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Approved by the Mānoa Faculty Senate on February 16, 2011
3 opposed.

[Pdf]

REPORT ON FACULTY FELLOWSHIP POLICY

The University of Hawaii at Mānoa as a leading research university has a strong interest in promoting the intellectual development and research careers of all of its faculty. We have nationally and internationally ranked programs and well-known faculty in a broad range of fields. Faculty in these fields operate in very different circumstances, according to the traditions of the disciplines and according to the levels of external funding for research in those fields. As a university with a broad commitment to knowledge production and transmission in an array of disciplines, we have to be careful to make sure that we develop policies that work for faculty in the full range of disciplines we represent.

Time to devote fully to the pursuit of research opportunities is a key aspect in the life of any faculty member's career. While funding for such research work is relatively more plentiful in most STEM fields, even the most prestigious and competitive faculty fellowships in the humanities, the arts, some fields in social sciences, and some other disciplines rarely come with stipends that match faculty salaries. A Guggenheim fellowship is arguably the most prestigious award that a faculty member in the arts or humanities can receive, yet the average award for a Guggenheim last year was $43,200, while most of the other highly prestigious awards offer between $40,000 and $60,000, at best matching the salaries of assistant professors but in most cases not even matching that. Some of these fellowship programs expect the home universities of the applicants to provide some matching support (akin to cost share commonly expected in the sciences), which means that faculty from universities that do not provide such cost share will not be competitive, and given that such awards are an important arena for institutional prestige and recognition in their own right (not even counting the results of the work the faculty member will complete as a result), universities telling their faculty that they are on their own are losing important opportunities for external recognition. Above all, an absence of such support means that faculty often have to take a substantial paycut in order to pursue such opportunities: this reduces the number who apply, means that those in more favorable economic circumstances already may be more likely to apply for and therefore receive such recognition, and therefore is a substantial disincentive that affects the entire institution.

The University of Hawaii at Mānoa would therefore like to propose the following policy framework that individual schools and colleges are free to adopt if they choose to do so. In other words, it is a matter of individual school or college decision making whether to adopt such a policy, as well as how to implement it, but the institution authorizes schools and colleges to adopt such a policy if they believe it fits the disciplines within their respective scope.

Tenured or tenure-stream faculty members with offers of individual fellowships that do not cover their full salary may request that the University cover the gap between that award amount and their full salary if the following conditions obtain:

  1. the faculty member must be tenure-track or tenured and in good standing at the university;
  2. the chair must endorse this request and certify that the department will be able to cover the faculty member's responsibilities;
  3. the award must be of the kind that can be paid directly to the university, in the form of a grant to the institution, not an individual award to the faculty member;
  4. the award must be a prestigious research award, a source of prestige to the faculty member and the institution;
  5. the award must cover a sufficient portion of the faculty member's salary that his or her instructional duties can be replaced for less than the amount of the award by an instructor, lecturer, or some other non-tenure-track appointment (the normal return to the department would be funds necessary to hire a 1.0 FTE lecturer, enabling the department to add to its curricular offerings);
  6. the faculty member must inform the chair of his or her intent at the time of application (in order to ensure that condition #2 be met if the application is successful).

The dean would be the decision-maker on all such matters, and if the decision were made to support the request, he or she would normally be releasing funds necessary to replace the faculty member’s teaching to the department. As the award would go to the institution, all applicable ORS and OVCRGE policies and procedureswould need to be adhered to. It is the intent of the OVCRGE to waive applicable overhead (e.g., IDC/F & A) on these awards but this needs to be handled on a case-by-case basis between the dean and the VCRGE.

Time spent on a fellowship of this kind would normally not count towards sabbatical leave from the University of Hawaii since such fellowships normally involve absence from the university; however, if a faculty member remains on campus and fulfills all other university duties during the fellowship, then that time should count towards sabbatical leave. This could count towards the probationary period for tenure track faculty but approvalin writing by the dean about whether it will count or not must be arrived at before the start of the leave.

The expectation would be that in the cases of all tenure-stream but untenured faculty, that the institution would cover the full gap between the award and the faculty member’s salary. However, for tenured faculty with higher salaries, the policy would retain the option of partial coverage of the gap, and in no cases would the university pay more than 50% of the salary. If 50% support from the University still left a gap, the faculty member could agree to a temporary reduction in salary in such a case, with the understanding that when the fellowship was over, the faculty member would return to the regular salary to which he or she was entitled. Faculty members who receive gap compensation are expected to return to their school or college for at least one academic year or return the gap compensation to their unit. Any faculty member who chooses to accept a fellowship withapproval of the Dean will be assured their position on returning to the University.

Appendix:

The Committee on Professional Matters developed the following table which they intended as an illustration of the possible range of situations covered under the policy.

Tenured

Salary

UH Appt

Duration of Fellowship

Salary Equivalent

Fellowship Amount

Maximum Gap Compensation

Likely Compensation

Y

$65,000

11 month

Year

$65,000

$45,000

$32,500

$20,000

Y

$175,000

11 month

3 months

$43,750

$20,000

$21,875

$21,875

Y

$175,000

11 month

Year

$175,000

$60,000

$87,500

$87,500

Y

$92,000

9 month

Year

$92,000

$42,000

$46,000

$46,000

N

$44,000

9 month

3 months

$14,667

$10,000

Full gap

$4,667

N

$44,000

11 month

Year

$44,000

$37,000

Full gap

$7,000

N

$44,000

11 month

Year

$44,000

$24,000

Full gap

$20,000

Y

$55,000

9 month

Year

$59,000

$35,000

$29,500

$24,000