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Communicate with the Senate

Contents

Remarks by UH President Evan Dobelle
     State's Current Revenue
     New Appointments
     Right-Sizing the University
     Appointment of Allan Ah San
     Permanent Chancellor
     Procedure for Appointment of Senior VP
     Neubauer to Continue in 2 Posts?
     Faculty Club
     CIP Fund for Repairs and Maintenance
     Why Ah San?
     Fate of Administrators and Managers
     External Reviewers for UH Managers
     Unions Represented on Personnel Committees
     Mortimer's $81 million project
     Faculty Involvement in Dormitories
     Transparency and CIP Proposals
     Honors College
     Criticism for Mistakes
     Marketing Survey
     Would he Move to Another Island
Committee Reports
CAPP
     Special Course Number for International Exchange Students
     Move Marine Sciences Option from SOEST to CNS
CAB
     Update on Permanent Chancellor Search
GEC
     Progress on General Core
Strategic Planning - Karl Kim
     Course Scheduling
     Update on Strategic Planning Effort
New APT Classification - Peggy Hong
     Changes for Civil Service and Secretaries?
Chair's Report

University of Hawai'i at Manoa Faculty Senate, Meeting November 21, 2001

William S Richardson School of Law Classroom 2

Forty-two Senators were present and signed in:
Roger Babcock, Cristina Bacchilega, Hazel Beh, Rhonda Black, Robert Bley-Vroman, Glenn Cannon, Catherine Cavaletto, Paul Chandler, Craig Chaudron, Meda Chesney-Lind, Joanne Cooper, Thomas Craven, James Dator, Sandy Davis, Ernestine Enomoto, Charles Fletcher, David Flynn, Michael Forman, Pamela Fujita- Starck, Donna Fukuda, Michael Garcia, Emily Hawkins, Val Kanuha, Spencer Leineweber, Peter Manicas, Thomas Morelli, Roy Nishimoto, Jeanne Oka, Robert Paull, David Sanders, Frank Sansone, Gwen Sinclair, Wayne Smith, Dan Spears, John Stimson, Elizabeth Tam, Mary Tiles, Jean Toyama, Charles Weems, Lynne Wilkens, Kelley Withy, and Sylvia Yuen.

Six Senators were excused:
Douglas Bomberger, Kent Bridges, Robert Grace, Merle Kataoka-Yahiro, Jane Schoonmaker, and Brent Sipes; also excused, Deane Neubauer.

Twenty-one Senators were absent:
Elaine Bailey, G D Bryant-Greenwood, Katalin Csiszar, Eric DeCarlo, H Gert DeCouet, Nancy Dowling, Carl Evensen, Richard Frankel, Patricia Fryer, John Goss, Tony Guerrero, John Hardman, Amelia Jenkins, Stacey Marlow, James Marsh [present but did not sign in?], John Melish, Neal Milner, Damon Sakai, Irwin Schatz, Richard Schmidt, and Frank Walton.

The following others also signed in:
Evan S Dobelle, Karl E Kim, Pat Omandam (Star-Bulletin), Lynne Higa (CASSAS), Sherwood Maynard (MOP), Joe O'Mealy (LLL), Peggy Hong (OHR), Wendy Pearson (MCO). Emanuel Drechsel (Liberal Studies), Thomas Hilgers (MWP), Ralph Moberly (G&G), Ken Tokuno (MCO), David Ross (Math), B Keever (Communications), George Wilkens (Math), Robert McHenry (English), C L Chia, Ron Cambra (A&S), S Ferreira (PEPS), Ginny Tanji (JABSOM), Ed Porter (SHAPS), Barbara Polk (OVPPP), Jim Caron and Alex Malahoff.

1. Chairm'am Cooper opened the meeting at 3:05. The minutes of the meeting of 17 October were approved.

Remarks by UH President Evan Dobelle

2. President Dobelle was welcomed. He greeted the Senate with "Aloha" and explained that he was sorry that Interim Chancellor Neubauer could not be present, but that he was in Hilo in his capacity as system Vice President for Academic Affairs. He explained further for the benefit of those not senators and perhaps unfamiliar with his practice with respect to the Senate that he would simply give an update on his activities and then leave.

State's Current Revenue

His first point concerned the State's current revenue picture. He had come from a meeting of the Governor's cabinet this day. The State is in mild recession, and there was an expectation of a 1% mid-year cut (which obviously would total something higher for the entire year).

New Appointments

His next point was the new appointments he has made under powers granted him by the Board of Regents. These followed EEO guidelines. There were twelve finalists out of a group which had contained 8 whites, 7 non-whites. His two top choices had been Asian women, but he was unsuccessful in persuading them to accept the positions. He spoke confidently about the ability of the two men he was able to hire.

Right-Sizing the University

He spoke of the question of "the right-sizing issue", talking about the burden of having to make decisions which might be harmful to persons' careers, and of not liking to do it. He explained that the letters to 230 or 240 (checking with Peggy Hong for clarification) were intended to give him flexibility. He was trying, he explained, to get the bureaucracy aligned. He considered it at present "reasonably stifling". He cited the Linda Campanella et al. report put up on the web last Friday and being edited for final presentation. He spoke of the University having "extraordinary potential" and being "already great in many ways," but, he said, it has not nearly reached its potential.

Appointment of Allan Ah San

He also reported another senior appointment, that of Allan Ah San, who would report directly to President Dobelle and be responsible for all capital (improvement) projects. [Charlotte informed me at this point that the Senate had attained a quorum for the meeting]. President Dobelle noted the Governor's generosity, with $264 million in capital projects, about one-quarter of a billion dollars over the next twelve-to-fourteen months. He appointed Ah San to insure that there would be one person in charge, thus making it clear where accountability lies.

Permanent Chancellor

The President said next that he awaits the Senate's recommendations with respect to the search for a permanent chancellor. This, he reiterated, is to be purely a faculty matter. He would hope, he said, that researchers, support staff, and students might be involved in the search committee, but he would leave that to faculty to decide. If a search firm is to be employed, the faculty should decide what such a firm should accomplish. Dobelle hoped for three candidates to select from, as soon as possible. It is his intention to make the appointment by the end of the school year, with the permanent chancellor to take the post certainly by August 1.

That, he concluded was the sum of what he had been doing. He noted the Senate's full agenda, and offered to return the floor to Chair Cooper. (It was 3:15 at that point). Chair Cooper asked if he was willing to take questions, and he agreed to do so.

Procedure for Appointment of Senior VP

The first question was from Senator Mary Tiles. She asked about the procedure for appointment of a Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs. President Dobelle replied that the BOR had voted that authority to him at the March meeting. The VPAA would be chosen by him, probably with advice from a committee of administrators who would be working with the person selected. This choice would not be made until after the faculty had chosen the Chancellor at Manoa. Alternatively, if this search should end up being conducted in a parallel way, the selection would be made with sensitivity to the criteria the faculty set for the Manoa selection. President Dobelle declared firmly that he will insist on "gender equity at the top."

Neubauer to Continue in 2 Posts?

The second question (MT follow-up) noted that Deane Neubauer was serving in the two posts of interim chancellor for Manoa and system VPAA. Would the joint appointment continue?

President Dobelle said that this would definitely not be the case. He said that it had been established before he came that the faculty wanted a chancellor who would be the advocate for the campus. This debate was settled before he arrived.

At this point he started to talk about "Kit and I" in personal terms, saying that the publicity on College Hill was the "last thing we needed". He mentioned the possibility that College Hill might properly be the home for the Chancellor of Manoa. He said that matters like where the President ought to be housed had, to his knowledge, not ever been talked about.

Then he returned more directly to the question and insisted: "It's a separate position." He mentioned that he had thought about turning College Hill into a faculty club, but that there was a problem in the agreement between the University and the donor, the Atherton Family.

Faculty Club

Quickly President Dobelle was asked: "Are you still committed to a faculty club?" The President said that he was, and that presently he was asking the Foundation to engage in negotiation for a property "pretty close to here" which might serve this purpose.

CIP Fund for Repairs and Maintenance

Senator Sansone asked about the CIP fund for repairs and maintenance. President Dobelle cited the figure of 9.4 million, but made it clear that decisions about use of this money would be in the hands of Interim Chancellor Neubauer and/or Vice Chancellor Kim. He mentioned his own thoughts about Varney Circle and his hope that the money would be used to "make an impact" but that the decisions would be made at the Chancellor's level.

Why Ah San?

The next question was with regard to the selection of Allan Ah San. The speaker said he had been critical of Ah San's stewardship. President Dobelle responded by talking about Jack Bradshaw. Dobelle in this context praised KaLeo, comparing them favorably to the local press. Bradshaw, he explained, had been in charge of DAGS in Massachusetts under Governor Dukakis. President Dobelle expected to bring Bradshaw in every six weeks to serve as his senior consultant. Allan Ah San would be the operational officer, but Bradshaw would be looking closely over his shoulder. The President spoke of angering quite a few people recently when he told them: "I don't trust anybody in this room." He explained that he himself was quite angry with a bill he received for $100,000 in overtime costs, which, he complained, he had never received even a memo warning him to anticipate. He said that Bradshaw told him there is "no S.O.P. (standard operating procedure) here." There will be a process of accountability instituted so that President Dobelle can have confidence in what he is being told. Things as they are right now are not right.

Fate of Administrators and Managers

The next question concerned criteria for deciding the fate of the 200+ administrators and managers. Dobelle said that faculty have to be involved in developing process. The President said we needed to begin with "zero-base budgeting" and each employee would have to explain why she/he is needed.

External Reviewers for UH Managers

A follow-up question concerned participation of external reviewers in this process. Dobelle said no to this, that it would be done by Deane and himself. He explained that he had to have options, he has to understand "why we have all these people." He said that most of these people were making seventy-to-eighty thousand dollars a year. Peggy Hong amended this by noting that there were some earning as low as $45,000.

Unions Represented on Personnel Committees

Senator Chesney-Lind asked about inclusion of people represented presently by unions.

President Dobelle said he wanted to sit down with the union leadership first, but, he insisted, no one can be "held harmless". His reality was that if he did not send out these one-year notices, then when it was clear to him that certain people were not needed, he would be forced by contractual arrangements to wait a year from that point, and he did not want such a constraint. Then he cited a 900 million CIP figure, saying that the Governor intended to re-submit the budget that had not made it through the special session of the legislature just finished. Jump- starting the economy was at issue. 70 million at least was needed for the theater and for dorms. The President said that the dormitories are "embarrassing, really" and that he suspected few senators had ever visited dorms.

Mortimer's $81 million project

Senator Weems asked about an 81 million dollar project under former president Mortimer, wondering if anything had been done with that? President Dobelle said he would have to look into details, that he did not have particular information on the past in this respect, but that it would be his preference to tear things down and build anew rather than spend so much on refurbishing. He mentioned a figure of 30 million that had been estimated as cost of refurbishing Frear Hall. Dobelle said certainly a new dorm could be build right with that kind of money.

Faculty Involvement in Dormitories

Senator Forman asked what ideas the President might have been entertaining with regard to faculty involvement in the dormitories. He answered that there was some exploration of providing students small amounts of money to enable them to invite faculty to come and share meals with them in the dormitories. He went on to talk about his dismay at discovery of how student fee funds were being spent currently on building maintenance and not on support of student activities. Of 1.8 million generated in student fees, 1.5 million was being consumed for maintenance. Roof repairs were needed. Dobelle asked why that sort of repair money should come from student fees, and why those funds should not be spent instead on things like opening up the amphitheater, having the Honolulu Symphony playing pops at noon, and so on. He said he suspected "someone with a very tight green eyeshade" had somehow figured out how to slip these repair and maintenance bills to the students and he thought it outrageous. He said that we ought to be awarding honorary degrees (like that awarded to Marcel Marceau recently) once a week. He was concerned to make a change in campus atmosphere.

Transparency and CIP Proposals

The next question was with regard to transparency and the CIP proposals: could a complete list be made available? President Dobelle said that such a list could be made available.

Then he noted that "the Regents have delegated me enormous authority over the last several months." Deane Neubauer is prioritizing the CIP list. He mentioned again his own idea that Varney Circle deserved attention in this regard, especially for symbolic value. Whether his own notions would make it to Neubauer's priority list or not he did not know. He said that it was not his desire to be "cute, politically" but then he urged further thinking about West O'ahu, saying that there were six-to-eight thousand students of the sort he calls "transitional", who are merely looking for employment, who did not really belong on this campus -- [which ought to be exclusively for students seeking a transformational education] and that the transitional students belonged in a campus of the California State system sort. He asked if the Senate was aware that 80% of current students are Hawai'i residents.

He said his effort was to "do something symbolic" -- and then he urged Senators to read the Campanella report.

Honors College

Professor Drechsel asked about Honors College. President Dobelle said he was just spinning pictures, waiting to be told that this or that was a dumb idea. The idea of an honors college had to be something vetted by the faculty, and then it would be up to the President to go after the "add-on" money required. He said he imagined finding money for merit scholarships to attract local residents. He mentioned Georgia as a model. He said he imagined an honors college might well have a liberal arts orientation, but that was another dimension to be discussed. He talked about "the kids in Hawai'i who don't look at us now," saying that he wanted to change that, and to make this campus a first choice for them. We don't have the right image now. And it's not just the right image that we don't have. The student body today mixes students who don't fit together. There is nothing illegitimate about being a transitional student; the point is that such students just do not belong here at this campus. He mentioned statistics about the student who is 26 years of age, is married, working, perhaps has children, and is living west of Aloha Stadium. He noted that there are 70,000 students K-through-12 in the Leeward and Central school districts, both of which are west of Aloha Stadium.

He invited Senators and others in the audience to communicate with him by e-mail or to come by and see him. He noted that it might take a couple of weeks to schedule such a face- to-face appointment. He said working on these matters "takes all of me."

Criticism for Mistakes

He mentioned criticisms he has received, mistakes he is said to be making. He said he wanted to be told about mistakes, or, alternatively, that he would tell us about mistakes he made. But he felt we were doing better, and that it was his goal to build a constituency. Some said he might be moving too fast, but, he said, he has been talking to people he thought were people we've never heard of. He said he had given nine speeches recently, and would give two more today. These were mostly to people who were never involved with the university.

Marketing Survey

He mentioned his marketing survey, done 7-10 September, saying that two things stood out: (1) that 78% of respondents rated UH as "excellent" or "good", and (2) that, asked to say why they held that opinon, 69% said, in effect, "just because" and that 20% mentioned athletics. Another 9% said it was because of their notions of the new president. The point, he said, is that the public does not really know UH. The respondents do not know why UH really is good-to-excellent, even while agreeing that it is. He compared public treatment of himself and of Coach June Jones. He said that the public does not know about languages or marine options or astronomy. They do know about football rankings. His conclusion is that it is up to us to do a better job (of informing them about the ways in which UH is excellent). President Dobelle spoke about people of white or Japanese ancestry who are earning $75,000+, saying that such people do not care about UH, and send their children to the mainland. These are the people in power, the decision-makers, but they do not know UH. They just think that their kids are going to USC or to Yale. President Dobelle said "I've got to bring them back in." Such people do not understand the success, or the value of the $216-219 million in research funds that UH brings in. But they are the power elite. The major supporters of UH, the people who do send their kids to UH, are a poorer group.

That in part, he suggested, explains why it is that the faculty in the community colleges are paid at the 60th percentile, while we at Manoa lag behind near the 20th percentile in salaries among Research I universities.

President Dobelle wished those present a Happy Thanksgiving. He said that his family was having 50-60 kids over on Thursday. He was asked if he was doing the cooking. Laughing, he responded that it was going to be a Sodex'ho turkey.

He said that he had been highly visible over the past four months, but that it was not going to be so in the future. He was finished with the easy stuff but now would be going about the difficulty challenge of bringing in the dollars needed. He needed, he stressed, to have people working with him who brought imagination and speed to the tasks.

Would he Move to Another Island

Another questioner asked: Would you move to another island? He responded lightly that (his son) Harry has discovered girls (at Punahou) and would not permit such a move. The President said again that the BOR had not really given thought to the question of the president's residential location. He mentioned the Charlot home, newly deeded to the University. He talked about this as one among other possibilities. He said that the presidency had not ever really been defined. He asked whether Senators thought that his office ought to be in Bachman Hall, or somewhere else. He contrasted different models universities such as Wisconsin had, concerning President and Chancellor close or distant. He said it would be his style to help some neighborhood strip mall recover by moving in there. He urged the Senate to think about what kind of leadership was wanted. He mentioned Australia, Hong Kong, mainland China, and Japan as possible sites for searching for desired leaders.

It was pointed out that Hawaii Hall was a traditional locus for the office of leadership. President Dobelle turned the floor back to Chair Cooper. (It was 3:47, more than thirty minutes of Q&A having extended the President's presentation, initially just ten minutes in duration).

Committee Reports

CAPP

3. Two resolutions from CAPP were introduced:

Special Course Number for International Exchange Students

3.1. Paul Chandler (Spanish) introduced a Resolution relating to The Establishment of a Special Course Number For Registering Students at UHM Who Will Be Participating in Interanational Exchange Programs. After a brief introductory explanation by Chandler, Senator Hawkins asked if the 099 would not count toward graduation. Senator Chandler explained that 099 is "just a place holder" and that the college's departments would plug in specific courses to be used in the count toward graduation. Senator Hawkins then asked if the resolution had been "run by" Jeanne Oka. As Senator Oka was present, she volunteered the comment that "it'll work." She underscored that double counting was undesirable and that this would not allow such double counting. Another question was asked, this about non-international study. Senator Davis said that these are transfer courses which come to her and were not a problem. Further discussion concerned needs for improvement in the information system.

The resolution was brought to vote and was approved, 38 votes for the resolution, none against, none abstaining.

Move Marine Sciences Option from SOEST to CNS

3.2. Roger Babcock (Civil Engineering) presented a Resolution Relating to Transfer of the Marine Option Program from SOEST to CNS (College of Natural Sciences). Discussion of this resolution centered on the fact that as the agreement to transfer MOP to CNS, space for MOP in the new location was not committed. Senator Babcock expressed the view that the Senate would not be comfortable supporting the move without provision of stability in terms of space. A question was asked regarding whether or not the Chancellor's office had been asked about space. [Vice Chancellor Kim was noted smiling broadly at this]. Senator Babcock answered that, Yes, there had been lots of discussion, spread over a couple of years. The adequacy of the space offered had not yet been fully resolved, although "CNS wants this, SOEST wants this, MOP wants this. . . ."

A question regarding SOEST's motive was deflected.

The resolution was approved with 37 voting to approve, none voting against, none abstaining.

CAB

4. There were two committee reports, one from CAB and one from GEC.

Update on Permanent Chancellor Search

4.1. Senator Mary Tiles presented a report on behalf of CAB, an update on the search for a permanent chancellor. Senator Tiles reported that there would be a website up, it was hoped, next week. The committee is asking for input. The search will start soon. She presented on overhead a list of responsibilities and requirements as tentatively spelled out so far, building on the document of approval from the July 2001 BOR meeting. She noted that CAB wishes to add that the candidate should be an academic, commanding respect from UHM faculty, who can provide academic leadership to the campus. She asked for the sense of the meeting: Is this the right list of responsibilities and requirements? Is there something we need to add? How do the Senators feel about the CAB addition. No opposition being voiced, Senator Tiles moved on to discussion of composition of the search committee. The composite she sketched out led to a question from Professor Drechsel regarding the presence of APT and Alumni representatives, given that the search is for a position with academic focus. Senator Tiles responded that the committee was meant to be inclusive. The next question concerned the manner in which the representatives on the committee were to be selected. Sen. Tiles commented that she had not yet had the opportunity to discuss this question with Chair Cooper, but that it was her understanding that CFS and the SEC would propose names. Joanne Cooper asked about the possible inclusion of someone from the University/Community partnership. Tiles said that this had been discussed in CAB, but the committee did not favor it. Another question concerned the possibility of representation from the system at large. Sen. Sansone objected vigorously, saying that this was to be a search by the faculty, and the decision was to be a faculty-driven decision. Sen. Sansone added that we need to move on this as soon as possible, getting the advertisement out by the end of this calendar year. He asked that Senators alert their colleagues to the website and the proposals to be found there. Sen. Tiles noted that in the deliberations of CAB there was envisioned a stage at which the community could be involved: three to five finalists would be brought in to interact with faculty. It was emphasized that there was a strong desire to ensure that there was a majority of faculty on this search committee. Another question concerned focus on undergraduate vs. graduate education. Why not just three faculty, said the questionner. Joanne Cooper and Mary Tiles responded that this sort of discussion might well come from the provisional material put up on the website.

Sen. Tiles said that the administration will assist the Senate with details in the search. That if we decide to have consultants, if we feel that it would be a good idea to have consultants identify candidates for us, or other such, that this would be possible. The view was expressed that we should see all the applications, in any case. Sen. Tiles spoke of the search process as being designed to be as open as possible, and to have as much meaningful participation as possible, from faculty, staff, students, alumni and community. She said that three candidates would be forwarded to the BOR. Sen. Chaudron questioned the role of the BOR. He felt that we might be giving the impression unintentionally that we were leaving the choice to them. Sen. Sansone clarified that the President will make the final decision. He has stated that he would prefer that we give him candidates' names unranked.

GEC

Progress on General Core

4.2. Peter Manicas presented the report from GEC. He said his remarks would be brief, that he wanted to note the progress being made. He said that responses to the hallmarks had been terrific and very helpful. He expressed the view that things would continue to get better. He assured the Senate that comments were being taken seriously and that the committee was "changing as we go."

The diversification aspect was, he said, in good shape and that chairs had discussed the various assignments to humanities or social sciences. This was thought also to be something which would make it into the Fall catalog. The foundations portion however was seen to be less good at present. The aim was still to have this settled by end of December and to make the catalog too.

Focus boards continue. The hope here is for inclusion in the Schedule of Classes for Fall 02.

Other items, ultimately as important as those above, but not yet settled, included articulation issues, "home entry" [???], the development of assessment procedures, and finally, the enhanced major program.

A senator, noting that advisors and students were very anxious about this, suggested that GEC communicate developments through KaLeo. Sen. Manicas said he thought this was a very good idea, and he thanked this senator and others for all the good suggestions that had been forthcoming.

Strategic Planning - Karl Kim

5. Interim Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Karl Kim was introduced next. Kim spoke first about course availability and, secondly, about strategic planning. He referred to tables of statistics on availability, exressed in terms of "seats scheduled", blocked out by time of day. He noted appreciatively the roles of Ken Tokuno and Roberta Enoki, the university's master scheduler. The tables mentioned were in the packet handed out to senators when they entered the meeting. Trends, which Kim said we were already pretty well aware of, included the following: that late morning was the most popular time, that 7:30am and late afternoon were the least popular times, and that there were changes in this once one factored for type of class. There is a particular problem, in planning change, for any course which straddled two time blocks, and Kim said this should be discouraged. One proposal under consideration was the idea of possibly abandoning the 7:30 start and making 8:00 the starting time. Sen. Garcia pointed out that 8:00am as starting time would surely be bad from the point of view of traffic. Sen. Mary Tiles commented on practice in the philosophy department, that they "try to double up, economizing faculty" and that they segregate morning for undergraduate classes, afternoon for graduate classes. Sen. Chesney-Lind observed (using her new word "incentivize") that the schedule might shift to MW and TR, reserving F for meetings, graduate seminars, and the like. She asked whether demand data might be made available. She also noted that parking might be made free after 1:30, to try to attract students to later classes. Sen. Fukuda asked about guaranteed parking, noting that in her program students resisted classes as late as 1:30 due to problems finding parking. She asked whether various lots might have staggered parking times, for example, as a possible solution to these problems.

VC Kim said that we ought to share the data and discuss the questions with faculty. Sen. Chaudron pointed out that another factor limiting classes in the later afternoon was the fact that both faculty and students have children exiting schools and day care facilities, so obligations to attend to children prevented some from later classes.

Course Scheduling

Sen. Manicas asked if the university might compare HPU's scheduling practices with our own. Joanne Cooper contextualized the discussion by pointing out that the overarching concern is what can be done to get students to graduate quicker. Another comment added the matter of custodial services into the picture. Sen. Sansone noted that the system does not presently provide information on which courses are actually in demand. VC Kim talked about deans' reports and said that we might learn more about reasons for closed-out courses, but he agreed that there were not systematic data available. Sen. Sansone suggested polling students with regard to demand. Another comment concerned HITS; it was observed that Manoa and Hilo course times do not match up, creating a difficulty for courses offered via HITS. Sen. Bacchilega expressed a desire for a computerized system which would offer us more relevant information on these matters. Another question concerned night classes and Outreach College. Kim pointed out that not all classes offered at night were under the control of Outreach College. This depended on individual units' control of classroom space. Calendar issues were added to the discussion as it wound down.

Update on Strategic Planning Effort

VCAA Kim's second topic was an update on the Strategic Planning effort. He pointed to the presence in handouts of a lot of data. He said that all the planning committees have now been appointed. He made a correction to the minutes note regarding a planned Nov. 30 meeting which would attempt to engage the community. He reported that this was now moved to Monday, December 3. He commented that the needs of this campus are really quite different from those of Hartford and the Trinity experience. To laughter, he suggested that we are really kind of "opposite" and that we needed to be thinking about the doughnut hole in the middle. He mentioned the Listening Project effort, now available in pdf and now with the capacity for response in electronic mode. He lamented having posted a question on the electronic bulletin board a week ago, but have received no answers to date. He asked if no one read that bulletin board. He reminded Senators of the msp@hawaii.edu address. Then he said that there was a second stage planned after the first stage Listening Project. This originally was going to be a retreat at Turtle Bay, but planners were dissuaded, given problems of inclusion. He spoke of the new plan for stage two being focused on "Open Space Technology", an idea credited to Harrison Owen. There is a handout in Senators' packets on this. The Open Space Technology event is planned for Friday, February 1. It is hoped that faculty will incorporate this into their syllabus planning (Sen. Bacchilega asked about this); Kim said one reason he was at the meeting was to ask faculty for their help. There was some talk about a rave as the culminating portion of this event (but there was back-bench disagreement as to whether this was Wendy Pearson's idea or Karl Kim's).

New APT Classification - Peggy Hong

6. Peggy Hong (Office of Human Resources) gave a short presentation on the new APT classifications and compensation system. The OHR is changing the way they classify and manage positions. There will be four ranks (A, B, C, and D), mimicking the faculty system of classification. The intent is to work this system-wide, creating a system which Hong said would emulate TPRCs, moving from the presently highly centralized system. IT had served as a demonstration project for this development. 1200 APTs are "in the throes of it now". On-line training is involved, and performance measures will be available electronically. UH Unix ID is necessary for any APT. Beginning in January and February, employees will go through this change-over in groups of 300. Job descriptions will be updated.

Changes for Civil Service and Secretaries?

Sen. Yuen asked about the possibility that such changes would also be developed for civil service and for secretaries. She expressed the view that this is needed. Peggy Hong replied that there were certain barriers impeding work toward that end. There was informal contact with BOR and that the University counsel's office was working on this. There was a desire to create a separate civil service classification for the university, but that there was resistance to that. A public reform act might be required. What was developing was not Chapter 304, but things developing were better than what had existed. She also noted that on- line recruiting methods are being developed.

Chair's Report

7. Joanne Cooper presented her Chair's Report. She has been representing the Senate at the University/Community Partnership meetings, the Transition Team meetings, the meetings of the Deans and Directors, the meetings between SEC and the Chancellor, and the meetings of the All-Campus Council of Faculty Senate Chairs. Issues current include strategic planning, the special salary adjustment, the budget, and the chancellor search. She pointed to feedback on the faculty conversation which was included in the handouts for the meeting, and she said that she intended for this conversation to continue.

There being no other business, the Senate adjourned at 5:00pm.

Respectfully submitted,

Michael L Forman
Secretary of the Senate


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