Traditional Hawaiian carving at Windward CC earns high school students college credits

Windward Community College
Contact:
Kelli Abe Trifonovitch, (808) 228-8108
Chief Communications Officer, UH Communications
Posted: Aug 12, 2019

Hawaiian carving class at Windward Community College.
Hawaiian carving class at Windward Community College.
Hawaiian studies lecturer Jordan Souza helped to start Windward CC's Hawaiian carving program.
Hawaiian studies lecturer Jordan Souza helped to start Windward CC's Hawaiian carving program.
Castle High School student Haley Texeira works on a papa kuʻi ʻai (poi pounding board).
Castle High School student Haley Texeira works on a papa kuʻi ʻai (poi pounding board).
Windward CC started offering Hawaiian carving classes about 10 years ago.
Windward CC started offering Hawaiian carving classes about 10 years ago.

Link to video and sound (details below): https://bit.ly/2ODBlUp

WHAT: High school students earned three college credits in their Papa Kālai (Hawaiian carving) class. 

WHO:  24 Castle High School students and 7 Ke Kula ‘o Samuel M. Kamakau Hawaiian immersion students

WHERE:  Windward Community College

WHEN:  Summer 2019

HOW:  The hands-on course incorporates Hawaiian culture and language, as well as college-level math, science and research. 

WHY:  To learn how to design and create carving projects of Hawaiian cultural relevance or significance and gain a deeper insight into Hawaiian cultural use of wood, bone, stone, shell and plant fiber.

OTHER FACTS:

Hawai‘i high school students can earn both high school and University of Hawai‘i college credits through dual-credit programs such as Early College and Running Start.  

To learn more about dual-credit programs see:  http://www.p20hawaii.org/programs/college-and-career-readiness/dual-credit/ 

VIDEO:

BROLL: 

(1 minute 35 seconds)

0:00-1:18, 14 clips: students working on projects

1:18-1:30, 2 clips: students in the classroom planning projects

1:30-1:35: throwing wooden spears

SOUND:

Haley Texeira, Castle High School student (12 seconds)

"The most important thing I learned was how to properly identify woods or how to properly harvest ti leaf.  So it’s a lot about learning about the plants and woods that we used. Not just how to carve them."

Channon Anderson, Castle High School student (12 seconds)

"So I kind of want to grow my own taro now and make a pōhaku ku‘i ‘ai and be able to pound taro."

Edward Fuentes, Jr., Windward CC lecturer (13 seconds)

"Carvers are going to carve, and we’re here to help nurture those traditions, help develop those traditions, and to give a place so that people in our community can carve and learn."