integrated into the seminar in various ways. In Spring, he and Cathy hope to complete their work as editors of the new Handbook of SLA (Blackwell). Mike will be in Tokyo and Osaka for TUJ the last week of March, offering a short course on ‘Current issues in task-based language teaching.’ In early July, he and Cathy will be teaching on the Mediterranean Summer Institute in Barcelona. There, Mike will, as always, pay his respects at the CNT gravesites (for Durruti, Ascaso, Ferrer, and others), conduct interviews for ASR, and generally begin to introduce Jordi to the Republican achievements of 1936-39, and to his cultural relatives, whence his name.

Dick Schmidt talked too much and wrote too little during 1999. The talking consisted of a plenary at the Hawai‘i Language Acquisition Workshop in Honolulu (January); invited lectures at Georgetown and Teachers College Columbia (March); presentations at AAAL and TESOL (also in March); workshop sessions for the NFLRC Summer Institute on self-directed learning (June); courses and public lectures during the ESADE Mediterranean Institute in Barcelona (July); a paper at AILA in Tokyo (August); workshops for the Center for Asia Pacific Exchange in Honolulu (August); and a plenary at the first conference of EgypTESOL –the newest TESOL affiliate (October). Dick continues as director of the NFLRC –NFLRC news elsewhere in this issue– and is also chair of the council of directors of the national associations of such centers, duties that took him to Washington for a meeting of the Consortium for International Education and to Dallas for the annual ACTFL convention. In his spare time he reads manuscripts for journals. He also edits this newsletter and invites all concerned to send contributions to schmidt@hawaii.edu

 

New faculty & student publications

Bamford, J., & Day, R. R. (1998). Comments on Jeong-Won Lee and Diane Lemonnier Schallert’s “The relative contribution of L2 language proficiency and L1 reading ability to L2 reading performance: A test of the threshold hypothesis in an EFL context.” TESOL Quarterly, 32, 747-749.

Brown, J. D. (translated into Japanese by M. Wada). (1999). Gengo tesuto no kisochishi (Literally: Basic knowledge of language testing). Tokyo: Taishukan Shoten.

Brown, J. D. (1999). “Relative importance of persons, items, subtests and languages to TOEFL test variance.” Language Testing, 16(2), 216-237.

Brown, J. D. (1999). “The roles and responsibilities of assessment in foreign language education.” JLTA Journal, 2, 1-21.

Brown, J. D. (1999). Statistics Corner. Questions and answers about language testing statistics (“The standard error of what?”) Shiken, 3(1), 15-19.

Brown, J. D. (In press). Using surveys in language programs. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Brown, J. D. (In press). “Developing and revising criterion-referenced achievement tests for a textbook series.” In T. Hudson & J.D. Brown (Eds.), A focus on language test development: Expanding the language proficiency construct across a variety of tests (Technical Report #21). Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i, Second Language Teaching & Curriculum Center.

Brown, J. D. (In press). “Using tests to unify language curriculum.” Proceedings of the Fourth International ELT Conference. Ankara, Turkey: Bilkent University.

Brown, J. D., Hudson, T., & Norris, J. M. (Forthcoming). Investigating second language performance assessments: Tasks, tests, and rating criteria (Technical Report). Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i, Second Language Teaching & Curriculum Center.

Brown, J. D., Yamashiro, A. D., & Ogane, E. (1999). “Three strategies for ‘tailoring’ cloze tests in secondary EFL.” TUJ Working Papers in Applied Linguistics, 14, 131-147.

Brown, J. D., Yamashiro, A. D., & Ogane, E. (In press). “The emperor’s new cloze: Strategies for revising cloze tests.” In T. Hudson & J. D. Brown (Eds.), A focus on language test development: Expanding the language proficiency construct across a variety of tests (Technical Report #21). Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i, Second Language Teaching & Curriculum Center.

Chaudron, C. (Forthcoming). “Contrasting approaches to classroom research: Qualitative and quantitative analysis of language use and learning.” Actas del XVI Congreso Nacional de la Asociación Española de Lingüística Aplicada. Logroño, Spain: Universidad de la Rioja.

Chaudron, C. (Forthcoming). “Métodos actuales de la investigación en el aula de segundas lenguas.” In C. Muñoz (Ed.), Segundas Lenguas: Adquisición en Medio Escolar. Barcelona: Ariel.

Chaudron, C., Martín Uriz, A., & Whittaker, R. (In press). “La composición como comunicación: influencia en el desarrollo general del inglés como segunda lengua en un contexto de instrucción.” In C. Valero Garcés (Ed.), La lingüística aplicada a finales de siglo, Actas del Congreso Nacional de AESLA, 1999. Alcalá de Henares, Spain: University of Alcalá de Henares.

Cooke, M., Eades, D., & Hale, S. (1999) “Introduction.” Legal Interpreting. Special Issue of Forensic Linguistics, 6(1), 1-5.

Crookes, G. (1999). NFLRC Summer Institute Evaluation (Advancing language immersion education). Research Note #22. Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i, National Foreign Language Resource Center.

Crookes, G., & Arakaki, L. (1999). “Teaching idea sources and work conditions in an ESL program.” TESOL Journal, 8(1), 15-19.

Crookes, G., Burns, A., & Cowie, N. (In press). “Talking about action research.” The Language Teacher.

Crookes, G., & Chandler, P. (1999). “Introducing action research into post-secondary foreign language teacher education” (NFLRC NetWork #10) [HTML document]. Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i, Second Language Teaching & Curriculum Center. http://www.LLL.hawaii.edu/nflrc/NetWorks/NW10/

Davis, K. A. (1999). “The sociopolitical dynamics of indigenous language maintenance and loss: A framework for language policy and planning.” In T. Huebner and K. Davis (Eds.) Sociopolitical perspectives on language policy and planning in the U.S.A. (Studies in Bilingualism, Vol. 16). Philadelphia & Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Davis, K. A. (Ed.) (1999). Foreign language teaching and language minority education (Technical Report #19). Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i, Second Language Teaching & Curriculum Center.

Day, R. R., & Yamanaka, J. (1999). Impact topics. Hong Kong: Longman Asia.

Doughty, C. (1998). “Acquiring competence in a second language: Form and function.” In H. Byrnes (Ed.), Learning second and foreign languages: Perspectives in research and scholarship. New York: Modern Language Association.

Doughty, C., & Long, M.H. (In press). “Eliciting L2 speech data.” In L. Menn and N. Ratner (Eds.), Methods for studying language production. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Doughty, C., & Long, M.H. (Eds.)(Forthcoming). Handbook of second language acquisition. Oxford: Blackwell.

Doughty, C., & Williams, J. (Eds.) (1998). Focus on form in classroom second language acquisition. Cambridge Applied Linguistics Series. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Doughty, C., & Williams, J. (1998). “Issues and terminology.” In Doughty, C., & Williams, J. (Eds.), Focus on form in classroom second language acquisition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Doughty, C., & Williams, J. (1998). “Pedagogical choices in focus on form.” In Doughty, C., & Williams, J. (Eds.), Focus on form in classroom second language acquisition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Doughty, C., & Varela, E. (1998). “Communicative focus on form.” In Doughty, C., & Williams, J. (Eds.), Focus on form in classroom second language acquisition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Eades, D. (1999). Review of Interpreters and the legal process by J.Colin and R. Morris. Forensic Linguistics, 6(1), 196-199.

Eades, D. (In press). Review of Discourse in a multilingual and multicultural courtroom: A court interpreter’s guide by R. Moeketsi. Forensic Linguistics, 6(2).

Eades, D. (Forthcoming) “The politics of misunderstanding in the legal process: Aboriginal English in Queensland.” In J. House, G. Kasper, and S. Ross (Eds.), Misunderstanding in spoken discourse. London: Longman.

Eades, D. (Forthcoming) “I don’t think it’s an answer to the question: Silencing Aboriginal witnesses in court.” Language in Society, September 2000.

Eades, D., & Siegel, J. (In press) “Changing attitudes towards Australian creoles and Aboriginal English”. In J. Rickford and S. Romaine (Eds.), Creole genesis, attitudes, and discourse: Studies celebrating Charlene Sato. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Fukuya, Y. & Clark, M. (In press). “Input enhancement of mitigators.” Pragmatics and Language Learning, 10, 2000.

Harsch, K. & Bray, E. (1999). Encouraging reflection and review with learning journals. TESOL, English as a Foreign Language Interest Section Newsletter, 19 (2), 1, 10.

Harsch, K. & Wolfe-Quintero, K. (Forthcoming). Impact Listening 2. Hong Kong: Addison Wesley Longman Asia ELT.

Henze, R., & Davis, K. A. (Eds.) (1999). Anthropology and Education Quarterly (AEQ), Vol. 30, No. 1, special issue on “Authenticity and identity in indigenous language education.”

Henze, R., & Davis, K. A. (1999). “Authenticity and identity: Lessons from indigenous language education.” In R. Henze and K. Davis (Eds.), Anthropology and Education Quarterly (AEQ), special issue on “Authenticity and identity in indigenous language education.”

House, J., & Kasper, G. (in press). “How to remain a nonnative speaker.” In C. Riemer (Ed.), Kognitive Aspekte des Lehrens und Lernens von Fremdsprachen – Cognitive aspects of foreign language learning and teaching. Festschrift für Willis J. Edmondson zum 60. Geburtstag (pp. 101-118). Tübingen: Narr.

Hudson, T. (In press). “Self-assessment methods in cross cultural pragmatics.” In Hudson, T. & Brown, J. (Eds.), A focus on language test development: Expanding the language proficiency construct across a variety of tests (Technical Report #21). Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i, Second Language Teaching & Curriculum Center.

Hudson, T. & Brown, J. (Eds.)(In press). A focus on language test development: Expanding the language proficiency construct across a variety of tests (Technical Report #21). Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i, Second Language Teaching & Curriculum Center.

Huebner, T., & Davis, K. A., (Eds.) (1999). Sociopolitical perspectives on language policy and planning in the U.S.A. (Studies in Bilingualism, V. 16). Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins.

Inagaki, S., & Long, M. H. (In press). “The effects of implicit negative feedback on the acquisition of Japanese as a second language.” In K. Kanno (Ed.), Studies on the acquisition of Japanese as a second language. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Iwai, T., Kondo, K., Lim, D. S. J., Ray, G., Shimizu, H., & Brown, J. D. (1999). Japanese Language Needs Assessment 1998-1999 (NFLRC NetWork #13) [HTML document]. Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i, Second Language Teaching & Curriculum Center. Retrieved April 30, 1999 from the World Wide Web: http://www.LLL.hawaii.edu/nflrc/NetWorks/NW13/

Jasso-Aguilar, R. (1999). “Sources, methods, and triangulation in needs analysis: A critical perspective in a case study of Waikiki hotel maids.” Journal of English for Specific Purposes, 18 (1), 27-46.

Kasper, G. (1999). “Self-report data in pragmatics research.” In N. O. Jungheim & P. Robinson (Eds.), Pragmatics and pedagogy: Proceedings of the 3rd Pacific Second Language Research Forum, Vol.2 (pp.1-15). Tokyo: PacSLRF.

Kasper, G. (in press). “Data collection in pragmatics.” In H. Spencer-Oatey (Ed.), Culturally speaking. London: Cassell Academic.

Kasper, G. (in press). “Learning pragmatics in the L2 classroom.” In L. F. Bouton (Ed.), Pragmatics and language learning monograph series, Vol. 10. Urbana, IL: Division of English as an International Language Intensive English Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Kasper, G. (in press). “Unterrichtsforschung zur Lernersprachenpragmatik – eine Forschungslücke.” [Classroom research on interlanguage pragmatics - a research gap]. In B. Helbig, K. Kleppin, & F. G. Königs (Eds.), Festschrift für Karl-Richard Bausch. Tübingen: Niemeyer.

Kasper, G., & DuFon, M.A. (Forthcoming). “La pragmática del interlenguaje de una perspectiva del desarrolo.” In C. Muñoz (Ed.), Segundas lenguas: Adquisición en medio escolar. Barcelona: Ariel.

Kasper, G., & Rose, K.R. (1999). “Pragmatics and SLA.” Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, 19, 81-104.

Kim, D.-K., Ahn, B.-K., Kim, Y., & Kim, J.-M. (1998). Measurement of proficiency for secondary school learners of English. Chungbuk, Korea: Research Center for Subject Matter Education, Korea National University of Education. (in Korean)

Kim, D.-K., Ahn, B.-K., Oh, Y.-J., & Kim, Y. (1999). “A proposal for performance assessment criteria with focus on speaking and writing abilities.” English Teaching, 54(2), 175-200. (in Korean)

Long, M. H. (1999). “Self-education.” Review of Self-Education Collective, Skills for action: talking and writing. Notes on effective communication, Sheffield: Solidarity Federation, n.d. Anarcho-Syndicalist Review, 25, Summer, 30-31.

Long, M. H. (1999). “Remembering Spain.” Review of Abel Paz, The Spanish Civil War, Paris: Editions Hazan, 1997. Anarcho-Syndicalist Review, 26, Fall, 29-30.

Long, M. H. (1999). “Ebonics, language, and power.” In F. L. Pincus and H. J. Ehrlich (Eds.), Race and ethnic conflict: Contending views on prejudice, discrimination, and ethnoviolence (pp. 331-345). Second edition. Boulder, CO: Westview.

Long, M. H. (In press). “Focus on form in task-based language teaching. In R. L. Lambert and E. Shohamy, E. (Eds.), Language policy and pedagogy. Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins.

Long, M. H. (in press). “Second language acquisition theories.” In M. Byram (Ed.), Encyclopaedia of language teaching. London: Routledge.

Long, M. H. (in press). “Acquisition and teaching.” In M. Byram (Ed.), Encyclopaedia of language teaching. London: Routledge.

Long, M. H. (in press). “Reform and/or revolution? A response to Chomsky.” Anarcho-Syndicalist Review, 27, Winter, 1999.

Long, M. H. (Forthcoming). Problems in SLA. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2000.

Long, M. H. (Forthcoming). “Theories and theory change in SLA.” In M. H. Long, Problems in SLA. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2000.

Long, M. H. (Forthcoming). “Methodological issues in learner needs analysis.” In M. H. Long, Problems in SLA. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2000.

Long, M. H. (Forthcoming). “Recasts in SLA: The story so far.” In M. H. Long, Problems in SLA. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2000.

Long, M. H. (Forthcoming). “Three implications of SLA research for L2 curriculum design.” In M. H. Long, Problems in SLA. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2000.

Long, M. H. (Forthcoming). “Sensitive periods in SLA: Counter-evidence?” In M. H. Long, Problems in SLA. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2000.

Long, M. H. (Forthcoming). “Does SLA have a future?” In M. H. Long, Problems in SLA. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2000.

Long, M. H. (Forthcoming). Task‑based language teaching. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.

Long, M. H. (Forthcoming). “Fossilization: Rigor mortis in living linguistic systems?” In C. Doughty & M. H. Long (Eds.), Handbook of second language acquisition. Oxford: Blackwell.

Long, M. H. (Forthcoming). Getting from here to there: Essays on anarcho-syndicalism in memory of Charlene J. Sato. London: Freedom Press.

Long, M. H., & Norris, J. M. (In press). Task-based teaching and assessment. In M. Byram (Ed.), Encyclopaedia of language teaching. London: Routledge.

Menacker, T. (Ed.) (1998). Literacy for change: Community-based approaches (Technical Report #13). Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i, Center for Second Language Research.

Menacker, T. (Ed.) (1998). Language issues in Hawai‘i: A plan for action (Technical Report #14). Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i, Center for Second Language Research.

Neff, J. A., Dafouz, E., Díez, M., Prieto, R., & Chaudron, C. (Forthcoming). “Contrastive discourse analysis: Argumentative text in English and Spanish.” In C. Moder (Ed.), [final title pending]. John Benjamins Typological Studies in Language series.

Negretti, R. (1998). Internet and foreign languages. 7th volume of a scientific series entitled Linguistics Research. Pescara: Libreria dell’Università Editrice.

Negretti, R. (1998). “Authoring for language education on the Internet.” In Proceedings of the international conference “Authoring for Internet Education: Products, experiences, proposals – May 1997.” Pescara: Libreria dell’Università Editrice.

Negretti, R. (1999). “Web based activities and SLA: A conversation analysis approach.” Language Learning and Technology, 3(1), 75-87. http://polyglot.cal.msu.edu/llt.

Negretti, R. (1999). “A conversational analysis approach to internet interaction for ESL learners.” In Integration through innovation – The challenge facing language centers in Europe; Proceedings of the 5th CercleS International Conference. Plymouth, UK: University of Plymouth, Department of Modern Languages.

Norris, J. M. (1999). Review of Language testing in practice. Language Teaching Research, 3(1).

Norris, J. M. (Forthcoming). A validation study of the ACTFL guidelines and the German speaking test. Bochum, Germany: Manuskripte zur Sprachlehrforschung.

Norris, J. M. (Forthcoming). “Identifying rating criteria for task-based EAP assessment. In T. Hudson, & J. D. Brown (Eds.), Processes in developing second language assessments: Diverse applications (Technical Report). Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i, Second Language Teaching & Curriculum Center.

Norris, J. M. (Forthcoming). Review of Performance testing, cognition, and assessment: Selected papers from the 15th Language Testing Research Colloquium. Language Testing.

Norris, J. M., Brown, J. D., & Hudson, T. D. (Forthcoming). Constructing and validating second language performance assessments: Tasks, tests, and rating criteria (Technical Report). Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i, Second Language Teaching & Curriculum Center.

Norris, J. M., & Ortega, L. (In press). “Effectiveness of L2 instruction: A research synthesis and quantitative meta-analysis.” Language Learning, 50(3).

Ortega, L. (1999). “Planning and focus on form in L2 oral performance.” Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 21, 109-148.

Ortega, L. (1999). ” Rethinking foreign language education: Political dimensions of the profession.” In K. Davis (Ed.), Foreign language and minority language education (Technical Report #19). Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i, Second Language Teaching and Curriculum Center.

Ortega, L. (1999). “Language and equality: ideological and structural constraints in foreign language education in the US.” In T. Huebner and K. A. Davis (Eds.), Sociopolitical perspectives in language policy and planning in the U.S.A. (Studies in Bilingualism, V. 16). Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins.

Riley, L. & Harsch, K. (1999). “Using strategy journals to compare ESL and EFL students’ awareness, development, and use of language learning strategies.” In J. E. Purpua and R. L. Oxford, Language learning strategies in the context of autonomy (compendium compiled for invitational symposium). New York: Teachers College, Columbia University.

Roever, C. (1999). “Computer und Internet zum Lehren und Lernen von Routinen” [Computer and internet for learning and teaching routines] Zielsprache Englisch, 29, 23-25.

Schmidt, R. (1999). “Factors contributing to learner motivation and teacher satisfaction in language teaching programs.” In M. Zikri (Ed.), Proceedings of the national ESP conference. Cairo: Helwan University.

Schmidt, R. (in press). “The centrality of attention in SLA.” In P. J. Robinson (Ed.), Cognition and second language instruction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Schmidt, R., Kassabgy, O., & Boraie, D. (Forthcoming). “Values, rewards and job satisfaction in EFL.” Center for Career Development (Cairo) and the National Foreign Language Resource Center (Honolulu)

Wolfe-Quintero, K. (In press). “Negotiation as a participatory dialogue.” In M. P. Breen and A. Littlejohn (Eds.), The process syllabus: Negotiation in the language classroom. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Wolfe-Quintero, K., & Tripodi-Segade, G. (1999). “University support for second language writers across the curriculum.” In L. Harklau, K. Losey, and M. Siegal (Eds.), Generation 1.5 meets college composition. Lawrence Erlbaum.

 

Conferences of interest

January 20-22, 2000. Thailand TESOL, Bangkok. Contact Thailand TESOL, c/o Chulalongkorn University, Language Institute, Phyathai Rd., Bankgok. Tel. 66-2-218-6100, Fax 66-2-218-6027, email naraporn.c@chula.ac.th

February 15-19, 2000. National Association of Bilingual Education (NABE), San Antonio, Texas. Contact NABE, 1220 L Street, N.W., Suite 605, Washington, DC 20005-4018. Tel. 202-898-1829. Fax 202-789-2866.

March 11-14, 2000. AAAL, Vancouver. http://aaal.org

March 14-18, 2000. TESOL, Vancouver. Contact TESOL Conventions Dept., 1600 Cameron Street Suite 300, Alexandria, VA 22314. Tel. 703-836-0774. Fax 703-836-7864. conv@tesol.edu, http://www.tesol.edu

March 27-31, 2000. IATEFL, Dublin, Ireland. Contact IATEFL, 3 Kingsdown Chambers, Whitstable, Kent CT5 2FL, United Kingdom. Fax 44-1227-274415. iatefl@compuserve.com, http://www.iatefl.org

April 6-9, 2000. California TESOL (CATESOL), Sacramento. Contact Janet Lane, Linguistics Program, UC Davis, One Shields Ave., Davis, California 95616. Tel. 530-754-6357. Fax 530-758-0134. http://www.catesol.org/confer.html

April 8-9. TESOL Greece. Contact Eleni Giannopoulou, 40-42 Mikras Assias str., 115 27 Athens, Greece. Tel. +01-7488-459. Fax +01-7488-411.

April 8-10, 2000. Higher Colleges of Technology. Technological Education and National Development (TEND), Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Contact Secretariat, Higher Colleges of Technology, PO Box 25026, Abu Dhabi, UAE. tend@hct.ac.ae, http://www.hct.ac.ae

April 12-14, 2000. TESOL Arabia, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates. Contact Les Kirkham, HCT, Al Ain Women’s College, PO Box 17258, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates. Fax 971-3-622920. leslie.kirkham@hct.ac.ae, http://tesolarabia.uaeu.ac.ae/tesol/mission.html

April 13-16, 2000. Northeast Conference on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, Washington, D.C. Contact Northeast Conference, Dickinson College, PO Box 1773, Carlisle, Pennsylvania 17013-2896. Tel. 717-245-1977. Fax 717-245-1976. nectfl@dickinson.edu, http://www.dickinson.edu/nectfl/

April 17-19, 2000. Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization Regional Language Centre (SEAMEO), Singapore. Contact Seminar Secretariat, SEAMEO Regional Language Centre, 30 Orange Grove Rd., Singapore 258352. Tel. +65-737-9044. Fax +65-734-2753. admn@relc.org.sg, http://www.relc.org.sg

April 18-21, 2000. University of Holguón, Cuba. II International Workshop on Foreign Language Teaching, Holguón, Cuba. Contact Lic. Arturo Leyva, Gerente Agencia de Viajes Mercadu, Prof. Vilma Pàez Perez, Universidad de Holguón, “Oscar Lucero Moya,” Ave. XX Aniversario, Gaveta Postal 57, Holguón 80100, Cuba. Tel. 53-24-481324×32. Fax +53-24-481843. vilma@uho.hlg.edu.cu

April 25-29, 2000. Fachverband Moderne Fremdsprachen TESOL (FMFTESOL). Berlin, Germany. Contact Helmut Hagge, Lichtensteinweg 23, 22391 Hamburg, Germany. Tel. +4940-539-0138. Fax 4940-600-3681.

May 4-6, 2000. Georgetown University Round Table on Language and Linguistics (GURT). Conference, Washington, DC. Contact Ai-hui Tan. Tel. 202-687-5659. tana@gusun.georgetown.edu

May 12-13, 2000. IATEFL Chile, Santiago. misabel@ctcreuna.cl

May 19-21, 2000. Venezuela TESOL (VENTESOL), Caracas. Contact Lucius Daniel, Conference Chair, Interidiomas, Av. Romulo Gallegos, Torre Capital, PB-Local 3, Los Dos Caminos, Caracas, Venezuela. Tel. +582-232-5969. Fax +582-232-2812. marychap@ven.net, iidiomas@internet.ve

May 30-June 3, 2000. CALICO, Tucson, Arizona. Contact CALICO, 214 Centennial Hall, Southwest Texas State University, 601 University Dr., San Marcos, Texas 78666. Tel. 512-245-1417. Fax 512-245-9089. info@calico.org, http://www.calico.org/calico00.html

July 2-5, 2000. Australian Council of TESOL Associations and QATESOL, Brisbane. Contact Jenny Miller. J.Miller@mailbox.uq.edu.au

July 9-14, 2000. University of Melbourne, Australia. 27th International Systemic Functional Linguistics Congress. Contact ISFC 27, Department of Language, Literacy, and Arts Education, Level 5, Doug McDonnell Building, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic 3052, Australia. isfc27@edfac.unimelb.edu.au, http://www.edfac.unimelb.edu.au/LLAE/new/conferences.html

July 9-14, 2000. International Pragmatics Association (IPrA), Budapest, Hungary. Contact IPrA Secretariat, PO Box 33 (Antwerp 11), B-2018 Antwerp, Belgium. Tel. +32-3-230-55-64. Fax +32-3-230-55-64. ipra@uia.ua.ac.be, http://ipra-www.uia.ac.be

July 17-20, 2000. Brazil TESOL (BRAZ-TESOL) Sao Paulo. Contact Nadia Sarkis, c/o BRAZ-TESOL, Rua Vitoria 486, Sao Paulo SP 01210-000 Brazil. Tel. +55-(0)11-2415195. nadias@yazigi.net.br or braztesol@nox.net

September 7-10, 2000. SLRF, University of Wisconsin – Madison. Topic: Past, present and future of second language research. slrf2000@studentorg.wisc.edu, http://mendota.english.wisc.edu/~SLRF

November 16-19, 2000. ACTFL, Boston. Information: ACTFL, 6 Executive Plaza, Yonkers, NY 10701. Tel. 914-963-8830, Fax 914-963-1275. http://www.actfl.org

December 27-30, 2000. Modern Language Association of America (MLA), TBA. Contact MLA, 10 Astor Place, New York, New York 10003-6981. Fax 212-477-9863. E-mail convention@mla.org

March 11-14, 2001. AAAL, St. Louis. http://aaal.org

March, 2001. TESOL, St. Louis. Contact TESOL Conventions Dept., 1600 Cameron Street Suite 300, Alexandria, VA 22314. Tel. 703-836-0774. Fax 703-836-7864. conv@tesol.edu http://www.tesol.edu

November 26-28, 2001. American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL), Washington, DC. Contact ACTFL, 6 Executive Plaza, Yonkers, New York 10701-6801. Tel. 914-963-8830. Fax 914-963-1275. actflhq@aol.com, http://www.actfl.org/

November 22-25, 2001. Japan Association for Language Teaching. Pan Asian Conference 3 at JALT 2001, Kitakyushu, Japan. Contact David McMurray, Japan Association for Language Teaching, NPO Urban Edge Building, 5th flr., 1-37-9 Taito, Taito-ku, Tokyo 110-0016. Fax 81-776-61-6014. mcmurry@fpu.ac.jp, http://www.jalt.org

March, 2002, AAAL, Salt Lake City. http://aaal.org

March, 2002. TESOL, Salt Lake City. Contact TESOL Conventions Dept., 1600 Cameron Street Suite 300, Alexandria VA 22314. Tel. 703-836-0774. Fax 703-836-7864. Email conv@tesol.edu, http://www.tesol.edu

November, 2002. ACTFL, Salt Lake City. http://www.actfl.org

March, 2003. TESOL, Baltimore. Contact TESOL Conventions Dept., 1600 Cameron Street Suite 300, Alexandria, VA 22314. Tel. 703-836-0774. Fax 703-836-7864. conv@tesol.edu http://www.tesol.edu

March, 2004. TESOL, Long Beach (tentative). Contact TESOL Conventions Dept., 1600 Cameron Street Suite 300, Alexandria, VA 22314. Tel. 703-836-0774. Fax 703-836-7864. conv@tesol.edu

 

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