two students doing science

Middle school students participate in College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources’s Summer Gene-ius Day Program at UH Mānoa.

With STEM workforce projections for the state on the rise, a new Hawaiʻi P–20 report explores education pathways that prepare students for careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The Education to Workforce Report highlights Hawaiʻi State Department of Education (HIDOE) graduates enrollment, persistence and STEM degree attainment at University of Hawaiʻi campuses and whether these students end up in the local workforce.

Between 2016 and 2026, STEM occupations in Hawaiʻi are projected to grow 3.7 percent to 31,965 jobs.

Key report highlights:

  • Since 2015, the number of HIDOE graduates who earned a STEM honors certificate or completed STEM-related Career Technical Education (CTE) courses of study has increased.
  • HIDOE graduates who earned a STEM honors certificate or completed STEM-related CTE course of study had higher college enrollment rates compared to the statewide average.
  • The number of UH graduates earning a STEM degree or certificate has increased over recent academic years.
  • STEM graduates who earned technology degrees were more likely to be found in Hawaiʻi‘s workforce five years after UH graduation than other STEM graduates.

The report was created in partnership with the Office of the State Director for Career and Technical Education and is the first issue of Hawaiʻi P–20’s annual Education to Workforce Report.

Download the full report at the Hawaiʻi P–20 website.