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Manoa Faculty Senate Minutes of March 16, 2005

Highlights

Wednesday, March 16, 2005
Crawford Hall Room106

Senators Present:
Aquino, Aune, Bley-Vroman, Bopp, Brown, Cannon, Caron, Chen, Chopey, Cohn, Dator, Dawson, DeMattos, Fujimoto, Gibson, Grace, Haning, Hawkins, Kazman, Kim, Kipnis, Lorenzo, Lowry, Lukas, Magaard, McGranaghan, McKimmy, Moore, Mottl, Nielsen, Nunokawa, Paull, Ramsey, Richardson, Ross, Rutter, Satsuma, Schroeder, Shiramizu, Speitel, Staff, Stodden, Teves, Tiles, Uchida, Valliant, Ward, Warn-Cramer, Wilmeth, Yue, Yuen, Zaleski

Senators Absent:
Aeby, Allen, Baker, Cox, Fryer, Herring, Judd, Kasuya, Lee CH, Lee L, Lee MT, Liebert, Mark, Robinow, Singh, Singleton, Skouge, Yates, Yu

Senators Excused:
Desser, Hilgers, Lu, Nishida,

Ex Officio: Peter Englert, Neal Smatresk

Others who signed in:
Denise Antolini, Paul Chandler, Gerald Meredith, John Cusick, Joy Logan, Lynne Higa, Jeanne Oka, Ronaele Whittington, David Stegenga, Karen Lee, Tom Bingham, James Cartwright, Star Davis, Mary Tiles, Sharon Ouchi, David Flynn, Mike Forman, Sophia McMillen, Dennis Carroll, David Hiple, Ray Allen, Sandy Dennis, Gregg Lizenbery, Megumi Taniguchi, Ray Yeh, Catherine Fulford, William O'Grady, Robert Littman, Ruth Horie, Eric Szarmes, JMJ Madey, David Chin, Alan Mags, Ron Cambra, Susan Chandler, Swee Berkey, Catherine Thomas, Dharm Bhawuk, Helen Sokugawa, Louise Kubo, Myrtle Yamada, Douglas Bomberger, Mamo Kim,Teresa Bill, Dean Alegado, Melodee Metzgar, Paula Morelli, Rodney Sakaguchi,

Following the adjournment of the Manoa Faculty Congress, Manoa Faculty Senate Chair Tom Schroeder called the Manoa Faculty Senate to order at 4:22 PM. He immediately recognized Emily Hawkins who moved to adopt the agenda as distributed, including following the time limits for discussion of each item as listed there. Her motion was seconded, and after a brief explanation by Parliamentarian Robert Bley-Vroman, it was unanimously approved.

1. The minutes of the Senate meeting of February 16 were unanimously approved as submitted.

2. Matt McGranaghan, Chair of the Committee on Administration and Budget, referred the Senate to the set of Proposed By-Laws Amendments that had been read to the Congress. He noted that the proposed changes to the Committee on Athletics had been withdrawn since those changes had already been made, and the entire last sentence on the new description of the Committee on Student Affairs had been deleted with the approval of both CAB and CSA.

The By-Laws Amendments were then approved
In Favor--44
Opposed--1
Abstain--0

3. Ken Kipnis, Chair of the Ad Hoc Committee on Classified Research introduced the following motion:

The Manoa Faculty Senate Ad Hoc Committee on Classified and Proprietary Research, formed in accordance with a Senate resoloution in Devember2004, unanimously recommends that the Senate adopt the resolution set below:

BE IT RESOLVED that the Manoa Faculty Senate affirms that the University of Hawaii at Manoa support only research for which there is a reasonable expectation that timely publication of the results of the research will not be restricted by its sponsor.

Kipnis briefly reviewed the major points discussed during the Faculty Congress, focusing especially on concern about the term "reasonable". He explained that this is in the sense of "has good reason to expect." The idea is that while there may be parts of a research that may not be published--such as the opinions of specific people in public opinion surveys, or the health records of specific individuals in medical research--the intent here is to say that the University should not support any research whose publication is restricted or denied by the terms of agreement of the funding party and the researcher.

This wording does prohibit the University from supporting classified research, though a UARC could be set up if it did not engage in classified research.

Torben Nielsen, a member of the Ad Hoc Committee, pointed out that the term "reasonable" had been suggested by himself and Jon Osorio, another member of the Committee. The term puts the administration on notice that it has to make the case if it permits restricted research. He also noted that the resolution has nothing to do with security clearances: a researcher might be required to have a security clearance for certain research even though the results of the research can be freely published.

Jill Nunokawa reminded everyone that the reason we are here is because the Vice President for Research, Jim Gaines, asked for the Senate to reconsider its policy on classified research. He must feel that the current policy prevents it, and thus wants to get a new policy that allows it. If current policy allowed the University to establish a UARC, we would not be here, she said. The issue of the policy and the UARC are intertwined and so we should not vote on the policy until we know more about the UARC proposal.

Roger Lukas contradicted Nunokawa, pointing out that David Lassner had brought the issue of a new policy to the attention of the SEC some time ago--well before the UARC was under consideration.

Mimi Sharma wanted to know what the problem is with the current policy. This has never been clearly explained.

Ruth Dawson said she agreed with Nunokawa. There is an alternate reality world of classified research that the rest of us never get a chance to know about. We should not contribute to that here.

Jim Gaines, Vice President for Research at UH, reminded everyone that he was in the Chancellor's Office three years ago. He had heard about a possible UARC but he was not part of any discussions about it. He then moved the System office as Vice President for Research when David Lassner drafted a revised classified research policy. Our current policy not only would allow a UARC, but it would also allow one to do classified research. He said he wanted a better policy than the one we have now, and so brought a draft policy to the Committee on Research of the MFS to discuss.

Gaines stated that he thinks the proposed new policy is better than the existing one, and, once accompanying administrative procedures are drawn up and adopted, it should be effective. It is not possible for UH to be certain it will be free of all publication restraints. It is possible for the government to declare research classified after the fact. It rarely happens, but it sometimes does.

Gaines commented that it is sometimes possible to use classified material but still produce unclassified, publishable reports. Clearly UH should not do research involving toxic and dangerously fissile materials.

After several more comments of support and concern the question was called on the resolution of the Ad Hoc Committee on Classified and Proprietary Research:

The results were
Favor--36
Opposed--7
Abstain--1

The resolution passed.

4. Ruth Dawson then re-introduced her resolution on Classified, Proprietary and other Publication-Restricted Research that had been presented to the previous Senate for deliberation and decision now.

Since the Senate had just accepted the Ad Hoc Committee's resolution, and her resolution was written well before that, she proposed that the new resolution be acknowledged by inserting something about it into her resolution. She also pointed out that her resolution was not intended just to stop the establishment of a UARC but more generally any other similar institution.

Dawson then submitted a substitute, expanded resolution as follows:

Whereas the Manoa Faculty Senate in January 1986 resolved that "The University will accept no contract or grant which requires classification or limitation in publication," and

Whereas the Manoa Faculty Senate in December 2002 reaffirmed its opposition to classified, proprietary and other publication-restricted research being conducted on the Manoa campus, and

Whereas the conduct of publication-restricted research is incompatible with the fundamental values of a university and with the strategic imperatives of this campus to "publicize our research more widely to the local, national and international communities" and to "promote the free exchange of ideas," and

Whereas in March 2005 the Manoa Faculty Senate has affirmed that the University of Hawaii at Manoa should support only research for which there is a reasonable expectation that timely publication of the results of the research will not be restricted by its sponsor,

Therefore be it resolved that

The Manoa Faculty Senate stands opposed in principle to the establishment of any research entity that includes conducting classified research of a sort for which there is no reasonable expectation that timely publication of the research results will be restricted by its sponsor.

Parliamentarian Bley-Vroman pointed out that the revision needed to be voted on, and was not debatable.

Kipnis commented that the resolution does not add substantively to the one just passed and is superfluous.

Lukas agreed with Kipnis, reiterating the fact that any research project can be classified retroactively, and then what?

Tom Bopp pointed out that the last paragraph was stated in the opposite of the way intended. Dawson agreed and amended the last sentence to read: "will be permitted by its sponsor."

Bley-Vroman again reminded the Senate that the motion to replace is not debatable and so the question was called on replacing Dawson's original resolution with the following:

Whereas the Manoa Faculty Senate in January 1986 resolved that "The University will accept no contract or grant which requires classification or limitation in publication;" and

Whereas the Manoa Faculty Senate in December 2002 reaffirmed its opposition to classified, proprietary and other publication-restricted research being conducted on the Manoa campus; and

Whereas the conduct of publication-restricted research is incompatible with the fundamental values of a university and with the strategic imperatives of this campus to "publicize our research more widely to the local, national and international communities" and to "promote the free exchange of ideas;" and

Whereas in March 2005 the Manoa Faculty Senate has affirmed that the University of Hawaii at Manoa should support only research for which there is a reasonable expectation that timely publication of the results of the research will not be restricted by its sponsor; therefore

BE IT RESOLVED that

The Manoa Faculty Senate stands opposed in principle to the establishment of any research entity that includes conducting classified research of a sort for which there is no reasonable expectation that timely publication of the research results will be permitted by its sponsor.

The motion to replace Dawson's original resolution with this one passed:
Favor--30
Opposed--7
Abstain--1

The resolution as amended was then debated.

Tom Ramsey said that he doubts that this resolution would stop the creation of a UARC. He also said that it should be possible to create a UARC that did not do classified research. He concluded that we should not vote on this matter until the nature of the proposed UARC is made clear, and we have had a chance to debate it.

Dawson replied that she offered the resolution as she did because we were told at the September 2004 Senate Meeting that any UARC must permit classified research.

Nielsen said he was confused by Ramsey's remark. He asked Dawson if she was opposed to a UARC that did not do classified research.

Dawson said she was not. She was mainly opposed to weapons research. While she actually does not favor any research sponsored by the US Department of Defense, that is not the aim of the current resolution.

Lukas said that actually a lot of very beneficial research, unrelated to weapons or other military activity, often results from DoD-sponsored research, so that we should not oppose all research money just because it comes from the military.

Dawson replied that philosophically she would prefer that researchers accept money from the National Science Foundation rather than from the DoD, but that she does not blame some UH researchers for accepting DoD money, which offers so much while the NSF offers so little. She added that her resolution does not prohibit UH researchers from accepting DoD money for unclassified research.

After several more similar exchanges, the question was called and the Resolution offered by Dawson was defeated:
Favor--11
Opposed--18
Abstain--9

5. The final order of business concerned the resolutions by CAPP that had been introduced in the Faculty Congress and should be voted on now by the Senate.

CAPP Chair David Ross introduced the following CAPP Resolution on Prerequisites:

Whereas a course's official prerequisites are designed to ensure that all students enrolled in a course are genuinely prepared for that course; and

Whereas prerequisites are also used externally in the evaluation of a course's suitability for a program or major, and in the evaluation of the program or major itself; and

Whereas the current system permits retroactive enforcement of prerequisites at graduation, at which time it will not help the cours or program and might hurt the student; and

Whereas the Banner system does not currently enforce course prerequisites; therefore

BE IT RESOLVED that

(1) Departments are encouraged to adopt and maintain course prerequisites which are adequate, appropriate, and up-to-date;

(2) Enforcement of prerequisites through Banner should be implemented as quickly as possible;

(3) Until such time as Banner enforces prerequisites, departments and faculty are encouraged to monitor and enforce prerequisites for their own courses; and

(4) Waiver of prerequisites, which may be done at the discretion of the course instructor, should be done only when there is clear evidence that the student is prepared for the course.

The Resolution was unanimously approved.

CAPP Chair David Ross then introduced the Resolution on Hawaiian Languages and Literature. He especially thanked the faculty who brought this proposal forward for acknowledging, respecting, and following the required procedures in bringing this proposal forward:

Resolution on the Proposed Master's Degree Program in Hawaiian Language and Literature

1) Whereas, the University of Hawai'i at Manoa campus has the largest faculty and student population of scholars, including both faculty, students, and Native Hawaiians in the University of Hawai'i system; and

2) Whereas, the Constitution of the State of Hawaii states that English and Hawaiian shall be the official languages of Hawaii and that the State shall provide for a Hawaiian education program in the public schools; and

3) Whereas, the University of Hawaii strategic plan states that the University must recognize the important role it performs for Native Hawaiians by actively preserving and perpetuating Hawaiian culture, language, and values; and

4) Whereas, the Hawaiian language is endangered, and its survival is a vital component to the welfare of the Hawaiian people; and

5) Whereas, currently, the study of Hawaiian language at UHM is limited to the BA; and

6) Whereas, there is community need for trained individuals that a Master's program could produce (such as the Hawaiian language newscast Ke Aolama, Kula Kaiapuni (Hawaiian medium public schools) teachers, and materials for the Kula Kaiapuni program); and

7) Whereas, the University of Hawaii at Manoa Library's Hawaiian Collection holds a world renowned collection of Hawaiian language materials, with many rare and unique items, which in conjunction with the extensive collections of Hawaiian language materials at the Bishop Museum Library and Archives, the Hawaiian Historical Society Archives, and the Hawaiian Mission Children's Society Archives and Library, will support graduate level research and instruction in Hawaiian language and literature; and

8) Whereas, UHM is the most appropriate academic venue to support the continuation and growth of Hawaii's indigenous language given that the necessary resources, faculty, and student demand are all here; therefore

Be It Resolved that

The UHM Faculty Senate supports the creation of a Master's Degree Program in Hawaiian Language and Literature.

Someone rose to call upon the Administration to pledge that they would support this Program, and not raid other departments to pay for it.

VC Neal Smatresk replied that the Administration will support the Program at the level consonant with need. He assured the Senate that the Chancellor fully supports the Program.

The Senate approved the Program:
Favor--31
Opposed--1
Abstain--1

Finally, CAPP Chair David Ross introduced the Resolution on an MA degree in Hawaiian Studies.

CAPP Resolution on a M.A. degree in Hawaiian Studies

WHEREAS, there does not now exist anywhere in the world a Master's degree in Hawaiian Studies housed in a School focusing on area studies at a major research university;

WHEREAS, a proposal to establish a Master of Arts degree in Hawaiian Studies at the University of Hawaii at Manoa has been submitted to CAPP by the Hawaiian Studies Program of the School of Hawaiian, Asian and Pacific Studies (SHAPS);

WHEREAS, CAPP has carefully reviewed the proposal to see if it meets academic, personnel and other requirements for a graduate degree, and the Committee is satisfied that the proposal does meet such requirements; in particular, we note that aside from the current graduate faculty in the area, the program has several junior members who are tenure-track;

WHEREAS, the University of Hawaii at Manoa Library's Hawaiian Collection, comprising a unique, world-renowned collection of materials about Hawaii with many rare and unique items, will support graduate level research and instruction in Hawaiian studies in conjunction with collections at the Bishop Museum Library and Archives, the Hawaiian Historical Society Archives and the Hawaiian Mission Children's Society Archives and Library; moreover the Center for Hawaiian Studies itself has a collection separate from the UHM Library, as well as a full time librarian to oversee the collection;

WHEREAS, there is evident demand for a graduate program from students, especially on Manoa, who would like to pursue graduate study focusing on Hawaiian Studies;

WHEREAS, major institutions in the state need specialists trained in Hawaiian Studies, and there is a need to train future teachers in Hawaiian Studies for the public schools in the state;

WHEREAS, a graduate program in Hawaiian Studies would strengthen the overall academic program of SHAPS, and would enhance the role of Hawaii in Asia-Pacific regional affairs;

THEREFORE, be it resolved that

The Manoa Faculty Senate recommend the approval of the proposed M.A. degree in Hawaiian Studies.

With no discussion, this Resolution was unanimously approved, 33 votes to none.

The Senate adjourned at 5:25 PM.

Fearfully submitted,

Jim Dator
Senate Secretary


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