University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: Kauai Community College
Program: Liberal Arts

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The last comprehensive review for this program was on 2015, and can be viewed at:
http://kauai.hawaii.edu/program-review-apru-cpr

Program Description

The Liberal Arts Program is one that provides quality instruction in a variety of disciplines so as to meet the needs of a diverse student body and community.

 

 

Part I. Program Description

Date of Last

Comprehensive Review

2015

Date Website Last Reviewed/Updated

August 2018

Target Student

Population

All

External Factor(s)

that Affected the Program or Unit

None

Part I. Quantitative Indicators



Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

The Overall Program Health is CAUTIONARY.

 

DEMAND: Our program was rated cautionary because the number of majors in Liberal Arts has continued to decline, as exhibited in Table 1 below. The Liberal Arts program has continued to lose majors since our enrollment peaked in 2011-2012. This downward trend is consistent with the enrollment records at KCC. As stated in last year’s APRU, we are serving a large number of early college & early admit students, both at the high schools and here on campus.

This initiative has helped to keep the overall enrollment numbers steady, but in reality KCC’s regular population is declining. As the student population has declined, the number of majors in the Liberal Arts program has naturally followed suit. Despite this downward trend in the overall number of majors, our Native Hawaiian population remained consistent.

 

To show that we continue to succeed in creating demand for the classes we teach, we should look at some indicators which are not used in calculating the program’s demand health as in Table 2 below. The SSH of program majors in program classes has gone down, but when looking at the ratio of SSH to number of majors, it has remained nearly steady, so we can safely say that we continue to do a good job at getting our program students to enroll in program classes. What this means is that our students used to only take an average of 11.57 credits per year in 2015-2016, but the last couple years have increased to roughly 13 credits per year. In order for students to graduate on-time, we need to get this number as close to 30 credits per year as possible. With roughly 70% of our students being part-time, the problem we need to solve is how to encourage these part-time students to take more credits to progress towards graduation.

 

We continue to serve our non-majors well as there has been a significant and continuing growth in the SSH of Non-Majors in Program Classes and the number of classes taught by the program. Again, this positive trend might be attributed to the robust early college programs and the relationship we have built with the high schools on island.

 

 

IMPORTANT INDICATORS NOT USED FOR DEMAND HEALTH

 

 

Indicators:

2015-2016

2016-2017

2017-2018

SSH Program Majors in Program Classes

6298

6981

6481

Ratio of SSH to # of Majors in Program

11.57

13.27

13.12

 

 

Fall % Part-time

60%

66%

68%

Spring % Part-time

71%

73%

73%

SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes

3521

4039

4400

Number of Classes Taught

208

244

246

 

Efficiency: Our fill-rate has been steady at roughly 70% and this is one reason our program's efficiency was rated as cautionary. However, our student to faculty ratio measure is marked as healthy as exhibited Table 3. This ratio is something we are proud of and is in line with the philosophy of a community college. This faculty-to-student ratio, and the reasonable class-sizes it leads to, create an excellent teaching environment to provide support to our students. The positive impacts of this can be seen in the results of our most recent CCSSE survey in Table 4 below. Although the survey sample includes students outside of Liberal Arts program, given that Liberal Arts faculty taught 40% of the SSH offered at our campus, and other programs share similar class sizes and faculty-to-student ratios, we believe it is safe to infer a link between these data.

 

EFFECTIVENESS: Our effectiveness was rated as healthy owing to the Liberal Arts Program’s high Fall to Spring persistence rate. In fact, in 2017-2018 our persistence was the best it has been in at least 10 years. Our efforts at acceleration in English and Math may have played a role in this success as students are able to enroll and succeed in college-level classes with fewer hurdles and delays. While this high Fall to Spring rate is encouraging, our students' Fall to Fall persistence stayed steady at 45%.  It remains to be seen whether the higher Fall to Spring rate will have an impact on student retention Fall to Fall. In the past, there has not been a strong correlation between the two.

 

In our APRD, system goals are missing for some key measures of effectiveness as seen in Table 5 below. While we do not have concrete goals from the system, we are encouraged by the growth in degrees and certificates awarded. It appears that 2016-2017’s extraordinarily low number of graduates was likely an aberration (see Table 6b). We are hopeful that our efforts at acceleration combined with the upcoming change to our program requirements will lower barriers and further encourage student success, persistence, and matriculation.

 

In other measures, our Distance Learning success rate continues to improve. In our last APRU, we wrote about improving the quality of instruction in Distance Learning. This year’s data shows an improvement as the success rate increased from 65% in 2016-2017 to 70% in 2017- 2018, while still maintaining the same number of courses offered, as seen in Table 6a. The liberal arts program continues to contribute to KCC’s system Performance Measures as seen in Table 6b as we have seen growth in four out of the five measures.

 

Because of the low number of graduates, one provisional program did not make the transition to established. We have requested that admissions to the Sustainability Science Certificate of Achievement (CA), the Plant Biology and Tropical Agriculture Associate of Science (AS) and Certificate of Achievement (CA) programs be stopped out for the period beginning with the approval of this request and continuing until July 1, 2020. While the program may be put on hold, we feel it is essential that the college continue to offer these classes, as Agriculture and Sustainability are incredibly important to the island and community of Kauai. As the only institution of higher education on Kauai, our campus must provide classes on these subjects to our community. We are exploring the options of holding the ASC in Sustainability under the Liberal Arts program, and are looking into revising the ASC in Plant Biology and Tropical Agriculture to make it better fit the Liberal Arts program.

 

Compounding the difficulties of the stop-out of the PBT program, our Ag instructor moved to UH-Hilo in August. This APRU provides a perfect opportunity for the Science and Math division to revisit their course offerings and the needs of the biological science department to ensure a replacement position is the best fit for their needs. In looking at our Multi-Year Plan of Offerings (MYPO), Table 7 shows that the biological science department needs 5.36 FTE when they currently have only 3 full-time instructors. The number of Teaching Equivalencies (TE) assigned to AG courses alone warrants a full-time AG instructor. Our needs, however, extend beyond the classroom. A full-time instructor will provide services and support that would be unavailable were we to hire lectures to teach the classes, including managing aspects of the lab, managing the garden including the oversight of inventory and employees/staff, developing or modifying the current course curriculum as needed, and maintaining articulation within the system. A full-time instructor would be able to provide traveling opportunities to students to enrich their learning and research experience, as well as creating grant opportunities to supplement the cost of running the program. A full-time instructor will be able to build better relationships with students and can be more involved in committee work and service to the college. Additionally, the ASC in PBT requires AG 293V, a class that does not have any assigned TEs. It is not reasonable to ask a lecturer take on that responsibility.

 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE YEARLY WORKLOAD

 

 

 

Course

 

TE

 

Fall

 

Spring

 

Fall TE

Spring TE

AG 102

1

1

1

1

1

AG 122

4.5

 

1

0

4.5

AG 141

3.3

 

 

0

0

AG 200

3

2

1

6

3

AG 200L

2.5

2

1

5

2.5

AG 264

3.3

1

1

3.3

3.3

AG 271

4.5

 

1

0

4.5

AG 293V

0

1

1

0

0

BIOL 100

3

 

1

0

3

BIOL 100L

2.5

 

1

0

2.5

BIOL 171/MARE 171

3

1

 

3

0

BIOL 171L/MARE 171L

2.5

1

 

2.5

0

BIOL 172/MARE 172

3

 

1

0

3

BIOL 172L/MARE 172L

2.5

 

1

0

2.5

BOT 101

3

1

1

3

3

BOT 101L

2.5

1

1

2.5

2.5

BOT 105

3

1

2

3

6

BOT 130

3

 

1

0

3

BOT 130 L

2.5

 

1

0

2.5

MICR 130

3

1

1

3

3

MICR 140L

3.3

1

1

3.3

3.3

PHYL 141

3

1

1

3

3

PHYL 141L

2.5

1

1

2.5

2.5

PHYL 142

3

1

1

3

3

PHYL 142L

2.5

1

1

2.5

2.5

SCI 121

3

2

2

6

6

SCI 121L

2.5

2

2

5

5

ZOOL 105

3

1

1

3

3

Ulutopia/Farm/USDA

6

1

 

6

0

 

 

SEMESTER TOTAL:

66.6

78.1

YEARLY TOTAL TE:

144.7

 

FTE:

5.359259

 

 

 

Demand for English classes remains high, with the recent efforts at acceleration increasing the number of TEs English faculty carry – many sections of ENG 100 are now linked to ENG 100L with a combined total of 5.5 TEs rather than 3 as in past semesters. English faculty are also in called on to teach early college classes. This high and continued demand has led the college to hire two full-time, non-probationary instructors. As this is an ongoing need, the Liberal Arts Program is requesting that one of these positions be converted to a tenure-track, permanent position. In writing the new position, we would be able to include early college classes as one of the responsibilities to guarantee we can continue to serve that population. Table 8 below contains the relevant workload information for this academic year, which is representative of our needs going forward.

 

ENGLISH YEARLY WORKLOAD

 

Course

TE

Fall

Spring

Fall TE

Spring TE

ENG 75

5

2

1

10

5

ENG 100

3

16

9

48

27

ENG 100L

2.5

6

4

15

10

Eng 104

3

0

1

0

3

ENG 106

4

2

4

8

16

ENG 200

3

1

1

3

3

ENG 250

3

0

1

0

3

ENG 254

3

1

0

3

0

ENG 256

3

0

1

0

3

ENG 257T

3

1

0

3

0

ENG 261

3

0

1

0

3

 

 

Semester Total:

90

73

YEARLY TOTAL TE:

163

 

FTE:

6

 

 

 

Prior Year Action Plan(s)

Anticipated Outcome

Actual Outcome

Form a Liberal Arts Continuous Improvement ad- hoc committee

Organize assessment day activities for the program, and to make recommendations to address areas of weakness and

improve student success

As anticipated.

Organize Discipline Retreats (Math/Science/English) to examine data within the disciplines for the purpose of continuous improvement

Fostering communication and sharing culture among our faculty members.

Retreats not yet organized, but our efforts to develop PSLO assessment methods have resulted in greater sharing and collaboration among faculty. Math faculty had a brief math retreat morning during Fall 2018 convocation, and have been meeting regularly to discuss math data, their acceleration

efforts in particular.

Create exploratory majors for Health, Education, and Business in order to provide guided pathways to transfer to

UH 4-year institutions.

Easier transfer to UH 4-year institutions

TBD. These pathways were created in 2017-18. Students may complete these exploratory majors

beginning in 2020.

Create a first-year study plan to encourage all students to complete their College-Level

Math and English in their first 30 credits.

Guided pathways have been created in the STAR GPS system to encourage this.

TBD. These pathways were created in 2017-18. Students are now beginning to use them.

Increase percentage of students testing at one level below college-ready standards completing their college-level English and/or math course within one semester.

An increased percentage of students testing at one level below college-ready standards completing their college-level English and/or math course within one semester.

TBD. New acceleration models have been put into place and thus far the results are promising, however further data is needed to make an accurate assessment of our

efforts.

Increase of students testing at two or more levels below college-ready standards completing their college-level

English and/or math course within one year

An increased number of students testing at two or more levels below college-ready standards completing their

college-level English and/or math course within one year

As above.

Create an Academic Subject

Students will be able to get this

As anticipated. The

 

 

Certificate in Mathematics

certificate

certificate was created and

students have begun to enroll.

Increase Early College Math offerings

The demand for Early College Math courses will be met through adequate staffing

Ongoing. A position has been approved and advertised and the interview process will

begin shortly.

Maintain quality instruction in

mathematics, especially developmental math

Quality instruction will be

maintained through adequate staffing

As above.

Meet student demand for Biological Science classes.

Demand will be met through adequate staffing

Ongoing. Additional instructors have been

requested in this APRU.

Replace three fume hoods in

NSCI building

Safe operation of science labs

As anticipated

Replace chairs for NSCI 110

classroom.

Students will be safe and

comfortable in the classroom

As anticipated

Replace two broken analytical

balances in chemistry lab.

Safe operation of Chemistry

labs

As anticipated

Replace kiln in ceramics

studio

Safe operation of the ceramics

studio

As anticipated

 

 

Part III. Action Plan

Goals 1-6

Strategic Goal/Priority (List number)

Benchmark

Desired Outcome

Unit of Measure

Year(s) Implemente d

Increase # of Majors in

Program

1, 4

550

Meet the Benchmark

# of majors

Ongoing

      Increase

Persistence

1, 2, 7

75%

Meet the Benchmark

% of students persisting Fall to

Spring

Ongoing

Increase # of degrees/certifi cates

1

70

Meet the Benchmark

Degrees or

Certificat es

Ongoing

      Increase # of

degrees/certifi cates in NH

2

18

Meet the Benchmark

Degree or

Certificat es

Ongoing

Increase # of transfers to UH-4yr

4

50

Meet the Benchmark

Transfers with or

without degree

Ongoing

Reduce time to degree

6, 7

40

Meet the Benchmark

% of full- time students graduate within 3

years.

Ongoing

Part IV. Resource Implications

Program Goal

#1-6

Resource Requested*

$65, 000 for Pro-Tutors in English and Math

Cost and Vendor

Pro-tutors hired by Academic Support Center

Annual Recurring

Cost

Yes

Useful Life of

Resource

Funding is an annual budget

Person(s) Responsible and

Collaborators

Math and English Coordinators

Timeline

Tutors to be hired Fall 2019

 

Program Goal

#1-6

Resource Requested*

1 FTE to hire AG instructor (replacement)

Cost and Vendor

Salary of an instructor

Annual Recurring

Cost

Yes, Salary of an instructor

Useful Life of

Resource

As long as the instructor will stay with us.

Person(s)

Responsible and Collaborators

SAM Division Chair

Timeline

To be hired by Fall 2019

 

 

 

Program Goal

#1-6

Resource Requested*

1 FTE for Biological Science

Cost and Vendor

Salary of instructor

Annual Recurring

Cost

Yes, Salary of instructor

Useful Life of

Resource

As long as the instructor will stay with us.

Person(s)

Responsible and Collaborators

SAM Division Chair

Timeline

To be hired Fall 2019

 

 

 

Program Goal

#1-6

Resource Requested*

Convert one temporary FTE English position to tenure-track

Cost and Vendor

Salary of an instructor

Annual Recurring

Cost

Yes, Salary of an instructor

Useful Life of

Resource

As long as the instructor will stay with us.

Person(s)

Responsible and Collaborators

English Coordinator and LAH Division Chair

Timeline

To be hired by Fall 2019

 

 

 

Program Goal

#1-6

Resource Requested*

$458,600 to renovate NSCI 107

Cost and Vendor

Various vendors and an architecture drawing needed.

  1. Removal of central sink units & old teaching podium ($400K)
  2. Cupboards and countertops ($50K)
  3. Electrical ($5K)
  4. Whiteboards (4 x $2,500 = $10K)

5. Tables (12 x $300 = $3,600)

Annual Recurring

Cost

None

Useful Life of

Resource

30 years

Person(s)

Responsible and Collaborators

Physical Science Faculty will work with VCSA and maintenance

Timeline

Fall 2019

 

 

 

Program Goal

#1-6

Resource Requested*

$9,88.00

Cost and Vendor

Vendor: Carolina Scientific 2018 catalog

591158 Wolfe Beta Elite Binocular Microscopes $799/each

12 microscopes (two students/scope) x 799 = grand total $ 9,588.00

 

 

 

 

Annual Recurring

Cost

No

Useful Life of

Resource

5-10 years

Person(s)

Responsible and Collaborators

Biology Instructors

Timeline

To be purchased Summer 2019

*An approved ITAC Request Form must be attached for all technology requests

 

 

Program Goal

#1-6

Resource Requested*

$5000 for counter material and 12 stools

Cost and Vendor

Vendor: https://www.westelm.com

12 classic café walnut bar counter stools x $200 each = $2,400

Annual Recurring

Cost

No

Useful Life of

Resource

5-10 years

Person(s) Responsible and

Collaborators

SAM Division Chair

Timeline

To be purchased and built Summer 2019

 

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2017-2018 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

Yes
By the end of the program, Liberal Arts students will be able to . . . 1) Communicate effectively both orally and in writing in Standard American English, and interpret, and/or express themselves in, some other form of communication at a basic level, whether from knowledge of a second language or through artistic or symbolic expression.

2

Yes
2) Make and express critical judgments about issues and ideas after accessing, analyzing, and synthesizing relevant information, using technology where appropriate; use creative and critical thinking skills to weigh the relative merits of opposing positions; and apply knowledge of formal systems of reasoning and logical fallacies in arriving at informed opinions.

3

Yes
3) Apply quantitative methods appropriately; analyze real-life situations using numeric, graphical, and symbolic models, and verbally explain these models; and recognize the impact of mathematics on the sciences, society, and everyday life.

4

Yes
4) Analyze the behavior of people from psychological, sociological, philosophical, and anthropological perspectives, and knowledgeably consider the social, political, and economic implications of human interactions in order to make informed personal and social choices.

5

Yes
5) Support opinions and make decisions based upon a scientific understanding of the physical and natural world, and appropriately apply the scientific method to test ideas, measure and evaluate results, develop models, solve problems, and generate new ideas. 5) Support opinions and make decisions based upon a scientific understanding of the physical and natural world, and appropriately apply the scientific method to test ideas, measure and evaluate results, develop models, solve problems, and generate new ideas.

6

Yes
6) Demonstrate a sympathetic awareness of the values and beliefs of their own and other cultures; explain the historical dimensions of contemporary affairs and issues; analyze the interactive roles that social, religious, artistic, political, economic, scientific, and technological forces play in society; and engage responsibly in their roles as citizens with issues affecting themselves, their families, their communities, and the world.

7

Yes
7) Demonstrate an aesthetic appreciation of creative and original expression and, making use of natural gifts, acquired knowledge, and the intense discipline of art, engage in creative activities which enrich their quality of life. cooperatively, and engage in healthful physical activity.

8

Yes
9) Make informed decisions based on an understanding of the qualities of a healthful lifestyle, explain the connection between a healthy body and a thoughtful mind, perform group activities cooperatively, and engage in healthful physical activity.

A) Expected Level Achievement

No content.

B) Courses Assessed

ANTH220
ART101
ART105
ART244
ASTR110
CHEM151
CHEM151L
ENG100
ENG100X
ENG104
ENG106
ENG215
ENG250
ENG251
ENG252
ENG75
HIST151
HIST152
HIST281
HIST284K
HLTH140
HPER100
HPER152
HPER170
HPER270
IS103
JPNS101
JPNS201
LING102
MATH100
MATH103
MATH111
MATH112
MATH115
MATH75X
MATH82X
MICR140
MUS121B
MUS121C
MUS122B
MUS253
OCN120
OCN201
PHIL100
PHIL213
PHYS101
PSY100
PSY220
REL150
SCI121
SCI121L
SCI122
SCI122L
SOC100
SP151
SP231
SP251

C) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

No content.

D) Results of Program Assessment

PSLO

Assessed During this APRU Cycle (Y

or N)

Findings

Improvements Implemented

Next Assessment Date

1

Y

Inferred Success

N/A

Fall 2018

2

Y

Inferred Success

N/A

Fall 2018

3

Y

Inferred Success

N/A

Spring 2019

4

Y

Inferred Success

N/A

Fall 2019

5

Y

Inferred Success

N/A

Spring 2019

6

Y

Inferred Success

N/A

Fall 2019

7

Y

Inferred Success

N/A

Spring 2020

8

Y

Inferred Success

N/A

Spring 2020

E) Other Comments

No content.

F) Next Steps

This semester the Liberal Arts program is beginning dedicated PSLO assessment to better address these questions. Prior to fall 2018, Liberal Arts faculty only reported their CSLO assessment data, reporting on every CSLO for every student in every class.  As CSLOs are linked to PSLOs, PSLO success was inferred from there. This approach produced a confounding amount of data which in general indicates that students are successful in achieving our PSLOs without providing any actionable specifics. This strategy of inferring PSLO achievement from CSLO data makes concrete conclusions regarding PSLO success difficult to draw and difficult to learn from. Moving forward, the Liberal Arts program will be assessing our PSLOs directly on the following schedule:

 

Year

Fall

Spring

2018-

19

PSLO 1, 2

PSLO 3, 5

2019-

20

PSLO 4, 6

PSLO 7, 8

2020-

21

Focus on problem areas

PSLO 1, 2

2021-

22

PSLO 3, 5

PSLO 4, 6

2022-

23

PSLO 7, 8

Focus on problem areas

 

This will allow each PSLO to be assessed twice during any 5-year period so that areas of weakness may be identified and efforts to address those weaknesses can be evaluated. Liberal Arts faculty decided to leave the method of assessment (i.e. what classes will be evaluated to determine PSLO success, what benchmarks will be used, etc.) to those faculty with expertise in the fields being assessed. Currently faculty members have identified which classes should be utilized for PSLOs 1 and 2 and what benchmarks should be used to identify success.