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BSW Program Assessment & Evaluation

Assessment and Evaluation Results (pdf)

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ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Baccalaureate Social Work Program
LAST COMPLETED ON August 1, 2018

Form AS 4(B) This form is used to assist the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) Commission on
Accreditation (COA) in the evaluation of the program’s compliance with the accreditation
standards.

Table: AS 4(B) Form: BSW Program Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes (2017-2018)

Competency Competency Benchmark % of Students Achieving Benchmark
Competency 1: Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior 80% 91%
Competency 2: Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice 80% 81%
Competency 3: Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice 80% 78%
Competency 4: Engage in Practice-Informed Research and Research-Informed Practice 80% 80%
Competency 5: Engage in Policy Practice 80% 90%
Competency 6: Engage with Individuals 80% 88%
Competency 6: Engage with Families 80% 93%
Competency 6: Engage with Groups 80% 96%
Competency 6: Engage with Organizations 80% 75%
Competency 6: Engage with Communities 80% 75%
Competency 7: Assess Individuals 80% 85%
Competency 7: Assess Families 80% 91%
Competency 7: Assess Groups 80% 91%
Competency 7: Assess Organizations 80% 80%
Competency 7: Assess Communities 80% 80%
Competency 8: Intervene with Individuals 80% 90%
Competency 8: Intervene with Families 80% 91%
Competency 8: Intervene with Groups 80% 89%
Competency 8: Intervene with Organizations 80% 83%
Competency 8: Intervene with Communities 80% 83%
Competency 9: Evaluate Practice with Individuals 80% 89%
Competency 9: Evaluate Practice with Families 80% 89%
Competency 9: Evaluate Practice with Groups 80% 93%
Competency 9: Evaluate Practice with Organizations 80% 80%
Competency 9: Evaluate Practice with Communities 80% 80%
“Competency 10: Engage, Honor, and Respect Indigenous Culture Towards Decolonized Professional Practice” 80% 94%

BSW Program Assessment Plan
The BSW Program assessed ten (10) Social Work Competencies – nine (9) Competencies from CSWE EPAS and one (1) developed by the DSW – utilizing two direct measures from two separate Program sites: the classroom and the field experience. The assessment of student competency for the BSW Program is presented below.

Benchmark and Rationale
The BSW Program, working with the Department Assessment Committee, established both a 5-point Likert scale (fully detailed below) as well as an acquisition benchmark for all social work competencies. Taken in aggregate, the expectation is that 80% of all students surveyed in the BSW Program will score a 4 or higher on a 5-point Likert scale. As detailed below, a score of 4 on our 5-point Likert scale represents near consistency of competency demonstration. The BSW Program recognizes that students have varying skills upon entry to the Program and throughout their tenure, and will continue to learn and grow long after their formal educational experience is complete. The near consistent demonstration of social work competencies is critical if our graduates hope to be legitimate helpers in the community.

Ideally, all of our graduates would score 5 on the 5-point Likert scale and in the estimation of both our Field and classroom Instructors, most of our students do in fact demonstrate consistency. 80% was chosen as the benchmark for the Program because it approximates what we believe to be overall excellence for Program faculty and staff. While the Program technically evaluates student competency, the benchmark says more about our faculty and staff than it does our student body. Aggregate scores below 80% would represent shortcomings of the Program itself, particularly issues revolving around pedagogy, horizontal/vertical integration, and/or emulation. Faculty meet with students individually to discuss their performance (through grades and competency development), but the Assessment Committee’s aggregation of competency data is used to evaluate the BSW Program.

CSWE identifies several dimensions critical to each competency, they are Knowledge, Values, Skills, and Cognitive & Affective Processes. The BSW program determined that the Skill dimension would be measured on the Field Supervisory Evaluation (FSE), while one of the other remaining dimensions would be measured on the Instructor Evaluation Sheet (IES) as determined by the BSW Faculty.

Two Measures for each Competency
The attainment of SW competencies through specific dimensions as outlined by CSWE is assessed using the following two measures:

  • Field Supervisory Evaluation (FSE). The FSE measures the acquisition of each of the nine social work competencies outlined by CSWE as well as the tenth competency
    designed by the DSW and implemented by the BSW Program through the Skill dimension. Full details of the implementation process are detailed below.
  • Instructor Evaluation Sheets (IES): the IES measures the acquisition of each of the nine social work competencies outlined by CSWE as well as the tenth competency designed by the DSW and implemented by the BSW Program through one of the remaining three dimensions (Knowledge, Values, Cognitive and Affective Processes). Full details of the implementation process are detailed below on Form AS 4(B).

The Ten (10) Social Work Competencies

Competency 1: Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior
Social workers understand the value base of the profession and its ethical standards, as well as relevant laws and regulations that may impact practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. Social workers understand frameworks of ethical decision-making and how to apply principles of critical thinking to those frameworks in practice, research, and policy arenas. Social workers recognize personal values and the distinction between personal and professional values. They also understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions influence their professional judgment and behavior. Social workers understand the profession’s history, its mission, and the roles and responsibilities of the profession. Social Workers also understand the role of other professions when engaged in inter-professional teams. Social workers recognize the importance of life-long learning and are committed to continually updating their skills to ensure they are relevant and effective. Social workers also understand emerging forms of technology and the ethical use of technology in social work practice.

Competency 2: Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice
Social workers understand how diversity and difference characterize and shape the human experience and are critical to the formation of identity. The dimensions of diversity are understood as the intersectionality of multiple factors including but not limited to age, class, color, culture, disability and ability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, immigration status, marital status, political ideology, race, religion/spirituality, sex, sexual orientation, and tribal sovereign status. Social workers understand that, as a consequence of difference, a person’s life experiences may include oppression, poverty, marginalization, and alienation as well as privilege, power, and acclaim. Social workers also understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination and recognize the extent to which a culture’s structures and values, including social, economic, political, and cultural exclusions, may oppress, marginalize, alienate, or create privilege and power.

Competency 3: Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice
Social workers understand that every person regardless of position in society has fundamental human rights such as freedom, safety, privacy, an adequate standard of living, health care, and education. Social workers understand the global interconnections of oppression and human rights violations, and are knowledgeable about theories of human need and social justice and strategies to promote social and economic justice and human rights. Social workers understand strategies designed to eliminate oppressive structural barriers to ensure that social goods, rights, and responsibilities are distributed equitably and that civil, political, environmental, economic, social, and cultural human rights are protected.

Competency 4: Engage In Practice-informed Research and Research-informed Practice
Social workers understand quantitative and qualitative research methods and their respective roles in advancing a science of social work and in evaluating their practice. Social workers know the principles of logic, scientific inquiry, and culturally informed and ethical approaches to building knowledge. Social workers understand that evidence that informs practice derives from multi-disciplinary sources and multiple ways of knowing. They also understand the processes for translating research findings into effective practice.

Competency 5: Engage in Policy Practice
Social workers understand that human rights and social justice, as well as social welfare and services, are mediated by policy and its implementation at the federal, state, and local levels. Social workers understand the history and current structures of social policies and services, the role of policy in service delivery, and the role of practice in policy development. Social workers understand their role in policy development and implementation within their practice settings at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels and they actively engage in policy practice to effect change within those settings. Social workers recognize and understand the historical, social, cultural, economic, organizational, environmental, and global influences that affect social policy. They are also knowledgeable about policy formulation, analysis, implementation, and
evaluation.

Competency 6: Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities
Social workers understand that engagement is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers value the importance of human relationships. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge to facilitate engagement with clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand strategies to engage diverse clients and constituencies to advance practice effectiveness.

Competency 7: Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities
Social workers understand that assessment is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in the assessment of diverse clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand methods of assessment with diverse clients and constituencies to advance practice effectiveness. Social workers recognize the implications of the larger practice context in the assessment process and value the importance of inter-professional collaboration in this process. Social workers understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions may affect their assessment and decision making.

Competency 8: Intervene with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities
Social workers understand that intervention is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers are knowledgeable about evidence-informed interventions to achieve the goals of clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge to effectively intervene with clients and constituencies. Social workers understand methods of
identifying, analyzing and implementing evidence-informed interventions to achieve client and constituency goals. Social workers value the importance of inter-professional teamwork and communication in interventions, recognizing that beneficial outcomes may require interdisciplinary, inter-professional, and inter-organizational collaboration.

Competency 9: Evaluate Practice with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities
Social workers understand that evaluation is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. Social workers recognize the importance of evaluating processes and outcomes to advance practice, policy, and service delivery effectiveness. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in evaluating outcomes. Social workers understand qualitative and quantitative methods for evaluating outcomes and practice effectiveness.

Competency 10: Engage, honor, and respect indigenous culture towards decolonized professional practice
Fairness and justice for indigenous people and respect for traditional ways of knowing requires understanding processes that actively seek to decolonize dominant cultural hegemony. Social workers are informed about institutional barriers and cultural intolerance; strive to eliminate all forms of injustice; and, acknowledge the inalienable rights of indigenous people to self determine.

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