University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: Leeward Community College
Program: Hawaiian Studies

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Program Description

Program Vision

Seeks to cultivate leaders in our local and global communities through the perpetuation and integration of Hawaiian knowledge and practices.

Program Mission

The Associates in Arts in Hawaiian Studies degree prepares students to pursue a baccalaureate degree in Hawaiian Studies and other disciplines by providing a foundation in Hawaiian knowledge.  The degree integrates Hawaiian knowledge and values into the curriculum, and thus nurtures a sense of place, defines personal, community and global responsibilities and builds connections between all who call Hawai’i home.

Ke Kahua (The foundation)

The AAHS multi-campus program is founded on the following ideas:

The AAHS is the first joint degree in the University of Hawai’i Community Colleges (UHCC) system with 7 participating colleges (Hawaii CC, Honolulu CC, KapiÊ»olani CC, KauaÊ»i CC, Leeward CC, Windward CC and UH Maui College).  The 7 campuses agreed on 4 core-required classes:

Program learning outcomes

  1. Describe Native Hawaiian linguistic, cultural, historical and political concepts.
  2. Explain Native Hawaiian concepts as expressed in the broader areas of science, humanities, arts or social sciences.
  3. Use writing to discover, develop, communicate and reflect on issues relevant to the Native Hawaiian community.

Curriculum Map

  PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
PROGRAM COURSES Describe Native Hawaiian linguistic, cultural, historical and political concepts. Explain Native Hawaiian concepts as expressed in the broader areas of science, humanities, arts or social sciences. Use writing to discover, develop, communicate and reflect on issues relevant to the Native Hawaiian community.
HWST 105 X X X
HWST 107 X X X
HWST 160 X   X
HWST 261 X X X
HWST 270 X   X
HWST 291 X X X
HAW 101 X   X
HAW 102 X   X
HAW 201 X   X
HAW 202 X   X
HIST 284 X X X
POLS 180   X X

 

Part I. Quantitative Indicators



Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

Demand

Demand Indicators

Program Year

Demand Health

15-16

16-17

17-18

1 Number of Majors 49 46 51

 

 

 

Healthy

1a Number of Majors Native Hawaiian 42 40 40
1b Fall Full-Time 50% 60% 44%
1c Fall Part-Time 50% 40% 56%
1d Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 4% 7% 4%
1e Spring Full-Time 48% 57% 53%
1f Spring Part-Time 52% 43% 47%
1g Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 2% 0% 0%
2 Percent Change Majors from Prior Year -13% -6% 10%
3 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes 349 442 454
4 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes 5,258 4,486 4,490
5 SSH in All Program Classes 5,607 4,928 4,944
6 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes 187 164 165
7 Total Number of Classes Taught 77 71 71

 

The demand health call is healthy because of the increase in program majors.

Efficiency

Efficiency Indicators

Program Year

Efficiency Health

15-16

16-17

17-18

8. Average Class Size 23 22 22

 

 

 

Cautionary

*9. Fill Rate 83.7% 80.5% 79.9%
10. FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 4 3 3
*11. Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 12 15 17
12. Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty 5 5 6
12a. Analytic FTE Faculty 10 9 8
13. Overall Program Budget Allocation      
13a. General Funded Budget Allocation      
13b. Special/Federal Budget Allocation      
13c. Tuition and Fees      
14. Cost per SSH      
15. Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 4 6 4

 

The efficiency score is cautionary based on the 79.9% fill rate and the ratio of faculty to majors.   

The slight decrease in fill rate may be a result of the overall drop in enrollment in the college.

Effectiveness

Effectiveness Indicators

Program Year

Effectiveness Health

15-16

16-17

17-18

16. Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 74% 76% 72%

 

 

 

Cautionary

17. Withdrawals (Grade = W) 98 86 98
*18. Persistence Fall to Spring 62% 64% 67%
18a. Persistence Fall to Fall 35% 42% 36%
19. Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded Prior Fiscal Year

11/27*

12/22*

10/23*

19a. Associate Degrees Awarded

11

12

10

19b. Academic Subject Certificates Awarded

0/16**

0/10**

0/13**

19c. Goal

14***

28***

23***

19d. Difference Between Unduplicated Awarded and Goal

92.9%†

-21.4%†

0%†

20. Transfers to UH 4-yr

8

8

16

20a. Transfers with degree from program

5

5

11

20b. Transfers without degree from program

3

3

5

20c. Increase by 3% Annual Transfers to UH 4-yr Goal

4††

9††

9††

20d. Difference Between Transfers and Goal

200%†††

-12%†††

+78%†††

 *  Adjusted number of Degrees/Certificates awarded

** Adjusted number of Academic Subject Certificates awarded

*** Adjusted Goal

† Adjusted difference between certificates and degrees awarded and goal

† † Adjusted annual transfer goal

† † † Adjusted difference between transfers and goal

 

The effectiveness health call is cautionary based on the number of Associates awarded, transfers and persistence from fall to spring.  

The number of transfers to a UH 4-year doubled in the last year and is 78% above the goal.

Other Performance Indicators

Performance Indicators

Program Year

15-16

16-17

17-18

27. Number of Degrees and Certificates

11/27**

12/22**

10/23**

28. Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian

10/26**

11/32**

8/21**

29. Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM 0 0 0
30. Number of Pell Recipients 8 6 4
31. Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr 8 8

16

 

**Adjusted number of AA degrees and ASCs in Hawaiian Studies awarded

The number of Academic Subject Certificates (ASC) in Hawaiian Studies awarded (#19b) is incorrect – there were 13 certificates awarded.  There is a duplicate program code for the ASC in Hawaiian Studies – the program codes HWST and HAWN are both listed as Hawaiian Studies and the ASCs in Hawaiian Studies were entered as HAWN, not HWST.  Thus, the wrong data set was pulled to fill this field (#19b).  The actual number of ASCs in Hawaiian Studies awarded in AY 2017-2018 (listed erroneously as HAWN) is 13.  Factoring in this information changes the number of Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded Prior Fiscal Year (#19) to 23.  As of spring 2019, the program code has been corrected.

Part III. Action Plan

GOAL 1: Increase Access, Recruitment, and Retention

The University has a long-standing commitment to support the advancement of Hawaiian language, culture, history and practice as well as Native Hawaiian student success and completion.  To support the University’s goals, it is critical to provide additional funding for instruction and student support.

Action Plan:

  1. Hire 1.0 FTE BOR appointed Hawaiian Studies instructor in Hawaiian Studies (C-2, 9 mo.).
    • There are 3 Hawaiian Studies/Pacific Studies lecturers who taught 36% (27 credits) of the classes offered in the 2018 AY.  Additional BOR appointed faculty is warranted by the number of credits taught by lecturers.
    • Demand for HWST courses has increased on the LCC WaiÊ»anae-Moku campus. We are unable to meet the demand for different HWST courses needed to complete the AA in HWST degree at this location.
    • UH is a long-time partner of the Polynesian Voyaging Society. President Lassner has made voyaging courses a priority for the University and additional faculty with specialized training is needed to fulfill this goal.

Supporting Goals

University of Hawai’i Mission (BOR Policy 4.201): [E]nsures active support for the participation of Native Hawaiians and supports vigorous programs of study and support for the Hawaiian language, history and culture.”

2015-2021 UH Strategic Directions (rev. 2018): Mission-Focused System (MFS) - Realize the University’s commitments to becoming a foremost indigenous-serving university... support[s] vigorous programs of study and support for the Hawaiian language, history and culture.”

Executive Sustainability Policy EP 4.202: “Embrace the culture, wisdom and fundamental values of the indigenous people of Hawai‘i to advance sustainability.”

Leeward CC Mission: “We advance the educational goals of all students with a special commitment to Native Hawaiians.”

AAHS Program mission: “prepare[s] students to pursue a baccalaureate degree in Hawaiian Studies ...by providing a foundation in Hawaiian knowledge… by integrating Hawaiian knowledge and values into the curriculum...nurture a sense of place, define personal, community and global responsibilities and build connections between all who call HawaiÊ»i home.”

 

  1. Hire a 1.0 FTE BOR appointed Counselor, Hawaiian Studies Program
    • The College has only one full-time counselor for the 1,849 Native Hawaiian students enrolled at Leeward CC (as of fall 2017, UH IRO.)
    • During the 2017-2018 school year, one counselor was available via the Native Hawaiian Center.  The counselor conducted the following number of in-person appointments and unduplicated students:
      • Spring 2018: 392 appointments - 296 unduplicated students
      • Fall 2017: 590 appointments - 398 unduplicated students
    • The counselor also reported fielding over 500 email interactions with students during each semester.  
    • The current full-time counselor was asked to assist the program as the Hawaiian Studies program counselor. However, 1.0 FTE is insufficient to support both 26% of the college’s population and the specific needs of an academic program at the same time.

Supporting Goals

University of Hawai’i Mission (BOR Policy 4.201): [E]nsures active support for the participation of Native Hawaiians and supports vigorous programs of study and support for the Hawaiian language, history and culture.”

2015-2021 UH Strategic Directions (rev. 2018): Mission-Focused System (MFS) - Realize the University’s commitments to becoming a foremost indigenous-serving university... support[s] vigorous programs of study and support for the Hawaiian language, history and culture.”

Leeward CC Mission: “We advance the educational goals of all students with a special commitment to Native Hawaiians.”

AAHS Program mission: “prepare[s] students to pursue a baccalaureate degree in Hawaiian Studies ...by providing a foundation in Hawaiian knowledge… by integrating Hawaiian knowledge and values into the curriculum...nurture a sense of place, define personal, community and global responsibilities and build connections between all who call HawaiÊ»i home.”

 

  1. Hire a 1.0 FTE, Native Hawaiian Recruitment and Retention Specialist (APT, band B)

Supporting Goals

University of Hawai’i Mission (BOR Policy 4.201): [E]nsures active support for the participation of Native Hawaiians and supports vigorous programs of study and support for the Hawaiian language, history and culture.”

2015-2021 UH Strategic Directions (rev. 2018):

UHCC Strategic Directions (rev. 2/2017): Native Hawaiian Graduation - Further develop Native Hawaiian student success centers on each campus that incorporate peer and professional advising and  mentoring, cultural activities, student leadership development, and other support systems based on Native Hawaiian values and practices;

Leeward CC Mission: “We advance the educational goals of all students with a special commitment to Native Hawaiians.”

AAHS Program mission: “prepare[s] students to pursue a baccalaureate degree in Hawaiian Studies ...by...nurtur[ing] a sense of place, define personal, community and global responsibilities and build connections between all who call HawaiÊ»i home.”

GOAL 2: Expand and align course offerings

In response to UH system initiatives and student demand, the Hawaiian Studies program will expand and diversify our course offerings.

Action Plan:

  1. Create and propose five new courses:  The University of HawaiÊ»i is a long-time partner of the Polynesian Voyaging Society. President Lassner has made voyaging courses a priority for the University.

  1. Align and restructure courses: As a part of the University’s realignment initiative, program faculty will align and/or restructure courses. For example, the following courses represent a restructuring of the hula courses in the UHCC system.

  1. Purchase virtual reality equipment for use in the voyaging courses:  The voyaging lab courses necessitate meeting off-campus at night to observe the starlines. This is an obstacle to students who don’t have regular transportation. A graduate program at the University of HawaiÊ»i at Mānoa, in partnership with the Polynesian Voyaging Society, created a virtual reality program that lets students experience life on a canoe and navigate the ocean in real time. They are offering the software for free; purchasing the recommended equipment is the only requirement.  Virtual reality units such as these would minimize the need to meet at night off campus.

Supporting Goals

UH Mission and Purpose (BOR Policy 4.201) [E]nsures active support for the participation of Native Hawaiians and supports vigorous programs of study and support for the Hawaiian language, history and culture.”

2015-2021 UH Strategic Directions (rev. 2018): Mission-Focused System (MFS) - Realize the University’s commitments to becoming a foremost indigenous-serving university... support[s] vigorous programs of study and support for the Hawaiian language, history and culture.”

Executive Sustainability Policy EP 4.202, “Embrace the culture, wisdom and fundamental values of the indigenous people of Hawai‘i to advance sustainability.”

Leeward CC Mission: “We advance the educational goals of all students with a special commitment to Native Hawaiians.”

 

GOAL 3: Improve Program Assessment

The AAHS is an interdisciplinary degree; there is currently no procedure in place to assess all courses.  

Action Plan:

  1. Develop a capstone course that will be used to assess the successful completion of program learning outcomes via relevant, guided student research projects.

    • HWST 292: KÅ«kulu ManaÊ»o: Hawaiian Studies Capstone Project  - This is the capstone course for the AA in Hawaiian Studies Program. It requires students to integrate knowledge gained in the Associate in Arts in Hawaiian Studies program. Students will collaborate with faculty to design and complete a project which demonstrates that students can describe aboriginal Hawaiian linguistic, cultural, historical and political concepts, apply those concepts in other areas, and analyze topics relevant to the aboriginal Hawaiian community.

GOAL 4: Foster External Partnerships

The Hawaiʻi Department of Education (HDOE) (Hawaiian Studies) is interested in courses that would provide professional development for current HDOE teachers in Hawaiian science and natural resource management.

Action Plan:

  1. Propose a course that focuses on Hawaiian natural resources management, transfers to UH Mānoa in the natural resources management track of the Bachelor in Hawaiian Studies degree, and could be used for professional development of DOE teachers.

    • HWST 207: Hawaiian Perspectives in AhupuaÊ»a Resource Management -  HWST 207 examines the Hawaiian ahupuaÊ»a as an integral component of the Hawaiian resource management system, and its relevance today. Using both primary and secondary written and oral sources, students will study Hawaiian perspectives on resource management and their relationship with land. This course emphasizes land-based learning.

Part IV. Resource Implications

No content.

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2017-2018 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

No
Describe Native Hawaiian linguistic, cultural, historical and political concepts.

2

No
Explain Native Hawaiian concepts as expressed in the broader areas of science, humanities, arts or social sciences.

3

No
Use writing to discover, develop, communicate and reflect on issues relevant to the Native Hawaiian community.

A) Expected Level Achievement

The expected level of achievement for the AA-HWST program is that at least 70% of students will meet the course-level learning outcomes. All course-level learning outcomes are directly connected to one or more of Program Learning Outcomes. 

B) Courses Assessed

HWST 107

In the 2017-2018 AY.  All 3 SLOs were measured and met.

LEARNING OUTCOME

MET-NOT MET

1.     Demonstrate knowledge of the origins, migrations and settlement patterns of Oceania.

MET

2.     Show knowledge of similarities between Native Hawaiians and other Oceanic peoples' cultures, languages, religions, arts and natural resources.

MET

3.     Explain the connections of historical events to modern issues in relation to the unique social, political and economic history of Hawaii, including concepts such as colonization and decolonization, occupation, independence movements, sovereignty.

MET

C) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

The AAHS is an interdisciplinary degree; there is currently no procedure in place to assess all courses.  We developed a capstone course (HWST 292: KÅ«kulu ManaÊ»o: Hawaiian Studies Capstone Project) that will be used to assess the successful completion of program learning outcomes via relevant, guided student research projects.

D) Results of Program Assessment

No content.

E) Other Comments

No content.

F) Next Steps

No content.