Pivoting towards a State of Active Aging: State Senate Resolution 83 Passed!

The 2019 Hawaii State Senate introduced and passed Senate Resolution 83 SD1 to help the state pivot from just viewing older adults from a sick-care to a well-care perspective.  While the work to address the needs of functionally disabled persons is important and will continue, Resolution 83 underscores the  imperative for the state to target boomers, pre-retirees, and active agers, emphasizing opportunities for health, security, and participation in society both to enhance their quality of life and enable them to remain important assets to their communities.

This resolution points out that the 2013 Executive Office on Aging policy paper on Active Aging should be reviewed, updated, and implemented. Hawaii has a viable roadmap, and the passage of Resolution 83 provides the opportunity to promote its vision for positive social change.

 Nurs 399 Gerontology, Healthcare and Law Section 002

Course for Fall 2019

Sign up for:

Don’t Pass this up; Register for

Fall 2019  – Online 

 Nurs 399 Section 002

  CRN 87265

Gerontology, Healthcare and Law

(includes the application of ethics)

Featuring a special “Ask a Lawyer”  Component

Designed for  Undergraduates in Health Care Professions, Social Work, Gerontology, Nursing, Pre-law and Pre-med 

 Learn practical legal theories and applications affecting older adults. Join this multi-disciplinary longevity course with a focus on preventive legal strategies and ethical issues in caregiving, decision making, end of life care, dementia and other age related legal issues.

Approved Social Work Upper Division elective
 
•Approved FAMR/HDF’s Program elective
 
•Approved Center on Aging Undergraduate Certificate

 on Aging

•Approved Dept. of Nursing Undergraduate elective
 

Dr. Lenora Lee:  lenoral@hawaii.edu     

(808) 956-6544        

https://www.law.hawaii.edu/personnel/lee/lenora  

NURS 399 Class Advertisement Flyer

Job Announcement Agent Position Announcement: Lihue & Kona

JOB ANNOUNCEMENTS

UH Manoa’s Family and Consumer Science Department is hiring TWO Junior Extension Agents (Temporary/Full time) to work with intergenerational and youth programs. One position is located in Lihue and a second in Kona. To view the full position announcement and apply for the position, please click on the appropriate link:

Junior Extension Agent (#85381T), Kona, HI: Link for Kona

Junior Extension Agent (#85377T), Lihue, HI: Link for Lihue

For best consideration, application materials should be submitted by March 27, 2019.

Contact:

Barbara Yee, Ph.D.

Professor and Chair

2515 Campus Road, Miller 110

Family and Consumer Sciences

University of Hawaii at Mānoa

Honolulu, HI 96822

yeeb@ctahr.hawaii.edu

808-956-8105

Aging 101: Applying Gerontology in Your Work Setting

Aging101-FLYER

Practical Skills for Providing Age-Friendly Services

Aging 101: Applying Gerontology in Your Work Setting (A14997)

Event ID: A14997
Info: Feb 2-9, 2019 • Sat • 9:00am-12:00pm • 2 mtgs • UHM Krauss 12 • $179 (Early Bird Special – register by 01/11/19); $199 (Regular) • Course has been approved by the State of Hawaii Workforce Development Division, ETF. For more information and to see if you qualify for funding please click here
With: Margaret A. Perkinson

With the longest life expectancy of any state, Hawai‘i has a growing need of age-friendly products, services, and environments. This two-day workshop provides a basic overview of the latest discoveries on aging and shows practical ways to work with older customers and clients.

The course also addresses how to best work with individuals who are experiencing physical and mental changes during their elderly years, simple ways to create employment and business environments that are age-friendly, best practices for improving communication with older adults, cultural differences and attitudes about old age, and how to promote successful aging.

After successful completion of the course, participants will receive a certificate.

Who Should Attend:

  • Healthcare and social services providers
  • Workers in tourism and hospitality serving older clients
  • Resident managers serving elderly populations
  • Architects, designers, and urban planners
  • Engineers designing age-supportive technology
  • Estate planners
  • Individuals seeking strategies to age well

When and Where:

Saturdays, February 2 & 9, 2019 • 9am-12pm Location:   Krauss Hall 12, UH Mānoa  Campus

Cost:

Early registration is $179 (register by 1/11/19) Standard registration is $199

Register Now:

outreach.hawaii.edu/professional

or call (808) 956-9249

About the Instructor:

Margaret A. Perkinson, PhD, Director of the UH Center on Aging, has been involved in

gerontological research and education for over 35 years. She is a member of Hawai‘i’s Policy Advisory Board for Elder Affairs (PABEA) and the Kupuna Caucus and writes a column for Generations Magazine. She is the author of Occupational Therapy with Aging Adults: Promoting Quality of Life through Collaborative Practice.

 

For more information please visit:  Outreach College Professional Programs

 

 

Gerontologists urge countries to adopt social policies in support of active aging

Previously posted by: Theresa Kreif & University of Hawaii News

Gerontologists urge countries to adopt social policies in support of active aging

Active Aging Consortium in Asia Pacific country representatives with signed copies of the declaration

A dozen international gerontologists affiliated with the Active Aging Consortium in Asia Pacific (ACAP), including two public health professors from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, met in Hong Kong recently to sign a declaration urging countries to adopt social policies in support of active aging.

“Active aging calls for a partnership involving individuals, governments, nonprofits, researchers and businesses,” said ACAP President Kathryn L. Braun, chair of the Office of Public Health Studies within the Myron B. Thompson School of Social Work. “Individuals must prepare for a long life, taking care of their health and continuing to contribute to society. Policymakers must assure a basic level of support for all and institute policies that promote healthy choices. And science must find, and business must create, affordable solutions to counter and compensate for disabilities common in old age.”

Ways to support active aging include the creation of age-friendly programs, active collaboration across sectors, use of research to address challenges and establishing international networks for exchange of best practices.

Present at the declaration signing were gerontologists representing Australia, China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, the United Kingdom and U.S. Representing the latter was UH Center on Aging Professor Christy Nishita, who gave a presentation on the Hawaiʻi Alzheimer’s Disease Initiative and a talk titled “Age-Friendly Honolulu.”

The world’s elderly population is growing at an unprecedented rate. According to the National Institutes of Health, 8.5 percent of the planet’s population is age 65 and older. In Hawaiʻi, the percentage of the elderly population is more than twice as high, about 17 percent in 2016.

“As the aged population grows, Hawaiʻi needs to increase support and opportunities for our kūpuna,” commented Braun. “The longer we can keep our elders healthy and active, the more they can contribute to families and society.”

ACAP‘s Asian partners have even more cause for concern. By the year 2050, people ages 60 or older will represent 41 percent of Japan’s population, 39 percent in Korea, 38 percent in Singapore and 37 percent in Hong Kong. This compares to only 27 percent in the U.S.

“Populations are aging rapidly in these countries because birth rates are below replacement, and elders are living longer and longer,” said Braun. “Asian governments are exploring policies to increase the retirement age, expand work and volunteer opportunities for older adults, and support elders to live independently in the community or with families, rather than in institutions—resulting in the need to import foreign elder care workers.”

Anthony Lenzer, PhD- In Loving Memory

Picture of Dr. Lenzer Tribute

It is with a heavy heart that we announce the passing of Dr. Anthony Lenzer, first Director of the UH Center on Aging and champion of aging issues in Hawaii.

 

Gerontology was Dr. Lenzer’s life-long interest and career.  His first Gerontological job, in 1956, was as staff for the Michigan Legislative Council on Problems of Aging.  He went on to study elders living on a Michigan “County Poor Farm,” before moving to the School of Public Health at The University of Michigan.  At Michigan, he helped to create a Chronic Disease & Aging Program.  

 

In 1969, he came to the University of Hawaii’s School of Public Health to establish a Gerontology Program and to support aging research and teaching across the UHM campus.  From 1988-93, he also served as the first Director of the UH Center on Aging. During that time, he was Executive Producer for a 13-hour public television series and college telecourse titled, “Growing Old in a New Age.” The series won several national awards.  Since retiring in 1994, he has been an active advocate for Hawaii’s elders and their families, and spent three legislative sessions as Senator Les Ihara Jr.’s Aging Issues Advisor.  

 

Tony was also the first President of the Hawaii Pacific Gerontological Society, and served as Emeritus Board Member, where he was a strong advocate for workforce development and gerontology student scholarships.  He also worked with Kokua Council, the Policy Advisory Board for Elder Affairs, the Hawaii Family Caregiver Coalition, and the Hawaii Alliance for Retired Americans.

 

He is terribly missed, and we at the UH Center on Aging strive to continue his legacy and vision.

 

Health Communication in Home care for Elders in Hawaii with Kendi Ho PhD Student

Health Communication in Home care for Elders in Hawai‘i
Do you work in a home care or home health agency or Community-Based Organization that cares for elders?
If the answer is YES…
Kendi Ho, a PhD student, would like to invite you to participate in a research study.
The purpose of this study is to find out how people involved in elder home care communicate in the home and what features of language support or limit communication. Part of this study is funded by the Russell J and Dorothy S Bilinski Research Award and Dissertation Fellowship.
Focus group discussion or interview (1), pilot surveys (2) and possible home observations (up to 6).
Study volunteers will be given a gift card for their time.
A summary of the results of two surveys performed during the study will be available to study volunteers.
To learn more about the study,
please call Kendi Ho
808.387.3950

The University of Hawai`i is conducting a study:
Health Communication in Home care for Elders in Hawai‘i
Do you or a family member receive care from a home care or home health agency or Community-Based Organization?
If the answer is YES…
Kendi Ho, a PhD student, would like to invite you to participate in a research study.
The purpose of this study is to find out how people involved in elder home care communicate in the home and what features of language support or limit communication. Part of this study is funded by the Russell J and Dorothy S Bilinski Research Award and Dissertation Fellowship.
Focus group discussion or interview (1), pilot surveys (2) and possible home observations (up to 6).
Study volunteers will be given a gift card for their time.
A summary of the results of two surveys performed during the study will be available to study volunteers.
To learn more about the study,
CALL Kendi Ho
808 . 387. 3950

Welcome our Visiting Scholar: Dr. Alexandra Crampton from Marquette University

 

Alexandra Crampton is an Associate Professor in the Department of Social and Cultural Sciences at Marquette University in Milwaukee, WI.  She brings an anthropological perspective to applied fields such as gerontological social work, elder mediation, family court mediation, negotiation, and restorative justice. As a visiting scholar, she will be convening a panel discussion on cross cultural responses to professional and policy work in gerontology, and writing up past research on elder mediation in Ghana and the United States.

Director of UH Center On Aging, (COA) Margaret Perkinson, PhD, and COA research gerontologist, Christy Nishita, PhD, collaborate with Scholar Athlete, Kendall Horan by creating a volunteer opportunity.

The director of UH Center On Aging, (COA) Margaret Perkinson, PhD, and COA research gerontologist, Christy Nishita, PhD, collaborate with Scholar Athlete, Kendall Horan by creating a volunteer opportunity.

The volunteer project brings the University of Hawai’i Women’s Track and Field team together to help out at Manoa Cottage Nursing home. Recently, the team helped Manoa Cottage with a crafts activity, a Halloween-themed photo-shoot, and talking story to the residents. The team will be back later this month to help out by baking pies with the residents. 

“ Not only as student athletes at UH but as human beings I think we have a responsibility to take care of the people that allowed us to be in the positions we are in today. Our Kupuna are the people who created our beautiful aina that we explore today. Your time and love is the best gift you could give someone. To give just a portion of our day to our Kupuna is something we all should do. The track team might be helping the residents at Manoa Cottage, but in grand scheme of things the residents are really teaching us. I am so thankful to be a student athlete at this University and to call Oahu my home.”