Search UHMFS

main | roster | committees | current session | minutes | documents | links | site index

Communicate with the Senate

Contents

University of Hawai'i at Manoa Faculty Senate, December 12, 2001

Chair's Report
     Brain Gain
     Permanent Chancellor
     Neubauer seeking University System Models
     Campus Cleanup
     Increase Internships
     Governor Announces a 1.1% Budget Cut
     Deans & Directors
     All-Campus Council of Faculty Senates
Committee Reports
CAPP
     Change in Program Name in KLS
     Merger of Programs in School of Education
VP Planning & Policy -- Colleen Sathre
     Student Graduation and Retention Rates
Strategic Planning Task Force -- David McClain
     Update on Activities
VP for Research -- SOEST Presentation
     VP Research vs Chancellor
     Funding
     Comparison with Other Universities
Committee Reports
Athletics
     NCAA Re-Certification
     Course and Grades for Athletes
     Self-Supporting Athletic Department
CAB
     Search for Permanent Chancellor
     Type of Person

University of Hawai'i at Manoa Faculty Senate, December 12, 2001

Architecture Auditorium

Forty-one Senators were present and signed in:
Roger Babcock, Cristina Bacchilega, Robert Bley-Vroman, Douglas Bomberger, Kent Bridges, Glenn Cannon, Catherine Cavaletto, Paul Chandler, Craig Chaudron, Meda Chesney- Lind, Joanne Cooper, Thomas Craven, James Dator, Sandy Davis, Carl Evensen, Charles Fletcher, David Flynn, Michael Forman, Richard Frankel, Pamela Starck-Fujita, Donna Fukuda, Robert Grace, Tony Guerrero, Val Kanuha, Merle Kataoka-Yahiro, James Marsh, Roy Nishimoto, Jeanne Oka, Damon Sakai, David Sanders, Frank Sansone, Jane Schoonmaker, Gwen Sinclair, Wayne Smith, Dan Spears, Mary Tiles, Jean Toyama, Frank Walton, Lynne Wilkens, Kelley Withy, and Sylvia Yuen.

Two Senators were excused:
Hazel Beh and Emily Hawkins.

Twenty-six Senators were absent:
Elaine Bailey, Rhonda Black, G D Bryant-Greennwood, Katalin Csiszar, Eric DeCarlo, H Gert DeCouet, Nancy Dowling, Ernestine Enomoto, Patricia Fryer, Michael Garcia, Jon Goss, John Hardman, Amelia Jenkins, Spancer Leineweber, Peter Manicas, Stacey Marlow, John Melish, Neal Milner, Thomas Morelli, Robert Paull, Irwin Schatz, Richard Schmidt, Brent Sipes, John Stimson, Elizabeth Tam, and Charles Weems.

1. Chairma'm Joanne Cooper opened the meeting at 3:04 and told a seasonal joke. There not yet being a quorum at starting time, discussion of the minutes of the November 21 meeting was temporarily set aside.

Chair's Report

2. Chair Cooper presented her Chair's Report, which focused on activities at various meetings which she attends on behalf of the Senate:

Brain Gain

2.1. The University/Community Partnership (whose meetings she attends) continues to work on its "Brain Gain" project (intended to assist in retaining bright local highschool graduates as students at UHM).

2.2. President's Executive Committee:

Permanent Chancellor

2.2.1. Progress is being made on the plans for a search for a permanent chancellor.

Neubauer seeking University System Models

2.2.2. Interim Chancellor Neubauer has traveled to North Carolina, Wisconsin, and Georgia seeking information on university system models which might be useful in our strategic planning.

Campus Cleanup

2.2.3. Plans are being made of a second campus clean up day, this to be held on the morning of January 19.

Increase Internships

2.2.4. The administration wishes to increase the number of internship opportunities for students, and this number has already shown recent growth.

Governor Announces a 1.1% Budget Cut

2.3. Meetings of the Budget Advisory Group -- a 1.1% cut announced from the Governor's Office; unfunded budget requests: some funded, some denied.

2.4. Meetings of the Deans and Directors:

Deans & Directors

2.4.1. The saga of the Special Salary Adjustment guidelines: a never-ending story.

2.4.2. The program of showcasing individual colleges at these meetings continues.

2.4.3. Discussion continues of Strategic Planning.

2.4.4. Graduation rates were discussed.

All-Campus Council of Faculty Senates

2.5. ACCFSC (All-Campus Council of Faculty Senate Chairs): An all-day conference will be held on January 11, to which all Senators are invited. 300 in all are expected to attend. System-wide configuration will be one of the topics.

Committee Reports

CAPP

3. Two CAPP resolutions were presented, but first Chairma'm Cooper thanked CAPP for its hard work this semester.

3.1. Senator Chaudron offered some information first (a quorum check indicating that at this point the Senate was three shy of a quorum). He discussed the interest in a change in the grading policy, permitting plus and minus grading, as one of the items most important for CAPP to receive input on. There would be no resolution presented on this as yet, deliberation being needed, but Senators were requested to think about this and to stimulate discussion among faculty. This might come back to the floor in, Chaudron estimated, a month or so.

[A quorum was attained at 3:11pm].

Concern was raised, particularly coming from the English Department, that the current ISIS system does not check whether or not students have pre-requisites before enrolling them in classes. The absence of checks here, coupled with rules against back-tracking, creates problems.

Change in Program Name in KLS

3.2. Senator Chaudron then called the Senate's attention to the resolution proposals in Senators' packets.

3.2.1. The first is the "Resolution relating to change in name and program requirements of the Health/Exercise Science option of the Bachelor of Science in the Department of Kinesiology and Leisure Sciences, College of Education." The resolution has developed in the aftermath of loss of four out of fourteen facultm members in the department, and a shift in practice toward greater involvement of graduates in management. Senator Chaudron asked Professor Hetzler, of the affected department, to field questions.

The first question was: What happens to the health part? The reply was: It remains a focus. This is not the health education program; that is a separate program. Professor Hetzler explained that in the past ten years there has been a major shift toward jobs current in the fitness industry. Changes made in the 1990s involved "retrenchment" and retirement. The DOE not hiring in the field also affected the picture. Resources were alloted elsewhere.

A second question was a follow-up to the first: Is there no health education program now? Professor Hetzler replied Yes, but that he did not see the relevance to this resolution. He said that the department did not have the faculty to meet that demand.

Senator Chesney-Lind then asked why the degree was still a bachelor of science, with emphasis on science, given the diminishing involvement of science in the requirements with respect to the older requirements. Prof. Hetzler listed current requirements of a science-focused nature including Physiology 301 and 302, and Biochemistry 341. He noted that the program has graduated 78 students. Then he talked about how the fitness industry has been changing over the past fifteen years. Companies are now subcontracting, in order to avoid costs of overhead and benefits. The jobs that exist today are to be found in the military and in the private, commercial fitness field. The proposed change is an attempt to better meet student needs.

Senator Chesney-Lind persisted: Why a "BS"? Is there another option there? Prof. Hetzler replied that there remains a large science component in the program proposed. Furthermore, for some, "management is 'science'". Senator Chesney-Lind stated that she was not questioning the value of the proposed or extant program; her question was only whether the degree ought to be a "BS" or a "BA". Prof. Hetzler noted the ten credits in physiology, three credits in biochemistry, and the additions of three credits in information and computer science plus statistics.

The resolution was passed by a vote of thirty for, one opposed, three abstaining.

Merger of Programs in School of Education

3.2.2. Senator Chaudron then introduced the second of the two CAPP-sponsored resolutions. This is the resolution "Relating to Approval of Merger of Programs for Masters of Education in Elementary & Secondary Education to Masters of Education in Curriculum Studies." Senator Chaudron invited Senator Frank Walton (who was present) and Professor Stephanie Feeney (who was not) to take any questions. There being no discussion, a vote was taken. The resolution was passed unanimously.

Senator Chaudron closed with a reminder to the Senate of the ISIS problem he raised at the beginning of his presentation (3.1.). It was then 3:35pm.

VP Planning & Policy -- Colleen Sathre

Student Graduation and Retention Rates

4. Chair Cooper then introduced Vice President for Planning and Policy Colleen Sathre. VP Sathre presented with PowerPoint and handouts a report on student graduation and retention rates, which, she said, she had been asked by Interim Chancellor Neubauer to share with the Senate. This being a complex study, she said, it was best to begin with definitions of key terms.

graduation rate: the percent of students, in an entering cohort, who graduate within a designated time period (usually 4, 5, or 6 years);

average years to graduate: the average number of years within a designated time period (usually 6 years) it takes an entering cohort of students to graduate;

success rate: the percentage of students who graduate plus the percentage of students who are still enrolled;

time to degree: the average years it takes a graduating class of students to receive their degrees; and

benchmarks vs. peer, where benchmarks, developed internally, reflect the desire to understand where UHM stands relative to well-known institutions (U Michigan, Ann Arbor; U California, Berkeley; U California, Los Angeles; U Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; U Wisconsin, Madison; U California, Davis; U Washington; U Florida; Indiana U, Bloomington); and peer, developed by NCHEMS, using multiple criteria such as institutional character, faculty, finance, enrollment, etc. (U Virginia, main campus; U No. Carolina, Chapel Hill; U California, Davis; U Georgia; UHM and Iowa State U. Dr. Sathre explained that Interim Chancellor Neubauer had asked for those particular groupings.

The findings are readily available at the following web sites, as provided by Dr. Sathre: MAPS Reports (MAPS : Management and Planning Support) at http://www.hawaii.edu/iro/maps.htm Graduation and Retention Rates: at http://www.hawaii.edu/cgi-bin/iro/maps?cgma99.pdf SAT Report at http://hawaii.edu/cgi-bin/iro/maps?satmaf00.pdf UHM Graduating Senior Survey: at http://www.hawaii.edu/ovppp/inter/intergradsurv830.htm First-Time Freshmen at UHM: at http://www.hawaii.edu/osa/ovpsa_assessment.htm Ad-Hoc Studies: at http://www.hawaii.edu/iro/adhoc/

Vice President Sathre ended her presentation and turned the floor back to Chair Cooper at 3:47pm.

5. The Minutes for the Senate Meeting of November 21, 2001 were then discussed. One query concerned a blank on page five. Secretary Forman explained that the blank was to be filled with the word "himself" (President Dobelle had explained that 9% of respondents to his September survey said UHM was good or excellent because of him). With that amendation, the minutes were approved.

Strategic Planning Task Force -- David McClain

Update on Activities

6. Professor David McClain, Dean of the College of Business Administration, was introduced as Chair of Strategic Planning Task Force steering committee. He made a brief progress report on the activities of the various subcommittees.

The essential activities of the group focus on going out to stakeholders and returning to reflect what was learned, developing a report on core values and beliefs. The Physical (plant) subcommittee has been very busy. The Academic subcommittee had met that morning. The Spirit subcommittee was to meet on Monday (December 17). The steering committee had met first in November and intended to come back in January, but had decided that there was too big a time gap. They were to meet on Friday (December 14) to review progress to date.

These committes represent a highly diverse group. The Listening Project aims to elicit ideas through a variety of channels. Interim Vice-Chancellor Karl Kim's Open Space Event, the date of which has recently changed to February 1, should be a major activity. In all there are twenty-five connected events. The charge to the committee is to produce a draft in February 2002 for campus-wide review and the aim is to have completed plans by spring break. All are urged to read reports on-line. The URL is uhm.hawaii.edu/vision

A question was raised from the floor: Is the 18 January workshop connected to these activities? The reply was that both system-wide and Manoa campus-focused activities are being synchronized. Senators were urged to be involved in both. This portion of the meeting was concluded at 3:55pm.

VP for Research -- SOEST Presentation

7. Chairma'm Cooper introduced Roger Lukas, Professor of Oceanography, who was appearing on behalf of Dean Barry Raleigh, on the question of a Vice-President for Research at UH. Professor Lukas talked about the importance of research to the UH budget, saying that in fiscal year 2000 $180 million in research dollars represented 50% of the UH budget. This has risen in fiscal year 2001 to $220 million. There are $18 million in overhead and indirect costs. Approximately 3000 jobs are derived from this research. Nonetheless, the fiscal environment is perceived as unfriendly to researchers.

Research may be looked at as a rather large business, albeit a not-for-profit "business." The expectation is for a more integrated system in the future.

President Dobelle, it was noted, does not come from a research-university background. This then is critical. The need to maximize resources is very important. A group has been working since a first meeting with President Dobelle in May of this year. A major concern is the matter of recovery of indirect costs. Federal government reimbursements to UH are considerably lower than they are at premier institutions, and as a result of the UH position our funding competitiveness will decline and there will be a declining support base unless things change. An overhaul of research administration is needed. Non-Manoa faculty engaged in research are seeking support, and there is a need for representation across the system. Recommendations from the various campuses need to be integrated. Furthermore, there is need for high-level interface between the University and both the federal government and the private sector.

The current acting vice-chancellor, from Oceanography (Professor Laws), will be returning to that position, Prof. Lukas said he understood, next August. We were, he opined, "paying the piper for mis-steps made ten years ago."

VP Research vs Chancellor

A question from the floor asked: Would a Vice President for Research not strip the Chancellor of authroity and prerogatives? Professor Lukas said he questioned the premise, thinking himself that such a position might prove enabling to the Chancellor.

Funding

The follow-up question focused attention on funding. Professor Lukas replied in personal terms, asying that he had been here since 1982, had done some teaching, saw research as "the golden goose" and said it sould not be killed to support a focus on teaching.

Chair Cooper commented that the concern of the SEC was more with power than with funding, that the concern was with too many system-level people possibly diluting the power of the Chancellor. The question of a possible Vice-President for Research is a question that needs to be asked, and faculty should stay alert to it, be engaged in it. A central concern is for empowering the Chancellor.

Professor Lukas: "If you'd allow me to continue -- I'm for a strong chancellor." He talked about UH-Hilo and others not being in the process. He said he is more worried that a strong (and busy) chancellor won't be able to give the time necessary to sustain strong research activities.

Senator Chesney-Lind, a member of the SEC, pointed out that the proposal had been sent to both CAPP and CAB for consideration.

Comparison with Other Universities

Senator Fletcher asked about comparison to other universities with system configurations. He noted that the UC system has a structure which is strong at the system level. He said his impression was that his peers in these schools did nor feel there was interference.

Chair Cooper then mentioned Interim Chancellor Neubauer's recent trip to explore various system designs.

Neubauer said it was hard for him to comment in detail at this point, having just returned and not yet having submitted his report on this trip to President Dobelle. He said that he did want to "endorse the conversation, to welcome it." We need to work toward a clear statement of what we want for this university and to find a structure which will function in a way we want. He cautioned that we must not assume too quickly that any given structural change will automatically produce the end we desire. He noted that for fifteen years or so UH has in fact had a vice-president for research. Neubauer expressed a hope that Professor Lukas and others would assist in the decision-making by collecting data from peer and benchmark institutions on this matter. This discussion was concluded at 4:12pm.

Committee Reports

Athletics

8. Committee reports, from COA (Committee on Athletics), CAB (Committee on Administration and Budget), and CAPP (Committee on Academic Policy and Planning) followed:

NCAA Re-Certification

8.1. Carl Evensen, Chair, reported for the Committee on Athletics. He provided a brief update beginning with the fact that the committee had been pressed into service on four additional committees concerning NCAA re-certification. Then he discussed a letter received by the Senate from Southern Methodist University. A movement called "Academics First" and the Knight Foundation Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics are involved. Senators were advised to consult the following website for information:

www.ncaa.org/databases/knight_commission/

There is a fear that big money is corrupting universities through athletic programs, and that the education of all students will be compromised through the mechanism of diversion of funds. It is alleged that there is a widespread lack of academic rigor. The phrase "athletics arms race" was associated with figures like $4.1 billion annually in expenditures for athletics.

The question is: Does our Faculty Senate Committee on Athletics see a need to "follow suit"? The committee is inclined to support the intent of the Knight Report, but to make it clear that to them UHM seems quite different from other schools described. The committee's view is that UHM athletics is self-supporting, with a good emphasis on academics for its student-athletes. It was noted that advising for athletes is in the hands of Arts & Sciences, and that g.p.a. ratios are between 2.5 and 3.0. Graduate rates are about 10% above that of the general student body. Resources are being directed to these concerns, and they are doing well because of the strong support given. Dean Ron Cambra's report has recommended using the situation in Athletics as a model for improving advising overall.

The COA recommends: Commending the Athletics Department, but at the same time continuing to monitor them with respect to the Knight benchmarks. We should not be complacent about this. The COA also recommends thanking SMU and supporting their initiative. The COA is still engaged in thinking about what it is we need to do. Senators' thoughts on this were welcomed by the Committee.

Course and Grades for Athletes

A Senator asked if the COA had information on matters such as course selection and grade inflation as possible explanations for the findings here. Senator Evensen said that they felt that the involvement of A&S in the advising program added credibility to the Athletics Department position, and that advisor numbers were up now from one to four, with a fifth to be added soon.

Self-Supporting Athletic Department

Senator Bley-Vroman asked if, on the matter of the program being "self-supporting," the methods of calculation here were the same as those used by the Knight Commission. Senator Evensen said that the revenue streams had been looked at broadly, but that the committee would welcome guidance in ways to examine this. Senator Bley-Vroman suggested that matters such as construction costs, including such intangibles as lost land space, the loss of acreage on campus, might also be taken into consideration.

CAB

Search for Permanent Chancellor

8.2. Senator Mary Tiles reported for CAB. Her report focused on work done on the search for a permanent Chancellor. The committee has just recently finished recommendations to SEC for the description of the position to be used in the job advertisement. She directed Senators to the Senate website set up for CAB, and reported that many comments had been received and considered. One of the questions addressed had been inclusion in the statement of qualifications "outstanding research and publication record". It remained a question as to how important it was that research expertise be in these stated requirements for qualification. There was continuing conversation about the need for a vice-president for research. System-level, it was thought, was the appropriate locus.

Type of Person

One question concerned the sort of person needed. It was thought that perhaps two different kinds of talent were called for: (a) one type to put a new system in place, and (b) a second type to run it, once it was set up and functionning. She noted that other modifications to the search process had been suggested, such as that two deans rather than one, and that alumni/community, be included in the search committee.

Senator Tiles said that classified research would be on the CAB agenda next semester. She noted BOR action in changing the oversight committee, and the new situation with the Maui Supercomputer. UH-affiliated status is a dimension of these concerns. Comments were welcomed from Senators and others for this future work of CAB.

9. There being no further business raised, the Senate adjourned at 4:32.

Respectfully submitted,

Michael L Forman, Secretary of the Senate


Main | About the Senate | Current Session | Communication | Documents | Site Index | Related Links

University of Hawaii | UH Manoa | UH Links | UHPA | Board of Regents


Designed by David Flynn
Social Sciences/Business Librarian, University of Hawaii at Manoa
Maintained by Robert Valliant, SHAPS,
Send questions and comments about this site to: valliant@hawaii.edu